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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 28, 2019 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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good morning and welcome this is business live from bbc to breakfast with naga munchetty news with maryam moshiri and charlie stayt. and sally bundock. our headlines today: anger, frustration and uncertainty. theresa may promises business demands clarity to resign as prime minister if her own party backs her brexit as the political deadlock over brexit deepens. deal but her key allies, the dup, still oppose it. live from london, that‘s our top what we can‘t agree to is something story on thursdsday 28th of march. good morning. welcome to breakfast that threatens the union, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: theresa may promises to resign which has a strategic risk as prime minister if her own party to the union, because for us backs her brexit deal, in the democratic unionist party but her key allies, the dup, the union will always come first. still oppose it. parliament rejects all eight plans put forward as alternatives british mp5 fail to agree to the prime minister‘s deal. an alternative brexit strategy — as companies struggle to prepare what we can't agree to is something good morning. financial services is that threatens the union, which has one of our biggest export, employing for an uncertain future. a strategic risk to the union, for more than 2 million people around also in the programme. mission to beijing: us officials the country, but what does the are in china for talks on ending us a strategic risk to the union, for industry think of the chaos in the trade war between the world‘s us in the democratic unionist party the union will always come first. westminster? i will get an expert parliament rejects all eight plans view a little later live from the put forward as alternatives city of london. two biggest economies. to the prime minister's deal. late drama for chelsea. an injury—time goal helps them but what does all of that mean for to beat paris saint—germain european markets have and progress to the semi—finals oui’ but what does all of that mean for our financial services? it is one of of the women‘s champions league. oui’ our financial services? it is one of our biggest exports from this good morning from the national country, employing more than 2
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million people stop so i'm on the nextjob of outbreaks in roadtrip to find out what happens next. forest in leicestershire, 200 square late drama for chelsea. miles of stunning woodland. an injury time goal helps them to beat paris saint—germain, ambitious tree—pla nting targets and progress to the semifinals miles of stunning woodland. ambitious tree—planting targets have been set for england. 11 million new of the women's champions league. trees by 2022. that is that and i've been talking to hugh jackman about realistic? we will be finding out. the greatest showman and how he handles shocking karaoke tributes. you can‘t help but sing along. that is amazing. yeah. i have spent but how does hughjackman stay a life in the theatre. we are being hollywood‘s mr nice guy? experts at going backstage and my my mum always said to me, always to lying. this day, every person on the planet good morning. we have some patchy needs to feel appreciated. there are fog to get rid of this morning. when we do for many of us it will be a pockets of frost and dense, patchy dry day. one for the time of year. some sunshine about some stubborn fog, which will lift and most of us cloud. and i will tell you where in will have a dry day with sunny 15 minutes. spells but also some stubborn cloud around and! spells but also some stubborn cloud around and i will tell you where in good morning. 15 minutes. it's thursday 28th march. our top story. theresa may has told backbench it‘s thursday 28th march. conservatives that she'll resign, our top story: providing they support her brexit deal, but this morning it seems it theresa may has told still might not be enough the conservative party that she‘ll resign, providing it to get it over the line. supports her brexit deal. last night mps seized control last night, mp5 held a series of the commons agenda to hold
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of votes on alternatives a series of votes on alternatives to the prime minister‘s deal, to the prime minister's deal, including the possibility including the possibility of another referendum. of another referendum. but all eight options were rejected. but all eight options were rejected. our political correspondent, our political correspondent, alex forsyth reports. alex forsyth, reports. once again, the prime minister once again, the prime minister was in parliament yesterday trying was in parliament yesterday trying to sell her brexit plan to sell her brexit plan and with so many of her mp5 set and with so many of her mps set against it, she made one last big against it, she made one last big pitch to win them around. pitch to win them round. at a meeting inside parliament, at a meeting inside parliament, she said she would quit if they back she said she would quit if they backed her brexit deal, to exit deal, making way for someone making way for someone else to take over the second stage of talks, else to take over the second stage which did convince some tories. with the prime minister saying what she said, of talks which did the majority in that room see this convince some tories. with the prime minister saying what she said, now as the best way to get us out the majority in that room see this now as the best way to get us out and to deal with it in the future. to deal with that in future. i am encouraged that she has i am encouraged she has accepted accepted we should have a new leader we should have a new leader for that for that second stage when it comes second stage when it comes so i think i will now vote so i think i will now vote for the agreement. for the agreement. but with views on brexit so entrenched, will it be enough? other tories say they still won‘t but with views on brexit so entrenched, will it be enough? back her deal and crucially it
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didn‘t get northern other tories say they still won't ireland‘s dup onboard. we wanted to get a deal. back her deal and crucially it didn't get northern a deal that worked for the whole of the united kingdom, ireland's dup onboard. a deal that worked for northern ireland, we wanted to get a deal. but now we‘re in a situation where we can‘t sign up a deal that worked for the whole of the united kingdom, to the withdrawal agreement that worked for northern ireland but now we're in a situation and it‘s all because where we can't sign up the prime minister decided to the withdrawal agreement to go for that backstop. on its own the prime minister meanwhile, mp5 were debating decided to go for that backstop. alternatives to theresa may‘s plan meanwhile, mps would debating alternatives to theresa may's plan but on eight options, but have eight options — they could not agree on any one. they could not agree on any one. the results of the process this house has gone through today the results of the process this house has gone through today strengthens our view that the deal the government has negotiated strengthens our view that the deal is the best option. the government has negotiated many don‘t agree with that and say is the best option. other options did prove popular. they‘ll debate them again on monday. many don't agree with that and say other options did prove popular. leaving with a customs union or referring this back to the people they'll debate them again on monday. with the option to remain, leaving with a customs union those are really the two most popular options. you would think perhaps those or referring this back to the people are the ones that should go forward forjudgement on monday. for now, though, parliament with the option to remain, is still deadlocked, those are really the two most popular options. struggling to agree any way forward.
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you would think perhaps those alex forsyth, bbc news, westminster. are the ones that should go forward so what next? forjudgement on monday. for now, though, parliament is still deadlocked, struggling to agree on any way forward. well, there is a possibility alex forsyth, bbc news, westminster. so, what next? that the prime minister well, there is now a possibility that the prime minister will try to hold a third vote will try to hold a third vote on her deal by tomorrow. on her deal, by this friday. if she fails, parliament could come back on monday if she fails, parliament could come to debate further options, back on monday to debate further options, but, it's worth remembering but it‘s worth remembering that no single option has yet drawn any that no single option has yet drawn majority support so far. any majority support so far. if mrs may can‘t if mrs may can't get her deal get her deal through, through, the uk has until april 12th the uk has until april 12th to find to find a way forward for eu a way forward for eu leaders to consider. if it does get support, leaders to consider. if it does get support, britain will then leave the eu on may 22nd, which could then, britain will then if the prime minister keeps leave the eu on may 22nd. to her word, lead to a conservative leadership contest, with a new pm installed in number if the prime minister keeps to her word, this would lead to a leadership contest, 10 by the summer. with a new pm installed in number 10 by the summer. let's join our political in a moment, we‘ll get the latest from strasbourg correspondent ben wright with our reporter adam fleming. who is in westminster. find out what they think of what is going on over here. lots going on. we talk to and write. first let‘s go to our political correspondent, ben wright who‘s in westminster. good morning to you. i hope you iimagine i imagine what they think about what
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managed to get enough sleep today is going on over here it‘s as just what was going on sa —— ben confusing as what we think about it. wright. she says she will go if iam sure confusing as what we think about it. i am sure you‘re right. they probably hoped they had solved the hotel is passed. what if it is not problem by sketching out a map for how the next few weeks would pan past? out. a set of the uk, get their that is the extraordinary situation withdrawal deal through the house of commons by the end of tomorrow and we are in. she has put ahead on the britain can leave the european union block and setback this deal and will on the 22nd of may. the alternative go. implication is if it doesn't go they gave to theresa may was coming through in the next few days then back to the eu by the 12th of april she will be staying on indefinitely. with a plan b, and then there would bea it's a completely unprecedented situation in british politics. the with a plan b, and then there would be a discussion about a much longer extension. it looks like we are hurtling toward that point at the prime minister's power had already had a right battering over the past moment. as far as i can see, there few months. now her authority has is still not much of a chance the government can get the withdrawal deal through the house of commons, gone. yet she soldiers on. you have because there is a hard core group two parallel tracks going on. as you heard there, parliament is of tory mp5 still opposing it and discussing alternate scenarios it critically you have the dup who are would like to see, even though none not going to vote for it either. of them secured a majority in the arlene foster, their leader, said house of commons yesterday, they there was no way the party would will again vote and discuss those abstain on such an important options on monday, trying to whittle question. they were going to vote them down to one. on the other hand, this deal down as it stood at the you still have number 10 desperately moment. so where are we? oliver hoping that the prime minister's a letwin, tory mp and the architect of
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beleaguered deal will get through. we thought yesterday there was a this alternative voting system that good chance it would come back for a happened yesterday, looking at vote in the house of commons various brexit alternatives, he said tomorrow. now you see the opposition this morning that if the deal doesn‘t go through soon, then we are from the dup holding firm. there are 20-30 from the dup holding firm. there are 20—30 tory mps who will not back heading towards no—deal, unless this. it would be a really big risk parliament and the government can for number 10 to bring it back as soon as for number 10 to bring it back as soon as tomorrow. for number 10 to bring it back as soon as tomorrow. but we will wait coalesce around an alternative plan. and see. this is quite an extraordinary moment. it really is. thank you very much. that could mean simply a general election or may be a referendum to break the political paralysis that exists here. but that, as oliver letwi n exists here. but that, as oliver letwin said, involves a much longer later we'll be speaking to extension and long delay to brexit. the prime minister's former advisor. that's at 6:40. we are shrouded in political fog people trying to work out what is here. there is no map, no compass, going on in her head. we will try to and we are in a campus —— crisis and getan going on in her head. we will try to get an inside. that is in about the uncertainty over brexit nobody knows where we are going is already doing "real world damage" to the uk economy, according next. thank you. adam fleming is in to the british chambers of commerce. the body, which represents some 75,000 businesses, strasbourg for as now. says its members are "angry and frustrated", and that mps need to stop "chasing rainbows" when it comes to resolving the brexit deadlock. parliament could take control here bbc news has learned that government from monday, but in a way it is officials never met the backers irreleva nt to from monday, but in a way it is irrelevant to the eu because they of seaborne freight, the company contracted to run deal with prime ministers, with ferries in the event
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of a no—deal brexit, governments. it is not totally despite not having any ships. irreleva nt governments. it is not totally irrelevant because of course it has a freedom of information request revealed no officials or ministers an effect that you are right in the met with arklow shipping, the irish company which later sense that the eu negotiates with withdrew its support for the route between kent and belgium. the british government, and with the government stressed that e—mails theresa may, currently the british and calls were exchanged and called suggestions they should hold prime minister. she hasn‘t resigned face—to—face meetings yet and the government isn‘t asking with contracted for anything different in terms of the brexit deal yet. that is why there has been no official reaction companies ridiculous. from the eu yet. although the people who have been in touch with me overnight, the eu diplomats from the two weeks since cyclone idai member states and eu institutions, devastated parts of mozambique, health officials are warning they are just as split as the uk of an outbreak of cholera. appears. we have got some people tests have so far confirmed five cases, as communities struggle saying no deal is inevitable and the to deal with the aftermath of the storm, which has left more uk will leave it no withdrawal than 500 people dead. agreement and no deal at all on or nomsa maseko reports. around the 12th of april and it is just a question of when it happens. others are saying that surely if parliament is so paralysed, there has got to be a general election. then you get a few optimists, saying after the storm, now in its wake comes the threat of a public health a few, then you get a few optimists, saying afew, —— then you get a few optimists, saying a few, —— just a few, saying that crisis. the focus increasingly they will have to vote for theresa may‘s deal and maybe it willjust turning to preventing the inevitable outbreaks of diseases like malaria sneak through at the last minute.
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and cholera. doctors are fighting a add in terms of theresa may‘s desperate battle to help contain the future, people here lost faith with her a few months ago because they outbreak. but the challenge is saw her trashing her own deal which he had done with the eu and siding enormous, and in danger of becoming with their opponents. having said that, they at least respected the overwhelming. of course, of course, fa ct that, they at least respected the fact that theresa may was back to we pray. cholera is an epidemic the ground rules of the whole brexit situation. you see when you have one process. they are worried that there case you have to expect that you is an that comes afterwards might will have more cases in the not be quite so friendly. —— theresa community. therefore, the health workers are in the communities, may was respectful of the ground helping to organise them and prevents and how to treat the water rules. there were eight votes and everything to prevent the spread of the cholera. although only five yesterday and none of them got cholera cases have been confirmed, through. if you want to see it's expected many more will come. how your mp voted on all the options in the commons last night, thousands of people have already you can use the application been treated for diarrhoea. early over on our website, just head to bbc.co.uk/politics. symptoms of cholera. there is no you can have a look and see how your mp voted. let‘s move onto stories doubt the city old bay road is slowly starting to get back on its now. feet, but beyond the city, in the people will be safer
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if the supervision of offenders countryside, thousands of people are in england and wales is brought back still waiting for help to arrive and into the public sector, according to the chief inspector of probation. with the threat of cholera looming a in her final annual report, dame glenys stacey says the probation model introduced by the government four years ago, second disaster could be on the under which low and medium risk offenders are monitored by private horizon. nomsa maseko, bbc news, companies, is irredeemably flawed and hit by staff shortages and poor performance. dust and debris from mozambique. dust and debris from the grenfell tower fire has polluted the grenfell tower fire has polluted the surrounding area, the surrounding area, resulting in levels of toxic resulting in levels of toxic chemicals many times higher chemicals many times higher than normal, according to a study. than normal, according to a study. soil samples collected from the site contained substances which could cause cancer and asthma. soil samples collected from the site here's our home affairs contained substances which could cause cancer and asthma. correspondent, tom symonds. here‘s our home affairs alerted by a colleague, working independently. professor anna stec gathered three correspondent, tom symonds. bin bags of this stuff from the streets and flats alerted by a colleague, around grenfell tower. working independently, professor anna stec gathered three bin bags of this stuff i would say this stuff is definitely not good from the streets and flats around grenfell tower. for touching and having close i would say this stuff is definitely to your mouth or nose. not good for touching and having it is soil scrapings from window blinds inside close to your mouth or nose. flats with a lot of this. the burnt remnants it‘s soil, scrapings from window blinds inside flats,
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and a lot of this. of the home insulation the burnt remnants of the foam insulation fixed to the outside of the tower during its refurbishment. fixed to the outside of the tower within the soil, we found a high during its refurbishment. level of contaminants released inside the soil, we found a high level of co nta m i na nts from the fire within a close released from the fire. within close vicinity of the tower. vicinity of the tower. we found a number of chemicals we found a number of chemicals that are that are categorised as, categorised as, for example, for example, respiratory respiratory sensitisers, which might lead to asthma but also more focused sensitisers, which might lead on the carcinogens or chemicals to asthma, but also more focused on the carcinogens or chemicals classified as carcinogens. classified as carcinogens. she says there‘s a higher risk of cancer and asthma but it she says there's a higher risk of cancer and will take further studies asthma but it will take further studies to determine how to determine how high a risk. higher risk. the government believes it is generally a low risk. yet people living in the government believes it‘s, the tower have told us they've suffered from what they call the grenfell cough, quotes, generally a low risk. sometimes bloody. they are deeply concerned. the area around the tower has been yet people living near the tower have told us they‘ve suffered sampled in the weeks after the fire. from what they call the grenfell cough, sometimes bloody. they are deeply concerned. the air around the tower has been no concerns, but this is the first sampled in the weeks after the fire. no concerns, but this is the first
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study of pollution in soil and dust in flats. study of pollution in soil in a statement, the government said: and dust in flats. in a statement, the government said: a new study has now been ordered, and more health screening. tom symonds, bbc news. a new study has now been ordered and more health screening. now for the story of two otter pups, tom symonds, bbc news. rescued after being separated from their mothers. we like a good happy ending. the icelandic airline wow air, here's mara and gibson — they were found stranded which serves three uk airports, has suspended all flights, while it on the californian coast. tries to secure new investment. unable to be released back in to the wild, a rival firm, icelandair, they've been rehomed at an aquarium. had been in talks to take over the business the pups travelled to their new home but decided not to press ahead. in a luxury private jet, affected passengers have been told which was loaded with ice they can apply for a refund, to help keep them cool. or change or cancel their booking. facebook says it will ban they are cute. they are so cute. users from posting praise and support for far—right groups everybody loves otters. do otters on its platforms from next week. the social media giant also pledged to improve its ability to identify and block material bite? they must do, mustn't they? from terrorist groups. facebook has come under pressure yes, they can bite. but they are after a man live—streamed an attack very cute. you sound very on two mosques in new zealand, authoritative there. that was as if which killed 50 people.
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now for the story of you were speaking from experience.” two otter pups rescued after being separated have never been bitten by an otter, from their mothers. here‘s mara and gibson. just to clarify. quote of the day. they were found stranded never bitten by an otter. should i on the californian coast. unble to be released ta ke never bitten by an otter. should i back into the wild, take over? there will be people out they‘ve been rehomed at an aquarium. there saying that they have.“ the pups travelled to their new home take over? there will be people out there saying that they have. if you have been, let us know... on a luxury private jet which was loaded with ice backin to help keep them happy. have been, let us know... back in the room. chelsea played they are happy and they are saved brilliantly last night. they left it and they are very cute, as otters really late. a lwa ys and they are very cute, as otters always are. the trouble is that once it was a great night for chelsea, you start flying on a private jet, who are through to the semi—finals nothing else is good enough, is it? of the women's champions league. i dare say they will be very happy they left it very late though. this injury time goal from maren mjelde in their new location. it is 8:13am. helping them to a 3—2 aggregate win over psg, and sending them through to the last four for a second consecutive in a last—ditch effort to get her brexit plans season. approved by parliament, they play lyon next. the prime minister has told mp5 "back my deal then i‘ll quit". she‘d been under pressure to stand down by brexiteers within her own party. but some mp5 say they‘ll still oppose the deal, staying with chelsea — despite theresa may‘s promise. they've offered counselling let‘s talk to the conservative mp5 to callum hudson—odoi mark francois and john whittingdale after he was racially abused twice who join us now from westminster.
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in 11 days. the 18—year—old was the target of chants in chelsea's europa league gentlemen, a very good morning to win at dynamo kiev, and in england's win over montenegro. you both and thank you for your one of the most influential men time. john whittingdale, if i can in english football, ask you first, theresa may‘s gamble, gordon taylor, is going to step down as chief executive of the professional footballers' association. the 74—year—old has saying support me and i‘ll quit, has lead the players' union for almost a0 years. that worked? that is not the only and rory mcllroy won his first match at the wgc matchplay in texas, reason why i decided that beating luke list, five and four. relu cta ntly reason why i decided that reluctantly i would have to support the deal. what became clear in there were also wins forjustin rose, and tommy parliament yesterday was that there fleetwood. was a very strong parliament yesterday was that there was a very strong majority against leaving without a deal. and that the not barred. not bad at all. it is alternative, which parliament is likely to try and push through, is worse. i was opposed to the deal on getting exciting heading into the masters. thank you very much. carol the basis there was a risk it would leave us trapped in the customs union. the alternative, it appears, something to say about otters. anything on otters for us this is permanent membership. the fact the prime minister said she would morning? they are very cute. those stand aside for the second stage, i pictures were gorgeous. ever been think that is helpful, because i bitten by an otter? never. did you would like to see somebody at that time who believes in brexit, but the important thing is that we first get brexit, and i reluctantly concluded do an outside broadcast with otters? that the only way that can happen is 0r do an outside broadcast with otters? orare you imagining do an outside broadcast with otters? or are you imagining that? you are getting a whole other story mixed by supporting the deal. for absolute up. penguins! moving on from otters,
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clarity, john whittingdale, you are now saying you are supporting the deal? i have said that i will vote it isa up. penguins! moving on from otters, it is a lovely start to the day for for the prime minister‘s deal if some of us. sunshine around. equally there is a third meaningful vote. there are patches of fog. high let‘s move on. mark francois, pressure is right across the uk establish your possession. you have today. so hardly a breath of wind in said consistently that you will bow to the deal down. where are you this that area of high pressure. we have morning? i am consistent. iwill two areas of cloud, on down the east, on dundee west. then the vote against it. unfortunately it thicker cloud coming in from the means that we don't leave the north. it will not make much european union. it leaves us hanging progress today. it will leave us half in and half out, which has always been the case. not one with some residual cloud. it will be punctuation mark in the treaty, and it isa punctuation mark in the treaty, and it is a treaty we are voting on, has pretty windy, quite breezy. so some changed. nothing has changed, to use the phrase of the moment. to be patchy fog this morning for the rush consistent, i have always been against it, i am still against it. i hour. across devon, somerset, told my work the other day i dorset, wales. some of that is quite wouldn't vote for it if they put a shotgun in my mouth. —— my whip. i dense. because of the lack of wind it will slowly lift. then we are looking at a fair bit of sunshine. have no other view. enlighten us as we could hang onto stubborn cloud across the southeast today in the same across the north—west, with the to your erg colleagues. it is
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unclear who is doing what they what odd spot coming out of that. nothing too much. temperatures, ten in the can you tell us this morning? this will be a situation for every member of parliament and it is a difficult north, highs of 16—17 as we sink decision. i would like constituents further south. heading on through do know that we have all thought the evening and overnight we will about it and we have weighed it up. whatever we are doing, john and i, have some areas of cloud, across the we are friends and we have been north—west, where it will be breezy, friends for years and we have a weather front is approaching. that will become salient for us all. it will become salient for us all. it will start to bring in rain overnight. these are the overnight neighbouring constituencies and lows. legally you could see a touch ethics. whatever any mp dad, they of frost. we are also looking once will do it after having thought about it very carefully. our unofficial motto would be run yard again at patchy mist and fog kipling's if, the famous poem. if forming. that will slowly lift. then you can keep your head when all there will be dry weather around. a weather front pushing slowly south—east with across the far north west of scotland, bringing in some rain. temperatures behind that cold about you are losing theirs and front turning that bit fresher. 8—9. blaming it on you, if you can trust ahead of it we are still looking at yourself when all men doubt you, yet to make allowance for their doubting i7, possibly as much as 18. that to, this deal is not going to go through parliament because there are too many mps who have read it and weather front is salient because as realise it does not represent brexit it sinks southwards during the and will never ever vote for it. to
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course of saturday, watchou the be clearagain, and will never ever vote for it. to be clear again, all about clarity this morning, mark francois. can you blues follow on behind, indicating put a number on how many of your erg that fresh air is going to follow collea g u es put a number on how many of your erg colleagues are like you and staying true to what you have said in the behind that weather front —— watch past? can you give a number? enough. how the blue. there will be sunshine 0k! do and shovels. wintry in the hills of past? can you give a number? enough. ok! do you not think you owe people a little bit more than that? why scotland, even in the lower levels can‘t you just tell us? a little bit more than that? why can't you just tell us? i am terribly sorry to make things across orkney and shetland. ahead of that band, which is weakening all difficult for the bbc. i do apologise. i was the operations the time, we hang onto some brighter officer for the whip's office as conditions. a fair bit of cloud many as are of the opinion say around at times. highs up to about "aye", to the contrary "no". years, 15. about the time we get through which is where i learnt my trade. and it was drummed into me that you saturday into sunday, you can see never discussed numbers publicly, the progress that weather front is particularly not with the media and making. brightest goes behind as especially not with the bbc. —— i high pressure wilson once again. was the operations officer for the does make brighter skies. there will still be some sunny spells. all of us still be some sunny spells. all of us will be in cooler conditions. whip's office for two years. we are gone will be 16 and i7, only concerned about talking to you us will be in cooler conditions. gone will be 16 and 17, it will be 11 gone will be 16 and 17, it will be ii or 12. but it has been a warm about this. tell us where you think the prime minister is in relation to winter so far. february the warmest the prime minister is in relation to the third meaningful vote. there is on record. that has had an impact on still the possibility that she will bring that forward. would that be some of the flowers. beautiful flowers sent in. the rhododendrons,
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wise? the alternative is either that parliament does not reach any for example, have actually flowered conclusion, in which case we are a month earlier than you would heading for a no deal exit. if i expect. and they are quite felt that was the most likely spectacular, aren't they, naga and outcome, i would charlie? beautiful pictures. felt that was the most likely outcome, iwould be felt that was the most likely outcome, i would be much more relaxed. the reason why i have relu cta ntly relaxed. the reason why i have reluctantly decided to vote for the deal is that i think that parliament camellias and magnolias in there as will step in and force us to accept well. absolutely stunning. thank an alternative which is likely to be you. careful as you land. it is 17 minutes past six. let's take a look at today's papers. the guardian reports on the result of the last night's votes in the commons permanent membership. with the headline: "parliament finally has its say: no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no." — indicating mps' rejecting all eight alternative brexit options. the daily telegraph says more than 20 conservatives who opposed theresa may's deal have these are very difficultjudgments now said they would back it, after she promised to stand down if her deal was passed. to make. mark is absolutely right. the daily mirror's headline — each one of us has wrestled with
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"the end of may" — this for a very long time. some of points to speculation that the prime minister would leave us have reached different conclusions as to the best way office by 22nd may, forward. we are still of the same mind that this is not a good deal. if parliament backed her deal. the question is what is the alternative? i put one thought to you, to both of you in a way, there and the daily mail wonders, are some people watching the goings—on, and this is specific to "will her sacrifice be in vain?", the conservative party which is why it is so good to talk to both of as it points out that mrs may failed you, there is something deeply to win the crucial support unpleasant about the notion that at of northern ireland's the moment she says i will quit if you vote for me, lo and behold, the votes co m e you vote for me, lo and behold, the votes come in. there is something unseemly about that, which suggests it was never about the principle and democratic unionist party. it was never about the principle and it was never about the principle and it was always about whether we like or we don‘t like her. you will be aware that there is an impression that that has been a big part of they still say they will vote this latest twist. that is your against her deal. sally. this story caricature of what has happened and i don‘t accept it for a minute. i said before i thought it would help if we knew if there would be an alternative person with a track record of fighting for brexit when we come to that stage, but actually is on the back page of the times. a what made up my mind was the fact that parliament voted very narrowly last night not in favour of the customs union, but the likelihood is that parliament will force upon the government something worse. that was the most important factor in my decision making. i listened to the fa ntastically prime minister last night. i think she spoke with great dignity and she is on the back page of the times. a fantastically famous english footballer, harry kane says he wants to try his hand at american accepted that when we come to the next stage, if we can get there, football. he says that if he can thenit next stage, if we can get there, then it is right that we have a
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become a successful kicker in the fresh start. personally i think that isa fresh start. personally i think that is a sensible conclusion. please nfl it would enhance his sporting record. i pick up, mark francois? certainly, charlie. one of the great things wondered where he would fit in but a about when this process is finished lot of footballers have gone over a is that we will not need to listen specialist kickers. we will have to to that gentleman who is shouting look it up. in the past i think they have. they have not done incredibly well because theyjust can't keep it outside parliament forever. i have going. i know more former rugby players who have tried it but we not voted on this process one way or will see... do you think he really means that? why is he saying it now? because he wants a bigger sporting legacy. another interesting story just here talking about this another. we are being asked whether exclusive, and expose on the silent or not to approve a draft international treaty, which if we do approve it, will bind as in international law forever. that is the question. it is not about the epidemic of gaming addiction in football at the moment saying that prime minister. having read the young players in particular have to treaty diligently, i hope, and we are mps and it is ourjob to do be helped with the problem that is
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this, having seen that it keeps us in the eu, it means that we remain affecting their performances on the under the control of the european court ofjustice in key areas of our pitch. so this is the players law, and we pay £39 billion for nothing, and on the basis of what i themselves? yes. players themselves who spend too long on the xbox in have read and that is what i am voting on, i cannot vote for it. the the afternoon. online games are very daily telegraph called it a surrender document and i will never go through the lobbies of the house of commons to surrender my country to anybody. we are not going to do it. we thank you both for your time much designed to keep you involved and engaged and keep you going back this morning and for dealing with the noises off. we will speak to you and engaged and keep you going back and you play against your friends againi the noises off. we will speak to you again i am sure. in the next half hour and you play against your friends and with your mates and teams. they we‘ll be speaking to labour‘s shadow business secretary, say that they are having trouble rebecca long—bailey. that‘s at 08:30. stopping this. do you know what they what is happening with the weather? it is 8:20am. gorgeous blooms. yes, lovely rhododendrons. quite a chilly start with some people starting off need? they stopping this. do you know what they with rust and others with fog but need ? they need stopping this. do you know what they need? they need a old—fashioned that will lift and with high pressure in charge, things will be hobby. paul mccartney, apparently, fairly settled. —— starting off with he spends a lot of his time frost. you might have noticed the birch pollen, because the levels are birdwatching. he says it gets you outdoors and you engage with your moderate across the south—east and surroundings. most recently he was in london. they winds will be gusty in brazil and he was out spotting in the far north west of the uk. birds at the people's park in a best thing this morning, there is some fog around, so across parts of
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major city there and he said it was devon, cornwall, somerset, dorset and south wales. they are dense a wonderful way to chill out. the pockets of fog, so if you are problem is that you need a lot of travelling, bear that in mind. with patience. a lot of patients and a that lack of wind in the centre of lot of time. a quick debate. it would not surprise you to know that the high pressure, it means it will lingerfor lam would not surprise you to know that the high pressure, it means it will linger for some the high pressure, it means it will lingerfor some time the high pressure, it means it will linger for some time before i am fussy about cheese on toast. the high pressure, it means it will lingerfor some time before it lifts, but when it does, there will did you know there is a perfect formula? white bread, precise medium sickness. toast the bread on both sides. i only toast one side. no. it be sunshine. also some cloud in the west and east, which will mostly goes soggy. and then butter it to melt away but it will stick in the edges which apparently stops it south—eastern england, and also take a cloud in the north west of scotla nd a cloud in the north west of burning. 50g scotland with the risk of the odd shower coming out of that. temperatures today are responding to the sunshine. ten to 16. in the edges which apparently stops it burning. 50 g of mild or medium aberdeenshire and around the london cheddar know, i prefer strong. a area we could hit 16 or even 17. dash of worcestershire sauce. no. cook 17 inches under the grill. i through the evening and overnight, for many there will be clear skies and another cool night in prospect with pockets of frost and patchy mist and fog forming, particularly in wales and the south—west and quarter. at the same time, weather have never measured it. worcestershire sauce is a must. no. front in across the north west of
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scotla nd front in across the north west of scotland will introduce some rain. that rain tomorrow will slowly sink south, getting as far as far as the no. cheese on toast is my favourite great glen. ahead of it when we lose snackin no. cheese on toast is my favourite snack in the world. period with the patchy mist and fog, we are looking at a drier weather and lengthy sunny spells but it is a herbs. i know that the pizza but it cold front bringing the rain and is still good. —— pizza with herbs. behind it, look at the difference in you may remember, back in 2016 we made a promise. temperatures. temperatures coming if 1000 viewers e—mailed in, we'd plant 1000 trees down and feeling fresher but ahead in a new woodland in leicestershire. of it, especially in any sunshine, it will feel pleasantly warm with high temperatures of 17 or even 18. as we move from friday into it was to address a huge fall in the number of trees planted saturday, this weather front in the uk since the 19705 — continues to journey further south. now the government too is promising we can see the blue following on to plant millions more. behind, indicating that it will turn tim muffett is in the bbc breakfast cooler. this is the weather front woodland this morning. introduced in the cloud and spots of it has our name on it! good morning. rain, weakening all the time as it travels south because it is bumping into the centre of the high good morning to you. some beautiful pressure. the cloud will build ahead of it but we will still have mild images for you. this is the national conditions. behind it, we are looking at some brightness, some sunshine and some showers. when over the hills of scotland and even to forest, some 200 square miles in derbyshire and leicester where we lower levels over the northern
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are today on the idea was first born isles. that continues itsjourney in the 19805 to connect ancient woodlands with new woodland and it lower levels over the northern has been a tran5formative thing. it isles. that continues its journey on saturday night into sunday morning, breathed new life into this part of clearing away eventually, with high pressure building in behind. dry and the midlands. 2016, breakfast fine weather on sunday and there will be cloud around an hazy sunshine as a result. temperatures e55entially 5pon5ored the midlands. 2016, breakfast e55entially sponsored a new woodland and planted some trees. the5e trees only five in america, to highs of 12 are coming along well. you did a as we push toward cardiff, plymouth and st helier. —— five in lerwick. really good job as did the children who helped to plant them. ambitious treeplanting target5 who helped to plant them. ambitious treepla nting ta rget5 have who helped to plant them. ambitious treeplanting targets have been set the 17s and 18s and back to business out for england by the government. 11 million new trees by 2022. is as usual. so we should enjoy the that realistic? at the meeting, some nice weather on saturday and hunker down on sunday? if you like it to people were helping to plant trees. warmer, yes. today you might want to go out plant trees. a lesson with a long—term impact.” you may remember back in 2016 we made a promise. if 1000 viewers emailed in, have planted 375 trees. trees are we‘d plant 1000 trees in a new woodland in leicestershire. getting cut down so you need to plan more. please and he planted some.” and he planted some. i did. the overhead shots look beautiful. these
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are not the ones that we planted. they are the ones that have been trees give us oxygen. the government has announced ambitiou5 target5 there for sometime! the reason was trees give us oxygen. the government has announced ambitiou5 targets for england which will form part of the that we need more trees to be northern forest. the northern forest planted the uk. and tim is in a clearing. he will tell us where he i5 northern forest. the northern forest is. he is with the baby trees. good is an initiative to plant trees over the next 25 years. the northern morning. yes, this is the forest doe5 the next 25 years. the northern forest does not strictly have to be planted along the big green spaces, it can be in schools in parks and places that people use. how does it leicestershi re morning. yes, this is the leicestershire forest, covering 2000 square miles, and as well as feel that in years to come you will established trees there are younger ones, including the ones that have lots of trees here that you charlie helped to plant in 2016. help to plant? it would feel very right now i am in the bbc breakfast good. quite warming. it is daunting woodland area. how beautiful it is and how lovely to see some kids and it is a big challenge. last year planting some more trees. this area is going to get even bigger. there the government made william worsley industry champion. i have been set a are some very is going to get even bigger. there are some very ambitious tree planting target set by the government. 11 million trees to be challenge by government to get 11 planted in england by 2022. it million trees planted and 1 million sounds a lot. is it realistic and urban trees in the next three years. viable? i will chat tojohn from the
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people do not like change so any change to a landscape worries national forest company. how people. we need to show people that realistic is it to plant 11 million we can do it, that we can improve trees in the next three years? we think it is possible but we need to the landscape and that is better than detracting from it. in 1976, have the right kind of incentive and help for farmers and landowners to do it. we have shown that we can do another new trees were planted to it in the national forest so there cover 28,000 hectares of land about is no reason not to do it 100 square miles. roughly an area nationally. do you need volunteers or is it paid for? how does it work? the size of the city of york. fast farm owners and landowners can forward to 2018 and treeplanting i5 receive grants to plant trees that down by almost two—thirds. la5t we have a whole mechanism. we use year, around 9000 hectares of new trees were planted. 35 square miles. the planning system, volunteers like today, and we plant with our own that is an area around the size of side and we use a range of other the london borough of barlett. why grant systems as well. thank you. you talked about the volunteers and we have got some younger ones here. has there been a reduction in the there is a bit of family history number of trees planted ? has there been a reduction in the number of trees planted? down to the economics of the woodland and forest because your brother helped to plant industry. planting i5 the trees in 2016. yes, and i am economics of the woodland and forest industry. planting is the easy bit. but you need to manage the woods and very glad to be here, like he was. i that means sending them and weeding have never planted trees before. you
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are doing a very good job right now. them to get the trees to grow mum, how does it feel to be part of this process and to have children inspired by nature? it is lovely and 5trong. them to get the trees to grow strong. william believes that ta rg ets strong. william believes that a great day for it. it is lovely. in targets will be met. a5 strong. william believes that targets will be met. as well as government funding the price of timber i5 government funding the price of timber is going up so there is incentive to create more woodland. changes to our landscape that could last for generations. i am delighted a great day for it. it is lovely. in a few years, the trees will be here to be joined on this morning by the ceo of and they will be much bigger, leaving a legacy for the future. do the national forest company. it is we need might recover in the uk? absolutely. we love being in the not just planting trees the national forest company. it is notjust planting trees in rural great outdoors and we have a lot of areas, is it? a forest also forestry around us, at with the dog and the kids, and it is really encompasses towns and important to keep up the tradition. areas, is it? a forest also encompa55e5 towns and cities. areas, is it? a forest also encompasses towns and cities. yes. it important that we do that. here you are doing a finejob. 11 million we have four town5 trees to be planted by 2022, it is it important that we do that. here we have four towns and over 200,000 people so planting trees near to where people work and live is hoped, but for the time being these important for a range of reasons. quys hoped, but for the time being these guys are doing a fine job. hoped, but for the time being these guys are doing a finejob. i hoped, but for the time being these guys are doing a fine job. i will leave you with the news, weather and what do you make of the targets? 11 travel where you are this morning. million trees, is that doable?m doe5 million trees, is that doable?m does sound like a big target but if you get the incentives right and the support and the can help. here we have planted nearly 9 million trees over 25 yea r5 good morning. it‘s been a glorious start
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have planted nearly 9 million trees of the day for many of us. over 25 years and we have gone from some patchy fog affecting the south—west of england. that‘s mostly clearing 6% to 20%, 21%, actually, of forest away at the moment. cover. it can be done but it does while it‘s been quite chilly to start off with, need support and advice. some people we‘re going to see some warm sunny spells developing later. don't like tree cover. compared to now, high pressure firmly in charge european countries we have less of our land covered by trees and some of the weather at the moment. people prefer it that way. what do that‘s keeping things very settled. light winds for many of us. you say to them? we believe in the the breeze a bit stronger further right tree in the right place. so north and west and that‘s still bringing in some cloud places where you really cannot put trees, where they are not suitable across the north of scotland. for the landscape or the environment there may also be some cloud today across east anglia and the south—east of england. but actually we have such low tree cover in this country that there are elsewhere, we are just looking all kinds of spaces where we can put at blue skies and sunshine and it‘s going to feel warmer trees and they can have wonderful benefits for our environment, for than the last few days. people and the economy. a little temperatures typically about 13—16, later we will see more trees being one or two spots could reach 17. planted and the breakfast woodland where we are right now will be through tonight, we‘ll continue with a bit of cloud. expanded even further. that is there will be some patchy fog forming in central and southern something to look forward to. a areas, perhaps a bit more extensive first thing tomorrow morning. beautiful sight here this morning. lengthy, clear spells, quite chilly an ancient woodlands, and the new again with a touch of frost around. trees about to be planted. it is a temperatures in towns magical effect and we will have more and cities about 3—7. later on. i will leave you with not as cold in the far
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lovely views of leice5tershire a5 north—west of scotland, where the cloud is still going to be later on. i will leave you with lovely views of leice5tershire as we find out the latest news weather and there and bring some outbreaks travel where you are this morning. of rain during friday. it will move its way gradually south and east words. more club generally for scotland good morning from bbc london news. a and northern ireland. temperature about 9—12. 15 in aberdeenshire. man has been arrested on suspicion of the murder of a shopkeeper elsewhere, with lots of sunshine outside his newsagent in north—west again, another warm day with highs london. before—year—old father of up to 17 or maybe even 18. two was stabbed to death during a that weather front in the north west is going to move southward as we go through the weekend. robbery a5 two was stabbed to death during a robbery as he opened his store last sunday morning. police say a behind it, you can see these 44—year—old man was detained in blues, the colder air, which is going to slowly filter its way southward. harrow last night stop some of the during saturday, after that rain clears away, there will be some capital's boots operator5 claim that wintry showers across scotland, particularly the far could be forced out of business if north of scotland. new safety regulations are passed. some sunny spells but chillier, the maritime inc coastguard agency temperatures 8—10. ahead of that, some cloud on saturday, largely dry, temperatures still potentially about 15—16. bye— bye. i5 the maritime inc coastguard agency is looking at narrowing the gaps in safety 5ta nda rds is looking at narrowing the gaps in safety standards between old and new vessels but some who operate on the river thames believe the proposals are disproportionate and will be too
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costly to implement. the government agency says they have a duty to keep the travelling public safe. most tram services in south london will be cancelled today due to a strike by drivers. last week, members of the union voted to walk out in a dispute over pay. transport for london says it has put a contingency plan in place with a limited service and urged the union and operator to continue talks. the baby on board badges worn by mothers to be have been given a makeover. six new designs have been created and will be available for free in time mother's day. the project aims to help pregnant women feel more visible it was found that almost half of expectant mothers in london fill overlooked on public transport. on that note let's have a look at the situation. good news for tube users with all lines running well. traffic on the a13 is building westbound. the romford road is blocked at warwick road. and in
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central london tottenham court road is down to two lanes northbound. that is for resurfacing work. let's see what the weather is doing today. hello and good morning. another quiet day of weather today and there should be lots of sunshine developing for most of us. it is a cloudy start, particularly towards eastern areas where we will keep the cloud for longest but because of the cloud for longest but because of the cloud it stop the heat radiating away so it is a mild start this morning. the best of the sunshine today towards the west and central and western areas of the capital. when we get the rest of that punch and we get highs 16. further east across parts of essex and kent we could keep the cloud for much of the day but it will also brighten up at times. overnight tonight it is said to feel colder. we theologically spells around and it will stay dry.
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in some spots temperatures could drop low enough to get a touch frost into tomorrow morning. it is said to stay dry for the rest of the weekend. 17 celsius in the best of the sunny spells tomorrow. 16 degrees on saturday with some more spells of sunshine but things will turn cooler and cloudier by the end of the weekend. and i will be back with the latest in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address and we will see you soon. well. absolutely stunning. thank you. careful as you land. hello this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. we're looking at how brexit will affect life here in the uk. ben's examining the impact on the two million people working in financial services. hughjackman tells us all about his greatest showman success and starring in the new animated film, missing link. and after 8:30, find out if your favourite show has been nominated for this year's prestigious bafta tv awards. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. a mate of mine, robbie williams, i have been trying to get an album
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like that and you have only done one album. and after 8:30, find out if your favourite show has been nominated for this year's prestigious bafta tv awards. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. theresa may has told backbench conservatives that she'll resign, providing they support her brexit deal. mrs may didn't set a date for her departure. it came as mp5 seized control of the commons agenda to hold a series of votes on alternatives to the prime minister's deal, including the possibility of another referendum. but all eight options were rejected. so, in the event the prime minister does stand down, who could be in line for the top job? let's speak to our political correspondent ben wright, who's in westminster for us. it is also who once said, who wants
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it? depending on whether the proneness to goes in the next three months or six months, she has uncorked a leadership contest, there is no doubt about that. tory candidates are now busy building the support behind the scenes. i think a dozen could go for it, there is no question about that. some of the main wants to look out for when the moment comes, michael gove, certainly, the environment secretary. ebacc to leave during the referendum has been a past of the border of theresa may's deal. knifed borisjohnson during border of theresa may's deal. knifed boris johnson during the border of theresa may's deal. knifed borisjohnson during the laughed —— last tory leadership campaign. boris johnson would love to be prime minister, a leading figure in the leave campaign, of course, strongly opposing theresa may's deal, until last night when here said here would back it after all. i was a jeremy hunt, the foreign secretary, would love to do the job, here back remain in the referendum but has since
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sounded like a fan breaks it. so to sajid javid, the home secretary. here too has ambition. and dominic raabe. here was brexit et cetera —— secretary until here quit in november. a fierce critic of theresa may's deal. here fancies this chances too. the process, when it happens, means that all these candidates will try to wind support of tory mp5 will have a ballot among themselves and pick two candidates who will then go through to a vote of the wider conservative party membership, about 100,000 people. and then they will pick a winner. that winner will become prime minister potentially for a number of yea rs into minister potentially for a number of years into the next phase of the brexit negotiations. it is a really big deal. interesting, there are no women in this list. amber rudd not considered a contender? it is certainly possible. i think esther mcvey, the former work and pensions secretary, has discussed it, too, and said publicly that if people
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urge her to stand then she will. i think you could definitely have two or three women. it is hard to say. there is no clearfront—runner, that is for certain. and it will be a fiercely contested race. thank you very much. it is so interesting. we will keep you up—to—date throughout the morning. facebook says it will ban users from posting praise and support for far—right groups on its platforms from next week. the social media giant also pledged to improve its ability to identify and block material from terrorist groups. facebook has come under pressure after a man live—streamed an attack on two mosques in new zealand, which killed 50 people. dust and debris from the grenfell tower fire has polluted the surrounding area, resulting in levels of toxic chemicals many times higher than normal, according to new research. soil samples collected from the site contained substances which could cause cancer and asthma. the government said the risk to health was very low, but more studies have been commissioned.
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a painting believed to have been a fake for 100 years, has turned out to be a genuine masterpiece. this work by sandro botticelli, was assumed to be an imitation of the italian artist's famous madonna of the pomegranate. but during cleaning, it was discovered to be a rare, smaller version of the 15th—century painting. iam sure i am sure i was talking about a story like this just a month ago. these brilliant fakes, they are originals. i am sorry for the people who owned it over the saying i am sure it is real and people say no, it is not. and now it is. if you wanted it for the money and not the ivy wanted it for the money and not the joy of the art. do you want some really, really good news from europe? go on. please! talking about european football, of course. they left it very late, but chelsea are through to the semi—finals
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of the women's champions league for a second successive season. they actually lost on the night to paris saint—germain, but went through on aggregate — as ben croucher reports. chelsea are into the semi—finals... when you reached the women's champions league semi—finals it means a lot, when you get relay chelsea did it makes it all the sweeter. they were unfancied against the french, paris saint—germain's sa ns the french, paris saint—germain's sans provided a hostile atmosphere, the players crank up. trailing 2— 0, they half the deficit. it was the flashpoint to ignite the tie. through the haze, thejudgement became clouded. a routine corner with the most calamitous of outcomes. 2—2 on aggregate. into injury chelsea pushed forward. can you see her? can you see her now? the goldeyes and chelsea into a semi—final against holders leon, another european note to say before english football. ngoza, bbc news. we are at a level now where we can
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get into a position where we can fight to get into the final. we are not the favourites, we are not expected to go through. so there is no pressure on my team. but we want this game. staying with chelsea, they've offered counselling to callum hudson—odoi after he was targeted by racist abuse twice injust 11 days. the 18—year—old heard monkey chants during chelsea's europa league match at dynamo kiev earlier this month, then he was one of several england players abused during their 5—1 win over montenegro on monday. one of the most influential men in english football — gordon taylor — is going to step down as the boss of the professional footballers' association. the 74—year—old has lead the players' union for almost a0 years, and he'll leave after a "full and open review" into the organisation's finances. taylor is well paid, earning more than £2 million a year. but he'd become a divisive figure in recent years, with many players calling for him to quit. roger federer was as his imperious best as he progressed to the quarter—finals of the miami open.
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the 20—time grand slam winner took just one hour and one minute to beat russia's danil medvedev in straight sets. he'll play wimbledon finalist kevin anderson next. a great time to be a golfer at the moment. the masters — golf‘s first major of the season — starts two weeks today, and rory mcilroy is hitting form atjust the right time. he won the players championship ten days ago, and he's started very well at the wgc matchplay in texas too. he comfortably beat luke list, five and four. there were wins too forjustin rose and tommy fleetwood. this is a lovely story. the captain of galatasaray‘s under—1a team in turkey has given everyone a lesson in sportsmanship, by deliberately missing a penalty. have a look. this is 13—year—old beknaz almazbekov. he was given a penalty after appearing to be fouled. but he was very honest, and knew that he'd gone down very easlily. because the penalty had already been
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awarded it had to be taken, so he decided to kick it wide on purpose. he got his rewards, as his side won 3—0. applause there you go. thank you very much. can we maybe see the incident again? i really like football. it is not my favourite sport. i think there is an ugly side to this game. that makes me like football. here is the incident. he was awarded a penalty for that. he realised he had gone down too easily. the penalty had to be done. poor refereeing. forget the poor refereeing ago for the fantastic sportsmanship. you are absolutely right. what?! i am glad we are sitting down. we will see you later on. in a last—ditch effort to get her brexit plans approved by parliament, theresa may has told mp5 "back my deal and i'll quit". she'd been under pressure to stand down by brexiteers within her own party. let's get some insight now from herformer director
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of strategy, chris wilkins who joins us from vienna. good morning to you. just so people understand your connection to the prime minister, how recently were you working on her on a routine, regular basis? i worked for the prime ministerfor her regular basis? i worked for the prime minister for her first year in number10, prime minister for her first year in number 10, between august of 2016 until about august of the following year. but we go back really about 20 yea rs year. but we go back really about 20 years to the days when she made a nasty party speech, which made her somewhat famous as chairman almost 20 years ago. with that inside, tell us 20 years ago. with that inside, tell us what you make, first of all of her announcement last night, initially to her own mp5, but it is out there now —— inside. i will quit if you vote for me. many people are seeing it as a big gamble. is certainly a big gamble. at first sight not one that seems to have paid off. but it was also, i think, in the and slightly inevitable that it was a card she had to play. for quite some time now there have been
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brexiteers in the party, particularly those known as the drg, the european research group. one of the european research group. one of the problems with the withdrawal agreement is they fear that bypassing that the prime minister and her team will try to stay around to negotiate phase two, which is the future relationship. and their judgement is that they have made a bit of a mess of phase one and there was no way that could happen. this has long been something they have called for. i think she has tried everything else to get her deal through and it has not quite worked. and then last week was not a great week for the prime minister with a statement ten downing street that went very badly and a view changes, changing her mind on a few things. it felt inevitable. last night it was a card she had to play because it was the last card she had. is the downside to this though the line is a vote for me and i quit, but are there brackets following on from that that if you don't vote for me i'm probably going to have to quit
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anyway? well, i think that is exactly right. it is a strange narrative, vote for me or i quit. what we have seen previously with prime ministers is the moment the genie is out of the bottle of something like this you can't put it back in. we saw it when tony blair announced the date of his departure and immediately authority drains away and we have seen it with others. even though this morning the picture is a bit confused, we don't know if the withdrawal agreement will get through and therefore we don't know what the timetable is, the reality is the genie is out of the reality is the genie is out of the bottle now and the starting gun on the next tory leadership contest has well and truly been fired.” on the next tory leadership contest has well and truly been fired. i am not sure how far you are prepared to go in terms of talking about her personally, but unfortunately her saying i'll quit if you help me makes it personal comment makes it very much about her. people have criticised in the past for her mindset, which is don't listen, only the most extreme circumstances if you prepared to to those around her.
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is that what you witnessed, is that one of the floors in her make up? yes, a sort of strange paradox with the prime minister really is that she is actually very good, when you are around and in meetings with her she will take the time very much to go around table and listen to views, she likes to sit back and let people argue things out as well, and she will absolutely let people have their say. she is not somebody who simply closes their ears and won't ta ke simply closes their ears and won't take advice at all. i think the two things, the failings are that having done that, she will then in a meeting very rarely sum up, you rarely leave a meeting with the prime minister understanding what decision she has made. she likes to go away and think about things and make the decision somewhere else. so you are never entirely clear about how the process works. can i just ask you one last thing, the gamble of saying vote for me and i quit, if she chooses, and this is the big if, to go for a third go, she doesn't do
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that, because she doesn't think she can get it through, does she then proudly say, well, i am here and i might be here for quite some time, or is that, as you sort of alluded to, is that past, is she gone, issue toast? the difficulty is for the tory party, i suppose, is that it is very much on her hands. there is no mechanism for them to remove her until at least december of this year because she won the confidence vote in december of last year. in theory she can say that. until brexit is delivered, i am going to stay here. the reality is pressure would build so the reality is pressure would build so much, having said what she said, but i think it probably is a matter of time before one way or another the party does encourage her to leave and we are looking at a new conservative leader and a new prime minister. chris wilkins, thank you for your time this morning. trying to getan
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for your time this morning. trying to get an insight into theresa may and what happens next. chris wilkins, former director of strategy and what with her on many of the big speeches. it is quite interesting hearing his take. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. you said it is getting wetter for us. you said it is getting wetter for us. is it? no... iwould like you said it is getting wetter for us. is it? no... i would like to say yes so that you are not wrong...” am happy to be wrong. i don't want any of us to get wetter. i want some sunshine. well, there is sunshine around. later tomorrow there will be rain in the forecast so i will show you. a chilly start this morning. some begin with a touch of frost. the high pressure has pulled right across us so the high pressure has pulled right across us so the weather today once again will be fairly settled. you can see that he was hardly a breath of wind the centre of this high—pressure but there is some cloud around however in the northwest it is breezy with the
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weather front not too far away. in the centre of that high—pressure we are prone to fog. if you are travelling this morning there is fog around across parts of cornwall, devon, somerset, dorsetand around across parts of cornwall, devon, somerset, dorset and also south wales. it is not everywhere, it is patchy but pockets of it are dense and that will take a while to lift because there is no wind to move it along. we also start with a cloudy note in the west and the east so cloudy note in the west and the east so it looks like that cloud will be stubborn, particularly in the south—east and could stay all day. the north—west, more cloud with the odd spot of rain and gusty wind. in between you are looking at sunny skies and temperatures responding. highs of ten, possibly 17 as we come further south. equally we could see 17 in aberdeen shire today. as we head on through the evening and overnight you can see how the cloud 5ta rts overnight you can see how the cloud starts to build even more across the north—west. here is a weather front that will introduce some rain and that will introduce some rain and that will introduce some rain and that will be breezy. south of that
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for the bulk of the rest of the uk, actually, we're looking at clear skies and locally pockets of frost and patchy mist and fog forming. that will slowly lift through the course of tomorrow and then we are looking at sunny skies. however, watch this weather front. as it sinks south across the north—west of scotla nd sinks south across the north—west of scotland taking its cloud and rain within, behind it it will turn a little fresher and reaching six, nine degrees. it is a cold front with cold air following behind. looking ahead of it we still have temperatures reaching 17, possibly 18 degrees. that looks great. i am so 18 degrees. that looks great. i am so pleased. thank you so much, carol. ben's in the city of london for us this morning, looking at how the financial services sector is preparing for brexit. it is such a big issue this one, isn't it? and given the confusion at the moment i dare say many heads are being scratched? you are absolutely
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correct. we have been taking this brexit road trip around the country looking at how different sectors are affected by all of the uncertainty thatis affected by all of the uncertainty that is coming from westminster at the moment. financial services is one of our biggest exports as a country. over 2 million people working financial services setting you may think most of them work here in the city london but two—thirds of those firms and jobs are across the country. they are in everything from insurance and banking to accounting and auditing. all sorts of different things come into the category. so there are questions about what brexit could mean for them and certainly with that indecision and uncertainty that we have from westminster right now whether they can westminster right now whether they ca n start westminster right now whether they can start making any plans because there are fears that some financial jobs will move overseas. that's discuss that with two guests this morning. we have the chief executive of the city uk and an insurance company founder. morris, let's start with you. we look at the city of london and think it is lots of money
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and lots of jobs london and think it is lots of money and lots ofjobs but many of those jobs are up and down the country. that is right. what you find is that there are many centres like manchester and so on where you have a huge numberof manchester and so on where you have a huge number of these high—value jobs that contribute to the local economy and are part of a massive export industry. about half the exports of the uk financial services industry. most of those outside london. and there are many fears, aren't there? many jobs from london. and there are many fears, aren't there? manyjobs from the city and elsewhere will move overseas. why hasn't that happened? i think thejobs overseas. why hasn't that happened? i think the jobs have always been a red herring. we have always considered it a worst—case scenario thejobs considered it a worst—case scenario the jobs would considered it a worst—case scenario thejobs would go considered it a worst—case scenario the jobs would go elsewhere. considered it a worst—case scenario thejobs would go elsewhere. outside europe, that is so places like asia and new york would be the winner. what seeing are a smaller number than we feared moving. but assets
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however have gone abroad. now simon, you have your own insurance form. people wonder how brexit affects insurance. what difference does it make if we are in or out of the union? there is passport issues so we need to access via brussels into europe to sort past sporting arrangements. you made a point there aboutjob arrangements. you made a point there about job losses. arrangements. you made a point there aboutjob losses. job arrangements. you made a point there about job losses. job losses initially were projected to be £500 and we are seeing around 2000. much fewer than we feared. i think we are looking for strong optimism. we need to deal and conclusion and clarity but we are seeing options in the city. we have grown by 40% since the brexit vote. there are success stories and optimism around the city. i think we just need to embrace it. what have you done that allows you to have that optimism? many firms are now trying to put
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plans in place for whatever may play out. what have you done? we embraced the opportunities of becoming a lloyd's banker. we are doing a lot of business outside europe. we are sensing that we are a great country and a great economy and a great city and a great economy and a great city and we embrace that and are positive and we embrace that and are positive and optimistic. there should be more optimism. we are a great country and lloyd's of london have been operating for hundreds of years. lloyd's of london have been operating for hundreds of yearsm has defeated depressions and world wa rs has defeated depressions and world wars i don't think brexit will defeat it. we will leave it there and talk more later. some views of what financial services are thinking in regards to brexit but no clarity yet on what happens next. the plans are in place but no direction about where things go from here. more from me after seven. thank you very much. one of the things you need on a
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weary day like this, you need a nice quy- weary day like this, you need a nice guy. you need a nice guy. a fun guy. and some escapism. how about hugh jackman? he's a delightful person in hollywood and we have been to him about his new film and about success. # ladies and gentlemen this is the moment you have waited for. this thing that has happened, the greatest showman, it is extraordinary, isn't it? it is so extraordinary. a mate of mine, robbie williams, i was speaking to him the other day. he wanted me to understand what i had done. he spent his whole career trying to get an album like that and you did just one album. so it surprised everybody
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involved. weirdly, the entire trajectory is the story of the film with about a guy with big dreams and everybody else went know. and then when it starts it is a no and that gradually builds. # tell me do you wa nt to gradually builds. # tell me do you want to go. # impossible, it's taking over you # this is the greatest show. have you heard any shocking versions of your soul? karaoke bars? have you heard any yet? yes. but it usually comes in the form of you have to hear my nephew singing this. can you please listen. every day. so this is someone listen. every day. so this is someone going... and i told them yes. that is so sweet. that is amazing. let's talk about missing link. neither aid nor amazing. let's talk about missing link. neitheraid nor man amazing. let's talk about missing link. neither aid nor man but a giant. he has had many names.
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actually, i go by susan. first thing i want to ask is can you do the voice? because your english accent... my name is sir lionel frost. i am an explorer and an explorer of note, i might say. something like that. i have hung around with ian mckellen and patrick stewart a lot. it was everything. it was a voice and it was also a little bit of button business. it had everything. yes. iam bit of button business. it had everything. yes. i am a method actor. i give you my word. what is it? the word? it is a figure of speech. in my job gets me close to people who are very well—known. i can't you how many people say to me and they say that you seem like a nice guy. my mother always said to
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me always to this day, every person on the planet needs to feel appreciated. so it does not matter if you are catching a bus, if you are going to school, doing an interview. make sure the people around you feel that you are grateful. because everyone needs to fill that. so when people say, wow, you're being nice, ijust say that was the way i was brought up. everyone meant to do that? like if i don't, i will get a slap across the face. everyone is smiling. you have made the room smile. it is lovely to see you. did he or didn't he? what? singing? no. he did not think that he does have the ability and it is true that he makes people smile. he does have the ability and it is true that he makes people smilem is nice to hearfrom him. i see him as wolverine and that is such a change. missing link is his new
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film, out on april five. time to find out what is happening where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news. a man's been arrested on suspicion of the murder of a shopkeeper outside his newsagents in north west london. 54—year—old father of 2, ravi katharkamar, was stabbed to death during a robbery as he opened the marsh food and wine store in pinner last sunday morning. police say a 44—year—old man was detained in harrow last night. some of the capital '5 boat operators say they could be forced to out of business if new safety regulations are passed. the maritime and coastguard agency is consulting on plans to narrow the gap in safety standards between older boats and newer vessels. but some companies who operate on the river thames believe the proposals are disproportionate and would be too costly to implement. the government agency says it has a duty to keep the travelling public safe. most tram services in south london will be cancelled today due to a strike by drivers.
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last week members of the union aslef voted to walk out in a dispute over pay. transport for london said it's put a contingency plan in place, with a limited service and urged the union and operator to continue talks. the baby on board badges worn by mums—to—be have been given a makeover. six new designs have been created and will be available for free in time for mother's day. the project aims to help pregnant women feel more visible. it's after research by family site hoop found almost half of expectant mums in london feel overlooked on public transport. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. traffic on the a13 is building westbound from dagenham into barking. heading between stratford and forest gate, the a118 romford road is blocked at warwick road, following an accident near the travel inn north of coulsdon, the a23 brighton road is partly
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blocked between smitham downs road and old lodge lane following a collision to the south of reedham station now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello and good morning. another quiet day of weather today and there should be lots of sunshine developing for most of us. it is a cloudy start, particularly towards eastern areas where we will keep the cloud for longest but because of the cloud it stop the heat radiating away so it is a mild start this morning. the best of the sunshine today towards the west and central and western areas of the capital. when we get the rest of that punch and we get highs 16. further east across parts of essex and kent we could keep the cloud for much of the day but it will also brighten up at times. overnight tonight it is set to feel colder. we could see cold spells around and it will stay dry. in some spots temperatures could drop low enough to get a touch
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frost into tomorrow morning. it is set to stay dry for the rest of the weekend. 17 celsius in the best of the sunny spells tomorrow. 16 degrees on saturday with some more spells of sunshine but things will turn cooler and cloudier by the end of the weekend. and i will be back with the latest in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address and we will see you soon. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: theresa may promises to resign as prime minister if her own party backs her brexit deal, but her key allies, the dup, still oppose it. what we can't agree to is something that threatens the union, which has a strategic risk to the union, for us in the democratic unionist party the union will always come first. parliament rejects all eight plans put forward as alternatives to the prime minister's deal.
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financial services is one of our biggest experts, employing more than 2 million people across the country. but what does the industry make of the chaos in westminster? i get an expert view later life from the city of london. late drama for chelsea. an injury time goal helps them to beat paris saint—germain, and progress to the semi—finals of the women's champions league. good morning from the national florist in leicestershire. some 200 square miles of woodland. 11 million new trees have been promised in england by 2022. is that realistic, can that target be mad? we will find out. you can't help but sing along. but how does hughjackman handle karaoke tributes from his fans? that is so sweet. that is amazing. yeah. i have spent a life in the theatre. we are experts at going
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backstage and lying. good morning. there is a patchy fog and frost around this morning. when that lifts, for many of us, it will be dry was sunny spells. however, there is some stubborn cloud to clear. and i will tell you where in 15 minutes. good morning. it's thursday 28th march. our top story: theresa may has told the conservative party that she'll resign, providing it supports her brexit deal. last night, mp5 held a series of votes on alternatives to the prime minister's deal, including the possibility of another referendum. but all eight options were rejected. our political correspondent alex forsyth reports. once again, the prime minister was in parliament yesterday trying to sell her brexit plan and with so many of her mp5 set against it, she made one last big pitch to win them around. at a meeting inside parliament, she said she would quit if they backed her exit deal, making way for someone else to take over the second stage of talks, which did convince some tories.
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with the prime minister saying what she said, the majority in that room see this now as the best way to get us out to deal with that in future. i am encouraged that she has accepted we should have a new leader for that second stage when it comes so i think i will now vote for the agreement. but with views on brexit so entrenched, will it be enough? other tories say they still won't back her deal and crucially it didn't get northern ireland's dup onboard. we wanted to get a deal. a deal that worked for the whole of the united kingdom, that worked for northern ireland but now we're in a situation where we can't sign up to the withdrawal agreement on its own the prime minister decided to go for that backstop. meanwhile, mp5 were debating alternatives to theresa may's plan but have eight options — they could not agree on any one. the results of the process this house has gone through today strengthens our view that the deal the government has negotiated is the best option.
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many don't agree with that and say other options did prove popular. they'll debate them again on monday. leaving with a customs union or referring this back to the people with the option to remain, those are really the two most popular options. you would think perhaps those are the ones that should go forward forjudgement on monday. for now, though, parliament is still deadlocked, struggling to agree on any way forward. alex forsyth, bbc news, westminster. so, what next? well, there is now a possibility that the prime minister will try to hold a third vote on her deal, by this friday. if she fails, parliament could come back on monday to debate further options, but, it's worth remembering that no single option has yet drawn any majority support so far. if mrs may can't get her deal through, the uk has until april 12th to find a way forward for eu leaders to consider. if it does get support, britain will then leave the eu on may 22nd. if the prime minister keeps to her word this would lead to a leadership contest, with a new pm installed in number 10
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by the summer. in a moment, we'll get the latest from strasbourg with our reporter adam fleming. first let's go to our political correspondent, ben wright who's in westminster. imean, we i mean, we kind of have an idea of what has happened, it is just what happens next. you mapped out the potential direct very clearly. but amy nobody knows if that's going to stand up to events. there's also turbulence here, but nobody knows. there is political palat —— paralysis here with precedent. if a deal had passed through the house of commons by the close of play tomorrow, the eu said we could be out, brexit could happen by may 22.
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if it doesn't go through by the end of tomorrow then the government has until the 12th of april to come up with an alternative plan after having discussions with mp5 about some sort of option, a plan b through this crisis. theresa may laid herfinal card last night without meeting of tory mp5, promising them she would go soon after her deal had gone through and promising them she would not be there for the next phase of negotiations. that did a loss to win over many of her brexiteers, a who think she has screwed up the negotiations i don't want to there for the second phase. but it hasn't gone over enough. there is still a ha rd gone over enough. there is still a hard pocket of conservative mp5 who hate the steel and are not persuaded. and most crucially, the democratic unionist party have said they will not backing this because of the backstop. at the moment, it doesn't look like the numbers of them. it is unlikely they will bring them. it is unlikely they will bring the deal back tomorrow. and theresa may looks pretty finished, politically. she said she goes if
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the deal goes through, but if she brings it back and go through again i think she is also finished as prime minister. thank you very much. our europe reporter, adam fleming, is in strasbourg for us. lots of uncertainty, obviously, but april 12, that date of something having been decided, that is a definite date. i wonder what the europeans are making of what is happening. yeah, charlie, you're bestowing quite quiet at the moment. the fact is they don't negotiate with the british parliament. they negotiate with the british government and the prime minister, who is currently theresa may. in the government is in anything different and theresa may has resigned as prime minister yet. when you speak to people privately and people texture, though, there is a range of opinion. a lot of people, a bunch of them, think this means the most likely option is the uk leaving without a deal, maybe on the 12th of april, maybe a bit after that. you
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get some people thinking the paralysis in parliament, surely the only answer to that is to be a general election in britain. when you get quite a lot of people who are you get quite a lot of people who a re really you get quite a lot of people who are really confused and can't see any way through this at all. then you get a tiny number of optimists to wonder if that process last night, the so—called indicative of votes, when no—one managed to vote foran votes, when no—one managed to vote for an alternative to theresa may's deal, no other idea came out on top. does that perhaps channel people towards voting for the original deal, because there is nothing else to be voted on? in terms of looking way into the future where there might bea way into the future where there might be a new prime minister, well, the eu lost faith in theresa may sometime ago, they appreciated the fa ct sometime ago, they appreciated the fact that she respected the she respected the ground rules for these negotiations. she didn't come in all guns blazing and she didn't actually whip up anything at any point. she stuck to the rules. they worry is
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that a new prime minister in the short—term, the nearfuture, he not respect the rules? thank you very much. we will speak to you throughout the programme. people will be "safer" if the supervision of offenders in england and wales is brought back into the public sector, according to the chief inspector of probation. in her final annual report, dame glenys stacey says the probation model introduced by the government four years ago, under which low and medium risk offenders are monitored by private companies, is "irredeemably flawed" and hit by staff shortages and poor performance. dust and debris from the grenfell tower fire has polluted the surrounding area, resulting in levels of toxic chemicals many times higher than normal, according to new research. soil samples collected from the site contained substances which could cause cancer and asthma. the government said the risk to health was ‘very low‘ but more studies have been commissioned.
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facebook says it will ban users from posting praise and support for far—right groups on its platforms from next week. the social media giant also pledged to improve its ability to identify and block material from terrorist groups. facebook has come under pressure after a man live—streamed an attack on two mosques in new zealand, which killed 50 people. employers are ‘dragging their feet‘ when it comes to revealing their gender pay gap, according to new bbc analysis. each year, organisations with more than 250 employees must reveal the difference between the salary paid to their average male employee, compared to the average female member of staff. however, with just a week to go until the annual deadline, fewer than 40% have disclosed their figures. now for the story of two otter pups, rescued after being separated from their mothers. here‘s mara and gibson — they were found stranded on the californian coast. unable to be released back in to the wild, they‘ve been rehomed at an aquarium. the pups travelled to their new home on a luxury private jet, which was loaded with ice to help keep them cool.
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you know earlier i was saying do you think they bite? do otters bite? it was a rather stupid thing to say, ta ke was a rather stupid thing to say, take that on board. did you know that terry knock—ons lost part of two fingers to an otter?” that terry knock—ons lost part of two fingers to an otter? i did not know that. he is working with wildlife icon. he was 15 years old and lost two fingers. i have had loads of people getting contact telling me how aggressive otters can be. that‘s nature. they are cute now, perhaps not later. we will have the support and the weather for you a little later on. —— sport. brexit news is dominating the papers this morning. the guardian reports on the result of the last night‘s votes in the commons with the headline: "parliament finally has its say: no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no." — indicating mps‘ rejecting all eight alternative
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brexit options. the daily telegraph says more than 20 conservatives who opposed theresa may‘s deal have now said they would back it, after she promised to stand down if her deal was passed. the daily mirror‘s headline — "the end of may" — points to speculation that the prime minister would leave office by 22nd may, if parliament backed her deal. and the daily mail wonders, "will her sacrifice be in vain?", as it points out that mrs may failed to win the crucial support of northern ireland‘s democratic unionist party. so how has theresa may‘s announcement gone down in westminster? joining us now is sherelle jacobs from the telegraph, and sonia sodha from the observer. good morning to you both. it has been a brilliant time to be a political journalist, been a brilliant time to be a politicaljournalist, this moment in time. it is confusing. tell me or ta ke time. it is confusing. tell me or take now, after all eight proposals we re
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take now, after all eight proposals were rejected. sonia. no-one was really expecting any of the proposals last night to get a majority. it was a bit of a damp square. i still think it was significant in terms of having us some clues about what would come next. there were two or three significant things to come out of last night for me. the first is that it was a confirmatory referendum that got the most votes out of anything last night. i think that is quite interesting, because it shows there is possibly more support in parliament for a referendum than people thought. it shows something very clear, there is a clear route for theresa may to get her deal through parliament made she would to compromise and say vote for may deal, mp5, i‘ll put it to referendum afterwards, i think she would get it through. the other really interesting thing is there wasn‘t as much support as people were predicting for a very soft brexit. what people refer to as common market 2.0. that may be that option
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out of the running. and the third thing was that there was a group of mp5 who voted for a no deal outcome and within that group there will be and within that group there will be a number of conservative mp5 who i think will never really vote for theresa may‘s deal. so it is very ha rd to theresa may‘s deal. so it is very hard to see how she gets it through parliament without making some kind of compromise on a referendum. otherwise i think we will be in crisis for some time yet to come up thatis crisis for some time yet to come up that is the points, sherelle, in orderfor this meaningful vote that is the points, sherelle, in order for this meaningful vote three to be brought back, it has to be substantially or significantly different for the speaker to allow it. yes. and even if the speaker we re it. yes. and even if the speaker were to allow it still wouldn't get through. the dup have said they are not going to back it without changes to the backstop. even after boris jamarca does make an unsystematic switch last night. i had a drg sources are speaking to me and saying there were 30 waverers are still, that is not to mention ten
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tory remain mps who will not back the deal because they are holding out for a second referendum —— drg. the maths are not even good on the labour side, because they think had the dup not made their announcement yesterday attention would have been on the labour mps. yesterday attention would have been on the labour mp5. i think at maximum there are 20 that would back her deal. the mass still look very bad for theresa may even after she offered her resignation, practically ona offered her resignation, practically on a plate yesterday, dramatically, at the 1922 committee —— mathematics. i think this deal as --is mathematics. i think this deal as ——is dead as a dodo. looking at eithera no ——is dead as a dodo. looking at either a no deal exit or a longer extension which risks us having no brexit at all stop scary times for the country. to both of you, when you say you think this deal is dead in the water, when will we be told? what is the process? when does she admit or the conservative party admit or the conservative party admit this is dead in the water now, we have to look at alternatives? i
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don‘t think it will be dead in the water for another few days yet. there is still the possibility that she will bring this back to parliament if the speaker lets her ora parliament if the speaker lets her or a chance you may find some way around it. and i think it is too early to rule it out altogether that she may find a way to get support for her deal but as i said it has to come from something dramatic now and thatis come from something dramatic now and that is basically her saying that yes, if you pass it i will put it to a referendum. it is too early to say it is dead in the water but i think it is dead in the water but i think it would be very out of character for her to take drastic action like the one ijust discussed. but then, theresa may has done drastic things in the past that she said she was never going to do. such as: general election. the indications are not goodin election. the indications are not good in terms of polling of her deal be put to the country. if anything... the latest poll finds that 46% of people think that no
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deal outcome would be ok in the end. 40%, however, they support the revoking of article 50. there is no majority in any constituency for her deal so i don't think it would be successful in the referendum. and i think the prime minister knows that. i think this prime minister knows that. she knows that this is over now and i would not be surprised if we we re now and i would not be surprised if we were to hear a resignation announcement very we were to hear a resignation announcement very soon, even before the week is out. tomorrow? perhaps. perhaps we will hear a resignation from the prime minister tomorrow. i would not be surprised because looking at the arithmetic and looking at the arithmetic and looking at the arithmetic and looking at how views in parliament are hardening especially after last night where we had not only is there no appetite for theresa may's deal but no appetite for any other dealers an alternative. the camps are now forming and it is either no deal or it is stopping brexit.”
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are now forming and it is either no deal or it is stopping brexit. i do disagree with that because i think that no—one expected anything last night to get a majority because of the way that the birds were structured. it was yes, no—one in number of options. the significant thing will come next monday when mp5 are the chance to rank different options in preference order and there i think you could see more of a majority emerge, potentially in favour of a referendum stop we could talk... how long can we talk about this for? a long time. thank you so much forjoining us. it is 18 minutes past seven. let‘s leave brexit and go check the weather. good morning to you both. if you are just stepping out it is a chilly start for some of us with a touch of frost but high—pressure is in charge of the weather and although there will be areas of cloud around and some will remain through the afternoon, foremost we look at a day with pleasant sunshine. not a breath
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of wind in the centre of this high pressure. breezy towards the north—west of the uk but in the centre we‘re looking at dense fog patches so if you are travelling this morning that in mind. areas prone to this are devon, cornwall, through somerset, dorset and also south wales. it is not everywhere and that makes it more treacherous. with the lack of wind it will take some while before it lifts. when it does, a lot of sunshine. cloud will melt in the morning and we have some cloud on the east and south—east that could stick. in the north—west we still have cloud and you can see the odd spot of rain coming in but not as much as in recent days. there has not been a lot recently. highs from 10—16, possibly 17. as we head through the evening and overnight once again we will see the skies clear and temperatures will drop. there will be local frost and patchy mist and fog forming. whether from getting ever closer to the
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north—west at the end of the night will bring in some rain. and that is a coldweather front and as we go through the course of tomorrow it will sink a little further south. however, for the rest of scotland for northern england, wales, we are looking at a dry day with some sunshine. cloud building through the day as the weather front sinks south—east woods. behind it we have a cold front that would turn that bit fresher. ahead of it we are still in mild air and 17 or 18 somewhere in the south—east. that was different continues its journey south—east woods as we go through saturday into sunday and eventually moving across the whole of the uk and bringing cool conditions to us all. it goes during saturday. weakening all the time as it bumps into the high pressure. eventually you get the odd spot of rain in it. behind it, break conditions, sunshine and showers but some
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showers will be wintry. to lower levels in the northern isles as well. just hanging on by the skin of our teeth to high temperature in the south. by the time we reach sunday, the weather front pushes all the way down across the whole of the uk and high pressure builds in behind it. things settled down, there will be sunny skies around but for all of us it will be that little bit cooler. i would like to show you some cracking pictures from cornwall. this is drone footage of the lost gardens in cornwall and look at the rhododendrons. it is the warmest february on record so these have bloomed about one month earlier than expected. there are also some fabulous camellias to look at as well. but stepping —— talking about the rhododendrons, they are cornish red and they are
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they are cornish red and they are the largest in europe. stunning pictures and we note the beautiful sky as well but here we go. let‘s compete. this is leicestershire today. a beautiful blue sky there. perhaps a little breezy. two years ago you may remember, back in 2016 we made a promise. if 1000 viewers e—mailed in, we‘d plant 1000 trees in a new woodland in leicestershire. what has happened since then? a fabulous spot here. we are part of the national forest. it looks like we are in a field but look at the trees behind us and the national forest encompasses 200 back in 2016 bbc x. woodland was present and that is the area we are standing on now. it is even bigger now because we put the skies here doing some planting for us. there are some ambitious treeplanting targets for us. there are some ambitious treepla nting targets being for us. there are some ambitious treeplanting targets being set for england. some 11 million more trees have been promised by 2020. so is that viable? what impact could it have? do we need more tree cover in this country? i have been meeting some of the people doing the
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treeplanting as well as the person overseeing the whole project to see if it really is viable. a lesson with a long—term impact. he we will plant 375 trees as hedgerows around the school. more. trees give us oxygen. the government has announced ambitious targets for england which will form part of the northern forest. the northern forest is an initiative to plant trees over the next 25 years. the northern forest does not strictly have to be planted along the big green spaces, it can be in schools in parks and places that people use. how does it feel that in years to come you will have lots of trees here that you help to plant? it would feel very good. quite warming.
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it is daunting and it is a big challenge. last year the government made william worsley its tree champion. i have been set a challenge by government to get 11 million trees planted and 1 million urban trees in the next three years. people do not like change, so any change to a landscape worries people. we need to show people that we can do it, that we can improve the landscape and that is better than detracting from it. in 1976, enough new trees were planted to cover 28,000 hectares of land about 100 square miles. roughly an area the size of the city of york. fast forward to 2018 and treepla nting is down by almost two—thirds. last year, around 9000 hectares of new trees were planted. 35 square miles. that is an area around the size
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of the london borough of barlett. why has there been a reduction in the number of trees planted ? it‘s down to the economics of the woodland and forest industry. planting is the easy bit. but you need to manage the woods and that means thinning them and weeding them to get the trees to grow straight. william believes that targets will be met. as well as government funding the price of timber is going up so there is incentive to create more woodland. changes to our landscape that could last for generations. iam i am delighted to bejoined in this morning by the ceo of the national forest com pa ny. morning by the ceo of the national forest company. these painting targets realistic? there. 11 million isa targets realistic? there. 11 million is a lot of trees but if we have the right incentives on the right advice then we can really help our landowners to get these trees on the ground. we have done that in the national forest and we can do that across the entire country. we have a
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bunch of children helping us out, making the bbc breakfast woodland an even larger place. it is great to see them getting involved with nature. let's have a chat with the head teacher. it is important to get outdoor. we studied this in the classroom and then we come out here and it is an important thing for them to see what is going on. we have some girls here who are digging a hole... are you having fun? yes. how does it feel to be part of the process ? how does it feel to be part of the process? it feels really good because in 20 years time you will come here and see your trees growing really high. and give some support. that is fantastic to see. they are
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ambitious targets but compared to some other european countries, the amount of tree cover across the uk is comparatively low. 13% of lenders covered with trees and the average in some european countries is 35%. not everyone likes to recover. some people prefer the open space. but for many many people the benefits are widespread. where we are a you can see the national forest behind some is ancient woodland and a lot of other areas of new woodland as well. in a few years time these trees hopefully will be very big indeed. it is an inspiring sight to see so many young indeed. it is an inspiring sight to see so many young people inspired by nature. i will leave you with some photos of them hard at work. they are definitely getting involved. it is great to see. how many did you planned? is great to see. how many did you planned ? we planted is great to see. how many did you planned? we planted quite a few. the kids really did get involved. the evidence as we did ok because they still exist. they are still growing and that is good. plenty to come this morning. coming up on bbc brea kfast this morning. coming up on bbc breakfast is the... the wonderful hugh jackman. if i breakfast is the... the wonderful hughjackman. if i may say so
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myself. and he would know. telling is all about the success of the greatest showman and about starring ina new greatest showman and about starring in a new animation film. time out of the news, travel and weather where you are. —— time now for the news. good morning from bbc london news. a man‘s been arrested on suspicion of the murder of a shopkeeper outside his newsagents in north west london. 54—year—old father of 2, ravi katharkamar, was stabbed to death during a robbery as he opened the marsh food and wine store in pinner last sunday morning. police say a 44—year—old man was detained in harrow last night. some of the capital‘s boat operators claim they could be forced out of business if new safety regulations are passed. the maritime and coastguard agency is consulting on plans to narrow the gap in safety standards between older boats and newer vessels. but some companies who operate on the river thames believe the proposals are disproportionate and would be too costly to implement. the government agency says it has a duty to keep
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the travelling public safe. most tram services in south london will be cancelled today due to a strike by drivers. last week members of the union aslef voted to walk out in a dispute over pay. transport for london said it‘s put a contingency plan in place, with a limited service and urged the union and operator to continue talks. the baby on board badges worn by mums—to—be have been given a makeover. six new designs have been created and will be available for free in time for mother‘s day. the project aims to help pregnant women feel more visible. it‘s after research by family site hoop found almost half of expectant mums in london feel overlooked on public transport. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. there‘s a good service on the tubes this morning.
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heading between stratford and forest gate, the a118 romford road is blocked at warwick road, following an accident near the travel inn. in central london tottenham court road is down to 2 lanes northbound from goodge street towards warren st station for resurfacing works. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello and good morning. another quiet day of weather today and there should be lots of sunshine developing for most of us. it is a cloudy start, particularly towards eastern areas where we will keep the cloud for longest but because of the cloud it stopped the heat radiating away so it is a mild start this morning. between 7 and 9 celsius. the best of the sunshine today towards the west and central areas of the capital. when we get the best of that sunshine and we get highs 16. further east across parts of essex and kent we could keep the cloud for much of the day but it will also brighten up at times. overnight tonight it is set to feel colder. we could see cold spells around
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and it will stay dry. in some spots temperatures could drop low enough to get a touch of frost into tomorrow morning. it is set to stay dry for the rest of the weekend. 17 celsius in the best of the sunny spells tomorrow. 16 degrees on saturday with some more spells of sunshine but things will turn cooler and cloudier by the end of the weekend. and i will be back with the latest in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address and we will see you soon. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main stories from bbc news. theresa may has told backbench conservatives that she‘ll resign, providing they support her brexit deal. mrs may didn‘t set a date for her departure. it came as mp5 seized control of the commons agenda to hold a series of votes on alternatives to the prime minister‘s deal, including the possibility of another referendum. but all eight options were rejected.
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so, in the event the prime minister does stand down, who could be in line for the top job? let‘s speak to our political correspondent ben wright, who‘s in westminster for us. it is worth saying, before we go through who might be up for the job, there is quite a big if as to whether or not, for the foreseeable future, there will be a job. there are many ifs around here at the moment. theresa may was explicit that if the deal goes through that she won‘t be around for the second phase of the brexit negotiations, there would be a leadership contest throughout the summer, in time for the conservative party conference in the conservative party conference in the autumn. but in reality, if this deal doesn‘t go through or they try again and it fails, then her diminished political capital is then spent and we would be looking at a change of leader anyway. this is the reason why tory mp5 are now jockeying for position in earnest. they know there will be a new prime
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minister, probably within a matter of months. there are names everyone is talking about, for instance, michael gove, the environment secretary, back to leave in the referendum but has enthusiastically been supporting the prime minister‘s deal. borisjohnson, been supporting the prime minister‘s deal. boris johnson, former been supporting the prime minister‘s deal. borisjohnson, former foreign secretary, fiercely opposed theresa may‘s deal but came round to it last night when theresa may announced she not be sticking around. jeremy hunt, the foreign secretary, former health secretary, a remain in the referendum but has since been quite enthusiastic about brexit. so has sajid javid, the home secretary, who undoubtedly would have a crack at thejob as undoubtedly would have a crack at the job as well. there is undoubtedly would have a crack at thejob as well. there is dominic raab, the brexit secretary until he quit in november. i think he is on manoeuvres. andrea leadsom, who stood against theresa may last time around, ithink stood against theresa may last time around, i think she would have another go. i think you could add to the list as well. amber rudd, the work and pensions secretary, maybe esther mcvey, a former member of the cabinet who said the other day that
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people encouraged her to stand she would. they are starting to jockeying for position. the process works like this. mp5, tory mp5 would have to whittle down the contenders to just two and then they would go to just two and then they would go toa to just two and then they would go to a ballot of the water tory membership of about 100,000 people and they would potentially have the job of picking the next prime minister. one last thought, if you would, what is happening there today? what will happen in the chamber today? to be honest, i am not sure. the main thing we are doing today is waiting to see if tomorrow will be the day that they bring this deal back. there aren‘t going to be any indicative of votes today. talks about alternative brexit ‘s. today. talks about alternative brexit ‘5. there waiting to see if the government will risk trying to bring it steel but by the end the week to guarantee brexit can happen by april 22 —— deal. my hunch is that the numbers are not there and they will not risk. thank you very much. we will talk to you later on.
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dust and debris from the grenfell tower fire has polluted the surrounding area, resulting in levels of toxic chemicals many times higher than normal, according to new research. soil samples collected from the site contained substances which could cause cancer and asthma. the government said the risk to health was very low, but more studies have been commissioned. the probation model introduced by the government four years ago under which low and medium risk offenders are monitored by private companies is irredeemably flawed. and hit by staff shortages and poor performance. a painting believed to have been a fake for 100 years, has turned out to be a genuine masterpiece. this work by sandro botticelli, was assumed to be an imitation of the italian artist‘s famous madonna of the pomegranate. but during cleaning, it was discovered to be a rare, smaller version of the
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15th—century painting. now that is a surprise to have. my goodness. that is the news you want. sometimes you have the reverse when people think they have the real thing and it is a fake of the years and years where is the pomegranate? i don‘t know. i could not see it. madonna of the pomegranate. what have you got for us happy news if you are a chelsea fan. they left it very late, but chelsea are through to the semi—finals of the women‘s champions league for a second successive season. they actually lost on the night to paris saint—germain, but went through on aggregate, as ben croucher reports. chelsea are into the semi—finals... when you reach the women‘s champions league semi—finals it means a lot, when you get through like chelsea did it makes it all the sweeter. they were unfancied against the french, paris saint—germain‘s fans provided a hostile atmosphere, the players cranked it up.
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trailing 2—0 from the first leg, kadidiatou diani halved the deficit. it was the flashpoint to ignite the tie. through the haze, ann—katrin berger‘s judgement became clouded. a routine corner with the most calamitous of outcomes. 2—2 on aggregate. into injury time, chelsea pushed forward — top right. maren mjelde‘s not even in shot. can you see her? can you see her now? the goal that sent chelsea into a semi—final against holders lyon, another european night to savour for english football. ben croucher, bbc news. we are at a level now where we can get into a position where we can fight to get into the final. we are not the favourites, we are not expected to go through. so there is no pressure on my team. but we want this game. staying with chelsea, they‘ve offered counselling to callum hudson—odoi after he was targeted by racist abuse twice injust 11 days. the 18—year—old heard monkey chants during chelsea‘s europa league match at dynamo kiev earlier this month, then he was one of several england players abused during their 5—1 win
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over montenegro on monday. one of the most influential men in english football, gordon taylor, is going to step down as the boss of the professional footballers‘ association. the 7a—year—old has lead the players‘ union for almost a0 years, and he‘ll leave after a "full and open review" into the organisation‘s finances. taylor is well paid, earning more than £2 million a year. but he‘d become a divisive figure in recent years, with many players calling for him to quit. the masters, golf‘s first major of the season, starts two weeks today, and rory mcilroy is hitting form atjust the right time. he won the players championship ten days ago, and he‘s started very well at the wgc matchplay in texas too. he comfortably beat luke list, five and four. there were wins too forjustin rose and tommy fleetwood. it‘s the final match of england women‘s tour to sri lanka and they‘ve only gone and smashed
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a record t20 international score in the country. danni wyatt and amyjones both scored fifties as england clubbed 20a for 2 in their 20 overs — their second highest total ever. the hosts fell well short as england won by 96 runs. roger federer was as his imperious best as he progressed to the quarter—finals of the miami open. the 20—time grand slam winner took just one hour and one minute to beat russia‘s danil medvedev in straight sets. he‘ll play wimbledon finalist kevin anderson next. this is to cheer you all up. the captain of galatasaray‘s under—1a team in turkey has given everyone a lesson in sportsmanship, by deliberately missing a penalty. this is 13—year—old beknaz almazbekov. he was given a penalty after appearing to be fouled. but he was very honest, and knew that he‘d gone down very easily. he was really honest. because the penalty had already been awarded it had to be taken, so he decided to kick it wide on purpose.
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he got his rewards, as his side won 3—0. isn‘t that... they won anyway. isn‘t that a gorgeous thing to do? makes it more of a gentleman‘s sport, ladies‘ sport. it more of a gentleman‘s sport, ladies' sport. what you suggesting it might not be? we need to talk. i don‘t think it is. it might not be? we need to talk. i don't think it is. it is 7:40 a.m.. we‘re going to introduce you now to one ofjust two people in the world to be diagnosed with a rare genetic mutation, which means they feel virtually no pain or anxiety. jo cameron only realised she was different a couple of years ago, and it‘s hoped her experience can help contribute to research on pain relief. jojoins us now, along withjohn wood, a professor in pain genetics, who‘s in our london newsroom. good morning to you. jo, tell us your story. just a couple of years ago... how old are you now?” your story. just a couple of years ago... how old are you now? i am 71
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now. i was 65. i ago... how old are you now? i am 71 now. iwas 65. i had just ago... how old are you now? i am 71 now. i was 65. i had just retired from work. i had a recurring problem with my hip. no pain, but my daughter noticed i was walking peculiarly. limping? not limping. my gator change. every now and then my hip would go down. i was persuaded to go to the gp. i went to the gp and said you obviously have arthritis, how much pain you in? i said no pain. and he said there was no point in referring me because they won‘t do anything if there is no pain. my gate was not tremendously different, but my daughter noticed it was different. we would do normal things, and every so we would do normal things, and every so often there would be a jolt. i thought that is not normal. but it was nothing. because there was no pain involved, i just was nothing. because there was no pain involved, ijust thought something funny is happening. but the gp eventually, after about two yea rs, the gp eventually, after about two years, but me to hospital. the first thing they said, before they did
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x—rays are anything, and they asked how far i could walk. i said until it goes down. and they asked me how much pain! it goes down. and they asked me how much pain i was in and i said none and they said we can‘t do anything until you get pain. that happened three times. the third time they gave me an x—ray, thing just to get rid of me. when they saw make it was ina rid of me. when they saw make it was in a dreadful state they operated. they could not understand why i had no pain. to be clear on the painting, for example, if i have a scalding hot mug of tea or something, to the point i cannot hold it and instantly drop it, if i we re hold it and instantly drop it, if i were to hand it to you?” hold it and instantly drop it, if i were to hand it to you? i would hold it. so if it were a frying pan or something it could be dangerously hot and you would be able to just hold on and feel nothing?” hot and you would be able to just hold on and feel nothing? i will show you this. this is my recent thing. idrink show you this. this is my recent thing. i drink black coffee. i was carrying a couple of really scalding hot coffee upstairs and i had a thick sweater on. i think i must have spilt some onto mostly. had not realised. and then it felt wet. this
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was about a month into it. i did not realise until i took my sweater off in the evening that i had badly scalded my hand. this sweater had kept the heat on my arm, so it was quite an intense bone. i had not noticed it. i have a rayburn at home and quite often cooking and i put my arm across and don‘t realise they have but myself until i can smell, you know, burning flesh. because the houseis you know, burning flesh. because the house is a big and household, burning flesh is an obvious... that isn‘t a joke. it is not a joke. burning flesh is an obvious... that isn't a joke. it is not a joke. let us go to the professor. professor john wood. there is huge curiosity. people hearing jo recount that. as a scientist, what have you learned about the possible cause?m scientist, what have you learned about the possible cause? it is a very exciting story. i thinkjo's experiences show how useful pain is in stopping us from we in stopping us from self—harming. we have found a new genetic mechanism
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that seems to regulate pain thresholds. what we hope to do in the future is exploit this knowledge to develop new treatments for the millions of people who suffer ongoing chronic pain, which is different from the acute pain that jo has been describing. which is a massive clinical problem. about 70% of the 7% of the population have appalling pain. i bet you follow the news about the opioid crisis in the united states. there is a pressing need for new treatments. an jo's unique condition and the genetic mechanisms that underpin it give us clues about how we can develop new ways of making pain drugs. and, of course, you say this is genetic. so you would be trying to change our genetics how? how would that work if it is not pharmaceutical, if you see what i mean? this is a very good point. this was carried out by a brilliant geneticist called james cox. what is becoming more mainstream now is the technique of
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gene therapy. so you can manipulate genes in people by delivering modified genes with viruses. this kind of technology is being used in things like epilepsy and it has huge potential in treating pain. so there have been enormous efforts to make pills that will block pain and tremendous failures. most of the pharmaceutical industry are bailed out of pain research because of these expensive failures. we are banking on using gene therapy in the near future. perhaps to mimic the kind of condition that jo has. completely when was the last time you remember feeling pain? has itjust always been... as a child? as a child when i was eight apparently i felt and bumped my arm and that was it. i had broken my arm and two days later my
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mother noticed my arm was in a weird position. and i told mum i broke my arm. i obviously could not feel pain then. the thing is for me, and you don‘t question how you are. you are just you and as you are you ijust thought well, maybe... maybe i haven‘t been ill. i‘m very healthy. so that is why i don‘t feel pain. this also applies for anxiety. so you don't ever feel anxious, panicked about anything?” you don't ever feel anxious, panicked about anything? i dry people mad. you have been in a car accident and not felt the fear or anxiety. if other people are driving, they talk about having an adrenaline rush which obviously i have been told heightens your awareness of what is going on. i don‘t get that. awareness of what is going on. i don't get that. so your personality... i suppose your level of content is phenomenal. and i'm
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not cold. i'm emotional. but this thing called an adrenaline rush, i don‘t have it. i do hear about it. have you been on a rollercoaster? no. they make me feel sick. but it is not fear, it is just a sickness. people ask me questions now that i have to think about before, because it never dawned on me until tuesday when people started asking me questions. it is curious. joe explains it perfectly. you feel no pain and yet at the same time there is clearly an emotional element to this which is caught up in some of the work you are doing? exactly. what is exciting about this condition is that she has high levels of endo cannabinoids,. there is a euphoric quality to these drugs. joe
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has some kind of metabolism that mimics aspects of cannabis use. and thatis mimics aspects of cannabis use. and that is one of the ways in which pain has been controlled. thank you. it has been very good talking to you. joe just told us that she is just stupidly happy. some people would be envious but as you described, there is a real risk as well. you have three children, don't you? sorry, well. you have three children, don't you ? sorry, two well. you have three children, don't you? sorry, two children. natural childbirth? yes. but! you? sorry, two children. natural childbirth? yes. but i was talking to my husband about it the other day andi to my husband about it the other day and i said you remember me saying to you after i had my children, i knew you after i had my children, i knew you would have pain, people spoke about it and i kept asking if i want to drugs. i told them i would have
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it when it became unbearable but it never happened. i was expecting pain, whatever pain was. when people talk about how excruciating childbirth is. i went into it thinking that i will ask when i needed and i didn‘t need it i did not ask. and thank you very much. and keep well. be careful. my husband watches me all the time now to make sure... but i do still burn myself. i often have bruises, it does look like he knocks me around. thank goodness he does not. that is good. normally we say to guests to be careful as they walk out... a joy talking to you. thank you for explaining it so clearly as well. here‘s carol with a look at this morning‘s weather. have you heard of anything like this? can you imagine a pain and anxiety free life? you could fix the weather a little more often you could make that happen for us. that
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is amazing. good morning everyone. this morning it is a chilly start to the day. for some of the therapeutic pockets of frost around with patchy fog, more that in a second. high pressure is in charge of our weather so pressure is in charge of our weather so things are fairly settled. at the moment we have cloud in the west and also the east. some of that will melt away and we will see a fair bit of sunshine. first thing this morning if you are travelling, watch out for some dense fog patches, particularly so across parts of cornwall, devon, somerset, dorset and south wales. there is no wind to move this along quickly so it will be slow to lift but when it does lift later in the day we will see sunshine. cloud in the west tending to melt away through the day. cloud in the east mostly retreating into the south—east where it could linger. the north—west of scotland once again going to a little more cloud and a chance you could see an old spot of rain coming from that. only a small chance. temperatures
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ten to 16. the london area 17. as we had through the evening and overnight once again a lot of clear skies with pockets of frost and patching mist and fog forming. and a weather front starting to show its hand across the far north—west of scotland. by the end of the night it will bring in some rain. so that is a particularly important with a front for us. it is a cold front. it won‘t make a huge amount of progress south—east woods tomorrow but it will get as far as great glen. behind it we will begin to see fresh conditions coming our way. ahead of it there is still a lot of dry and mild weather. some sunshine with highs of 17 or 18. through the day is that weather front advances south—east woods after a grey start in northern ireland you will see the cloud build. there is the weather front in question on friday. watch how it slowly sinks southwards during the course of saturday and then blew returns to the charge
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indicating more of us will be in cool there was a cool side of the weather front. for scotland and northern ireland it be sunshine and showers. snow in the hills of scotla nd showers. snow in the hills of scotland but even at lower levels across the northern isles. ahead of this the cloud will build but we‘re looking at highs of around 15 so still in the mild side. through saturday into sunday eventually this conferencing is all the way south and high pressure builds in behind. things will settle down and leaving afair bit things will settle down and leaving a fair bit of sunshine for many on sunday, albeit with some high cloud. you will notice the ride across the board it will turn cooler than it has been. gone are the 16th 17th and 18th and we return to 11 and 12. the northern isles will reach five degrees. thank you so much, carol. ben‘s in the city of london for us this morning, looking at how the financial services sector is preparing for brexit.
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this code is on, coats off... carol was explaining that it was one of those days where it will warm up but i notice you have been taking your coat on and off. carol also explains that when the sun rises it gets colder. that is to do with the way the wind works. she could give a more scientific description than i but we have discussed this at length because it does get colder as it gets lighter. a glorious view across the city of london today. talking about financial services on the next stop of our road trip because we‘re looking at all sorts of different sectors and how it can be affected by brexit. financial services include things like insurance, banking, accountants. one of our biggest exports employing 2 million people across the country. two—thirds of those jobs are not in the city of london, they are spread out across the country even though we tend to think that this is the
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financial heartland of the uk. what happens next as far as chaos in westminster is concerned in what could a man for the jobs westminster is concerned in what could a man for thejobs in westminster is concerned in what could a man for the jobs in the investment the concept? we have two people here to shed some light on that and they join people here to shed some light on that and theyjoin me this morning. one isa that and theyjoin me this morning. one is a portfolio manager and the other is the chief executive of city uk. now we look at the city of london and we look at where the jobs and investments are. what is the city telling us about brexit right now? there had been a lot of assets that have moved out of the uk, mainly custody. so assets of european companies. they have not been a lot ofjobs that moved. the reason for that is that london still has a great ecosystem of advising brokers and accountants and insurance. london also has a really great business climate. the uk in general has great laws. and i think london will remain a financial centre london will remain a financial ce ntre eve n london will remain a financial centre even once we get through all
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of this. myles, we saw the headlines saying that 500,000 jobs will leave the uk and overseas if we bow to leave the eu but they were scare stories, won‘t they? leave the eu but they were scare stories, won't they? i think the jobs have always been a red herring. we never said it would be anything of that sort of scale. our view has always been the worst case is about 75,000. about 7- 10,000 have always been the worst case is about 75,000. about 7— 10,000 have moved. it is about where the assets are going over the long—term about maintaining competitiveness. and thatis maintaining competitiveness. and that is about holding onto critical links and people. can we hold onto people? business is maybe not moving people? business is maybe not moving people but money is going overseas. we make sure the uk remains a place where people want to do business? it is about our laws and remaining open to the outside world and companies will adapt to what business needs. we have a ready seen what business needs. we have a ready seen banks and insurers putting money into preparing for brexit no matter what happens in their duty is
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to keep the financial planning in place. that companies can still access place. that companies can still a ccess cas h place. that companies can still access cash and help their clients. although circumstances that are still without answers. for now, thank you to you both. that is the current state of play. wait and see, as always, as far as business is concerned. as we had last night in westminster there are still no a nswe rs westminster there are still no answers that will make any difference here. more from me after eight o‘clock. now for the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news. a man‘s been arrested on suspicion of the murder of a shopkeeper outside his newsagents in north west london. 5a—year—old father of 2, ravi katharkamar, was stabbed to death during a robbery as he opened the marsh food and wine store in pinner last sunday morning.
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police say a aa—year—old man was detained in harrow last night. some of the capital‘s boat operators claim they could be forced out of business if new safety regulations are passed. the maritime and coastguard agency is consulting on plans to narrow the gap in safety standards between older boats and newer vessels. but some companies who operate on the river thames believe the proposals are disproportionate and would be too costly to implement. the government agency says it has a duty to keep the travelling public safe. most tram services in south london will be cancelled today due to a strike by drivers. last week members of the union aslef voted to walk out in a dispute over pay. transport for london said it‘s put a contingency plan in place, with a limited service and urged the union and operator to continue talks. the baby on board badges worn by mums—to—be have been given a makeover. six new designs have been created and will be available for free in time for mother‘s day. the project aims to help pregnant
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women feel more visible. it‘s after research by family site hoop found almost half of expectant mums in london feel overlooked on public transport. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now: there‘s a good service on the tubes this morning. northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern it is also slow on wapping through tower hill. romney roads continue for emergency water works on romney roadin for emergency water works on romney road in central london, tottenham court road is down to two lanes. that is for resurfacing. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini.
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hello and good morning. another quiet day of weather today and there should be lots of sunshine developing for most of us. it is a cloudy start, particularly towards eastern areas where we will keep the cloud for longest but because of the cloud it stopped the heat radiating away so it is a mild start this morning. between 7 and 9 celsius. the best of the sunshine today towards the west and central areas of the capital. when we get the best of that sunshine and we get highs 16. further east across parts of essex and kent we could keep the cloud for much of the day but it will also brighten up at times. overnight tonight it is set to feel colder. we could see cold spells around and it will stay dry. in some spots temperatures could drop low enough to get a touch of frost into tomorrow morning. it is set to stay dry for the rest of the weekend. 17 celsius in the best of the sunny spells tomorrow. 16 degrees on saturday with some more spells of sunshine but things will turn cooler and cloudier by the end of the weekend. and i will be back with the latest in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address.
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