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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 29, 2019 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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this is business live from bbc news with maryam moshiri and jamie robertson. lift off for lyft: the ride—hailing app gets ready to makes its stock market debut ahead of its arch rival uber. live from london, that's our top story on friday 29th march. good morning. runaway investor demand welcome to breakfast with me, charlie stayt, in westminster. is expected to make it on the day the uk was supposed to leave the european union, a blockbuster launch but the question remains, will parliament finally when will lyft start agree on a brexit plan? making any actual money? mps will vote again today on part also in the programme... crisis? what crisis? of theresa may's deal. chinese telecoms giant huawei shrugs off its row with the us if it doesn't pass, they have just to post stellar profits. two weeks to come up with another plan. i'm naga munchetty. also today: more than 20,000 people attend a national remembrance service in christchurch for the 50 people shot dead in two mosques a fortnight ago.
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20 years after the murder of the television presenter jill dando, the detective who led the investigation tells the bbc her case will never be solved. doi do i think somebody will come back to court? probably not, no. good morning. how should city centres improve air quality for all of us and is it right the drivers pay? iam of us and is it right the drivers pay? i am in of us and is it right the drivers pay? iam in nottingham of us and is it right the drivers pay? i am in nottingham this morning, looking at one controversial scheme. good morning. it's the ultimate dream come true for the new permanent manchester united manager. 0le gunnar solskjaer has been rewarded for the job he's done as stand—in boss, and has been handed a three year deal. good morning and i am in the cotswolds farm park this morning. it is the start of british summertime, but it will feel like spring at the end of it. lots of sunshine for many. join me later in the programme
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for all the details. good morning. it's friday the 29th of march. today, of course is the day the uk was due to leave the eu. we're live in westminster this morning, as theresa may prepares another attempt to get mps to back her brexit deal. this time, they will only be voting on one half of her proposal. if it doesn't pass, they have just two weeks to come up with another plan. 0ur political correspondent iain watson has more on the prime minister's latest change of tactic. this was the day when britain was due to leave the opinion but instead, theresa may is trying to break the deadlock over deal. she used to say no deal is better than a bad deal. today her message to mps is, in effect, half a deal is better than no deal. she has already had two defeats, so she is trying a different approach. she is splitting
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the bill into, mps will vote on the withdrawal agreement or divorce bill, that settles a leading bill of £39 billion and guarantees citizens‘s right. mps will not vote on the political declaration on our future relationship with the eu. the government says if the ball agreement alone goes through, the eu will extend brexit to may 22 but if it doesn't. .. we will extend brexit to may 22 but if it doesn't... we would have until the 12th of april to explain to the eu what on earth happens next and that takes us into another soft that brexit or not leaving the eu at all oi’ brexit or not leaving the eu at all or potentially general election. but labour will not back even the strip down deal. what the prime minister has tried to do is do something that she denied she would do on the 14th of january, and that is separate the withdrawal agreement from the political declaration for the future arrangements. well, you cannot separate them because otherwise, you move into a blindfold brexit on the basis of the withdrawal agreement. and the usual allies, northern
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ireland's dup, say they will not support the prime minister either. so instead of leaving the eu today, how, if exactly when brexit will ta ke how, if exactly when brexit will take place remains uncertain. ben wright will be with me all morning. good morning to use. good morning, charlie. it is interesting, this was supposed to have been a really sizing day in british politics and yet here we are and it is a different kind of days. the two yea rs, different kind of days. the two years , we different kind of days. the two yea rs, we have different kind of days. the two years, we have been talking about the fact that this is supposed to be brexit dave, since the prime minister triggered article 50, triggering the brexit process. —— brexit day. the deal keeps getting rejected by mps for a whole variety of reasons, so we are now into extension territory and government and the parliaments are trying to find their way through this impasse. talk as to what is a pretty confusing day today, around 9:30am they will be sitting, but it is
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about half a deal that they vote on. it is probably about that much of the deal, it is 585 pages of the withdrawal agreement, the guts of the treaty that they have organised that you are right, they have also sliced off the small bit looking at the future relationship the uk and the future relationship the uk and the eu want to try and sort out later on. the government is saying that, it is the divorce agreement that, it is the divorce agreement that that you want is to surpass and that that you want is to surpass and that covers citizen's right after brexit, it covers the divorce bill, £39 billion, crucially what happens in northern ireland, the backstop. as they are telling mps, past this now and we will bank brexit, will banka now and we will bank brexit, will bank a transition period two years after, while those negotiations carry on and we can all start to move carry on and we can all start to m ove o nto carry on and we can all start to move onto bit. at some point, they would still have to pass the political declaration, as it is called, but that is ruse today. pass the divorce agreement and it might be enough for the eu too. i'm going to give you my first wire why
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question, why does theresa may think that this 2.5, i do not know what we're calling it now, why does she think that this would pass when it did not previously? i think it is partly because they had taken out the most controversial part of this deal, which is the? around the future relationship. —— why oh why. there is a massive argument going on around westminster now, should be in the customs union, should we be in a much closer relationship to the eu, she is saying how that argument later on, let's just pass the divorce agreement and get on with brexit, and i think the government their symbolism about doing it on this day, the day on which were meant to leave. i think it is putting pressure on the hardliners, ona putting pressure on the hardliners, on a day that we were meant to be leaving the european union and putting pressure on labour too, and i think she is going to be trying to put pressure on them to honour brexit. she lost by 139 weeks ago,
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thatis brexit. she lost by 139 weeks ago, that is certainly going to come down but the dup certainly oppose this deal, so do labour and so to a number of conservative mps, so i think it is going to be difficult to get past. you are going to be with us get past. you are going to be with us throughout the morning. thank you for that. naga munchetty, us throughout the morning. thank you forthat. naga munchetty, i us throughout the morning. thank you for that. naga munchetty, iwill hand back to you with the rest of the day's news. thank you, charlie. more than 20,000 people have attended an open air service in christchurch to remember the 50 people shot dead by a gunman in two mosques. new zealand prime ministerjacinda ardern was greeted with a standing ovation as she condemned what she called a "vicious cycle of extremism". our new zealand correspondent hywel griffith reports. linda susan armstrong. the names of the fallen, the 50 came to pay, as
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new zealand remembered the victims of the mosque shootings, its prime minister called on the nation to stay united, far beyond these days of mourning. we will remember the tea rs of of mourning. we will remember the tears of our nation and the new resolve we have formed and we remember that ours is a home that does not and cannot claim perfection, but we can strive to be true to the words embedded in our national anthem. two weeks ago, parts of this park were crime scene. today, it was a scene of reflection and resilience. this man was shot in the back as he hugged his son, shielding him from the bullets. he watched the gunman walk around the mosque, hunting down the living. but he tells me the legacy of that day will be love, not hate. the shooter, if you could imagine that this would happen, he would never shoot us. we became more unified and the
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community is one, you feel that christchurch is one city, new zealand one country and, by the way, i'm sure it will change the world. the al noor mosque has now been reclaimed as a place of worship, rather than fear. armed police officers still stand guard over the city as it tries to recover, to heal. hywel griffith, bbc news, christchurch. the detective who led the investigation intojill dando's murder has told the bbc her case will never be solved. in a documentary to mark 20 years since the presenter was shot outside her home in fulham, hamish campbell said he did not think any new suspects would be brought to court. barry george was jailed for the murder but was acquitted and released after a re—trial. sometimes i felt we were a day away from solving it and other times, i thought no, we're a long way away. the senior officers, they were
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asking what are the likelihoods of this case being resolved? so i think —— do this case being resolved? so i think ——doi this case being resolved? so i think —— do i think somebody will come back to court? probably not, no. would you think someone you might come to court? no. both members of the liverpool band her‘s, and its tour manager, have been killed in a car accident in the united states. stephen fitzpatrick and aidun lawding, as well as manager trevor engelbrektson, died while travelling to a gig the band's record label described them as "one of the country's most loved, up—and—coming bands". now, the current system of checking new—born babies for hip problems in england is failing, resulting in too many late diagnoses and corrective surgery. a new study by surgeons from southampton children's hospital said the rate of late diagnoses had not improved since screening started, more than 30 years ago.
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duncan kennedy has more. she is only seven years old but she has already had two operations on her left hip. stand on the other leg, that is perfect... she has a condition called hip dysplasia, whether ball—and—socket joints have not formed properly. how uncomfortable was it, how much pain was there? there was not much pain that there was some and... it was comfy when i was walking, actually, because i like hopping. well, it is horrible really. they should have find out as a baby, like a tiny newborn baby really and then she would not have had to go through what she has had. hip dysplasia affects thousands of children, can easily be treated if it is picked up early. if it isn't, that means surgery. screening programme to it was introduced in england in 1986, but today's new research from the university of south and says
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hundreds of children are being diagnosed too late. —— southampton. what we wanted to highlight is just how many children there are that i missed, despite the current national selective screening programme for something that actually is so readily and easily treatable and the scene. some are calling for universal screening of all babies, the public health england say that could cause more harm. for leah, it took surgery to make her more mobile after yea rs of took surgery to make her more mobile after years of discomfort and worry. rom close—ups of the earth's largest fish, — the whale shark — to stingrays swimming in the bahamas, blue planet live delivered more stunning images of ocean life last night. we even got to see turtles enjoying a bit of a deep sea spa day. in case you missed it — here are green turtles in australia at cleaning stations, areas where aquatic life gathers
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to be cleaned by smaller creatures. they do this by removing dead skin, bacteria, and parasites from their‘clients. blue planet live concludes on bbc one on sunday night. what do you think about that? that is turtle camp. beautiful. i was watching the other night and they we re watching the other night and they were doing a live broadcast from somewhere, i think of mexico, surrounded by about 30 sharks. big shock. and he felt fine about it? yeah, but he was talking about it and doing it live, and then they sent into australia live. we are very privileged to get all those lovely pictures. i tell you what, do you think manchester united fans feel privileged? i think they do. it was a bit of a dream when 0le gunnar solskjaer got thejob on was a bit of a dream when 0le gunnar solskjaer got the job on a part—time basis, has it worked? talk about great auditions. in that smile of his, idid great auditions. in that smile of his, i did not think it could. his smile isjust so broad, it is great.
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that is why he was called the baby faced assassin, he can leave into a false sense of security. he says that it is his ultimate dream, after the cloud made his position permanent. the former united striker has signed a three—year contract, having arrived on an interim basis, in december to replace jose mourinho. great britain's four—man bobsleigh team have been awarded a bronze medal from the 2014 sochi winter olympics. they came fifth at the time, but two russian crews have been disqualified for doping. rory mcllroy made it two wins from two, at golf‘s w.g.c match play in texas, beating south africa'sjustin harding. justin rose is also unbeaten. britain's adam yates is still in second place, after the fourth day of the volta
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a catalunya in spain. he's just 1a seconds behind new leader, miguel angel lopez. ina in a moment, in the papers, why age is just in a moment, in the papers, why age isjust a in a moment, in the papers, why age is just a number. in a moment, in the papers, why age isjust a number. i was going to say, you look... do you remember goat yoga? i do remember that, but this is matt. goat yoga is very therapeutic, mike felt very relaxed. i think that you should try it late in the programme. —— later. we do not seem to be enjoying this. you do not seem to be enjoying this. you do not seem to be enjoying that goat. do you know what? so it and run to a different position. not the goat, though the food and run to a different position. it is too big to sew, definitely. thank you very much. very good morning. we at cotswold farm much. very good morning. we at cotswold fa rm park much. very good morning. we at cotswold farm park this morning, established by adam hansen's dad backin established by adam hansen's dad back in 1981, full of rare breed such as these gorgeous ones here. i will be taking a look around to the
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morning, there are some lambs that have been born in the we all need a little bit of cuteness at the moment. a bit of a son tries to make sunrise coming up. a fine start to the day. as we take a look into the week, some changes. but sunrise. it should be fine to get out but you will notice things are about to turn a substantially cooler. through the north—east of scotland, they will be a lot of change is the next few days. the yellows, warmer colours across the country at the moment getting squeezed out through the weekend. northerly winds developed through saturday and saturday night and that will introduce chilly air which will last into next week. the fog is the issue across south—west england, pretty dense in places. it will come and go. away from that, a touch of
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frost here and there. a fair bit of sunshine. we will see more cloud across the north and west of scotla nd across the north and west of scotland throughout today which will bring outbreaks of rain and starting to feel a bit cooler for the far north of scotland. the rest of the country in the teens as well. the heavy front in scotland will work southwards. eventually northern ireland by the end of the night. a bit of fog across england and wales. most will start the day dry on saturday. still the sunshine once the fog clears. the cloudier conditions are going. to the south, 18 celsius. to the north, five
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degrees in lerwick. it will be a frosty start for all. on sunday. light winds. a good day to get out for a walk on sunday. more cloud in southern counties. wales can't rule out a spot of light rain. there will bea out a spot of light rain. there will be a bit of cloud bubbling up through the day. of course, on sunday, we started british summertime. i hate to say it, mums, and our less summertime. i hate to say it, mums, and ourless in summertime. i hate to say it, mums, and our less in bed. ——an hour less. just take the extra hour anyway. that's what i do. look over your right shoulder. every time you turn around, he thinks you are not
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staring at you. —— every time you turn around he pretends he is not looking. see you later, matt. let's take a look at today's papers. "you've got one last chance" is the daily mail's message to mp5, as they prepare to vote once again on the withdrawal agreement theresa may struck with brussels. the guardian says the deal is still unlikely to win support in the commons, and quotes an anonymous conservative source demanding theresa may step down now. the picture is environment secretary michael gove — apparently the bookies favourite to take over as pm. the daily mirror leads on an interview with the detective who led the investigation into the 1999 murder of newsreader jill dando. the paper quotes hamish campbell saying he believes her killer will never be brought to justice. the times says the eu is preparing for a year—long extension to article 50. the picture is of the stars of bbc
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thriller ‘killing eve', which has received 1a bafta nominations. wright charlie is not here with me this morning. he will be bringing you the latest. —— charlie is not here. he is in westminster. here it is, why age is notjust a number. he first picked up a tennis racket. at age 12. he has become the world number one at age a2. the world doubles over 85 ‘s. ——he is 80 but he picked up a tennis racket at age
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a2. there how long can you hold your breath underwater?” a2. there how long can you hold your breath underwater? i can't really say i've tried. you can train your mind to relax. i was training with someone and i got taught to relax. do it with close supervision, of course. this man has broken the world record for free diving under the ice. in the norwegian fjords, he went down to 70 metres. he can hold his breath underwater for eight minutes. mind boggling. his breath underwater for eight minutes. mind bogglingm his breath underwater for eight minutes. mind boggling. it makes you think these people have huge logs but a lot of it is mind? does make lungs. but you have to get to a
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relaxed state. i don't know if i could shut my mind down if i was in this car. you would think this is photoshopped. it's not. this is the car that simba drives in. he is treated like a pussycat. he is 26 months old and he was abandoned by his mother on theirfarm months old and he was abandoned by his mother on their farm so they just said they have him and he liked cuddles. i hope he is wearing the l plates. 0h. lfor lion. this is cuddles. i hope he is wearing the l plates. 0h. l for lion. this is the perfect moment to get rid of whatever this is and go to charlie. charlie, lots not going on. good
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morning. welcome back to westminster. we will have another debate and i'm sorry if you are already wary of that. you are not alone. we will talk more about it throughout the morning. it's always worth thinking about how things are received and peoples communities, in their homes, within their families and friends. all the time that has passed since the referendum result itself, there has been an organisation about what it will mean in the end. graham satchel has been looking at ways in which people are looking at ways in which people are looking to heal some of those wounds. i think the country is divided in a way i don't think i've seen in my lifetime. we are in boston where 75,
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6%, voted to leave. it's the highest in the country. i'm from london. we we re in the country. i'm from london. we were the highest in the country to vote remain. how much cooking do you actually do? (laughs). ivoted vote remain. how much cooking do you actually do? (laughs). i voted to leave because boston had had around about 15,000 eastern europeans arriving in its town. we were at capacity and the government weren't listening. we felt abandoned by the government. we were getting the funds, not getting the help. we couldn't cope with the levels of people settling in boston. couldn't cope with the levels of people settling in bostonlj couldn't cope with the levels of people settling in boston. i voted to remain because we are a multicultural society. it doesn't matter if you are from poland, english, pakistani, any part of the country. we are all united and all
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one. it is sad. it looks very unhappy, that egg. we are all part ofan unhappy, that egg. we are all part of an initiative that was started following the tragic death ofjo cox because one of the things she said, that we have more in common than that we have more in common than that which divides us. we realised there was so manyjoint issues that we had together, didn't we? the issues that brixton faced other same issues that brixton faced other same issues that brixton faced other same issues that boston faced in a slightly different angle.|j issues that boston faced in a slightly different angle. i thought i'd celebrate with a european breakfast and get some french croissants. lots of people were saying i don't really understand why people would vote to leave the eu, they don't understand, they are racist, they are scared of immigration. having met people from boston and doing these trips, it's really allowed people from london to see a different way of life. it isn't racist to say, you know, we
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need more services, we need more support from london. there was diversity and love on display here when they were visitations. we can learn a lot from brixton and you can see estate that might be in a space of different people and it is natural, people are comfortable with each other and i think boston could learn a lot from that. when people sit down and actually talk to each other, only then can it can become an understanding where people can come together somewhere in the middle. i would dearly love to see 1000 equivalent twinning is so people could get to know each other right across the country and people would see, actually, we do have more in common. really interesting watching graeme's piece. 0n really interesting watching graeme's piece. on a day like this, quite reassuring that people are managing to hear each other‘s arguments. possibly, many people would say, in
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a way that people here at westminster have not so far but todayis westminster have not so far but today is another important day. another vote on the day, the 29th of march, it has been seared into all of our mind is the day we should have left the eu. we know that's not happening. just for your information, we will try and get you information, we will try and get you information on what happens today, both of our correspondence going to the eu as well and talking to adam fleming. it will give their perspective. a lot of people are confused. also liam fox talking to us confused. also liam fox talking to us and keir starmer, shadow brexit statutory. —— secretary. we will try to get to the bottom. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. police are investigating after man was stabbed to death in north—west london last night. the victim was found on an estate
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near regents parkjust after six o clock but later died in hospital. -- 6:00. armed officers sealed off london central mosque as they searched for the suspect. scotland yard say the stabbing is not terror related. guy's and st thomas' is celebrating 50 years since staff performed the uk's first kidney transplant using robot—assisted keyhole surgery. since then, the trust has carried out over 7,500 procedures, including a ground—breaking transplant between hiv patients. the latest figures show the number of life—saving kidney transplants at the hospital went up by 9% between april 2017 and 2018. a deadly flesh—eating fungus is threatening london's wild newts. the bsalfungus has been responsible for wiping out large numbers across europe. and now experts here in the capital are warning private owners to take extra care when handling their pets to make sure it doesn't spread to other wilflife.
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just be making sensible choices. make sure being, anything from trays like this, don't use the same ones are different new populations. but for different. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning but london 0verground is part suspended between surrey quays and new cross because of a signal failure. also on the trains, there's disruption on thameslink services between bedford and luton due to a broken down train. 0n the roads in forest hill: roadworks on a205 london road at the junction with sydenham hill. in mitcham, cricket green remains closed northbound from madeira road to london road for gas mains work. in hampton, a308 hampton court road has thames water works and traffic lights by the thames. now the weather with sara thornton. good morning to you. it is a chilly start for some of us out in the suburbs this morning. temperature is way down in low single figures. not
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quite so chilly in the centre of the capital but watch out for some mist and fog patches in the next few hours. particular in 0xfordshire and west berkshire. we have a yellow met 0ffice weather warning. another fine day ahead despite the missed patches. yesterday we got into the mid— teams. expecting very similar weather for the day—to—day. sunshine but fairweather cloud afternoon. extent, 17, maybe 18. ——16. again, dry and clear tonight. 0nce extent, 17, maybe 18. ——16. again, dry and clear tonight. once more the temperatures especially away in the centre of london will drop down into low— single figures. a touch of rural ground frost but they will be some cloud out towards the north and west. that will affect us into sunday but for your saturday afternoon, again, 17 degrees. the cloud i just referenced afternoon, again, 17 degrees. the cloud ijust referenced bringing colder air. you will know the difference on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
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in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty. it's 6:31am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: councils across the country are under pressure from the government to meet tougher air quality targets. what's the best way to do it? ben's in nottingham for us this morning to find out how they're tackling the issue. we're hearing how dogs are helping victims or witnesses of crime give their evidence. # dreams can come true... it was one of the most recognisable songs from the 90s and helped gabrielle achieve her dream of becoming a pop star. she'll be here talking about her new album, which she describes
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as a blend of old and new. it's friday the 29th of march. there is a hole next to me but he is down in westminster this morning because it was supposed to be the day, it is not quite, it is half the day. it is finally the 29th of march, we all remember why that date was so important. it was the date the uk was due to leave the eu. that is why i am spending this morning at westminster. theresa may is preparing another attempt to get mps tobacco deal, slightly confusingly, this time they will only be voting on one half of that proposal. 0ur political correspondent ben wrightjoins me now. do you want to explain just very basically, how she split the deal into two parts. well, before the
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deal was signed off at christmas, there are always two bits. there was there are always two bits. there was the big fat withdrawal agreement, that includes the financial settlements, the uk owes the eu, details about how citizen's right can be guaranteed after the accident and also arrangements northern ireland, the controversial backstop. that will also form the basis of the controversial treaty between the uk and the eu. now, attached to that is and the eu. now, attached to that is a very small, non—binding thing called the political declaration, which is a bit of a route map to the future, the aspirations that both sides want for the future trade relationship. what theresa may is done today is to dig that bit and say just vote on done today is to dig that bit and sayjust vote on the terms of the divorce, let's get this through, it will get us brexit, it will get us a transition period and then we can have an argument about the transition period. if she loses today, and i was careful about perceiving what is going to happen, what are the implications of that?
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the main one is that the exit date, may 22, that the eu has said that we can have this goes through by the end of today, that does not any more. the new deadline will be given would be april the 12th, the eu has set that date, the uk would have until then to come back to them with the plan, either with the deal done or plan forgetting that deal through all we could be looking at the no deal on april the 12th. so there would be very little time left to the government and parliament to try and figure out what they have failed to do now four weeks. what the eu already did was give the government already did was give the government a short extension, if we go and ask for another extension, which is a possibility, what might that look like? well, if the uk goes to see eu leaders around the 11th or 12th of april, saying that we need more time, the eu's condition will probably be number one, you need to show us what you're going to do in that time. are you going to have a general election to sort this out? are you going to have another
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referendum? can you also probably going to have to take part in the eu elections in may, and the european union has already made this clear to theresa may that if this does not go through now, we could be looking at a much longer extension to sort this out with those european elections. that will be the crux of the argument that she is making today. we are blessed this morning with beautiful weather, we have a sunrise just coming over westminster. i'm not sure you can see that too well, maybe on the wide shot. but we are here trying to explain a little more about what is going on. actually, that sunrise looks lovely and i was going to say it is so calming, it looks so lovely and you had the sun shining on you, but then you had someone shouting in the background. but you can contend with that, see you later. more than 20,000 people have attended an open air service in christchurch to remember the 50 people shot dead by a gunman in two mosques. the names of those killed were read
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out before new zealand's prime minister, jacinda ardern, was greeted with a standing ovation as she condemned what she called a "vicious cycle of extremism". a woman has died and several people have been injured in a car crash, following a police pursuit. three cars were involved in the crash in waltham abbey, including one which officers had attempted to stop on the m25. there are still too many late diagnoses and corrective surgeries for hip problems in children, despite a screening programme for newborn babies — this is what a study suggests. research by surgeons from southampton children's hospital said the rate of late diagnoses hadn't improved since screening began more than 30 years ago. some surgeons want to see all infants given scans, but public health england says scanning all newborns could cause more problems. president trump has held his first political rally since the end of the investigation into alleged collusion between his election campaign and russia. he said the claims had been the single biggest hoax
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in the history of politics, and called for officials and politicians to be held accountable. the russia witch—hunt was a plan by those who lost the election to try and legally gain power by framing innocent americans, many of them, they suffered, with an elaborate hoax. from close—ups of the earth's largest fish, — the whale shark — to stingrays swimming in the bahamas, blue planet live delivered more stunning images of ocean life last night. we even got to see turtles enjoying a bit of a deep sea spa day. in case you missed it, here are green turtles in australia at cleaning stations, these are where aquatic life gather to be cleaned by smaller creatures. they remove dead skin, bacteria, and parasites from their so—called ‘clients'. it is like your own pedicure and
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manicure, exfoliation and the sea. blue planet live concludes on bbc one on sunday night. mike, ithink mike, i think if you could have a spa day down the ocean, beautiful. actually, a couple of years ago, i went on a swim and some turtles. he took me back to this whole underwater and this other turtle came out and was not so happy to see me, soi came out and was not so happy to see me, so i backed off and i went away. so it took me to his house or her house and then the partner came out and said no, what are you doing? anyway. those pictures are wonderful. anyway, it was no surprise that 0le gunnar solskjaer has got the appointment at one of the best auditions ever at manchester united. he is living the dream. his smile falls you into thinking he is soft
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and cuddly but no, he has got a hard interior. he has one or of his league matches since taking control. solskjaer has promised to get manchester united back to the top, after he was given the manager's job. we were expecting this to some time after his brilliant performance. —— he arrived in december, on a care—taker basis, afterjose mourinho was sacked, and they've only lost once in 13 league games. they were also in the champions league quarter—finals. he said he was straight on the phone to sir alex ferguson when he got the news. iam not i am not going to discuss what we spoke about but of course, it is one of the first phone calls you make when things more or less were decided. i'm just going to be myself, as have always been, and i know the expectations of the cloud, traditions of the cloud, the history we have got. 0f
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traditions of the cloud, the history we have got. of course, i want to be successful, of course i want us to lift trophies. —— club. the england captain harry kane has received his mbe for services to football. it was recognition for england's performance, at last year's world cup in russia, where they reached the semi—finals. prince william presented the award at buckingham palace. 0bviously obviously a big england fan, so watching england play and win the game is the way we did, 5—0, so yeah, it was great kind of chat with him again and i am sure we will chat over the next few years. here's a story which will strike a chord with some parents. the southampton manager ralph hassenhuttl has admitted to blocking the wi—fi at his team's hotels, to prevent his squad from playing video games —
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he says it's a dangerous addiction. idid it i did it in my last cloud. we had also problems with players who are playing until three o'clock in the morning before a game. you have to be at live and to protect that because it is not a small problem, i think, because if you be honest, that it think, because if you be honest, thatitis think, because if you be honest, that it is the same like alcoholism or getting addicted to drugs or something like that. they play brighton this weekend. great britain's bobsleigh pilot at the 201a 0lympics, jothackson, says cheats cost them their moment on the podium, after his crew were retrospectively awarded a bronze medal. the team finished fifth in sochi, but two russian crews have since been disqualified for doping. that takes britain's haul for the games to five medals. jackson said it was all the sweeter, as injury almost meant, they didn't make it to sochi. for us to have not been going to then potentially getting there and
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winning the metal, it was sort of a fairytale story that would have been nice to have happened at the time, but for us, it is nice to know that we finally got the metal we deserved. —— medal. we don't want to jinx, anything, but with only two weeks to go until the masters, rory mcllroy looks to be in great form. he made it two wins from two at the wgc match play in texas, beating justin harding three and two. england's justin rose is also unbeaten. but tiger woods was forced into drastic action in his match against brandt snedeker. tiger woods in the bushes there. a great recovery, playing on his knees. i must say when i tried that shot, i did not quite make it. amazing, isn't it? he lost two and one. a drop goal in golden—point extra time gave leeds rhinos a much—needed super league win. leeds, the bottom club,
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were level at 20—20 with castleford tigers, when brad dwyer kicked the winning goal. look at the distance there. what a long—range kick that was to get the goalfrom distance. britain's adam yates is still in second place after the fourth day of the volta a catalunya in spain. he finished in the bunch, well behind colombia's migeul angel lopez, who took the overall lead, but yates only trails by 1a seconds. how about this? two british cycling champions were crowned last night, but neither of their bikes moved an inch — at least, not in the real world. rosamand bradbury became the first ever eracing national champion, in a thrilling photo finish in the women's scratch race. and the men's race was won by cam jeffers. now, competitors use an app to race virtual versions of themselves. almost a00 people tried to qualify, racing from home or at their local gym, with the fastest making it to last night's finals. the new world of cycle racing. fantastic. we thought we would be in
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a new world today, didn't we? but it did not happen. charlie's in westminster for us this morning with the latest on brexit. ido i do not know if we can call it that yet, charlie will explain. yes, this isa yet, charlie will explain. yes, this is a nice view, isn't that lovely? blue sky, there is the house of commons, but the difficult bit is explaining what will be happening inside later this morning. mps usually do not sit at that time, thatis usually do not sit at that time, that is by arrangement because we are in very important times. it is confusing, the prime minister has asked mps to vote on just one half effectively offer deal. let's find out exactly what that means. —— of her deal. we're joined now by hannah white, from the think tank institute for government, to help explain exactly what's going on in parliament and what it means for you. so the withdrawal part of the deal is what mps will vote on today, so just explain a little bit about that. exactly, so the deal had two
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parts, it had the divorce bit and the statement about what the eu and the statement about what the eu and the government would like a future relationship to look like and what the prime minister has done is said that because she has not been able to get parliament to agree those two things together, she thinks that some people object more to the future declaration and what that says about what our future relationship might be and what we really need right now, what the eu has said we need to get an extension to the 22nd of may, is just the divorce bit. so, alawite, take us through the next step. supposing she winds her boat today on this part of the deal, we cannot stop the clock and say that is the moment where we have left, the decision has been taken, because there is yet more voting that has to take place. that is the thing, i mean this isn't even actually a meaningful vote as required under the legislation, so in order, if you passed it today, that would be a major belief or her. isa that would be a major belief or her. is a timetable to, effectively, isn't it? because that falls within
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what the eu is said so that we can go for the 12th of april and then leave on the 22nd day. that is right but she would still need to pass an actual meaningful vote. she would need, under the legislation at the moment, she needs to get parliament to agree on a political declaration but what the government could try and do is introduce the piece of legislation it needs to put the treaty into our law and use that piece of legislation, it is called the withdrawal agreement bill, to change what al gore says about needing the political declaration. they could try and change that requirement so that actually, we could leave by the 22nd of may without that political declaration signed off.
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some progress looks like it has made on what should have been an ending day. she will be hoping the symbolism has an effect. what she is saying is what's really needed in order to secure brexit is the divorce deal. by implication, she is saying, if you don't vote for the divorce deal, you are stopping brexit and she is hoping that will have an impact on some mps.m brexit and she is hoping that will have an impact on some mps. if it goes against her today, many people think it will, the 12th of april becomes the potential no deal day. in article 50 revoking day? it pushesit in article 50 revoking day? it pushes it back in the diary. in article 50 revoking day? it pushes it back in the diary! in article 50 revoking day? it pushes it back in the diary. . it is more can kicking, essentially. the
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longer extension would involve us participating in elections for the european parliament or eradication. 0ne european parliament or eradication. one last chance is the headline of the daily mail. for a lot of people out there watching what's going on, there is the sense that this is the third time she has brought a vote to the commons. slightly different of course. it seems like one of those days. it is in a series of crucial days. it is in a series of crucial days. the government will be hoping that having tried this different strategy, it can bring more mps on board. it doesn't look likely it will pass. there is a small group of conservative eurosceptics who don't wa nt to conservative eurosceptics who don't want to support it. good to see you here this morning. we are spending the morning here. the business
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sta rts the morning here. the business starts at around 930 inside the commons itself. the vote, if you are curious to follow these things directly, we are told the result of the vote and it is one vote, yes or no, will be around 2:30 or 2:a5. we are blessed with a lovely day and the mat, i believe, you are sharing some of the skies but the wildlife in and around you is a little different. we are at the cotswolds farm. we are seeing some of the younger ones. looking at the forecast. blue skies overhead for many. things will
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gradually change on the weekend. as you can see from the charts, the yellow colours, the mild air, the far north of scotland will have 8— 11 degrees by the end of this weekend. still chilly at the moment with a bit of frost. south—western parts of england in particular some very dense pet patches of fog. the far north of scotland, whether front which will bring thick cloud but the vast majority is dry. temperatures today, widely into the teens. a few thicker spots could head to around 17 or 18 celsius. 18 is 6a in fahrenheit. the weather front in northern scotland moves southwards. it doesn't make too many inroads overnight but north of it, when the skies clear later, it will feel
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distinctly chilly. a touch of frost taking us into tomorrow and what we have had the past few days, a bit of fog. tomorrow morning, the fog will clear. while most will be dry, the cloud in scotland and northern ireland, by the end of the day it will cross england and maybe the north midlands. it will turn colder and be damned. the temperature contrast by this stage, we could see snow floodlit —— flurries. light winds so it will be a case of a widespread frost into sunday morning. it will be a lovely day for it if you want to take your mum out for a walk, why not? one or two showers in the far south—west. most will see sunshine developed through the day. with lighter winds, it might not feel too sunny. it will
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feel distinctly chilly out of the sunshine and in the shade. of course on sunday, the start of traditional summertime and that means the clocks will be going forward. it is in our left in bed, too. matt, do you think some of those are curious because of the lining of your coat? did you think about that before you came out today? no, i didn't. 0k, think about that before you came out today? no, i didn't. ok, no i didn't. they are very friendly, though. as long as they are not scared. councils across the country are under pressure to meet stringent clean air targets. but what's the best way to do it? in nottingham they've introduced a workplace parking levy. ben's there now and can tell us more.
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then, you are still enjoying the weather but grateful you don't have any goats? yes, there are none here. good morning from market square in nottingham. you are right, we're talking how city centres can help with omissions. given so much business goes on here. one proposal is to charge businesses for the car parking spaces that they offer to their staff. it is not without controversy. a lot of businesses are worried about the extra burden it puts on them but the money is then used to fund public transport projects. particularly in nottingham. the money is directly spent on the tram system to help improve quality. how does it all works? i've been finding out, take a look. businesses pass the £a15 onto their staff. since it was introduced in
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2012, the scheme has raised more than £50 million. the money is ring—fenced so can only be spent on improving public transport. by reducing the number of cars on the road, the scheme has been crucial in helping nottingham meet its clean—air targets. so that is how the scheme works. what difference does it make for the city centre? good morning. jenny, on paper, this sounds like a great idea. more money for public transport. what do you make of it? you must welcome it. yes, they have been doing it for awhile and this the result. we all have to clean up the air. it's a real health crisis. with so many people, their early deaths are contributed. this is a way where we do what we need to do. clean—air
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zones are one do what we need to do. clean—air zones are one thing. they need to be rolled out in many places. we all know why it's important to make our air cleaner but it does come at a cost for small businesses. this would be double taxation because they pay business rates. less of which is considering, a charge of £800 per year. £400 on each of those already. it is important but it needs to be said in a wider scheme of activity. —— set. businesses like families are all encouraged to buy into diesel cars and actually that has changed. we have gone from really worrying about c02 to some of the other dangers as well. we think that some of this money should be used to help with that. also the rollout of electric charging points
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for electric cars because if all of the vehicles around here today and around the city is buzzing with vehicles at the moment, were electric, we wouldn't be having this conversation. jenny, michael has a point. is it fair we are asking businesses to pay for all of this and there are better ways of doing this, aren't they? like more electric charging points to current —— encourage people into electric ca rs. —— encourage people into electric cars. we need all of these things, actually. actually, the cost of business is relatively small. it's a relatively small amount for individuals. the key thing is that all of these measures will actually help his nose. how attractive is an area like this where you are not in area like this where you are not in a traffic clogged area. that can be beneficial and congestion can be down. we have to take all of this and the government does need to set up and the government does need to set upa and the government does need to set up a scheme. we should with ——we say it should be part funded by who helped get us into this mess. a
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range of measures are needed. what does this mean for businesses? we are worried about people not coming into city centres. will this keep more people away? this is part of the worry. everyone is worried about town centres. the government has announced a fund to help town centres reconfigure themselves for the future. £675 million. really serious amounts of money. they are driving people out of city centres and that will conflict with it. we will talk more a little later because this will go on and on. some concerns about the scheme but also at the same time, that money being ring—fenced to improve services like that to encourage moloch — make more of us out of our cars and onto public transport. we will talk more later after seven o'clock. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news.
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police are investigating after man was stabbed to death in north west london last night. the victim was found on an estate near regents park just after 6:00 but later died in hospital. armed officers sealed off london central mosque as they searched for the suspect. scotland yard say the stabbing is not terror related. guy's and st thomas' is celebrating 50 years since staff performed the uk's first kidney transplant using robot—assisted keyhole surgery. since then, the trust has carried out over 7,500 procedures, including a ground—breaking transplant between hiv patients. the latest figures show the number of life—saving kidney transplants at the hospital went up by 9% between april 2017 and 2018. a deadly flesh—eating fungus is threatening london's wild newts. the bsalfungus has been responsible for wiping out large numbers across europe. and now experts here in the capital are warning private owners to take extra care when handling their pets
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— to make sure it doesn't spread to other wilflife. just be making sensible choices. so make sure we're cleaning and disinfecting nets, anything from trays like this, don't use the same ones are different new populations. but for different. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning but london 0verground is part suspended between surrey quays and new cross because of a signal failure. also on the trains there's disruption on thameslink services between bedford and luton due to a broken down train. traffic on the a13 is building up into town from barking. in mitcham, cricket green remains closed northbound from madeira road to london road for gas mains work. forest hill: roadworks on a205 london road at the junction with sydenham hill. now the weather with sara thornton.
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a very good morning to you. it is a chilly start for some of us out in the suburbs this morning. temperatures way down in low single figures. not quite so chilly in the centre of the capital but watch out for some mist and fog patches in the next few hours. particular in 0xfordshire and west berkshire. we have a yellow met 0ffice weather warning. another fine day ahead despite the mist patches. yesterday we got into the mid—teens. expecting very similar weather for the day—to—day. sunshine but fairweather cloud afternoon. 16, 17, maybe 18. again, dry and clear tonight. once more the temperatures, especially away from the centre of london, will drop down into low— single figures. a touch of rural ground frost but they will be some cloud out towards the north and west. that will affect us into sunday but for your saturday afternoon, again, 17 degrees.
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that cloud ijust referenced bringing colder air. you will know the difference on sunday. i'm back in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with me, charlie stayt, in westminster. 0n the day the uk was supposed to leave the european union, will parliament finally agree on a brexit plan? mps will vote again today on part of theresa may's deal. if it doesn't pass, they have just two weeks to come up with another plan. good morning. i'm naga munchetty. also today: more than 20,000 people attend a national remembrance service in christchurch for the 50 people shot dead in two mosques a fortnight ago. 20 years after the murder of the tv presenterjill dando,
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the detective who led the investigation tells the bbc her case will never be solved. do i think somebody will come back to court? probably not, no. good morning. how can city centres improve air quality and is it fair that drivers pay the price? well, i am here in nottingham, ata that drivers pay the price? well, i am here in nottingham, at a scheme where they are using money from charging drivers to improve the city's tram network but it has been controversial. good morning. it's the ultimate dream, come true for the new permanent manchester united manager. 0le gunnar solskjaer has been rewarded for the job he's done as stand—in boss, and has been handed a three year deal. and it is a chilly and foggy starting friday morning for some but a day ahead, 18 possible for one or two but this weekend while mostly dry, it is said to get cooler.
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during the live from the cotswold farm park for all the details later 0n breakfast. —— joined me. ——join me. good morning. it's friday the 29th of march. today is the day the uk was due to leave the eu. we're live in westminster as theresa may prepares another attempt to get mps to back her brexit deal. this time, they'll only be voting on one half of her proposal. if it doesn't pass, they have just two weeks to come up with another plan. 0ur political correspondent iain watson has more on the prime minister's latest change of tactic. this was the day when britain was due to leave the european union, but instead, theresa may is trying to break the deadlock over deal. —— her deal. she used to say no deal is better than a bad deal. today her message to mps is, in effect, half a deal is better than no deal. she's already suffered two big
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defeats, so she's trying a different approach. she's splitting the deal in two. mps will vote on the withdrawal agreement, or divorce bill, that settles our leaving bill of £39 billion and guarantees citizens's rights. mps will not vote on the political declaration on our future relationship with the eu. the government says if the withdrawal agreement alone goes through, the eu will extend brexit to may 22, but if it doesn't. .. we'd have until the 12th to explain to the eu what on earth happens next, and that takes us into another soft brexit or not leaving the eu at all, or potentially a general election. but labour won't back even a stripped down deal. what the prime minister's tried to do is do something that she denied she would do on the 14th of january, and that's separate the withdrawal agreement from the political declaration for the future arrangements. well, you cannot separate them because, otherwise, you move into a blindfold brexit on the basis of the withdrawal agreement. and her usual allies,
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northern ireland's dup, say they won't support the prime minister either. so instead of leaving the eu today, how, if, or exactly when brexit will take place remains uncertain. iain watson, bbc news, westminster. ben wright is with me this morning. the gamble theresa may is making, she thinks by splitting the deal as described, changes it for mp5. she thinks by splitting the deal as described, changes it for mps. the government clearly thinks there is which symbolism on bringing this back on the day we were supposed to be leaving the european union. i think really, theresa may is daring mps of both parties who say they wa nt mps of both parties who say they want this to happen devoted on the day it was meant happen, i think she wa nts to day it was meant happen, i think she wants to force them to really confront the choice that is there on the table because if this went through, brexit would happen on may the 22nd. that is an interesting point you're making because in some ways, on a level, there is little difference apart from the split of
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the deal. what you are saying is a lot of this may be about the emotions of this day and this vote. yes, that is light. i think there is a change to the last time she presented this two weeks ago, taking up presented this two weeks ago, taking up the political declaration about the future, just focusing mps on the divorce. 0f the future, just focusing mps on the divorce. of course, she has also told her own mps that if this deal goes through, she will leave number ten, that is done a lot to reduce the toy rebellion, people like boris johnson, he said this deal is terrible, have now said i think i'm going to pack it after all. —— conservative rebellion. the dup still hate this deal. —— back it after all. they hate it because of the irish backstop. and there are some labour mps were still going to hold out too, so i think the prime minister has revealed task in getting this to today. the session in the house of commons will start at about 9:30am today, we are
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expecting the vote about 2:45 p.m., it will be a little bit earlier than it will be a little bit earlier than it has been in the past. that is all from us at the moment, naga munchetty, back to you. charlie, thank you. more than 20,000 people have attended an open air service in christchurch to remember the 50 people shot dead by a gunman in two mosques. the names of those killed were read out before new zealand's prime minister, jacinda ardern, was greeted with a standing ovation, as she condemned what she called a "vicious cycle of extremism". the detective who led the investigation intojill dando's murder has told the bbc her case will never be solved. in a documentary to mark 20 years since the broadcaster was shot outside her home in fulham, hamish campbell said he didn't think that any new suspects would be brought to court. barry george was jailed for the murder but was acquitted and released after a re—trial. sometimes i felt we were a day away from solving it, and other times, i thought no, we're a long way away.
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the senior officers, they were asking what are the likelihoods of this case being resolved ? do i think somebody will come back to court? probably not, no. would you think that someone new might come to court? no. both members of the liverpool band her‘s, and its tour manager, have been killed in a car accident in the united states. stephen fitzpatrick and aidun lawding, as well as manager trevor engelbrektson, died while travelling to a gig in california on wednesday. the band's record label described them as "one of the country's most loved, up and coming bands". there are still too many late diagnoses and corrective surgeries for hip problems in children, despite a screening programme for new—born babies. the latest study by surgeons from southampton children's hospital showed that the rate of late diagnoses had not improved since screening started
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more than 30 years ago. some surgeons want to see all infants given scans, but public health england said scanning all newborns could cause more problems. here's something to brighten your friday morning — three rare tiger cubs making their debut at a sydney zoo. these are sumatran cubs, named rose, midnight and archer, ten weeks old. they are staying very close to mummy, tentative steps, of course. they were spotted outside for the very first time. the species is currently endangered with only 400 remaining in the world. look at those fantastic stripes. gorgeous, gorgeous threesome indeed. if you're wondering where charlie is, he is in westminster and yes, it is, he is in westminster and yes, it is march 29 and yes, it was supposed to bea is march 29 and yes, it was supposed to be a pretty significant day—to—day, charlie, and it is panning out very differently i would
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imagine that theresa may had hoped. yes, you're absolutely right. the 29th of march, for so long that they was the day, the end all this. but we are here, we are where we are is one of those phases that is used a lot. it is probably worth taking a moment to take a look back at some of the key moment since that referendum the border c. —— that brought us here. -- that brought us here. it has been more than 1000 days since the uk voted to leave the eu. it was a result that change the political landscape and ushered in a new prime minister, who promised to respect the will of the people. brexit means brexit and we're going to a success of it. but success is not so easily earned. she has faced rebellions at home... i have never felt more
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ashamed to be a member of the conservative party. and isolation and resistance in europe.|j conservative party. and isolation and resistance in europe. i have been wondering what that special place in hell looks like for those who promoted brexited without even a sketch of a plan how to carry it. —— brexit. a deal has been rejected twice. —— her deal. iwill not brexit. a deal has been rejected twice. —— her deal. i will not sign up twice. —— her deal. i will not sign up to the withdrawal agreement and it is all because the prime minister decided to go for that backstop. and a firm promise has been broken. the united kingdom is leaving the european union on the 29th of march, 29th march, 29th march 2019. the prime minister who is even promised to resign to deliver brexit. —— a prime minister who has even promised. a country divided, parliament in chaos. yes, those
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words really ringing in our ears. repetitions of that date, the 29th of march over and over again. we're going to make a success of it, were theresa may's words. the historian sir simon schama joins me now. a very good morning to you. good morning, charlie. yes, it is easy to see a dog's breakfast, this morning. there is a thought, before we get into the detail of this, we were talking a bit on yourjourney in here. these debates, the arguments and where we are now is being played out in the real world, as well as the decision—making here. out in the real world, as well as the decision-making here. yes, that is light. i dojust want the decision-making here. yes, that is light. i do just want to say about those debates, actually, it is small consolation i'm sure, but what is actually going to happen today in what has been happening over the last two years has its majestic qualities, as well as its deeply depressing one. well, you're going to have to go some to convince people of that today.|j to have to go some to convince people of that today. i know that people of that today. i know that people say they are all rotten, we wa nt to people say they are all rotten, we want to get rid of them, just get on with someone that this is democratic
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argument. we have parliamentary sovereignty in this country, it has been said really that parliament is supreme, it makes and executes laws. lest we forget unless they get too sanctimonious, very large parts of the world cannot have the luxury of easily arguing against each other over the fate of their country. they had not managed it yet, have they? parliamentary democracy, as we stand now, is in a proper mess, can today help? stop accident! -- brexit! the saying is the voice of the people as the voice of god, i think god has taken friday. the voice of god, i think god has ta ken friday. god the voice of god, i think god has taken friday. god has taken friday. people were saying how miserable of a spectacle the failure to get a majority is, if you look calmly, two of those motions the parliamentary debate did get a start, particularly
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ken clarke's motion on the customs union. it is not quite true that the more debate we have, the more wretched and more insoluble situation is. here's the thing that has happened that is tragic and still remains tragic today. in my view, no surprise, i am a remainer, theresa may's mistake at the beginning was to accept the fact we area beginning was to accept the fact we are a divided country, that there was a relatively small majority in a referendum. there was not to deny that the leave people had won the referendum that they had to be some attention paid to the 16 million, as well as the 17 million. it all became muffled up in managing the domestic policies of the conservative party and today, she has uncovered the political declaration from the withdrawal agreement, in order to get it through and meet the requirements of the eu and again, with the
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leadership race starting, becoming subservience to the fate of the conservative party. —— ravelled. explain... the fate of the conservative party is not the fate of the nation. help us with why she thinks that separating the withdrawal agreement from the political was going to help today, why does she think that? lol, in some deep way, you and i think it is not going to help, it may actually lead to more damage. it was a tactical piece of obedience to the literal requirements the eu laid down. they said do this by this day. well, the government's argument is that they only required us to accept the withdrawal, parliament to accept the withdrawal, parliament to accept the withdrawal, parliament to accept the withdrawal agreement. that is their view. we have not actually heard from the eu whether that was actually what they meant in order for the may 22 date to be valid. can i ask you? so it is a mistake between tactics and strategy in my
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view. can i ask you about symbolism? because this is the 29th of march, one of the things political correspondence suggesting is that theresa may is hoping that will loom large in mps's heads as they put a vote down on a piece of paper today. do you think that will have a bearing? you know, i... for someone like jacob rees—mogg, it might because actually, he is so laserlike, he and one or two other people are so laserlike focus really on the fact simply of departure, but all you have to do is listen to other colleagues, mark francois and so on, who are actually the member jacob rees—mogg's own words, that to accept the withdrawal agreement is to a cce pt accept the withdrawal agreement is to accept a slave state and his a nswer to to accept a slave state and his answer to that is we will be a slave state the 21 months. where we are 21 months, 21 months is a hell of a long time. jacob rees—mogg could end
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up long time. jacob rees—mogg could end up with a soft brexiter like amber rudd as prime minister, which he would not like it all and the slave state would go on. my own view, the more important point is actually with all the kind of storm and thunder and lightning, heads will prevail over hearts and this attempt by theresa may to milk the melodrama of today, to milk the drama of today will not work because there is too much at stake. we are sitting on a kind of political than mine and you do not really want to make, whatever we are in britain, we are not cheaply showing. and the cheap showing us of the day will not determine the results. we will leave it on that note, thank you, very good to speak to you this morning. simon schama, historian, speaking to us. it isa it is a stunning day here in amongst the madness and matt, i believe, can pick up on some of the good weather
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and also in amongst some friends i think he has been making. in amongst the madness, we all need a little bit of cuteness and a bit ofa hug. a little bit of cuteness and a bit of a hug. saying good morning to this little fella. 0ne of a hug. saying good morning to this little fella. one of the newborns here. just out of interest behind me, this one is keeping a close eye. this is one of britain's most ancient indigenous breeds of sheep. she is fiercely protective of her young so she will be keeping a close eye on me throughout. all of them getting to grips of a new life —— with a new life. a big contrast weatherwise to what we had last year. we had the beast from the east and all of the cold, snowy weather. we could eat what we had yesterday today but it won't last. let's look
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at the forecast. this weekend, while many will see largely dry weather, it was beset to turn cooler. the warm air shown by the colours on the chart. the blue colours, the cold air, starts to rush in from the north. the winds fall lighter on sunday. this morning, some frost around in one or two spots. parts of north—west midland, northwest wales, south—west of england, lots of sunshine across much of england and wales. a bit of cloud developing. northern ireland staying largely fine. the north—west of scotland, outbreaks of rain and a caller feel. elsewhere, into the teens again. parts of england could hit 18, 6a in fahrenheit. through tonight, the front will move south through
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scotland. temperatures will drop below freezing in one or two areas and elsewhere, they will be a bit of frost around to take it into tomorrow morning. a few fog patches if you are heading about early on but through saturday, they will gradually clear and it looks like saturday for many will be a fine day across england and wales until we see cloud from scotland and northern ireland pushing into the north midlands later and that was separate much chillier air. five degrees, 18 celsius. that will be the last of the warmer air. it will be gone by sunday. weather fronts are still lingering through southern counties leaving one of through is but one or two spots with light rain. 0n mother's day, you might have had an hour less in band — make bed but there will be lots of sunny weather to enjoy after a frosty start. that is what —— how it is looking.
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to enjoy after a frosty start. that is what -- how it is looking. it is just so loving being in your arms. you obviously have a magic touch. this is what you need in a friday morning in amongst the chaos. west midlands police has told a meeting of lgbt residents that the force should have done more to reassure them after protests outside a local school. it follows calls from parents to scrap lessons about sex same couples as sima kotecha reports. more than 100 people from the lgbt community attended the meeting. it was a chance for them to tell the council and police how they have been feeling after hundreds of pa rents been feeling after hundreds of parents have been calling for the teaching of same—sex couples in primary schools to be scrapped. some said they have never felt more
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vulnerable. for this woman it has been a difficult time. as a gay woman, it's been very distressing. i have been privileged and fortunate to grow up in the family i grew up in. i haven't suffered like some people have and it'sjust in. i haven't suffered like some people have and it's just really upsetting to know that there are pa rents upsetting to know that there are parents out there, without even knowing what they kids are going to turn into or who get ——to their kids are going to grow into, are already dictating how their children should live their lives. some muslims believe children as young as four should not be taught about same—sex relationships and have been protesting. they argue their religious views should be taken into account. west midlands police told the meeting it wished had ——it had done more to reassure the community from the outset. we are not the right people to sort this out. we are there to keep the peace and keep people safe but we knew very early on we needed to do it in
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partnership. it said it should have worked harder to get muslims, the council and other groups to work together to try and resolve the —— the dispute. here with me from the muslim council of britain is imam ibrahim mogra and joining us from birmingham is khakan qureshi a muslim lgbt campaigner. let me begin with you. you are talking to parents and you have spoken to parents of children who are concerned about what they are being taught. what is their main concern and when do they believe that children should be taught about different families and lgbt communities? i find myself being in a privileged position. lots of people come to me about these matters and other matters. their main concern have been about the inability to have a say in the matter. most muslim families are accepting about the fact that we
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live in an equal society. everybody has a right to choose how they live and how they have relationships and all the rest of it. what they are saying is that this is a very sensitive matter. if our children are going to be taught these things in school, we need to know when they will start to be taught. and in what environments. what kind of material will be used. they have been given access to the materials. different relationships or other relationships isa mummy, relationships or other relationships is a mummy, mummy and me. is that the main objection? there has been, i believe, personally, some misinformation. and exaggeration. news that has filtered down to the pa rents news that has filtered down to the parents has in some cases been exaggerated, about the depictions in the books. very graphic imagery and the books. very graphic imagery and the like. this has raised an added layer of concern. this isn't about
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sex education, this is about different relationships. sex education, this is about different relationshipslj sex education, this is about different relationships. i agree and thatis different relationships. i agree and that is where we perhaps have missed the point. we need tojust calm down, leave emotion to one side and think very practically and logically that this is a society which is also pa rt that this is a society which is also part and parcel of our children's everyday reality. and the sooner they learn that there are people who have different ways of having families, the more we will enable them to be respectful of each other. isn't it simple in your position then? they say, look, it's all been exaggerated. just like what you have said to me now. this is the material. it is not a sex education, it's about relationships. what's the problem? it's about getting the message across. what we are saying is at the muslim council, we are receiving families' concerns and we are still analysing all of the information that is coming through and we have not yet come round to
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putting a position forward. as a imami putting a position forward. as a imam i have been trying, along with other colleagues, to try and help communities understand. if there is a child at school being brought forward by two mothers or two fathers, it is only right that their friends know about this. lets go to our other guest. khakan qureshi, you couldn't make it last night to the meeting. you are asked to be part of this panel. why does the lgbt community feel that a meeting like this was necessary? i think the reason why they feel this is necessary is because the impact of these protests on the children in particular and how we explore our identities, it impacts on them and enables the child to develop. it is about educating the children about equality and that's gld —— lgbt is
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0k. to have the parents protesting about this and as the imam says, it has been taken out of context. to be able to have that conversation, to be able to express their feelings as well. having this meeting last night isa well. having this meeting last night is a step forward and we're looking at solutions than anything. why has it taken so long? the imam agrees there is no harm with what is in the books and it's been exaggerated. i do think it has got to this point? the imam says there is misinformation and it's been exaggerated and i believe that somebody instigating it, i believe they may have their own political motivations. i don't know who it is but that's how i feel. i have spoken to some of the protesters and asked if it is not about the lgbt agenda, give mea if it is not about the lgbt agenda, give me a good answer. why don't you step forward and say it is not about that. one of them has said they are willing to step forward and say they've got it wrong. imam, are you willing to step forward? you just
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told me on the sofa you said there was nothing wrong. there is a time when children are ready to receive a particular type of information and education. in the early years, if there is no depiction which is graphic... which you know there isn't. yes certainly for now. if we look at the relationships add sexual education which starts at secondary level, that debate must also begin now to examine and explore what kind of information and what environments kids will be taught this to be able to appreciate people are different. we will keep you up—to—date with all
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thatis we will keep you up—to—date with all that is and isn't happening with brexit. 0f that is and isn't happening with brexit. of course on this day, much of the 20 night. —— march the 29th. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm victoria hollins. gang rivalries at a youth jail in west london are so fierce, some inmates say they're powerless to stop themselves attacking members of other groups. a watchdog found postcode allegiances are an "enormous problem" at feltham young 0ffenders institution, with violent behaviour almost every day. the independent monitoring board said many young adults arrive saying they can't mix with other individuals or feel unsafe living in the same unit with gang rivals. a youth custody service spokeswoman said while there are significant challenges, progress is being made. guy's and st thomas' is celebrating 50 years since staff performed the uk's first kidney transplant using robot—assisted keyhole surgery. since then, the trust has carried out over 7,500 procedures, including a ground—breaking transplant between hiv patients. the latest figures show the number of life—saving kidney transplants at the hospital went up by 9%
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between april 2017 and 2018. fans of the band the prodigy will be paying their respects in essex later, at a memorial for frontman keith flint. the flamboyant performer — known for providing the vocals on hits like firestarter — died at his home in dunmow in essex earlier this month. in a post on the band's offical twitter page, fans have been invited to line the streets in braintree for a memorial procession, ahead of a private service for friends and family. let's look at the travel situation.
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now the weather with sara thornton. hello there, a very good morning to you. it's a bit of a chilly start for some of us out in the suburbs this morning. temperatures way down in low single figures. not quite so chilly in the centre of the capital but watch out for some mist and fog patches in the next few hours, particular out towards 0xfordshire and west berkshire, if you're headed that way. we do have a yellow met office weather warning. so, some mist patches to start us off, but another fine day ahead. yesterday temperatures easily got into the mid—teens. expecting very similar weather for the day today. plenty of sunshine, but fairweather cloud this afternoon. 16, 17, maybe 18 celsius, 6a in fahrenheit. through this evening and overnight, it's again, dry and clear tonight. once more those temperatures, especially away from the very centre of london, dropping down into low—single figures. a touch of rural ground frost to start your weekend but plenty of sunshine again for tomorrow. you can see there's some cloud out towards the north and west. that will affect us into sunday
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but for your saturday afternoon, again, 17 degrees. that cloud ijust referenced bringing us some colder air. you'll know the difference on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning from westminster. it's friday the 29th of march. of course, today is the day the uk was due to leave the eu. we're live here in westminster, as theresa may prepares another attempt to get mps to back her brexit deal. this time, they'll only be voting on one half of her proposal. joining us now to get the very latest view from europe is our brussels reporter, adam fleming.
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good morning to you, adam. the way this is split, this vote, confusing but it is effectively what the eu acquired on this day for the brexit. hi mike charlie, nice and relaxing where you are, here. the deal was struck by theresa may and other eu leaders, it now seems ages ago, was not about the endpoint of exit, was about creating extra space and extending the brexit process, which was supposed and today and creating a bit more time, so it was not about the actual and, it was about the decision to create that bit of extra space in the decision that the eu gave for the extension from today until the 22nd of may was that the parliament in the uk voted on the withdrawal agreement and approved withdrawal agreement and approved withdrawal agreement, which remember is the divorce part of the brexit deal, so that is the stuff about the
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rights of citizens, the money, all sorts of technicalities and the irish backstop, the backup plan for avoiding a hard border in northern ireland. the eu did not say you have to vote on the other bit of the brexit deal, which is the political declaration, which sketches out the shape of the future relationship, so that in a nutshell is why mps are only voting on half of the deal today but of course, actually it is more than half of the deal because the withdrawal agreement is 585 pages long and the political declaration is only 26 pages long, so it is more than half. very good, adam. we will speak to you this morning throughout the programme. thank you very much. just a reminder for you. there'll be a special programme on bbc one and the bbc news channel this afternoon to report on the vote in the house of commons, starting at 2.15pm. we are expecting the vote and it is an individual vote today, yes or no vote, as compared with some of the previous votes. that is around
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2:45pm, we are expecting more from here throughout the programme. it is, as you can hear, getting quite noisy. do you think by the end of this afternoon, we will have a clear idea about what is happening next week? now, there is a question. the a nswer to week? now, there is a question. the answer to that is almost certainly know that he was to say? we have had those predictions before and it is undoubtedly, one of the things it is worth saying this will be reflected i know in a lot of interviews today, the 29th of march today and we reiterate this over and over again, it is such a symbolic day and a lot of people are saying part, that is why theresa may wanted to bring those back on this day. we will see what happens. yeah, absolutely. well, you will be explaining it as well. 0ther well, you will be explaining it as well. other news to bring you. thank you forjoining us. more than 20,000 people have attended an open air service in christchurch to remember the 50 people shot dead by a gunman in two mosques. the names of those killed were read out before new zealand
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prime ministerjacinda ardern was greeted with a standing ovation, as she condemned what she called a "vicious cycle of extremism". a woman has died and several people have been injured in a car crash, following a police pursuit. three cars were involved in the crash in waltham abbey, including one which officers had attempted to stop on the m25. there are still too many late diagnoses and corrective surgeries for hip problems in children, despite a screening programme for new—born babies. the latest study by surgeons from southampton children's hospital showed that the rate of late diagnoses had not improved since screening started, more than 30 years ago. some surgeons want to see all infants given scans but public health england says scanning all newborns could cause more problems. coming up on the programme: we have gabrielle sitting with us in the seat and before that, paula radcliffe. i know, it is really
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interesting. yeah, it will be really interesting. yeah, it will be really interesting. do you have your microphone on? sorry, it has fallen off. she is also going to be talking about some of the transgender issues that have been brought up in sport, she wants some clarification on who should be participating in which events and how that relates to female runners in particular. have you got your microphone? thanks for digging me out of the hole, what happens is that when you sit down sometimes, i sat down on the lead and it pulled out like that. funnily enough, it might, never had that problem. the smile keeps getting bigger, doesn't it? so it should do, now he's got the permanentjob at manchester united. 0ne defeat in 13 league matches, incredible. 0le gunnar solskjaer has promised to get manchester united back to the top, after he was given the manager's job. he arrived in december then on a care—taker basis, afterjose mourinho was sacked.
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as well as that great league record, they're also into the champions league quarter—finals. he said he was straight on the phone to sir alex ferguson, as soon as he got the news. i'm not going to discuss what we spoke about but, of course, it's one of the first phone calls i made when things more or less were decided. i'm just going to be myself, as i've always been, and i know the expectations of the club, the traditions of the club, the history we've got. of course, i want to be successful, of course i want us to lift trophies. great britain's bobsleigh pilot at the 2014 olympics, jothackson, says cheats cost them their moment on the podium, after his crew were retrospectively awarded a bronze medal. at the time, the team finished fifth in sochi, but two russian crews have since been disqualified for doping. jackson said it was all the sweeter, as injury almost meant
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they didn't make it to sochi. for us to have not been going potentially to then getting there and then winning the medal, it was sort of a fairytale story, that would have been nice to have happened at the time, but for us, it's nice to know that we'd finally got the medal we deserved. we don't want to jinx anything, but with only two weeks to go until the masters, rory mcllroy looks to be in superb form. he made it two wins from two at the wgc match play in texas, beating justin harding three and two. england's justin rose is also unbeaten, but tiger woods was forced into drastic action. years, tiger woods in the bushes. u nfortu nately, years, tiger woods in the bushes. unfortunately, i have been there but we have not done it as well. no, mike, we haven't. golfers have. great recovery, did he win? no, it was to no avail. he lost two and
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one. he's already won 100 career titles, and roger federer is not far off number 101. he's into the semi—finals of the miami 0pen, thanks to a straight sets win over last year's wimbledon finalist, kevin anderson. he'll play the canadian denis shapovalov tonight. simona halep needed to reach the final to go back to world number one, but she lost in the semis to karolina pliskova. now, this is quite extraordinary. when staff at colchester united's training ground found a rather strange object, they were totally baffled. why? well, it was a frozen burger, attached to a box, with a gopro camera inside. but as their tweet says, "then the phone rang". the photo was tom stanniland from sheffield, who'd sent the burger into space on a weather balloon. did actually get into space? 0h, yes! capturing some great shots, before the unidentified frying object landed in essex. tom had to try it, of course.
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it was apparently rather "dry, powdery, frozen". so he did not get very far eating that burger. he is actually eating that? well, he tried to bid had been up that? well, he tried to bid had been up to space, it was apparently cold and hard and very nice. you can understand the perplexed faces at colchester united when they suddenly found this. i like that. thank you very much, mike. thank you for joining us. councils across the country are under pressure to meet stringent clean air targets. what's the best way to do it? so many cities debate this. nottingham is looking at the workplace parking levy, what on earth is that? that is what ben is going to explaining, you have got some lovely stores being set up behind you, morning. yeah, he complained about it looking a little empty and desolate earlier, so look at what we have laid on for you.
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you're right, we're talking about workplace levies. basically, it is a charge in nottingham that they have introduced and it basically means if you are a business and you offer car parking spaces to your staff, you have to pay for them and that money is ringfenced and used to spend on public transport, to improve air quality, reduce emissions and make city centres are much nicer place to be, but hasn't actually worked? i have been finding out. businesses with more than ten parking spaces and annual fee of just with more than ten parking spaces and annual fee ofjust over £400 of space, some businesses park although some of that charge onto their staff. -- pass. but since it was introduced, the scheme has raised more than £54 million. the money is ringfenced though, so can only be spent on improving public transport, and by reducing the number of cars on the road, the scheme has been crucial in helping nottingham meet its clean—air targets. so that is how it works and with me is bridget fox, from the campaign for better transport. good morning. we have had
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a look at how that system works and clearly we can all see the need to reduce emissions but is this the best way to be doing it? hello well, we know that it is traffic that causes the main source of air pollution problems. -- well. as you said, nottingham has this larger system where there is a levy, so thatis system where there is a levy, so that is not only cutting air pollution but cutting parking spaces too, so we think that that is a win—win. too, so we think that that is a win-win. businesses say that there are fewer people coming and shopping here, city centres are under pressure, can they afford to pay this? well, actually, nottingham is going on we think the fact that businesses can do business more efficiently because they are not stuck in trafficjams as part of doing that. it is a fair scheme, small businesses are exempt, services like emergency services are exempt and businesses looking at the scheme in all parts of the country can tailor it to suit their area.
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the daily charge works out atjust over £1, and! the daily charge works out atjust over £1, and i think that some people watching this around the country would think that that is a bargain. it is being used to help fund the trend, are there better ways of using this money? electric car charging points would be very welcome, a lot of people say there is just not enough of them. should we be investing in things like that? lol, i think that the city of birmingham said that the principle that we would fund public transport for the city is the right one, we now have trams in nottingham, lots of good things can be done with the £9 million a year that is generated by the workplace parking levy. £9 million a year that is generated by the workplace parking levym £9 million a year that is generated by the workplace parking levy. it is not surprising that other local authorities are looking at nottingham and saying maybe we should do the same. absolutely, for now, really nice to see you. on cue. 0ne now, really nice to see you. on cue. one city council, nottingham has introduced the scheme so far, others
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are expected to do something similar. lester, for example, is looking at how this might work. a lot of businesses are worried about the extra cost because they are under pressure. —— leicester. this might not be the way to do it, which does not necessarily encourage people to come into town at all, according to some businesses. but here in nottingham, that scheme seems to have been quite a success. more for me a little later, i will see you soon. you have time that perfectly, with those town bells. 0urteam perfectly, with those town bells. our team tell us we've got to finish on time, i have finished bang on time for once. exactly, the for once is quite a today, ben. we know we will be having words later. i am going to take your stall the flowers and raise it with much because he is somewhere wonderful this morning. matt is on a farm this morning and he has been making so many little friends. i hope they are ignoring
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what you are wearing on your upper half. it is only sheep wall, that's it. they have to be clipped, don't forget. a very good morning to you. yes, in amongst many of the rare breeds this morning, and as you said, we are in the midst of lambing season at the minute. temperatures have soared recently and the temperature has been fine. many of the breeds behind me have all stopped to go and have a look. weatherwise today, a few changes. changes this weekend. dry at the moment across many parts of the country. it will gradually turn that bit cooler across the uk. noticeably caller the further north that you are. 16— 17 degrees. as we go
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through this weekend, notice the yellow colours are pushed away to the south. a northerly wind. temperatures will drop substantially. a bit of a chill and a nip in the air. a frost in one or two spots but that is now lifting out of the ground. it could cost — might cause some problems in the morning commute. not quite as warm as it was yesterday. 0utbreaks morning commute. not quite as warm as it was yesterday. outbreaks of rain amongst the cloud. starting to turn cooler. the weather front which will work south across scotland through tonight, bringing outbreaks of rain and a bit of hill snow. it will reach northern ireland to the end of the night. a touch of frost around. we will stay largely dry. fog patches to take us into tomorrow
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morning. much of england and wales sta rts morning. much of england and wales starts off dry and bright. northern england, wales and the north midlands, you will cloud over. a few showers through the day. sunshine comes back but with snow showers in shetland. five degrees tomorrow, contrast it with 18 in london tomorrow. it will even out as we go through saturday night into sunday morning. the clocks leap forward through saturday night and into sunday and that being said, we are into british summertime that it won't feel like it, widespread frost across the country. one or two showers around. that will gradually ease away but for most, a dry day. a nice day to enjoy the sunshine. temperatures eight — 11 degrees. the caller theme will continue into next
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week. warm jackets will certainly be required. we will accept the change because we are going into sunshine anyway. brexit negotiations reached a dramatic point this week when theresa may promised she'd step down as prime minister if mps back her plan for exiting the eu — and while this brought some tory rebels on board, it still wasn't enough to get it through parliament and her party remains divided. joining us now from westminster is conservative mp and international trade secretary liam fox. thank you forjoining us. i imagine this is not what we foresaw. what do you make of it? this was the day we wa nted you make of it? this was the day we wanted to leave the eu and that would be a major understatement for me to say that i disappointed that we are not doing so. we have an opportunity to set a path to a smooth —— smooth exit on the 22nd of
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may. if we don't take that, many, many may. if we don't take that, many, ma ny voters may. if we don't take that, many, many voters watching your programme will feel that there are a number of mps in parliament that have let them down very badly. that's the message you are saying on this programme but i don't think many in the house are hearing it. it's the voters that they need to hear it from. they voted leave in a clear expectation. parliament said that we can't make up parliament said that we can't make up our minds and we will abide by their decision. if you remember, the david cameron government spent £9 million sending a leaflet out to every house are saying the government will implement the decision of the people. parliament needs to live up to that side of the bargain. if we get into arguments about who spent want, we could get into a long conversation so let's shift that to one side. today, the prime minister put not a third meaningful votes, almost being cast,
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we are seeing half of the total agreement stop what if she loses this today? should she resign? she said she is going because she's obviously not getting consensus and getting this deal through. what will happen if we don't get that —— don't get the vote through is we won't get businesses the certainty they want about when we leave. the european union will then apply a deadline of the 12th of april at which point the government needs to set out a new approach. that could mean, as we have seen from parliament this week, a longer extension of our membership with the eu are indeed not leaving at all which i think would create a massive chasm between voters and parliament and i think voters will quite rightly say at that point, what is my vote worth? why should i trust parliament if i can't trust them to deliver on the referendum that they promised and they do something completely different? i'll ask again, if she loses this boat
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today, should she resign? she said she will stay on until we are able to deliver. what if you can't deliver? let's be realistic. allan is not the prime minister. doesn't it is not the prime minister unable to deliver, its parliament who are reviewing too... but she is the one in charge of the negotiations and she is the one in charge of presenting it to parliament and she hasn't delivered it. we had all these debates about what mps could agree on but whichever model they want, a customs union as the labour party say, whichever model of arrangement we want to have with the eu, elements that other alternatives are contained in the political declaration which we are not talking about today. this is about the withdrawal agreement. if
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we are able, if we want to leave the eu on the 22nd of may and have a smooth and orderly exit, we have to vote for the arrangements today. those who don't vote for it will introduce a new cliff edge and uncertainty into the debate and it won't take us any further on what the alternatives may be on the other side of that withdrawal agreement. i'm going to take you not answering whether or not she should resign as you say she will not resign, as she has made clear, until she gets this deal through. that's exactly what i said. i am then still considered judgement confused as to who our prime minister is. if she gets the deal through, unless you want to clarify my confusion there. the prime minister has said she will step down when the agreement is through. she will not be negotiating the second part which is our future relationship with the eu. then say
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she does get the deal through today, who will be negotiating the second pa rt who will be negotiating the second part of the deal if it's not her? what happens with the conservative party? what happens with getting prompt leadership so we can get the deadlines through? future negotiation, assuming that we get the bill through today, would be that on the 22nd of may we will leaving the eu and then we will get through the negotiations. the other element is that at that point they will be a new european parliament and they will be responsible for choosing a new commission with whom we welcome negotiate. —— whom we will negotiate. 0n the other side of that, clearly parliament was unable to do that this week. the risk is that as we go into the process next week, parliament tries to find us into either extending our membership with the eu or not leaving the eu at all so in many ways, given that this is the day that we expected to leave
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the eu, mps may find themselves that this is the real chance, the last real chance, to vote for brexit. let's be optimistic, shall we? this pa rt let's be optimistic, shall we? this part of the deal goes through, there needs to be a new leader to lead this country into brexit. are you the person to do that? if not, who are you supporting to stand and do it? do you know what? you need to have a view now because the 22nd of may is six weeks ago. but six weeks away. the key thing is to get the agreement through today and the key thing is to be able to leave the eu on time and in an orderly way. the personality issues will have to wait until then and we will have to kick to the issues. there are far too many, there is far too much attention placed on individuals at the moment. this serious issue here is can we deliver as parliament on what the voters instructed us to do way back in 2016. that is a clear,
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democratic and varied but very important decision to make today. the key thing is that you haven't ruled yourself out and what i would say to you is although you are saying the key thing is that we get through brexit now, there are lots of people who are asking well who is going to take us through it and when you come in this programme and can't give a clear agenda of what's going to happen over the next few days for the next person who is going to leave us through, it leaves many people dealing rather insecure and unconvinced that the conservative party is the one to take us through. but feeling rather insecure. you can ta ke but feeling rather insecure. you can take what you want from my answers what i need to tell you is what is important is the process and not the personalities. if we don't get through today, we go through a period of uncertainty, whether it be a cliff edge on the 22nd of april, that will not help businesses. — 12th of april. voters can't understand why parliament won't
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deliver on what they instructed them to do almost three years ago. that is the big democratic issue. yes, it will be important afterwards who is going to, what candidates are going to run for the conservative leadership but we have got to stop obsessing about those today and start voters focusing on the task at hand which is about getting britain out of the eu which is what we were told by the voters to do. take you very much, liam fox. now the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. gang rivalries at a youth jail in west london are so fierce, some inmates say they're powerless to stop themselves attacking members of other groups. a watchdog found postcode allegiances are an "enormous problem" at feltham young 0ffenders institution, with violent behaviour almost every day. the independent monitoring board said many young adults arrive saying they can't mix with other individuals or feel unsafe living in the same unit with gang rivals.
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a youth custody service spokeswoman said while there are significant challenges, progress is being made. guy's and st thomas' is celebrating 50 years since staff performed the uk's first kidney transplant. since then, the trust has carried out over 7,500 procedures, including pioneering robot—assisted keyhole surgery and a ground—breaking transplant between hiv patients. the latest figures show the number of life—saving kidney transplants at the hospital went up by 9% between april 2017 and 2018. fans of the band the prodigy will be paying their respects in essex later, at a memorial for frontman keith flint. the flamboyant performer, known for providing the vocals on hits like firestarter, died at his home in dunmow in essex earlier this month. in a post on the band's offical twitter page, fans have been invited to line the streets in braintree for a memorial procession, ahead of a private service for friends and family.
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let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning but london 0verground is part suspended between surrey quays and new cross because of a signal failure. also on the trains, there's disruption on thameslink services between bedford and luton due to a broken down train. the usual build—up on the highway into town towards tower hill. in mitcham, cricket green remains closed northbound from madeira road to london road for gas mains work. forest hill: roadworks on a205 london road at the junction with sydenham hill. now the weather with sara thornton. hello there, a very good morning to you. it's a bit of a chilly start for some of us out in the suburbs this morning. temperatures way down in low single figures. not quite so chilly in the centre of the capital but watch out for some mist and fog patches in the next few hours, particular out towards 0xfordshire and west berkshire, if you're headed that way.
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we do have a yellow met office weather warning. so, some mist patches to start us off, but another fine day ahead. yesterday temperatures easily got into the mid—teens. expecting very similar weather for the day today. plenty of sunshine, but fairweather cloud this afternoon. 16, 17, maybe 18 celsius, 6a in fahrenheit. through this evening and overnight, it's again, dry and clear tonight. once more those temperatures, especially away from the very centre of london, dropping down into low—single figures. a touch of rural ground frost to start your weekend but plenty of sunshine again for tomorrow. you can see there's some cloud out towards the north and west. that will affect us into sunday but for your saturday afternoon, again, 17 degrees. that cloud ijust referenced bringing us some colder air. you'll know the difference on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt in westminster.
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0n the day the uk was supposed to leave the european union, will parliament finally agree on a brexit plan? mps will vote again today on part of theresa may's deal — if it doesn't pass, they have just two weeks to come up with another plan. i'm naga munchetty. also today... more than 20,000 people attend a national remembrance service in christchurch for the 50 people shot dead in two mosques a fortnight ago. 20 years after the murder of the tv presenterjill dando, the detective who led the investigation tells the bbc her case will never be solved. do i think somebody will come back to court? probably not, no. good morning. how can a city centres improve air quality and assure the drivers pay the price? i am in
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nottingham looking at one scheme that it charges businesses for a car parking spaces. they use that money to fund the tram. how does it work? it has been pretty controversial. good morning. it is the ultimate dream come true for all leg on soldier, who has been rewarded for the brilliantjob soldier, who has been rewarded for the brilliant job he soldier, who has been rewarded for the brilliantjob he has done at manchester united. —— 0llie gunnar solskjaer. and we are lining up for the weekend weather forecast. today in the sunshine feeling warm after a chilly and foggy start for a song. details coming up. it's friday, the 29th of march. today is the day the uk was due to leave the eu we're live in westminster, as theresa may prepares another attempt to get mps to back her brexit deal. this time, they'll only be voting on one half of her proposal — if it doesn't pass, they have just two weeks to come up with another plan.
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iain watson has more on the prime minister's latest change of tactic. this was the day when britain was due to leave the european union, but instead, theresa may is trying to break the deadlock over deal. she used to say no deal is better than a bad deal. today her message to mps is, in effect, half a deal is better than no deal. she has already had two defeats, so she's trying a different approach. she is splitting the bill in two. mps will vote on the withdrawal agreement, or divorce bill, that settles a leading bill of £39 billion and guarantees citizens's rights. mps will not vote on the political declaration on our future relationship with the eu. the government says if the withdrawal agreement alone goes through, the eu will extend brexit to may 22, but if it doesn't. .. we would have until the 12th to tell the
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eu what on earth happens next and, that takes us into another soft brexit, or not leaving the eu at all, or potentially a general election. but labour will not back even the stripped down deal. what the prime minister has tried to do is do something that she denied she would do on the 14th ofjanuary, and that is separate the withdrawal agreement from the political declaration for the future arrangements. well, you cannot separate them because, otherwise, you move into a blindfold brexit on the basis of the withdrawal agreement. and her usual allies, northern ireland's dup, say they will not support the prime minister either. so instead of leaving the eu today, how, if, and exactly when brexit will take place remains uncertain. iain watson, bbc news, westminster. ben wrightjoins me now. it's a change of tactic for theresa may. why does theresa may think that splitting this might work? the
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government's argument is this is the less controversial pa rt, government's argument is this is the less controversial part, the withdrawal agreement nailed down by the eu and the uk back in november. it contains the irish backstop, which is very controversial, the dup hate it. rest of it is concerned with the financial settlement, £39 billion uk owes the eu, and rights of citizens from europe here and uk citizens in europe. that is the bulk of the deal. the additional bit is the political declaration, which they have hived off. it is a map of they have hived off. it is a map of the future relationship between the uk and of the eu. it is not binding, unlike the rest of the treaty. today is the 29th of march, the day we should have been leaving. is that going to play a part? and is in a way that what theresa may is hoping fora? way that what theresa may is hoping for a? it is heavy with symbolism. that will frame the government's argument today. they will say to
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tory mps, you want to brexit, back this now on the day it was meant to happen. it will be the same message to labour as well. the government will say this is your opportunity to guarantee britain has brexit on may the 22nd. but theresa may still faces the same obstacles she has for months. 0pposition parties are opposing this because they say as it stands this brexit agreement is a lea p stands this brexit agreement is a leap in the dark. herfundamental problem is that she has got tory mps, leave supporting tory mps, who don't think this deal represents a proper brexit. add to them the dup andi proper brexit. add to them the dup and i can't see the numbers going through for this. we don't know this afternoon. we will keep an eye on things this morning. we will be speaking to kier starmer in a few minutes. for the moment, speaking to kier starmer in a few minutes. forthe moment, back speaking to kier starmer in a few minutes. for the moment, back to nag. thank you. see you later. gorgeous day. nice for many of us
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this week. more than 20,000 people have attended an open air service in christchurch to remember the 50 people shot dead by a gunman in two mosques. new zealand, prime minister, jacinda ardern was greeted with a standing ovation as she condemned what she called a ‘vicious cycle of extremism'. our new zealand correspondent hywel griffiths reports. linda susan armstrong. musa nur awale... the names of the fallen, the 50 who came to pray. as new zealand remembered the victims of the mosque shootings, its prime minister called on the nation to stay united, far beyond these days of mourning. we will remember the tears of our nation and the new resolve we have formed, and we remember that ours is a home that does not and cannot claim perfection, but we can strive to be true to the words embedded in our national anthem.
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two weeks ago, parts of this park were a crime scene. today, it was a place of reflection and resilience. adeeb sami was shot in the back as he hugged his son, shielding him from the bullets. he watched the gunman walk around the mosque, hunting down the living. this is my wife... but he tells me the legacy of that day will be love, not hate. if the shooter could imagine that this would happen, he would never shoot us. we became more unified, and the community is one, you feel that christchurch is one city, new zealand one country, and by the way, it — i'm sure it will change the world. the al noor mosque has now been reclaimed as a place of worship, rather than fear. but armed police officers still stand guard over this city as it tries to recover, to heal. hywel griffith, bbc news, christchurch.
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20 years after the murder of the tv presenterjill dando, the detective who led the investigation tells the bbc her case will never be solved. hamish campbell said he didn't think any new suspects would be brought to court. barry george was jailed for the murder but was acquitted and released after a retrial. sometimes i felt we were a day away from solving it and other times, i thought no, we're a long way away. the senior officers, they were asking what are the likelihoods of this case being resolved ? do i think somebody will come back to court? probably not, no. would you think someone new might come to court? no. there are still too many late diagnoses and corrective surgeries
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for hip problems in children, despite a screening programme for new born babies. the latest study by surgeons from southampton children's hospital showed that the rate of late diagnoses had not improved since screening started, more than 30 years ago. some surgeons want to see all infants given scans, but public health england said scanning all newborns could cause more problems. something to brighten your friday morning — three rare tiger cubs have made their debut at a sydney zoo. the sumatran cubs, named rose, midnight and archer are just ten weeks old and were spotted outside for the very first time. the species is currently endangered with only 400 remaining in the world. these three definitely scoping out their environment. it is ten past
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eight. charlie is in westminster. the 29th of march, a date we have heard lots about. it is not necessarily delivering what we thought it would. good morning. yes, good morning. a beautiful sunny day. this is the date we were supposed to leave the eu. there will be a vote today. this week, we've seen theresa may promise to step down as prime minster if mps back her brexit deal. parliament has rejected eight alternative options and today they're set to vote again, but this time on just one half of her proposals. in a moment we'll be joined by shadow brexit secretary keir starmer, to get his take on theresa may's new tactic. but first, let's take a look back at how we got here. the british people have spoken and the answer is we are out. it has been more than 1000 days since the
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uk voted to leave the eu. it was a result that changed the political landscape. and ushered in a new prime minister who promised to respect the will of the people. brexit means brexit and we are going to make a success of it. but success is not so easily earned. she has faced rebellions at home. is not so easily earned. she has faced rebellions at homelj is not so easily earned. she has faced rebellions at home. i have never felt more ashamed to be a member of the conservative party. and isolation and resistance in europe. i have been wondering what a special place in hell looks like for those who promoted brexit without a sketch of a plan. her deal has been rejected twice. the noes habit. the noes habit. unlock. iwant rejected twice. the noes habit. the noes habit. unlock. i want to sign up noes habit. unlock. i want to sign up to the withdrawal agreement and it is because the prime minister
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decided to go for the back drop. and a firm promise has been broken. the united kingdom is leaving the european union on the 29th of march. the 29th of march... a prime minister who has even promised to resign to deliver brexit. a country divided, a parliament in chaos. yes, in case you are in any doubt todayis yes, in case you are in any doubt today is that day, the 29th of march. kier starmerjoins me now. how will labour vote today? we are going to vote against this today. what theresa may has done is to cut the deal in half and to present one half without the other. the bid she has cut off is the bit that tells you where you are heading, the political declaration. don't take my word for it. it is never going to work. the prime minister injanuary said you have to have both halves.
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she said the two go together. you can't have one without the other. you can't leave without knowing where you are going. she has turned her own argument on her head. the political declaration, that part of this deal, is not binding? it is not binding. why does it matter? you are left with the guts of the deal, which is about citizenship for eu citizens, it is about the money, the backstop. which bit of that in this deal does your party not agree with? yellow micron the elements of the withdrawal agreement, we have quarrels with bits of them. withdrawal agreement, we have quarrels with bits of themlj withdrawal agreement, we have quarrels with bits of them. i have said we don't much like the way the backstop is constructed but we accept it. you have to have a backstop. the withdrawal agreement is obviously the exit. article 50 couples together with immigration
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because both parties need to know and we need to know, what is the future relationship? you can'tjust divorce the two. 0therwise future relationship? you can'tjust divorce the two. otherwise it is a blind brexit. we don't know where we are going. even last week the prime minister said she would step down. that means the question of where we are going next has been subcontracted to the tory party leadership contest. that will now be determined by whoever wins that contest. from a labour party opposition point of view, we are her -- happy opposition point of view, we are her —— happy to sign off. but where we go is subtracted to an internal tory party battle. it needs to be in parliament, it needs to be put together so we have control over the exit and where we are going. what is happening here is you are playing politics. you have accepted that you ee, politics. you have accepted that you agree, you may have quibbles but you agree, you may have quibbles but you agree with the withdrawal part of this deal. and today, in that place, thatis
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this deal. and today, in that place, that is what you are voting on. nothing else. so how is it with this opportunity as it is being presented, as sir liam fox said this morning, the last chance to vote for brexit, how is it you can't vote for that bit alone and subsequently, as you rightly pointed out, have the argument about what happens next? we have said the same thing for months. i don't know how many interviews i have had, i have been at the dispatch box i don't know how many times. we accept the withdrawal agreement, but it has to go together with the political agreement. the prime minister said the same thing. the prime minister and the eu said the two are part of the same negotiating process. the withdrawal agreement refers in terms to the particular political declaration. the idea you can cut them apart is wrong in principle. and actually makes it of the blind lists of blind
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brexits. —— mike blind is to. nobody would go into a contract and say, we agree but we don't know what the next bit is. assuming it is voted down today, we move on to monday. the confusing thing is these votes that come in again. are you in the process of doing a deal now in order that progress is made to get something about which parliament agrees? will you compromise anywhere in order that something emerges from that part of the process? you accuse me of playing politics. we have been having cross—party talks this week, using the indicative process, to see if we can find a majority. all of us feel a deep sense of responsibility to break this. the labour party has been talking to tories, people in other parties, to say, can we find a way forward? other parties, to say, can we find a way forward ? we other parties, to say, can we find a way forward? we had to take control of the order paper on wednesday. we
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have to do that again on monday. is there a majority for some consensus? ken clarke's customs union, for example. you voted for that. we voted for own policy position on wednesday. we also supported other options because the challenge that has been put to me is, are you prepared to compromise, are you prepared to compromise, are you prepared to compromise, are you prepared to break the deadlock? contrary to party policy, we supported the so—called norway option. that is not hour party policy. but in the spirit of saying, is there something we can coalesce around, we voted for that. the highest number of votes was for a ballot by the public if any deal goes through. you are getting an idea of where the numbers are in parliament. we want to go back to that on monday. lots of discussions going on about, can we use that to indicate at least a way forward? rather than play politics, we have engaged in this. 0utside rather than play politics, we have engaged in this. outside of the
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prime minister, because we have taken the view she will plough on regardless. 0urselves, lots of other parties, including tories, will have to ta ke parties, including tories, will have to take some sort of control of this ourselves and see if we can find a different way through. that is a deep yearning and centre responded —— responsivity we have to break the deadlock. we know that across the country people want that deadlock broken. it will not be broken by just presenting and representing the same package. also, it is not going to bea same package. also, it is not going to be a settlement. the idea that on the third or fourth time presenting a deal gets through, if anybody thinks that will settle this matter for yea rs thinks that will settle this matter for years to come, they need to think again. sir kier starmer, thank you. we will see how events unfold. 9:30am business starts in the house of commons. we are expecting the result of the vote at around 2:45pm. are we going on the farm? iam happy are we going on the farm? i am happy to have a little chat if you are happy to have a little chat.
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you have got someone else coming up later in the morning, haven't you? you are talking to stephen gethins. yes, the snp in all of these discussions, we will be finding out from them where they sit this morning. kier starmer explaining the labour position. it is an interesting time. everybody saying the same thing. there is enormous symbolism about today. because it is the 29th of march. some people suggesting theresa may is hoping that will weigh heavily on people's mines, there is a vote today and there could be a result. how will that play on people's mines? we don't know. the perfect antidote is to lighten our minds with pictures of animals and sunshine. matt is in the cotswolds. good morning from the cotswolds. blue skies overhead. sunshine as
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well. not a bad start to what will be another pleasant day. i am at the cotswolds farm park this morning. many rare breeds. this one making himself very friendly. the carry breed of sheep behind me. beautiful with their black eyes and almost black kneecaps. with their black eyes and almost black kneeca ps. plenty with their black eyes and almost black kneecaps. plenty to see. we will meet some of the younger ones in the next half an hour. a lovely start. it will stay dry for many. that is the good news. it is going to turn that bit cooler, especially after the want of the sunshine in the next few days. yesterday we saw 17 celsius. if you look at this chart, the warmer areas get squeezed out as we go through the weekend. colder air pushing from the weekend. colder air pushing from the north on saturday and into saturday night, to all parts of the uk. out saturday night, to all parts of the uk. 0ut there this morning, a little bit of a chill in the air. it is a
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dry start. fog across parts of central and western england, and eastern parts of wales. that will clear in the next hour. the sun is getting stronger with each day. that burns off the fog quicker. for much of england and wales, lots of sunshine. more cloud in northern ireland. iam sunshine. more cloud in northern ireland. i am optimistic that would break to allow some sunshine. lots more clout in northern scotland with outbreaks of rain. temperatures falling away compared to yesterday. the rest of us, into the teens. temperatures across some parts of south—east england probably 17 to 18 celsius. 18 is 64 in fahrenheit. you are very friendly. as we go into tonight, the cloud across northern scotland, it is a cold front, outbreaks of rain will push south. snow on the hills as well. it doesn't get too fat tonight coming to parts of northern ireland and scotla nd to parts of northern ireland and scotland —— the morning. we will see a frost here and there across other parts of england and wales. much like we have seen in the past few
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days. a little bit of fog to take us into tomorrow morning. as for saturday, it should be a dry and bright start. fog clearing. northern england, north wales, northern midlands, fog developing through the day. 18 degrees in london. sunny conditions in the north but with some snow showers for shetland. 5 degrees at best on saturday afternoon. he colder air will be with us all as we go into sunday. cloud in southern parts of england. hello! there will be the chance of some showers around. but that will gradually clear. for most, it will bea gradually clear. for most, it will be a fine day. lots of dry weather. most be a fine day. lots of dry weather. m ost pla ces be a fine day. lots of dry weather. most places will see sunshine at times. i think i ran out of food at the wrong point! a dry weekend for many but it will turn cooler. a lovely start in salford as well.
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it looks absolutely stunning in sa lfo rd. it looks absolutely stunning in salford. quite moody here. we also have this gorgeous view of yours over the farm where you are this morning. absolutely stunning. and i must say, mike and i are sitting in the studio and we are in awe. the way you have handled your friends this morning. he is back! what is his name? say hello. we haven't got a name yet. what do you think? is it yet. what do you think? isita yet. what do you think? is it a nanny or a billy? call him bob. we are in all. he memorises all of that. how he didn't get distracted by that... you had a chicken earlier. he was so calm in matt's arms. doctor doolittle on breakfast. we
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are doctor doolittle on breakfast. we a re really doctor doolittle on breakfast. we are really excited this morning because paula radcliffe is here. we have had great news from manchester united. big smiles. not surprising it has made the back pages. 0le gunnar solskjaer has been given the manchester united job full time now. as everybody expected. you couldn't have denied him that chance after the success he has had. yes, but he had to have that success. and the players had had enough. it has been a complete transformation. the role of mike phelan is well behind the scenes, who used to work with sir alex. it has had the feel of the sir alex regime back again. the feel—good factor. romantics were delighted he got thejob factor. romantics were delighted he got the job because factor. romantics were delighted he got thejob because he factor. romantics were delighted he got the job because he scored the goal that won them the champions league 20 years ago. is managerial record was not that good. there were some doubters. he has blown them away with six straight wins at the start which set a new record as manchester united manager. and only losing one of 13 premier league
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games so far. and in the champions league quarterfinals as well. can i talk to you about lamp posts? you can talk to you about lamp posts? you ca n always talk to you about lamp posts? you can always talk to me about lamp posts! council is being accused of treating some residents as second—class citizens by removing the nice lamp posts and putting them in smarter areas. i don't even know what are the lamp posts look like on my street but if they were the fancy pa nts my street but if they were the fancy pants ones with the old... the one on the right is the old—fashioned one. i suppose if that fits into that older style of street, maybe that older style of street, maybe thatis that older style of street, maybe that is the reason. we have got ben in nottingham this morning and he is looking at the prospect of a parking levy being introduced in terms of pollution. and on the high street, seeing how that might affect parking. and we have got a gap here because charlie is in westminster. at least the sun is in westminster. at least the sun is shining. this is stunning. we are going to show you what parliament is
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like. it is basking in the sunshine this morning. it may be rather turbulent and stormy inside later. charlie is in westminster. he will be guiding us through what is happening through the day today with another vote on another meaningful vote 2.5. theresa may presenting half of her brexit deal to see if you can get it through parliament. local news where you are. some dense fog patches this morning in the south—west of england, the south—west of the midlands. those are clearing away and for many of us, it's been a sunny start. high pressure still kind of with us. it is moving towards the east and it will allow this cold front to move closer across the uk. today will be quite cloudy. some patchy rain moving into the north—west. for england and wales, that fog clears away and will be lots of sunshine
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this afternoon. and it will fill quite warm again. that cloud will continue across scotland and northern ireland. clear skies and patchy fog again going into saturday morning. not quite as cold in scotla nd morning. not quite as cold in scotland and northern ireland. but things are set to get colder over the weekend. the blues are filtering their way in across the uk as we go into sunday. by saturday, the cloud across scotland and northern ireland will have moved further south, but the rain is disappearing. to the south, there will be sunny spells and still quite warm across southern areas. further north, there will be some dry weather, but it will feel more chilly. 0n
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some dry weather, but it will feel more chilly. on sunday, we still have some cloud across england and wales, but that will break up to give sunny spells. a dry day for most of us, with sunshine, but noticeably chilly, especially across the south, where temperatures will drop bya the south, where temperatures will drop by a good few degrees.
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