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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  March 29, 2019 9:30am-11:00am GMT

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vo‘ited 4m remain bu‘it voied in remain buil information. i voted to remain but i was outvoted by 52%, and i think with democracy as it is, the politicians should all be forced to make a decision and paid no expenses until they have. here with us are british voters and a variety of politicians will also be dropping in throughout the morning. wherever you are in the uk, tell us how you are feeling right now. instead of leaving the eu today, mps are gathering in the commons right now ahead of a vote on half of theresa may's brexit deal. if it passes, it means an extension to the brexit process until 22nd may will be granted by the eu. it's not the big, bad meaningful vote, but it is high—stakes friday. at issue, are we leaving in may or are we facing a long delay? this is what one cabinet minister — a member of theresa may's top team, told bbc‘s newsnight nick watt last night when he asked why the prime minister is holding a vote
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when she's pretty sure she's going to lose. this cabinet minister said to me, "bleep knows, i'm past caring, it's like the living dead in here". run that by me again? this cabinet minister said to me, "bleep knows, i'm past caring, it's like the living dead in here". the race to replace theresa may as leader of the conservative party — and british prime minister — is on. i like borisjohnson a lot. who do you want to be the next prime minister? hello. welcome to the programme.
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it's been one of the longest weeks everin it's been one of the longest weeks ever in the history of this country! in a moment we'll go live to the commons where mps are debating ahead of another vote on half of mrs may's brexit deal — just on the bit called the withdrawal agreement. here's some of your comments in already: derek on twitter says: "i feel cheated by the house of treachery; they've had 3 years to arrange a smooth exit with a deal ready to put forward immediately after leaving. the eu would never agree a decent deal before we left." this is stuart on twitter: "i think there needs to be a general election and some kind of options on brexit given to the public. what the last couple of years has shown is we have a real problem with career politicians. who think about nothing but their own careers, pr & not about voters." chinedu on email says: "does
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17.4 million brexit voters actually represent a whopping 66 million adult united kingdom voters to determine brexit? don't you think a fresh referendum is absolutely necessary especially now the people are aware of what brexit is all about? the process, pros and cons, political games and manoeuvres? " and this from greg who tweets: "disappointed & feel that the majority of our politicians are trying to thwart the result since it was announced that leave had won. every day that passes now, a parliament gets closer to that goal, which if successful, is a total betrayal of a democratic vote & democracy". today was supposed to be brexit day, britain's independence day. instead, mps are back in the house of commons, which is unusual as parliament doesn't normally sit on a friday, to vote again. this time, they're voting on part of mrs may's deal known as the withdrawal agreement, to qualify for a brexit delay until may 22. what they won't vote on is any future relationship with the eu.
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if the withdrawal agreement isn't passed by mps today, well, then technically, the uk could leave with no deal on april 12, or what's much more likely — theresa may has to go back to the eu to ask for an even longer extension. the vote is at 2.30 this afternoon. we will go to the commons in a moment to hear some of the debate. they are just gathering. it is full, and so it should be at 9.30 on a friday morning on such a momentous day. we've brought together a group of voters and we'll be joined by a variety of mps to exchange views, chat about how we can break the brexit stalemate, talk about the impact on your lives, and who should take responsbility for the position our country finds itself in. here is the speaker, john bercow. here is the speaker, john bercowlj call the minister to move the
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motion. the question is the business of the house today motion, as on the order paper. a5 of the house today motion, as on the order paper. as many as are of the opinion, say "aye". to the contrary, "no... opinion, say "aye". to the contrary, "no". the ayes have it, the ayes haveit "no". the ayes have it, the ayes have it order. just before we get under way with the debate, i would like to ask the house to join under way with the debate, i would like to ask the house tojoin me in thanking extremely warmly they carry an von miller, brilliant members of staff in the library, for producing under extreme pressure of time a comprehensive and informative brief for this debate, not least in response to the representations of colleagues yesterday afternoon. they are wonderful servants of the house and we say thank you to them. order. we now come to the motion on the
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united kingdom's withdrawal from the european union. i am the house that i have not selected amendments. i remind the house that under the terms of the business motionjust agreed to, the debate may continue until 2:30pm, at which time the questions will be put. to open the debate, i call the attorney general, mr geoffrey cox. thank you. may i first begin by thanking all members of the house for coming on friday and apologising for the fact that we have had to convene today. but mr speaker, the reasons why we are convening today are partly to be found in the fact that today is march the 29th and it was today, mr speaker, which this house voted some months and years ago, should have been the day on which we left the european union. however, we are
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today where we are. and i do not intend to review how and why we have arrived at this point, but to explain the motion which the government is placing before the house. on the 21st of march of this year, the council agreed a decision. if the withdrawal agreement is approved, then we have a legal right asa approved, then we have a legal right as a country to an extension to the 22nd of may 2019. if not, if this withdrawal agreement is not approved, then that extension will
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expire on the 11th of april. that means, mr speaker, thatany expire on the 11th of april. that means, mr speaker, that any other extension that this house might desire to be agreed by the union would be at its discretion, subject to the veto of 27 leaders. therefore, by this evening, if the 11 o'clock deadline expires and the agreement has not been approved, that legal rights will expire with it. this is therefore the last opportunity to take advantage of our legal right, and the government has taken the view that it would have been wrong to allow that time and date to expire without giving this
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house the opportunity to consider whether it should avail itself of the legal right, or whether it should move to a position where any further extension will be at the discretion of the 27 leaders. i am not taking interventions at the moment. i will in due course. identity and tend to be long and i wa nt to identity and tend to be long and i want to set out clearly the choice before the house today. —— i don't intend to belong. the minimum necessary , intend to belong. the minimum necessary, therefore, in order to secure this right that is ours is a matter of law, is that the withdrawal agreement is approved. all negotiated exits from the european union will require this withdrawal agreement to have been approved. the union has made it
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abundantly clear, and the decision... point of order. i hope it is genuine. the attorney refused to a cce pt it is genuine. the attorney refused to accept my intervention. but i believe he may be inadvertently misleading us, because he spoke very importantly about the date and the significance of today and the importance of the deadline this evening. however, i know the government approached those of us working on the indicative process, asking if we would reschedule our indicative votes process for today. so if that is the case, why is there this significance, and surely early attorney is therefore misleading us about the significance of holding the vote today. i'm going to the honourable gentleman, but it doesn't require adjudication by the chair. the attorney general will have heard the point of order and it is open to him to respond to it or not, as he
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thinks fit. the attorney general. him to respond to it or not, as he thinks fit. the attorney generallj will thinks fit. the attorney general.” will take interventions. i wasjust asking if he would be patient, but let me deal with that point. the government was considering asking that the indicative votes process continue this morning so that we could have brought a motion this afternoon or this evening. yes, that is exactly what the thinking was. there is no desire by this government to interfere with the process that the house is currently undergoing. 0n the contrary, the motion acknowledges it and notes it andi motion acknowledges it and notes it and i will come to it if i may in due course. mr speaker, the minimum necessary to secure our legal right to an extension, therefore, is that this withdrawal agreement is approved. and all negotiated exits
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that any member of this house might conjecture or dream of will require this withdrawal agreement. therefore, the house has before it a clear choice this morning. it can either approve this withdrawal agreement, knowing that by doing so, it secures its right to an extension, or it can decline to do so extension, or it can decline to do so and no in doing so that by next week, there will be no right to an extension, that any extension applied for will require some clear indication of the pathway forward and a stable majority behind it. and thirdly, that it is subject to the veto of those 27 member states. that brings me, mr speaker, to the motion
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before the house. this motion sets out clearly that it is not a meaningful vote. pursuant to section 131b of the act. it is designed solely to give the opportunity to this house. studio: that is the attorney general geoffrey cox and you had an intervention. if you want to watch continuing coverage of that, it is on bbc parliament right now. 0ur assistant political editor, norman smith, is in the central lobby at the houses of parliament. the attorney general was making it clear that 11 o'clock tonight, things will change if this deal has not passed. he is putting the pressure on. he is and he is giving the mps a choice, which is either to vote for this motion tonight and bank that extension to may the 22nd, or if not, you enter uncharted territory. not entirely uncharted because most people here believe
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that the alternative will be that this place, parliament, orthe government, or mrs may, in order to avoid the outcome of no deal on april the 12th, which is the next cut—off, will have to ask for an extension and the expectation is that brussels will come back and say that brussels will come back and say thatis that brussels will come back and say that is fine, but if you want an extension, it has to be for a reason and let's be honest, you guys have been faffing around forever. you're going to need a long extension. in other words, the choice will be, vote for the motion tonight, may the 22nd. vote it down, and we stay in the eu potentially for a year, maybe even longer, as we try and work out what to do. and underneath that is another consequence. if this motion is lost tonight, can mrs may really go on and ask the eu for a long extension? almost certainly not. in other words, mrs may's own position
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comes into play. she has already said she is going once the deal is through, but if he loses tonight, would she really hang around to have parliament tell her, go back and get a longer delay? i think that is pretty doubtful. do you mean if she loses tonight, she will be gone by the morning? i don't think it is that quickly, but i think it's very ha rd to that quickly, but i think it's very hard to see her changing her mind before ever 12th and saying, 0k, hard to see her changing her mind before ever 12th and saying, ok, i will now ask for a longer delay. we will now ask for a longer delay. we will have the european elections. we may have to have a customs union. she said the other week that she is not going to do that. given how low her political capital is now, i don't think she could carry off that sort of u—turn. in other words, it would be mission: impossible for mrs may to ask for another extension. so i think herfuture is may to ask for another extension. so i think her future is also at stake today. it doesn't mean she will go tomorrow, the next day or the day
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after, but in the run—up to april the 12th, if we have to ask for a long delay, i can't see how she can do that. so she might have two weeks or so. thank you, do that. so she might have two weeks orso. thank you, norman. i know do that. so she might have two weeks or so. thank you, norman. i know you will be popping back and we will have mps dropping into the programme from where you are. let us know how you are feeling on the day that was supposed to be brexit day. i have a group of voters in the studio. you are watching history unfold. what are watching history unfold. what are you feeling? honestly, just watching that front cabinet, i can't help but think that the way theresa may and the tory government have handled this whole brexit situation has been a disaster. i am a green party memberfrom has been a disaster. i am a green party member from sheffield. has been a disaster. i am a green party memberfrom sheffield. theresa may is hopeless. we have found out that the budget deal would leave
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millions of people disappointed, disheartened and disillusioned. and what are you feeling today?” disheartened and disillusioned. and what are you feeling today? i feel dismayed with it all. but as a green party member, we are still in the eu, so that is good for you. it's good for now, but we don't know what will happen. this is a national crisis. a people's vote is not an option, it is a solution to the crisis. that is the only way to resolve this. how are you feeling? i am from bexley. i think we are witnessing the biggest political crisis since the suez canal crisis. and in terms of feelings, i am disappointed that nobody can make up their mind and come up with a proper solution. having another vote on the withdrawal agreement, i don't see that anything will change because there is no material change to the agreement. stephanie, how are you feeling? horrified and tired and
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exhausted. i have been following it since it started, prior to the vote. pa rt of since it started, prior to the vote. part of the independence vote was that if we stayed with the uk, we would retain eu membership. so in scotland, everyone is disheartened because we thought we were going to stay. oh, we are leaving the eu, oh, no. watching this unfold shows that the political system we have now is archaic. it needs to be designed. it is flawed and shows that we can't reach decisions. this is detrimental to so many outcomes. if businesses and education don't know what they are doing, we can't move forward.” will hear from are doing, we can't move forward.” will hearfrom more are doing, we can't move forward.” will hear from more of you are doing, we can't move forward.” will hearfrom more of you in are doing, we can't move forward.” will hear from more of you in a moment. we werejust will hear from more of you in a moment. we were just have a word with the children's minister nadhim zahawi. what we are seeing today is desperate stuff from your
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government, isn't it? well, what the government is attempting to do today is make sure that the withdrawal agreement is delivered and allows the extension 30 22nd of may, because all the options that parliament voted on earlier in the week, clearly none received the majority of votes. that would require a withdrawal agreement to be passed by the house. so i think that colleagues, especially on a day like march the 29th, which was supposed to be the day we leave with an orderly brexit, should think long and hard stop why wouldn't they vote for the withdrawal agreement? all the options for the future relationship are still on the table. but you're clutching at straws. aren't you? i don't think so. the prime minister is trying to do the responsible thing. when she came to the 1922 committee and spoke so passionately to the party, many
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collea g u es passionately to the party, many colleagues who were voting against the meaningful vote in the past, stood up and said actually, she has convinced them and they have changed their mind and they will back the government. so i am hoping many collea g u es government. so i am hoping many colleagues on all sides will today think about that. ultimately, we all have to think about one thing, do we wa nt to have to think about one thing, do we want to keep our promise to the british people? the uk voted to leave the european union and eve ryo ne leave the european union and everyone was told at the time that this would be an instruction to your government to your mps, it's a once—in—a—lifetime vote and your decision will be implemented. if we wa nt to decision will be implemented. if we want to keep that promise, we have to vote for this withdrawal agreement, no matter what you think the eventual relationship with the eu will look like. he said the prime minister is doing the right thing. she has split her dealing half in january, she told the commons there was absolute clarity on the explicit linkage between the withdrawal agreement and the political declaration. the speaker of
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parliament has decided that he would not allow the same vote to come back to parliament. we understand that... let me answer the question. you can't speak over me. the speaker would not accept a meaningful vote three to come forward. if we vote for the withdrawal agreement today, legally, we get the extension to the 22nd of may and none of the 27 european countries can stop that from happening if we vote for today. if we don't, and the vote falls, then it's up to the 27 countries, each and every one of them can block as having a further extension. so therefore, we will end up with the deadline of the 12th of april. i hope you agree that this is a better option, and if it means splitting the withdrawal agreement out and voting it through because we have an agreement from the eu that this would happen, it's the right thing to do. i want to play you a clip, if
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i may, from the political editor of newsnight, nick watt. he was talking to one cabinet minister and this was what was reported. isaid to i said to the prime minister, why is the prime and is the holding of that when she is going to lose? and using very strong language, this cabinet minister said to very strong language, this cabinet ministersaid to me, very strong language, this cabinet minister said to me, bleep knows, it's like the living dead in here. this minister went on to say to me, theresa may is the sole architect of this mess. it is her inability to engage in the most basic interactions that brought us here. cabinet has totally broken down. ministers say their bit, she gives nothing away.
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we are witnessing the dying days of this conservative government, aren't we? well, it's interesting that nick did not name the cabinet minister andi did not name the cabinet minister and i think people are hiding behind briefings is dishonourable in many ways. but what do you think of what they said? is that how you see it, they said? is that how you see it, the living dead ? they said? is that how you see it, the living dead? no, i don't. contrary to that point of view, at the 1922 committee, the prime minister came an mp after mp stood up minister came an mp after mp stood up and said she was right and they thanked herfor up and said she was right and they thanked her for the work she has done. this is the toughest decision we will make in my lifetime in our country, and it's a difficult decision. i wrote about brexit when we we re decision. i wrote about brexit when we were about to vote in the referendum and i said, the divorce will be messy and difficult. how close is this vote? it will be close, i'm certain of it. i have spoken to a number of labour mps where their constituencies voted to
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leave in a big way who were thinking about backing the deal, and i hope they do. we will all have to examine our consciences and go back to our constituencies. tonight i will have to explain why we are not delivering an orderly brexit from the european union and while we will have to have a much longer extension and dare i say, running candidates in the european elections. businesses in stratford—upon—avon, whether they voted remain or leave, have been telling me to get on with it and deliver this deal. if it fails, theresa may has to go. let's wait and see. i don't think it is right to speculate as to the outcome. you can't be suggesting that if it loses today, she could stay on to do what? you're suggesting that it may lose. what if it loses? i am not in the realms of speculation. i want to see the deal through. if the deal does fail, we would have to look at our options. one option which we would
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have missed is allowing a further extension to the 22nd of may and parliament would have voted that down. i don't understand why collea g u es down. i don't understand why colleagues would do that. it would be contrary and counter—productive, whether you are remain or leave, to the uk's future ability to negotiate with the european union. could this government to rally around a brexit that the commons can support, for example a softer brexit, for example, a customs union? u nfortu nately, example, a customs union? unfortunately, the commons didn't support any of the options. but we know that the most popular ones where those options. could the government get behind that? lots of options were popular, including living on the 29th without a deal. half the conservative party voted for that. we know what the top three were. could the government get behind a brexit that the commons can support? let's wait and see. it would be bad for the government to ask for a much longer extension and go into the european union
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elections. that would cause a chasm in whatever is left of trust between us and the people who put us in this place. but if it fails, you wouldn't have to do that. the government could get behind a brexit of the commons could support. but whatever deal the common supports would require further negotiation with the eu, which would mean a much longer delay, which would mean having to run candidates in the european elections. that's not the end of the world, is it? i would elections. that's not the end of the world, is it? iwould find it elections. that's not the end of the world, is it? i would find it very difficult to explain to constituents and businesses who want certainty while we are putting up candidates in the european elections and we are not leaving the eu. the other option is of course a general election, let the people decide what they want. all options are bad if we don't pass the deal tonight, because politics will go into meltdown. politics has beenin will go into meltdown. politics has been in meltdown for many weeks. you are right to criticise and challenge. all i would say is that
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parliament has failed because parliament has failed because parliament can't decide the way forward. today is another opportunity for parliament to come forward and i urge my colleagues to put our differences aside and vote for the withdrawal agreement. all the options you speak about require a withdrawal agreement. so if we don't vote for the withdrawal agreement, i don't see why you would do that. a general election doesn't require a withdrawal agreement. general election would compound the uncertainty. no one in my constituency has asked for a general election. the referendum would also compound the uncertainty because you could as easily go back to square one. it would be as divisive and poisonous as the last referendum was difficult. what do you think of your conservative colleagues who are planning to vote against this withdrawal agreement today in what was supposed to be brexit day?” would ask them to think long and
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hard. you know that some will vote against this withdrawal agreement. what do you think of that?“ against this withdrawal agreement. what do you think of that? if they feel they have to keep their promise to the british people and leave the eu, as we said we would, they should vote for the deal. i want them to think about the consequences of what would happen. none of the options are good and we would unleash forces in our politics, hard left and also dare i say fascist right, populist politicians would then be on the rise, telling people who will rightly feel let down, that the mainstream parties have let you down and they would basically sow chaos in our politics, and that is a bad place for the country. i am an immigrant to this country, you know
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that. i came from iraq and built a business here. i went to one of the best universities, ucl, university couege best universities, ucl, university college london. this is the best country in the world as far as i'm concerned, the fifth or sixth biggest economy in the world, so let's not throw it away. how angry are you with your conservative collea g u es are you with your conservative colleagues who are going to vote against this? i am not in anger mood, iam against this? i am not in anger mood, i am in persuasion mood. but you don't think you are going to persuade some of the die—hard brexiteers in the erg group today to vote for her agreement at this stage? many of them stood up in the meeting we had with the prime minister earlier in the week and said they have changed their mind. and many haven't changed. let's wait and see. thank you for talking to us. children's minister nadhim zahawi. your us. children's minister nadhim za hawi. your reaction? us. children's minister nadhim zahawi. your reaction? do introduce yourself. i am jeff nicholas from south wales. i can't understand why donald tusk... no, let's react to what the children's minister told us. is the deal going to go through and do you want it to? no, and i will tell you why. i read most of the withdrawal agreement and there
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are some big howlers in it. the withdrawal agreement and there are some big howlers in itm the withdrawal agreement and there are some big howlers in it. if it fails, what do you want to happen? festival, i want no deal. that might festival. secondly, donald tusk offered us a canada plus plus plus deal, last summer. i can't understand why they don't go for that, because the options are so good. as geoffrey cox said, we are where we are. you can have your favourite option and the rest of it. how are you feeling today? i think for me, i am trying to represent a lot of young people. there is a hell of a lot of confusion. i was listening to the radio earlier today and someone said this is the last day for anybody who voted to actually get what we voted for. and to be honest, it isjust so confusing for everyone. what do you want to happen
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today? what i want and what will happen are two different things. i wanted to leave the eu and i wanted it to be a smooth transition. let's be real. that was never going to happen. the withdrawal agreement will be voted against and we are going to be left in even more of a pickle. how are you feeling today? i am william. i am an entrepreneur. i would say that i am living the british dream. my parents came to the uka british dream. my parents came to the uk a couple of years before i was born. because of the infrastructure here i have been able to build a business. right now i am extremely frustrated because there is no certainty. a lot of our movements are from switzerland and japan. i don't know how this is affecting the pound going forward. the only certain thing right now is
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uncertainty and it is extremely frustrating. quite micro when you are watching the attorney general, whose beautiful booming voice addressed the commons today, half of her deal is coming back today and we have a deadline of 11pm tonight, apparently. are you thinking, this is history unfolding or this is a crisis? it feels like utter chaos. i feel like so many of the mps are career mps they are there to push forward their own careers as opposed to looking at what is best for us. that is extremely frustrating to watch day in and day out. eleanor, how do you feel? i feel embarrassed. people are bored now. brexit happened two years ago but nothing has happened in that time. it has all happened in the last three weeks. there is so much confusion. nobody knows what is going on. more
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often than not i switch the radio off. i wake up in the morning and it is different by lunchtime, and it is different again at tea—time. politicians live. it is a live micro—boxing match politicians live. it is a live micro— boxing match of politicians live. it is a live micro—boxing match of them battling each other's characters. it is not about characters —— micro—politics anymore, it is about getting rid the prime minister. i am going to bring people the news. here is the news with anita. thank you. good morning. mps will vote again on theresa may's brexit deal this afternoon but only one part of it. this is the scene live in the house of commons. they have begun discussing the withdrawal agreement, which includes the controversial backstop, designed to prevent a heart irish border. mps will not vote on the political declaration. labour and the dup say they will not back the withdrawal
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agreement. cabinet ministers are warning about the impact of it not being passed. if the withdrawal agreement is approved, then we have a legal right asa approved, then we have a legal right as a country to an extension to the 22nd of may 2019. if not, if this withdrawal agreement is not approved, then that extension will expire on the 11th of april. more than 20,000 people have attended an open—air service in christchurch to remember the 50 shot dead by a gunman in two masks. the names of those killed were read out before the new zealand prime minister was greeted with a standing ovation as she condemned what she called a vicious cycle of extremism. both members of the liverpool indie band her‘s have been killed in a car accident in the united states.
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tephen fitzpatrick and aidun lawding, as well as manager trevor engel—brektson, died while travelling to a gig in california on wednesday. the band's record label described them as "one of the country's most loved, up—and—coming bands". the current system of checking for hip problems in newborns in england is failing, according to a study by surgeons at southampton children's hospital. it found the percentage of children diagnosed with loose or dislocated hips has not improved since a screening programme was introduced more than 30 years ago. some surgeons want to see all infants given scans, but public health england says scanning all new—borns could cause more problems. that is the latest news. back to victoria. hello. let's hearfrom more of our voters. how are you feeling on the day that was supposed to be brexit day? i feelvery anxious and nervous when i see the scenes in parliament. i would like to imagine where we would be if the
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mps had honoured their pledge to respect the referendum result nearly three years ago. i think we would be in a different place now. we would have that certainty. but they didn't do that. i do feel they broke their contract that. i do feel they broke their co ntra ct to that. i do feel they broke their contract to the people. i don't think brexit is causing the crisis. i think democracy is in crisis. but we voted for those mps in the general election. they are refusing to stand by their manifesto. the erg are standing by their manifesto and yet they are called the extremists. the extremist ones are trying to stop the democratic vote, or at least water it down. do you want mps to vote for the withdrawal agreement today? i don't, actually. i don't think it is good to put your signature on a deal you cannot escape from. there is no unilateral way of leaving. i don't think that isa way of leaving. i don't think that is a healthy way of signing away
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your country's future. let me introduce you to conservative mp nigel evans, who is part of the erg group, the strongly pro—brexit conservative backbench group of brexiteers. are you going to be voting for this withdrawal agreement today, mr evans? yes, because it is a hierarchy of risks. i agree with every word apart from the last bit that your contributor just said. every word apart from the last bit that your contributorjust said. the last bit was the kebet. she doesn't wa nt last bit was the kebet. she doesn't want you to vote for it. i will tell you why. i feel incredibly frustrated. i have had to cancel my brexit party tonight. i was really looking forward to today. i have been planning it for the last two yea rs. been planning it for the last two years. all of a sudden we are where we are. i believe like your contributor that once we leave the european union, then all of this
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uncertainty finishes. we know exactly where we are going. the only reason i am voting through gritted teeth for this deal today is because we then technically do leave the european union. it is much more difficult than to go back into the european union. it is a decision that will be taken. to go back in will have all sorts of other consequences. it is a hop, skip and ajump consequences. it is a hop, skip and a jump brexit for me. my biggest fear is that we will be trapped in the european union more than we will ever be trapped in a backstop. the backstop is not where the european union want us. how much on a knife edge do you believe this vote is?” don't see it going through whilst the dup don't support it and whilst a number of my colleagues... i am contributing to a discussion on our whatsapp group. get this over the line today, get the bill to parliament and then you can have another argument about exactly what the bill should say. but if we lose
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it today, then i envisage the total humiliation of the prime minister coming back to the european union. they have already said they will not give the assurances the dup need. they will put conditions on us having a lengthy extension. they will want the money up front, the 39 billion. tell nigel evans what you think he is doing today? initially he voted for the bill, now he is voting for half of it. if you feel like you are being pushed by the threat of a corgan government, the threat of a corgan government, the threat of a corgan government, the threat of no brexit, there is a lot of—— threat of no brexit, there is a lot of —— there is not a lot of honour in signing a deal in that manner. it is also about trust. you say it is a withdrawal agreement, we see it as an eu treaty. it is very binding. do we an eu treaty. it is very binding. do we trust the parliament in the eu to see through the agreement and to
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keep us out of the backstop? the trust has been broken. i am not sure whether we believe enough of what is going on. a lot of theatre and spin has been around this bill. i hear you but it is a hierarchy of risks. that is why jacob rees—mogg and iain duncan smith have said they will vote for this deal today. after the withdrawal agreement, and we have left the european union legally, then you will have a leadership election within the conservative party. looking at the figures as to how many conservative mps actually voted to leave the eu and wto terms, we get to choose the next leader of that conservative party. i believe that will be somebody who actually believes in the mission. part of the problem is that parliament is letting you down. thank you very much. belinda, i think you have got to go. you are
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joining the last bit of the leave march. she is leaving the building. she is leaving the bbc studios. she is not leaving the eu. thank you so much. let's hear from is not leaving the eu. thank you so much. let's hearfrom people who have not spoken. my name is sean and i come from luton. you said at some point when you introduced the programme that this was history unfolding. i asked what it was like to watch history unfold.” unfolding. i asked what it was like to watch history unfold. i have seen a lot of history unfold over the yea rs. a lot of history unfold over the years. i a lot of history unfold over the yea rs. i voted a lot of history unfold over the years. i voted to leave. i didn't vote for a good deal, bad deal, soft brexit micro hard brexit. i think this is the worst i have ever seen. it is absolutely disgraceful. i feel very, very disgusted with the way they are carrying on today. when i saw michel barnier and donald tusk, when they got the withdrawal
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agreement, they were actually laughing. i thought they were going to break into a dance. that is when i felt betrayed by the people down the road in the house of commons. they are all saying they want a general election. they should be careful what they wish for. i think a lot of mps are going to be either deselected or they will not be voted in again. lam in again. i am shown. i am a retired gp. —— sean. you talk about being in a crisis, we haven't started being in a crisis yet. three years ago, the door opened up to a lot of hatred. we have a gift given to us by really wonderful people who went for legal redress to say we can get out of this if we want to. we can revoke this if we want to. we can revoke this deal. there was talk of the
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politicians are saying, we have so many legal things to go through. that could have been done in one day. we could have sorted, we could have talked to each other. i was visibly upset when i watched after the day when anna soubry stood up at the day when anna soubry stood up at the end of it all and she spoke from the end of it all and she spoke from the heart, trying to bring things forward , the heart, trying to bring things forward, and there were a horde of baying men on the day that two people were arrested for saying they we re people were arrested for saying they were going to murder her and bringing up the fact that jo cox, what happened to jo cox, bringing up the fact that jo cox, what happened tojo cox, will happen to her. i find it particularly sickening to watch that in parliament. we have been given a gift here. you mentioned at the beginning of the show, how do we feel. i actually feel relieved. and lama bit feel. i actually feel relieved. and i am a bit hopeful, hopeful for a change. we can change this. we can shut micro that door. we can stay in
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the european union. we can go back to living with our neighbours. i come from liverpool. my nearest capital city is 135 miles to the west. it is actually dublin. how much more irish liverpool can you get? i much more irish liverpool can you get? lam much more irish liverpool can you get? i am a proud scouser, i am a proud englishman, i get? i am a proud scouser, i am a proud englishman, lam get? i am a proud scouser, i am a proud englishman, i am a get? i am a proud scouser, i am a proud englishman, lam a proud british men. i am most proud to be european, living in a wonderful place. we have got lists of things that we have to deal with. gren fell. we are one faulty fridge away from another disaster. the people of gren fell, it is taking so long to do, because they are not enough people to look after it. they are all working on brexit. we have got to change. it is almost three years since the referendum. a second referendum and
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even a general election as possible. how did we get there? here is a look back on theresa may's the last three yea rs back on theresa may's the last three years in three minutes. her majesty the queen has asked me to form a new government and i accepted. we have a plan for brexit. actually we want a red, white and blue brexit. the uk is leaving the eu but we are not turning our back. brexit means brexit means brexit means brexit. and we are going to make a success of it. i am not going to be calling a snap election. the government should call a general election. showing the strong and stable leadership that our country needs. strong, strong, strong, strong...
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strong, strong, strong, strong... strong and stable leadership. we think it is pretty clear there will be a hung parliament. is this strong and stable, prime minister? they should stop playing politics with brexit. 0ur white paper remains the only serious and credible proposition. i have treated the eu with nothing but respect. in the two yea rs with nothing but respect. in the two years since the referendum we have had a spirited national debate. we will therefore defer the vote scheduled for tomorrow. and not proceed to divide the house at this time. they will now be a vote of confidence in my leadership. the parliamentary party does have confidence. the british people are ready for us to move on. the eyes to
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the right, 202. the noes to the left, 432. it is clear that the house does not support this deal. tonight's vote tells us nothing about what it does support. the ayes to the right, 242. the noes to the left, 391. i profoundly regret the decision this house has taken tonight. and i am absolutely sure that you, the public, have had enough. you are tired of the infighting, you are tired of the political games and the arcane procedural rows, tired of mps talking about nothing else but brexit. a short extension would give parliament the time to make a final choice.
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go and live there if you like it so much! the british people want this to be settled. they want a good deal that sets us on course for a brighterfuture. that deal is within our grasp. and i am determined to deliver it. slam. who do you think there is responsibility? who do you blame for where we are today? my name is charlotte. i live in london but i am originally from northern ireland. i think the blame has to fall with david cameron and the tory party. we have been dragged into a
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constitutional crisis which was designed to settle the backbench row in the tory party. and even now, how brexit is moving under the deal is put on the table, are to satisfy the back bench, which actually the erg, they are even now disagreeing among each other. we are being told this isa each other. we are being told this is a historic moment. it is a constitutional crisis that has been created for the personal gain of some politicians. and it started with david cameron. i am josh, i am a politics student. i did campaign for leave. who do you blame? parliament. the indicative voting the other day is a perfect example. when you vote it down eight other options, you are never going to get it. there is a round two. oliver letwi n it. there is a round two. oliver letwin said they never expected to come to a majority today, we have
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the knockout stages on monday.” don't think they should be put through —— to parliament anyway. olly robinson, the main architect... you are blaming a civil servant? he put the deal together. he is a remainer. the majority of the cabinet are remainers. it is hard to deliver a brexit delivers on the result of the referendum and everyone a remainer. i totally agree with what you just said, actually. ithink i totally agree with what you just said, actually. i think at the time when we were asked to vote by david cameron, i truly don't believe we —— they thought we would vote leave. that was the biggest problem. all of a sudden it was panic stations. i think it is highly embarrassing, watching all of these so—called, our peers. we pay these people's wages.
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it is utterly shambolic and really embarrassing, actually. people from around the world are watching. i think it is absolutely true. david cameron did not envisage the outcome. i am a student of politics in london. i am truly exhausted. and i know that most of my peers are. are you exhausted because you are working hard and playing hard?! are you exhausted because you are working hard a everaying hard?! are you exhausted because you are working hard a ever —— |g hard?! are you exhausted because you are working hard a ever —— forever. i what feels like ever —— forever. i can't see where it is going to end. it is embarrassing, it is exhausting. i know the indicative vote was not indicative of how
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people may vote on monday. the fact we people may vote on monday. the fact we could agree on no single outcome isi we could agree on no single outcome is i think indicative of the fact that nobody has any idea what they want. i don't see how we get out of this. iam this. i am esther. this. iam esther. i this. i am esther. i am an eu national. i have lived in the uk for more than 33 years. i am not one of the voters. i have not had a say in this. but i am being affected twice over because living in this country i have been affected by the repercussions of brexit that are already happening and wanted —— once it is decided, how we are leaving. i am also personally affected with regards to my status. when i moved here it was before free movement. i was given indefinite leave to remain. that was, as i see it, my agreement with the uk. i live accordingly. i work,
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agreement with the uk. i live accordingly. iwork, i have family here, i made my life here. and all ofa here, i made my life here. and all of a sudden after the referendum all of a sudden after the referendum all of that is thrown into the air. you don't know what your future is? there is no clarity. there is a feeling of being in limbo. not knowing if it will be with a deal or without a deal is a problem.” knowing if it will be with a deal or without a deal is a problem. i am going to ask you all who you want to be the next british prime minister. so how popular are theresa may and jeremy corbyn with the public? theresa may is not going to be around for much longer. so this may be redundant. the survey — which was conducted before theresa may announced her resignation plans —
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suggested that just 26% of the public had a favourable opinion of her, and 65% had a negative opinion. this gives her an overall negative rating of —39. meanwhile, jeremy corbyn's favourability is lower still, with just 18% of the public now holding a favourable view of him, compared with nearly four times that number (71%) who have an unfavourable view. this means his overall score is a negative rating of —53, down from —29 in october last year. what you think of those? asa what you think of those? as a psychology student, i try to look at the way that media sets out m essa g es look at the way that media sets out messages and how it can be persuasive. from jeremy corbyn's past, i wouldn't vote for him because i am an snp voter. but from the way the media is portraying him,
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it is not surprising that opinion polls are so low for him. is an snp voter, who do you want to be the next british prime minister?m voter, who do you want to be the next british prime minister? it is difficult. it is one of those situations where. .. difficult. it is one of those situations where... give us a name! i think situations where... give us a name! ithinki situations where... give us a name! i think i would vote forjeremy corbyn. my views probably align with his. who do you want to be the next british prime minister? for me out of the list it is difficult. i was a civil servant. i actually liked working under amber rudd. let's talk about who could take over from theresa may because the race to replace her has already begun. boris johnson is one of the hopefuls. he was foreign secretary under theresa may, before resigning in protest at her brexit plan which he said last year would reduce the uk to a "vassal state".
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he's voted against the deal twice, but when theresa may announced her departure plans this week, he changed his mind and said he'd vote for the deal after all. ardent brexiteer, michael gove, currently in the cabinet as environment secretary had a bruising experience in the last tory leadership race. injune 2016, he was the campaign manager for boris johnson to succeed david cameron — but withdrew his support on the morning mrjohnson was due to declare and threw his own hat in the ring instead. dominic raab is going for it. he was brexit secretary for 3 months — he also resigned because he didn't like what was being negotiated. on this show in may 2017 he told me: "the typical user of a food bank is not someone who's languishing in poverty, it's someone who has a cashflow problem episodically.". as brexit secretary, dominic raab admitted he did not realise "the full extent" of how much uk trade relies on the dover—calais crossing. jeremy hunt the foreign secretary wants the top job too —
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and has backed mrs may's plan. as health secretary, mr hunt fought a long battle with junior doctors over a new contract. while on a trade trip to japan, he misidentify his own wife as being japanese. —— misidentified. he later corrected himself saying: "i can confirm that she is officially chinese." in an interview with the evening standard yesterday laying out his vision for the conservative party, he said the tories must show they are notjust a "money, money, money party" but have a "social mission" as well. the home secretary sajid javid, backed remain in the referendum but has since positioned himself as a firm leaver. javid, became the first home secretary from an ethnic minority background. he's the son of a pakistani bus driver from rochdale, and is a former managing director at deutsche bank. javid faced criticism after the baby son of shamima begum died in a syrian camp. ms begum left london tojoin the islamic state group aged 15. mrjavid revoked her british citizenship when the teenager asked to return. sajid javid has said he wanted the tories to be the party of social mobility.
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the leader of the house andrea leadsom found herself at the centre of controversy in the 2016 leadership campaign, after she was accused of suggesting that she would be a better choice for prime minister than mrs may, because she was a mum. she has previously refused to rule out another leadership bid in the future. let's leave it there. it could go on and on. who do you want to see as the next british prime minister? it doesn't have to be a conservative. all the ones you mentioned are terrible. the one i would have liked the most is borisjohnson. he is a pound shop donald trump. he really is. changing leadership will not solve this issue. from everyone that has spoken today, what resonates is this trust in politicians. people say, we don't trust our mps. one way to get out of this deadlock, if we
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can't trust the mps, is to get rid of them. i have lost count of the amount of times mps have changed their minds on certain things. theresa may keeps bringing the deal again and again even though people don't want it. who else? i am courtney. i would actually not vote for any of the above. you won't have any say over who is the next leader of the tory party and who is the next prime minister. it is down to mps. names go on a ballot, that goes out to party leader —— members and they decide. out of those i guess it would have to be mrjavid. he seems the strongest. he has made some very difficult decisions recently and i feel he could probably do it. iam feel he could probably do it. i am sold onjavid lately. he seems to be saying the right things. but you can never trust a politician. i
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think dominic raab, i think he is coming to me and saying, hang on, i can do this. i don't think he is experienced enough. i think he has had experience as a minister. i think it would be all right. he has had three months in the brexit department.” think he has acted with dignity. he is the only brexiteer with a spine. michael gove has flipped. boris johnson is now going to vote for the deal. dominic raab is the only person that said, i am resigning because of this deal, and staying with his choice. how bad would it be if a remain pm was voted in? we would go back to the same old thing. this guy was only in the job for three months, but at least he had the backbone to save to theresa may, i don't agree with you. the woman behind you were
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smiling and disagreement. what do you say? i have got to go. i think dominic grieve, people laugh but he has shown integrity.” dominic grieve, people laugh but he has shown integrity. i am not a tory voter, i'm afraid. you might be able to tell. don't be afraid. but if the tory party want to make politics better and kinder, get tory party want to make politics betterand kinder, get rid, because these brexiteers are literally the lords who are deciding amongst themselves, and we are the peasants down below. the peasants are revolting. i don't think any politician will be able to get out of the brexit mess and i do think we need a people's vote to sort that out. but in terms of leading the country after that, we desperately
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need a labour government and a labour prime minister. jeremy corbyn for me. what kind of a president does a second vote set, though? with any carpenters or woodworkers, there isa any carpenters or woodworkers, there is a with the motto, measure twice, cut once. i don't think that can be transposed to democracy. we voted before without the correct information. people voted out of fear and lies, but now we know what direction it will take us, we can vote with the correct information. you don't get two bites at the cherry, you get one. democracy, they made a decision, you go with that decision even if you don't agree with it. but we are not exiting today, so we are not going with that decision. but how is another vote going to improve that? at least allow us to vote with the correct information. but if we choose to remain, is it all going to be happy?
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there are millions of voters just like me who voted to leave, and because we believe we were mis—sold a product, we simply want to return that product. that is why it's important to have a second referendum. so he voted leave like you, but now thinks you were mis—sold. you, but now thinks you were mis-sold. in my opinion, we have not experience the outcome yet. so what we experience the outcome yet. so what we read with bree wee baby re—voting for? —— what would we be voting for? some of us have experience the outcome. i had to shut my business at christmas because of customer confidence. people arejust at christmas because of customer confidence. people are just not spending their money. they do not feel empowered to shop the way they used to. so my business was closed. my used to. so my business was closed. my staff were made redundant and i'm starting again at the age of 41 with two children. how do you feel about that? it took me a long time to get
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over it. i have onlyjust got over it. i feel really let down, actually, by my own party. i voted conservative and i won't be doing that again for a long time. so there area that again for a long time. so there are a lot of people that have been made redundant over the last three yea rs made redundant over the last three years who have had to start again.” work in retail. i work with bridal retailers as an independent consultant, all over the uk and gorgeous ireland as well. and i have to say, i feel so desperately sorry for you, because i work with family run retailers. they are my 100% core client. there is a lot of worry out there know about inputs, because a lot of bridal gowns will come from spain, italy, france, eastern europe. not everything is made in britain any more. in fact, most dresses are not made in britain any
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more. so you have got the tax implications as well. sol more. so you have got the tax implications as well. so i sorry for you. you talked about redundancy. i am from the financial sector. we have felt the biggest brunt after this brexit. there was a massive drop in the property market, in the job market, it the banking industry is not secure. without mentioning the name of my employer, i was personally told the week before last week that myjob is in danger. personally told the week before last week that my job is in danger. why? because of the restructure. the market is down. and it is that linked to brexit uncertainty? yes. on the ist of may, i will know whether i have a job or not.” on the ist of may, i will know whether i have a job or not. i am a soft fruit grower. i grow strawberries, the only asian strawberry grower in the uk! i am also a fundraiser and when brexit
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happened, i employ eastern europeans and we have got about 250 who are from poland, bulgaria and romania. when brexit happened, i saw races and's ugly head. i grew up with it. i never had a chip on my shoulder but i did see it. and my staff said, we are not welcome here any more. the way the country has voted, either to remain but we voted leave. asa either to remain but we voted leave. as a grower, we have obstacles every day and we get on with it. in this country, we are not getting on with it. it is costing livelihoods. we are killing our industry because we are killing our industry because we are not getting on with it. that is what we used to be good at. if something happened, we would get on. if you want a prime minister, put someone like us there, because we get on with it. if the weather is bad, we don't moan. we get out
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tomorrow and carry on with the job. courtney has told us as a conservative voter, she is utterly let down and would not vote conservative for a long time. for ever? well, i would vote forjeremy corbyn if the opportunity comes around. but to be told we didn't know what we were voting for, i think that is a no—no because at the very start, david cameron did say we are leaving the customs union and the single market. with no this are leaving the customs union and the single market. with i anyone know we can speak now to rushanara ali, the labour mp for bethnal green and bow, who wants to see a second referendum. will you be voting for this withdrawal agreement this afternoon? no, i won't be. this is even worse
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than what we had before because we have no clarity about the future relationship. in fact, it was a blind enough brexit as it was. now they are taking the political declaration of the table, so i certainly won't be voting for it. do you want to honour the result of the eu referendum? well, the issue here is that we sought a compromise with the government. the prime minister set red lines that were going to be damaging to the economy. she ruled out being in the customs union and having single market access, two areas that are critical to protect jobs. so based on that situation, given the withdrawal agreement of the deal that she has negotiated, even the transition deal, the problem is that it is not going to make the country better off. they will make them worse off. my constituents will not forgive me if i vote for something that is going to hurt theirjobs. that is the
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future bit. but can you imagine, if the conservatives are having a row over who the leader of the party should be, it could be an even more hardline tory then we have got at the moment. perish the thought, it could be boris johnson the moment. perish the thought, it could be borisjohnson or dominic raab or even jacob rees—mogg. could be borisjohnson or dominic raab or evenjacob rees—mogg. the idea that we should put the future of our constituents and the country in the hands of hardline brexiteers like dominic raab orjacob rees—mogg is laughable. these people want to crash out. that is going to make life even harder. it's going to damage livelihoods and risk the economy further. i am not prepared to support something and walk into the dark and damage the future of my constituents. in the withdrawal agreement, which you will be voting on today, which is half of the deal, if you like, what is it specifically
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that you don't like? the government's own analysis shows that the withdrawal agreement is going to damage people's jobs and the withdrawal agreement is going to damage people'sjobs and damage the withdrawal agreement is going to damage people's jobs and damage the economy. the economy will be 4% smaller. the government because my own analysis is that. so the government is asking us to vote for a deal that will make the country worse off and i am not prepared to do that. what will happen? well, i hope that it gets voted down. this is yet another attempt by the government to ram a deal through thatis government to ram a deal through that is not accepted, has been rejected twice and will damage people interests. i want to see a compromise. i want to cross party working. that is what theresa may should have done from the beginning. she failed, said parliament has had
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to seize control of two days. we have another day coming up on monday to try and get a compromise. that is what the country needs. the government has failed to do that. now it is on us as members of parliament to work across parties to get that deal. 0ur constituents need us to protect their interests when they government have failed. they are busy plotting for who the next leader of the conservative party and the next prime minister will be. that is going to create more uncertainty. we have got some british voters here, not too far from where you are, who are business people and they are saying that the uncertainty which has been going on for so long now has lead to one woman having to close her business and others being worried about how they will continue to run their businesses because the uncertainty goes on and on. you must also take responsivity for that.” goes on and on. you must also take responsivity for that. i do take responsibility for making sure my constituents are not going to be worse off than under the current arrangements we have with the european union. it is on the prime minister to provide certainty and
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compromise and reach out across the house. the prime minister has co nsta ntly house. the prime minister has constantly resulted to just turning to the european research group, the hardline brexiteers who want us to crash out. that is going to make it worse for businesses. i heard the testimonies of two of the people who spoke earlier on your programme. they are saying that the customs union is critical because goods are not just union is critical because goods are notjust made in this country. to produce wedding dresses, as i heard one of the people talk about, you need goods from other countries. we are interdependent as a nation in our trade. that is why we need access to the customs union and the single market. that is what would give constituents certainty. thank you very much. rushanara ali, labour mp. richard on facebook says, you we re mp. richard on facebook says, you were asking who should be the next prime minister. there is no one in that den of charlatans that is fit to be prime minister! we need a person who will take charge and get the uk out of the eu. nick says, if
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esther mcvey can be considered a suitable candidate for prime minister, then my toenail cuttings could run for home secretary! another set is only another referendum would conclude brexit but we definitely need another general election as our parliament is broken. some of you are nodding. you wa nt broken. some of you are nodding. you want a general election. that would continue the uncertainty. it would in the short term, but in the long term we would come to a result that would be beneficial for term we would come to a result that would be beneficialfor us. right now, they are deciding on everything, but they haven't looked on how it will impact us. again, they are looking at what will benefit their careers and what will put them in the best position. and what if there is a general election and we end up with another hung parliament, so no party has overall control? we have seen the results of that. it doesn't mean brexit could be sorted. it doesn't mean it would
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bring you certainty. the same people would be back in the same seats in the house of commons. but people are more awake now and taking their vote seriously. before, no one did. we have a right to vote and we are now going to go out and vote. if there was a general election, i don't believe there should be, but i believe there should be, but i believe people would go out in numbers. but it doesn't mean there wouldn't be a hung parliament, even if everybody voted. that is why we need to put theresa may's deal to the people with an option of no deal, remain or theresa may's deal, because we don't know what anyone wa nts. because we don't know what anyone wants. they are arguing amongst themselves. you would split the leave vote then, that is the trouble. that is what they want. then have theresa may's deal or remain. but remain has already lost. something good has got to come out of all this stuff. we have got to
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change parliament. the fact that they walk up and down to vote, i can order a pizza on a mobile phone. they could press a button and vote. when you look at parliament, they can probably only spend a day and a half there because of the amount of time. you can just see the expenses now. we could change things for the better. we may need to think the first past the post system might not be the best for our country. but we had the alternative vote referendum when the liberal democrats were in collision with the conservatives, and it bombed. but we have to have a different way of doing parliament. it is almost like they have to hold a conch to speak. the first thing i was taught as a doctor is, listen to the patient and they will tell you their story. we have got to be kinder. there are many mps in parliament who have sincerely held
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beliefs who are often following the will of their constituents, even against what they might personally do, and also those with sincerely held beliefs who are going against what their constituents voted for in the referendum because they feel it would be worse for them. it's very nice to see sean's face because i read your letter is a lot in the local luton paper. it is nice to put a face to the name. i live in luton south, and rmp has... disappeared. slinked off and joined the independent group recently, mr gavin shook up. i know him as the lesser spotted because i never see him in town. he is usually in parliament or somewhere else. he doesn't represent me. but the core labour voters, what are they going to do who voted him and if there is a general election? let me bring in tim from the
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institute for government, who has been sitting alongside you. i am amazed that no questions have come up amazed that no questions have come up about what is happening today. it is pretty straightforward, may be, in the end. what about the significance of today? whatever happens today, picking up on the uncertainty point, that is going to continue. if the prime minister's deal is approved, they then need to put it into domestic legislation and we had nigel evans saying earlier that the erg will come out fighting on that, so parliament is going to keep tearing itself apart over the
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prime minister's deal even if they approve it. if they don't, we don't have the potential longer extension and we are still in the eu but trying to leave. if we get out by the 22nd of may, this is only the exit. we then need to sort out our future relationship, and it could be a plus plus plus all the common market 2.0 that nick boles and people are talking about, or something else. so those talks will keep going for years and this uncertainty, the fact that it is ta ke uncertainty, the fact that it is take up all of the government plasma energy, that is not going to change anytime soon. but if this goes through, there would be a transition period, so things would remain as are now. so for businesses and households, that is a short—term help. but after the end of 2020, we don't know where we are going. all bets are off. 0ur assistant political editor, norman smith, is in the central lobby at the houses of parliament. it has been such a fiery, passionate debate. it's great to watch. but one of the most interesting things has been the tussles within the parties. for example, in the tory party, we saw the european research group of brexiteers. some of them have gone on board with mrs may's deal, boris johnson saying he will back it even though it is painful. and we have
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seen others holding out like bill cash, saying it would be to castrate the freedom of the british people. and we have seen the two groups openly clashing with each other in the chamber. 0n the ulster unionist site, we have seen the leader of the dup, nigel dodds, clashing with sylvia herman, the independent unionists. and on the labour benches, we have seen labour mps in leave supporting constituencies challenging their own front bench over there policy. gareth snell was challenging his front bench over what sort of delay would be a cce pta ble what sort of delay would be acceptable to labour, how long do they want to stay in the eu? the labour party has put forward on numerous occasions what we consider to be an acceptable form of brexit. if the prime minister were to relent on her red lines and accept that form of brexit, and the labour party we re form of brexit, and the labour party were to consider that acceptable...
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with the labour party still consider that deal requiring a confirmatory vote in the public? secondly, on the 12th of april, when this deal fails this evening, our choice will be no deal or a lengthy extension. could he outline for me what length of extension the labour party will be seeking and for what purpose? no, the cheers you are hearing there are from the tory benches, because they believe that the likes of mr snell and other labour mps in leave supporting constituencies could yet be poised to support the prime minister's deal, fearful that brexit could be delayed for a year, maybe even two years. and that may yet provide mrs may with an escape route if she can get those labour mps on board. it has not happened yet, but you can see from mr snell that they
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are uneasy about where labour is going on this and the danger that labour could end up supporting a long delay to brexit. thank you, norman. what would people here feel about a long delay to brexit?‘ norman. what would people here feel about a long delay to brexit? a lot of civil unrest, i think. who would be doing the civil unrest—ing? do you think there would be civil unrest? yeah. who would be doing it? there would be marches. it would multiply the size of the peoples much. that is not civil unrest, that isa much. that is not civil unrest, that is a peoples protest.” much. that is not civil unrest, that is a peoples protest. i have heard a lot of people saying, i would stop paying my taxes, i am not paying into a system that will not listen to us. they are going to do it that way. who would do that? i would love to know how you do that. it would
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damage the british economy. i have seen a few friends exit to go to america to build their tech and fashion businesses. so it would no longer be a place where it is conducive to build your business. a lot of people would move abroad. it is easier to do that in this day and age. what do you think? the longer the delay, the more damage there is to our relationship with the eu and the more, to be honest, we are just a laughing stock until this is sorted definitively. also, if we do have a long delay, the lisbon treaty kicks in and we lose our abstention veto. that is wrong. there's this myth that the lisbon kicks in. the lisbon treaty is the latest eu treaty that governs the relationship between eu member states. it came
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into force in 2008. we have signed up into force in 2008. we have signed up to it as into force in 2008. we have signed up to itasa into force in 2008. we have signed up to it as a member state, as we we re up to it as a member state, as we were back then. there is no requirement for the uk or the other countries that have opted out from the euro to sign up to that. if there were an extension, we would have the same arrangement we have now, which is already very bespoke. the uk has negotiated a loss of one—off special arrangements to its eu membership that most member states don't have. if we stay, that status quo membership will remain for the length of that extension, whether it is a year or longer. esther, how would it affect you as a dutch citizen if there was a long extension? i would imagine that my status will stay as it is, so that would be a good thing for the time being. but it would still continue the uncertainty. you wouldn't be able to feel settled. courtney told us about having to shut her business down. have any of you been awake at night with brexit induced anxiety? i don't say that flippantly.”
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night with brexit induced anxiety? i don't say that flippantly. i have with my workforce. plenty of eastern europeans have gone back. the polish have started going back to poland because of the uncertainty. so you are waking up worried about whether you will have the staffing to pick the product that you need. most of them come from europe.” the product that you need. most of them come from europe. i voted remain for three reasons, the first world war, the second world war and to prevent the third world war. the european union was formed because of a war. but is it keeping you awake? it was keeping me awake at night the day after brexit. i had to look at my lovely european working staff and i actually was really upset. they we re i actually was really upset. they were hard—working and from other countries and i could see in their eyes that the uncertainty was there. ican see eyes that the uncertainty was there. i can see in my patient to my eyes when i asked them, what do you feel now? i feel afraid,
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when i asked them, what do you feel now? ifeel afraid, frightened. this is chaos. we can change it. we can revoke article 50 and reset it. it's a bit like that film, it's a wonderful life. we have been given a gift here. we are looking at the chaos, but we can live again. but if you do that, then every time we have a vote, we will go back and vote again. if you get labour in, let's vote conservative. democracy goes out of the window. there were eight or nine promises made by vote leave, and out of those, three of them, we are already having to deal with. they said there would be no problem with the irish border. there is. they said we would not have any short—term economic issues in the country. we have had them for almost two years now. and they also said,
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the third one was that we would be able to start negotiating trade with other global countries, and i saw two trips that were done by theresa may and boris johnson and nothing after that. we haven't got anything. we haven't been able to explore those avenues because we have been so busy. they cheated in the campaign and nothing has been done. they also overspent on their budget. i wasn't able to vote, i was three days to young, but i escorted my pa rents to days to young, but i escorted my parents to it! as a student of politics, i find parents to it! as a student of politics, ifind discussion about parents to it! as a student of politics, i find discussion about a second referendum problematic because it is a very slippery slope andi because it is a very slippery slope and i do not want to leave the european union but that sets a
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dangerous precedent. but i don't mind is voting on some kind of softer brexit, this norway plus model that nicky morgan has been discussing, where you join the afta or remaining the eea. there is room for manoeuvre and you don't have to totally leave. let me pause it there because we are coming to the end of the programme. thank you for being with us and for your patience. tim, you didn't say much but what you said was brilliant and spot on, so thank you. give tim a round of applause! thanks, everybody. and there'll be a special programme on bbc one and the bbc news channel this afternoon to report on the vote in the house of commons. you can join sophie raworth for that — it starts at 2.15 this afternoon. 0ur reporters have beenjoining leave campaigners who marched 300 miles to london. they arrive at
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westminster today. we spoke to one of them in the studio, belinda. she had to nip off tojoin of them in the studio, belinda. she had to nip off to join them of them in the studio, belinda. she had to nip off tojoin them as of them in the studio, belinda. she had to nip off to join them as they we re had to nip off to join them as they were arriving. and you can see james what a house's film on our website and on our social media. and one of our other reporters has been talking toa group our other reporters has been talking to a group of remain campaigners called best for britain, who are working with tech companies to design apps to fight brexit. that is online too. thank you again, all of you. have a good weekend if that is possible. stay calm! bbc newsroom live is coming up next. thank you for your company today. see you monday. we have had some patchy fog this morning. it has been dense in places across the south—west of england, across the south—west of england, across the south west midlands and even across the south west midlands and eve n a cross across the south west midlands and even across north—western parts of england, but this is the latest
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satellite imagery. for many of us, it has been a lovely start to the day with lots of sunshine. that sunshine will continue into the afternoon. the fog is continuing to clear away from the south—west but we still have that cloud across northern ireland and much of scotla nd northern ireland and much of scotland except the north—east of scotland, where there will be clearer skies. through this evening, some fog again forming, especially across central and southern areas of the uk. cloud is continuing in the far north—west. temperatures are variable depending on whether fog and a clear skies are. anotherfine day for many of us. but cooler by sunday.
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good morning — this is bbc news, i'mjoanna gosling live at westminster. the headlines at 11: 0n the 29th march — the day the uk was due to leave the eu — mps will vote yet again on a plan for brexit — they're currently debating in the house of commons. by taking the step of approving the withdrawal agreement today it will set out a clear and certain pathway to our departure from the european union. we are here today, mr speaker, because this government has manifestly failed on its central policy over the last two years. mrs may battled on with her deal and
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ministers say today is the last chance to save brexit and leave in may or risk a long

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