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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  March 29, 2019 11:00am-1:00pm GMT

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good morning — this is bbc news. hello, this is bbc newsroom live. on the day the uk was supposed to leave the eu, theresa may the headlines. battles to save a key part the headlines at 11.30. of her brexit deal. on the 29th march — the day on the day the uk was due to leave the eu, right now, mps are debating the uk was due to leave the eu — mps will vote on theresa may‘s good morning — mrs may‘s withdrawal agreement this is bbc news, i'mjoanna gosling mps will vote yet again on a plan live at westminster. for brexit — they‘re currently brexit withdrawal agreement. for a third time, ahead the headlines at 11: of another crucial vote debating in the house of commons. by taking the step of later this afternoon. on the 29th march — the day approving the withdrawal by taking the step of approving agreement today, it the uk was due to leave the eu — the withdrawal agreement today, it and all negotiated exits will mps will vote yet again on a plan will set out a clear and certain set out a clear and certain pathway pathway to our departure to our departure from the european that any member of this house might for brexit — they're currently from the european union. debating in the house of commons. union. conjecture or dream of, will require by taking the step of approving we are here today, mr speaker, we are here today, mr speaker, because this government has the withdrawal agreement today it manifestly failed on its central this withdrawal agreement. because this government has will set out a clear and certain pathway to our departure manifestly failed on its central if the vote goes the prime from the european union. policy over the last two years. minister‘s way, it would set policy over the past two years. the 22nd of may as the date more than 20,000 people have we are here today, mr speaker, more than 20,000 people attend for the uk to leave the eu. a national remembrance attended a national remembrance because this government has service in christchurch, service in christchurch, also this lunchtime... manifestly failed on its central new zealand for the 50 people shot new zealand, for the 50 people shot a memorial service is held dead in two mosques a fortnight ago. dead in two mosques a fortnight ago. in christchurch, new zealand to honour the 50 victims of the mass policy over the last two years. and at a rally, donald trump has shootings two weeks ago. accused his political opponents of using the investigation into alleged russian collusion to try to seize power illegally. donald trump has used his political mrs may battled on with her deal and opponents to try to seize power. both members of the up—and—coming liverpool band her‘s have been ministers say today is the last killed in a road accident chance to save brexit and leave in
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may or risk a long delay. both members of the up—and—coming in the united states. and the other stories liverpool band her‘s on bbc news this hour. have been killed in a road accident more than 20,000 people attend a national remembrance service in christchurch, in the us. new zealand for the 50 people shot we‘ll continue with our brexit dead in two mosques a fortnight ago. coverage here on bbc news, and let‘s take a look now at what could happen both members of the up—and—coming next in the process. liverpool band — her‘s — have been killed in a road accident in the us. welcome to bbc news. debate is underway in the house of commons, and later, mps will vote on the withdrawal agreement part of theresa may‘s brexit deal. it isa this only covers how the uk it is a beautiful sunny day. an leaves the european union, and not its future relationship unusual day, the day that has been with the bloc. if mps reject the withdrawal in the diary for so long as the day we would leave the eu. but it is the agreement today, there could be further indicative votes on a range of brexit options, on day mps will be voting on the monday 1st of april. that follows this week‘s votes, where there was no majority withdrawal agreement. it is not for any brexit plan. expected to reason they will win the next deadline for brexit that vote which will happen at is the 12th of april. welcome to bbc news, live from westminster, where mps will vote 2:30pm. in the commons, there is a that‘s when the european union expects a clear answer debate under way on brexit. outside from parliament on the the next again this afternoon on theresa may's brexit plans — but only steps for the uk‘s exit. on the withdrawal agreement. it‘s also the date the uk would need to make preparations proposals for the uk's future relationship with the eu in westminster, there are more for european parliament elections won't be considered. if a longer extension to brexit is needed.
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a debate started in the commons protesters, there are expected to be in the past half hour — several protests around westminster if mps do back the prime minister‘s we'll bring you some of what has withdrawal agreement, then, the eu will extend brexit been said shortly. until the 22nd of may. with extra police drafted in to keep but first let's take a look that‘s also the date when the 27 european union countries will hold at exactly what mps are being asked an eye on those vocal demonstrators european parliament elections. to vote on today: mps will vote on both sides of the argument. on the withdrawal agreement — looking further ahead — chris morrisjoins me now to or divorce deal — that on both sides of the argument. chris morris joins me now to explain what is happening today. the whole the newly—elected european settles our leaving bill parliament will sit for the first time on the 2nd ofjuly. of £39 billion, guarantees citizens‘ rights and also includes package is about the divorce and the backstop designed to prevent future relationship but it has been and next year, on 31st of december 2020, the transition period proposed a hard irish border. separated. within the withdrawal agreement the vote is just on the withdrawal mps will not vote on the political declaration on the future will come to an end. relationship with the eu. agreement, the 500 plus divorce treaty, the legally binding treaty. the government says that one of the conservative within that is the protocol on members of the pro—brexit european research group, if the withdrawal agreement alone ireland and northern ireland dealing with the irish border. charlie elphicke, is at westminster. goes through, the eu will extend brexit to may 22nd. the debate in the commons has been the most controversial thing there. thank you for your time on this busy under way for about 90 minutes. it was opened by the attorney day, talking about a lot of dates, and also the financial settlement of the focus now on what is happening general geoffrey cox. £39 billion the uk has agreed to pay mr speaker, the minimum to the eu, and rights of uk citizens in the chamber, tell us how you plan necessary to secure our legal to vote this afternoon? right to an extension, i have voted against this deal therefore, is that this withdrawal in the eu, and eu citizens in the twice. it is clear the balance of agreement is approved uk. other things, it risk has changed. the concern about
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in the eu, and eu citizens in the uk. otherthings, it sets in the eu, and eu citizens in the uk. other things, it sets out the basis of the transition period after being stuck in the backstop trap is and all negotiated exits that any brexit, at least 21 months, time to balanced with the concern about not member of this house might conjecture or dream of will require sort out that future relationship. leaving at all. this house of another thing which may have been this withdrawal agreement. commons seems determined to scotch therefore, the house has before it forgotten about, future arrangements brexit unless this deal is pushed forgotten about, future arrangements through. relucta ntly i a clear choice this morning. brexit unless this deal is pushed through. reluctantly i will be supporting it today. for gibraltar. it can either approve this coming back to the backstop, remind it shows the difference between the withdrawal agreement knowing that dup and the drg members who until us. this point have been very closely by doing so it secures its right the backstop is there because both to an extension or it can decline sides have agreed to avoid a hard aligned. there are some colleagues on to do so, and know in doing so, border, at the lad border between that by next week there will be no ireland and northern ireland under conservative benches are still concerned most about the backstop all circumstances. if they cannot do right to an extension, that by the end of the transition and are not prepared to support the that any extension applied for it period, the backstop will come into prime minister‘s deal. will require some clear indication effect which means there will be a of the pathway forward why are you not still backing the single customs territory between the and a stable majority behind it. whole of the uk and the eu. a lot of dup over their concerns over the backstop? my backstop? my bigger concern is we do not get and thirdly, that it is subject to brexit is, people like the dup, are brexit at all, and if we do not, worried that would mean they would people across the country will feel the veto of those 27 member states. never be able to get out of it. they have been let down, their there has been further legal democratic vote has not been taken reassurance from the eu in the form the labour response came seriously. my view is, let us get
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from the shadow solicitor general, nick thomas—symonds. of extra documents which would be this over the line and agree a pa rt of extra documents which would be part of the vote today. we have really positive, global future heard from the attorney general that relationship. while they give added reassurance, mr speaker, we used to say that the there is no guarantee that there iam relationship. i am sorry to interrupt you. we need to go to the commons, dominic raab political declaration was so vague would be any time limit or unilateral exit for northern is on his feet. it was a blindfold brexit but what we also now know because the prime ireland. that is why, as we speak, being forced to accept something minister has made clear she intends to leave her office, is rather than the dup says it will vote against akin to single market membership, losing control over our laws, the dup says it will vote against the withdrawal agreement. borders and an independent trade being a blindfold brexit the party the other aspect is the political opposite are asking us not only to declaration. policy. be blindfold but led into a it is not being voted upon today but the course of the government has different room by eight different is part of the overall package, it taken gives rise to the real concern tory prime minister. —— a different it would acquiesce in a further long is part of the overall package, it is non—binding, about 26 pages. it extension which on both sides of the is non—binding, about 26 pages. it is important, it sets out the channel would be used to exhaust the tory prime minister. —— a different boundaries of the future economic uk into revoking brexit altogether. that is something i believe we must relationship, as we had debated in not entertain. in fairness to the the commons, do we want to be in a tory prime minister. and let us be customs union or single market or clear as well, mr speaker, government, i recognise they have tory prime minister. and let us be clearas well, mr speaker, it tory prime minister. and let us be both? and where we set out the provided some additional assurances at domestic level that northern clear as well, mr speaker, it is a boundary for our future security prime minister ultimately chosen by ireland will not be forced alone to policy, future foreign policy. the conservative party members who
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formal negotiations on all that the follow eu regulations. that is of constitute a tiny part of the wider suck —— star only after brexit some value although i appreciate the electorate. and the party opposite concerns of those not just on that happens. labour is saying they fear side of the house who have concerns can talk about the national of those assurances are not a blind brexit, if they vote for the interest, it is not in the national contained within the withdrawal withdrawal agreement without knowing interest, it is not in the national interest for the future of our agreement and are not binding at the political declaration, we are international level. until we see country to be decided by a tory voting for something where we have the bill, it is impossible to assess leadership contest. no idea where it will end. the bill, it is impossible to assess the strength of those safeguards. thank you. the protesters are in let's cross inside the commons. beyond those assurances, the fine voice. let us go inside the unilateral declaration, the joint commons and here hilary benn. instrument relating to the exit from the debate started at half past the so—called backstop do not change i would argue the eu is almost international obligations and offer nine. certain to refuse any such extension scant political comfort. in all of well let's go to central lobby in the houses of parliament now where we can speak to our assistant on the grounds that we failed to this, however frustrating, scant political comfort. in all of this, howeverfrustrating, i believe political editor, norman smith. we need to proceed with realism. the it is not very full for this key ta ke debate on this key day. it is a huge on the grounds that we failed to take part in the eu elections choice now is between the risk of being held in the backstop by the eu because of paragraph ten of the moment, i know it probably sounds for a period without controlling our decision of the european council technical and complicated to folk which said, i quote, if the uk is watching it but the issues it throws exit, and on the other hand, a up watching it but the issues it throws up are pretty simple and they are, still a member state on the 23rd 26 significant risk of losing brexit can mrs may secure more time for it altogether. neither are palatable. may 2019, which we would be if we may be set 20 seconds to deal both could have been avoided if the asked for and were granted an
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government had shown the requisite through —— make the 22nd to get her extension beyond 22nd may, it would resolve and will. deal through. if she cannot, it is be under the obligation to hold the likely the government or mrs may elections to the european parliament. it is to be noted the uk i appreciate for many colleagues, will have to ask the eu for an this presents a finely balanced judgment call. would have to give notice of the extension and the likelihood is poll by 12 april 2019 in order to it'll be a long extension, and we i share the deep frustrations many will have to take part in the feel at being presented with two european elections and there is a unsavoury alternatives. hold such elections. since it would question mark about whether mrs may be impossible on the 20th of may to anger is not a political strategy. can go on and implement that policy. give notice to hold elections on the stakes are high apart from the in this fast moving and fluid 23rd may, it would be impossible to symbolism of the date because today landscape, i believe we must assess was meant to be the day we were due the specific and tangible decision comply with this requirement. to leave. as the leader of the house before us at this point in time. therefore, what this motion before the house means is if it were the motion today does not satisfy observed, many people will be wondering what is going on. carried, it would in effect rule out section 13 of the eu withdrawal act, i'm very much hoping so, any possibility... this really is such an iconic day. it is not in practice although a it is march the 29th, hilary benn inside the commons. he third meaningful vote. however, we are due to be leading the european union today and ijust has put forward amendments through urge all colleagues, this is to approve the withdrawal agreement this process, amendments, a key way it is not in practice although a which is what the eu needs to have third meaningfulvote. however, the vote on its own terms it does have us approve in order to give us on how events have unfolded. it has the extension to get the legislation significant legal and practical done, so this really implications. first, it is necessary is the last chance, and i urge meant the power has ultimately been to satisfy the eu council decision all colleagues to take it. taken away from the government in
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thank you very much. what if those numbers don't turn up? on 22nd march to avoid and prevent terms of looking at potential other thanks very much. ways on brexit. theresa may has her the government from returning to the 0ne one of the other fascinating things eu to seek a longer extension. i red line for instance on the customs about the debate is the subplot is union. mps wanted to vote on whether regard that as essential. the second one of the most interesting one is the power struggle within the that might be something that could implication of the motion by virtue european research group. within see a majority in the commons. there of that is to avoid the uk holding those brexiteers who have relu cta ntly those brexiteers who have reluctantly come on board mrs may's isa see a majority in the commons. there is a process under way where that is elections in may and i regard that being voted on, led by oliver deal and those who dubbed themselves letwin. it would be looked at again as absolutely essential, to avoid the spartans, who are adamant they the very dangerous and corrosive on monday. do not come on board, and they have let us talk more about the processes effect on public trust in our and how things might unfold. you are been going at each other in the democracy. i give way. may i urge my right chamber. 0ne been going at each other in the chamber. one of those who found professor of eu law at cambridge himself caught is jacob rees—mogg honourable friend before deciding to who has clearly indicated he wants change his mind and support what is to back the deal but will not do so university are welcome. today, mps vote on the withdrawal if the dup do not come on board. agreement aspect. will that be this is what he said this morning. in all intents and purposes a enough to have a delay? what needs meaningful vote three, we do not it is the day we should have been know what the future holds for sure leaving the european union, we to be done and when? but what we do know for sure is we should have been leaving at 11 o'clock this evening and it is a can only decide on those facts that great failure that we are not leaving at 11 o'clock this evening from the eu point of view, all they are before us. we know this is a bad and that this has been delayed. have acquired is for us this week to we should have left deal that could lock the uk without a deal at 11 o'clock, that is indefinitely in a backstop for a what people expected. have acquired is for us this week to have approved the withdrawal will you be spending the morning agreement, the article 50 text, the very long time. when deciding to
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trying to persuade your colleagues to vote for the deal? no, people will make eu has not required us to approve up theirown minds. vote against iraq like many others i am not trying to persuade people, that is a matter for the government here we could onlyjudge it on the the non—binding political whips to persuade people. fa cts here we could onlyjudge it on the facts at the time, not threats about so what is your message declaration. those are being to the doubters? i am not giving any wmd. please consider that before he message to people. it is a very difficult decision separated for the vote. why? because finally makes his mind up. and people will make up their own minds according to their feeling as to the speaker of the house said whether mrs may's deeply theresa may cannot keep bringing i always listen very attentively. he unsatisfactory deal is close to to back the same package. she has cut posits the dilemma absolutely brexit than potentially a two—year delay, and that is the dilemma the package, the withdrawal facing people. correctly. this is a finely balanced agreement is 600 pages, but 25 pages judgment of risk. the problem i have for the political declaration. so isi most of it is going through today. judgment of risk. the problem i have i mentioned the subplots going on, is i cannot countenance an even one of the other subplots is the at domestic level, that is not longer extension and i cannot countenance holding european tension on the labour benches enough. at the eu, it is enough. in elections in may. the third between those mps in leave the eu withdrawal at which it took supporting constituencies and their implication is a duly constituted a front bench stop a theory that may so long to go through in parliament third meaningful vote under section be party incrementally edging last year,, it says we need a 13 will have to return to this house meaningful vote on both the divorce towards accepting some sort of a for a vote presumably and a second longer stay in the eu and fears reading vote on the withdrawal and and political declarations. at some about how that might go down in implementation bill which will by stage, perhaps next week, if there the government a little more time their constituencies and a meaningful vote goes through today suggestion that some could come on and a little more room for board to mrs may's deal if she was just on the withdrawal agreement, manoeuvre. in my view, the government should use that time to
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willing to give a bit more, if for then the so—called withdrawal revert to the eu and seek an example she was willing to ensure exchange of letters that can provide parliament could set the shape of the legally binding changes to give oui’ parliament could set the shape of our future relationship with the eu. agreement —— and implementation bill effect to the brady amendments. i which will turn it into domestic law hear some honourable members on that what are the circumstances in which you might be prepared to back mrs and they could put a clause in to side looking in disbelief, and i may? i said from the beginning since say they are approving the political listened carefully to the honourable declaration at the same time. it lady when she spoke. why is it that the prime minister reached across might not be enough for the eu the prime minister reached across the eu position is treated immutable the house if you months ago, parliament has to have a role and a and unlivable, but the uk is always withdrawal at but it is a way built in what happens next because forward. the future trading relationship expected to change? and i say to the negotiations have not started and if the withdrawal agreement got through today but the political thatis negotiations have not started and that is the crucial part because it will determine what sort ofjobs at declaration did not, what would happen? there would need to be another bite house, that it is succumbing to that left in wigan, the quality ofjobs and the amount people are paid and of the cherry domestically to make mindset which is what led us into this predicament in the first place. many things beside for several sure the political declaration is at the same time, the risk of a wto decades to come. we are proposing an approved. all the relevant clause amendment that would give parliament from the eu withdrawal act gets the right to set the terms of the departure is growing because of the negotiating mandate and be built in reversed by the implementation bill. position of the eu and what we do in the future relationship, and i was pleased to see the government accept for eu purposes to trigger that this house. with the eu and notjust extension to the 22nd may, just on aviation, lorries where progress having a yes vote today on the that. one of your colleagues rose has been made, we should continue to divorce text is enough. there reason collaborate to mitigate the risk of and directly challenged the labour front bench on whether they would
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mps are so worried about a blind back a referendum. how long would it jobs and livelihoods. that is the responsible thing for all sides to delete the acceptable and how brexit is because of fears of do andl responsible thing for all sides to do and i hope the government is widespread are concerns amongst mps? whoever comes in next as leader, it engaged in that. i share his view that a long if the eu rejects all these offers, extension would be enormously will be up to them the shape of the it must take its responsibility for problematic, not least because we we re problematic, not least because we were tough to elect meps to eat future relationship, and how much the consequences of its political parliament we promised we were control if any mps would have over leaving several months earlier. intransigence in what follows. perhaps more importantly because i the next steps once it was agreed we on that basis, i will vote for. i we re the next steps once it was agreed we already have businesses in my were leaving. almost none at all, the political will do so without prejudice to my constituency who are saying they could not bid for contracts in the declaration is just that. almost none at all, the political european union because they do not declaration isjust that. it almost none at all, the political declaration is just that. it can almost none at all, the political declaration isjust that. it can be changed at any stage. that is a know whether they can deliver them position on the section 13 meaningful vote to achieve two oi'i know whether they can deliver them on or know whether they can deliver them on or what terms, so it is having an magnificent document because it essential outcomes. stave off a impact on people's job means all things to all people. it longer extension, and prevent on or what terms, so it is having an impact on people'sjob and lives now that several more years could be problematic but this may be where we is internally contradictory, there european elections in may. and i hope the government can more end up if we cannot get this are things in there for brexiteers, withdrawal agreement through. i hope vigorously pursued the reassurance for soft breast is, and remainers. not because on monday the house will we need on the withdrawal agreement. the point about taking back control former brexit secretary dominic raab finish what we started this week which is to sort out what happens confirming as expected in the was that we can change our minds on next. i hope that will be a commons debate he will back this what that is good declaration might commitment to a customs union and if say. nevertheless, labour will you put back together with what we withdrawal vote. the risk being held
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what that is good declaration might say. nevertheless, labourwill be have achieved today, hopefully that in the backstop or losing brexit provides some kind of lot against a voting on the withdrawal agreement without any clue as to what the altogether, he said. let us get more tory prime minister, who have rich future direction of travel might be. for the dup it is worse because they —— whether they reaction with our assistant hate the withdrawal agreement political editor in the lobby. because of the backstop and would be tory prime minister, who have rich — — whether they may tory prime minister, who have rich —— whether they may be, going against protections forjobs. what voting on a text which contains the thank you. clear signs the are you saying against those labour much hated backstop but without any supporters who may be watching and promise of anything better in the opposition amongst the european research group is crumbling. among thinking what on earth are you future. thank you. it is still under way in doing, you are talking about those who have changed their rescuing mrs may? the biggest position, iain duncan smith, and how the commons, mps are speaking. they many of your colleagues problem is the prime minister seems have a while longer to speak before realistically are holding out still to have done some kind of deal that against mrs may? that vote happens at 2:30pm. there she will go if the withdrawal ido against mrs may? i do not have a number, i do not agreement is passed and that raises has been some speculation around think it is very big. the balance of the prospect of somebody, a hard what mps might do in the commons, brexiteers, taking over, notjust choices, the political risks, are the tory party but the country and dominic raab it was vacated when he confronting everybody. we do not being in charge of the next stages stands up, he may say he is voting love this deal but the one thing this deal has which is to repeal the of negotiations. it is white many in favour of the agreement. labour mps who are considering european community at means we will voting for the deal in the interest sir ed daveyjoins us, welcome, how have left. alternatively, if we do of the country now believe it is not in the interest of the country, and will you vote? not vote for this, we go to the 12th i share those concerns. i think the
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against the government, the liberal prime minister has made a big of april, the eu will demand a two mistake this week because she may democrats believe there should be a people‘s vote. we have been arguing year extension and european elections which means the 17.a provided insurance colleagues on her that for two years, we were the side but it has the opposite effect first party pushing it. more and million people who voted will be oi'i oui’s. told we are not leaving. that would side but it has the opposite effect on ours. we know this figure has rolled out many amendments that matt more people arejoining us. with the bea told we are not leaving. that would be a disaster. people are realising indicative votes this week, it seems that to get this through. willock the speaker has —— we know what happens to jacob rees mogg who we have more mps behind us. it is has said he will not abandon the the speaker has rolled out many looking more positive. if we defeat amendments. the amendment is not dup. nigel dodds, sammy wilson, saying the backstop is the problem, the government, parliament can show a way out of this crisis next week. they are not shifting. you voted to trickle —— to trigger binding, the amendment we are you will have to askjacob rees proposing is to be written into law mogg. jacob places the hold —— the article 50. through that meaningful thought process which the government has accepted and is seeking to do as no, i wasn‘t in parliament. i whole of this country first. he has said he could vote today to support early as next week. that is the apologise. any mp that voted to the government. he will be moment when it becomes critical. i considering carefully whether it is will be voting against this motion trigger article 50 on the day we we re trigger article 50 on the day we were due to leave, they shouldn‘t by in the best interests of northern andl ireland that he votes to support will be voting against this motion and i think most of my colleagues will as well and i do not see any of this deal whilst continue to support this succeeding. we'll the not must rights be voting in favour of this them. it is possible to do that in withdrawal agreement. they set this that single vote.
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inevitably be moves to seek an process in motion. extension to april the 12th and you not at all. people have been looking if most of the european research end up in the situation you do not group come on board, is missing made to see what negotiations would wa nt to bring, which has been disastrous. within touching distance of getting end up in the situation you do not want to end up in? there are no good this through? options at the moment to be totally honest with you. if you told me a i haven‘t done the numbers, but i the government has been unable to couple of years ago we would be know a number of my colleagues have deliver on the referendum, partly having this conversation about a because the referendum was not decided that balance of political series of options, with bad clear. that is one reason why the risk is such that the choice is very lib dems say it should go back to stark for them, either they support consequences, series of options, with bad consequences, i would series of options, with bad consequences, iwould not series of options, with bad consequences, i would not have the people. now we have a clearer believed it. there are downside to this and try to get us out, or they idea. i don‘t think it is what every option now but we cannot people want. go to the 12th of april and we get a afford to get the future relationship wrong because if we do what today is about, and article 50, two year extension. that is moving we will feel it for years. i cannot is leaving the eu. the vote today is people across because they don‘t afford to gamble away to jobs in my simply on the divorce deal. wa nt to people across because they don‘t want to say, we said we would need, constituency without concrete it affects eu and british citizens, but we haven‘t and we won‘t for at reassurances that have not been forthcoming so far. thank you very there is between northern ireland least two more years. and the rest of the country. you much for your time. when other bit what usain to the dup? many saying of interesting political news is the can‘t package it might this. the you will not abandon the dup. they independent group of mps who left withdrawal agreement is poorly negotiated. the political agreement the labour party and conservative which is not worth the paper it is feel this deal threatens the union. party are going to form a political written on because it is not legally party. the thinking seems to be so they are legitimate in saying the they can be registered as a binding, is shocking. people call it deal itself, if unchanged, if we do political party in time for the blindfold brexit.
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not have a strong government with a european elections. i guess they you say you did not want brexit, you strong leader, fighting the course must be calculating they are going wa nt you say you did not want brexit, you want there to be a referendum. but to get the withdrawal agreement to have a long delay and we will be sorted, they are right, it could be fighting the european election. i was told what their name was but i damaging to them. but the aren‘t you thwarting the will of the am afraidi was told what their name was but i conservative party is best placed to am afraid i have forgotten, sorry about that. no worries, it is people? mps have shown you can debate other get itself a new leader and make it clear to the eu we are not going to inevitable things a bit forgotten along the way because there is so options. the most favoured which got leave the northern irish alone in much to keep track of. the key most support is for the people to any stitch up in the backstop. they have a final say. whatever happens need to make changes to those moment today is to 30 pm when mps arrangements which are already on the table. we have an opportunity to today, that still has to be decided will vote on the withdrawal if we vote to leave. change that process. that is the agreement. well the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier has tweeted best way to make sure we do not we can properly have the vote given leave the dup alone. in the past hour that today's commons vote is ‘important‘. to the people in autumn which would let's get the latest from brussels now, our correspondent bring closure to the whole thing. adam fleming is there. how does this unfold? looking at that is one way of describing it. numbers, iam how does this unfold? looking at numbers, i am assuming the dup do unlike mrs may‘s approach. they not come on board, and some brexit withdrawal agreement is only phase is holding out, the likelihood is one, the second phase would take up michel barnier is hitting the nail mrs may will fall short by a small to four years, it is a never—ending on the head there. it is important margin. on monday, parliament will because the eu's plan a was agreeing brexit. what lib dems argue is it is with theresa may and the senate last more democratic because people can push for a longer extension, a week. cannot believe it was only now see what brexit means and they
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last week. it was if the withdrawal can now see what brexit means and they ca n vote now see what brexit means and they can vote on something real. softer brexit. agreement, not the accompanying moreover, we can get it over far political declaration on the future more quickly with a people‘s vote. relationship, as approved by mps today then brexit happens on the thank you. let us go back inside the on monday, they are saying they want 22nd of may, that is the extension to ta ke palace of westminster, norman smith on monday, they are saying they want to take over again. wednesday was a is there for us. to the article 50 process. that does shambles. the idea parliament will not happen it is into plan b, which sort this out is a running joke. if you are bogged down with brexit, they want to refine it down so they is the uk would have two weeks to i bring you fresh news from come up with an alternative course get everyone over the line to a elsewhere. the independent group who of action which would be agreed by customs union. if that goes through, the eu by the 12th of april. the split from the labour party and the eu will not accept we are 12th of april becoming the new cliff suddenly going into a customs union, conservative party, this morning, edge. we think that means if the it will demand we have an extension deal does not go through today they applied officially to become a of at least two years to donald tusk, the president of the political party which they hope will renegotiate. back to square one. we european council, will call for a be known as change uk. i am joined will not have left. what is coming emergency summit of eu leaders in a week that includes the 12th of april. we think it will happen on down the tracks, whether they want it or do not want it, is an the 10th of april and they will be a by heidi allen, their interim binary choice. does the uk reef with leader, why the application to become a political party? extension now with the customs union there is a sense we might end up tacked on. the public will say you no deal on or around the 12th of did not get brexit, you lied. we april or is there a longer extension having european elections and we wa nt to having european elections and we want to be ready for that. it is have been treated like dirt. we have to the brexit process, and by long that would mean towards the end of moving more quickly than we to get this through today. this year were next year and would
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anticipated. almost certainly involve the uk having to take part in the european fascinating. this morning, most is your calculation the european would have calculated business way parliament elections which would be elections are a moment which would due on the 23rd of may. there have bea elections are a moment which would be a launch pad for your party? —— mrs may was heading into a brick been some classic quotes coming out wall. but now there are clear signs of the eu during this whole process. yes, the thinking is as much as it some previous opponents are coming is being forced upon us, it feels on board. but some labour mps in some upbeat mood for us now on this like a weather vane moment, the day we were supposed to leave the eu? i depends who you speak to which people‘s vote march, 6 million leave supporting constituencies are wobbling. it will be close. i realise is a copout answer. some people for the position, the country people are confused about what is is crying out for someone to lead. happening in the uk and think it is it feels right we should do that. a roller—coaster experience with who chris morris from bbc knows what happens next. some people you are the interim leader, how did reality check has been explaining you arrive at that? ot my colleaguejoanna gosling say, if there is going to be no a bit more about what‘s with no fighting at all. we sat happening today. he began by reminding us deal, we have our ducks in a row and down, recognised what we would like to do is to have a first conference it needs to happen. there is a tiny of what exactly mps are voting on. handful of people who think they in september. right now we need a will indicative votes process about knocking out alternative to the leader. chuck umunna as spokesman, the vote is just on the deal, could eventually lead to from labour, myself as leader, from withdrawal agreement, people voting for the deal but that the 500—plus page divorce treaty, is just people voting for the deal but that the legally binding treaty. isjust a people voting for the deal but that is just a handful. people voting for the deal but that isjust a handful. the big trend is within that is the protocol
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people starting to think that no the conservative party. and we are on ireland and northern ireland deal is becoming more and more dealing with the irish border. and also the financial settlement recent to politics. likely. there was a meeting of £39 billion the uk has how far around cooks down the road yesterday with the eu ambassadors agreed to pay to the eu, from the 27 other countries and and rights of uk citizens in the eu, are you to forming a viable michel barnier and people from the and eu citizens in the uk. political party? you need members, european council, they started discussing what would be the terms other things, it sets out for the uk coming back to the table money, organisation, a manifesto, the basis of the transition with the eu to negotiate some kind and gender. period after brexit, there is a lot to do. we are running at least 21 months, time to sort out of future relationship out of the that future relationship. rubble of no deal. they say the uk as fast as we can. there is support another thing which may have been forgotten about, future arrangements for gibraltar. would have to make pledges on in terms of member sign—ups. how citizens‘ rights, the eu budget and many have you had? in the tens of the irish border. if there was no deal in the next couple of weeks we are back to square one because, you thousands. even in south cambridgeshire, i have had 700 will probably remember it, that is people signing up. people are where the brexit negotiations coming back to the backstop, started with those three big issues. crowdfunding. this is david and remind us of the issues. the backstop is there goliath stuff. because both sides have agreed thank you, if you like your drum you how difficult is it for you to get to avoid a hard border, are right to be watching it today. at the land border between ireland the debate under way in the commons, traction? everything is dominated by and northern ireland under all circumstances. if they cannot do that by the end iain duncan smith is currently of the transition period, speaking and saying he is supporting brexit. how easy is it to get a the backstop will come into effect which means there will be a single hearing? customs territory between the whole the government because the balance as you said just now, there is a
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of the uk and the eu. fresh glimpse of something else. has changed. we have also heard that that is what we are. everyone is a lot of brexiteers, worried on both sides. brexit is the people like the dup, when dominic rab stand up in the are worried that would mean comments he will be backing the they would never be deal. that is one of the main able to get out of it. ca ta lyst worried on both sides. brexit is the catalyst that has brought us contenders expected to stand for the together but this is about same there has been further legal leadership in the event of theresa politics is broken. here is a new, reassurance from the eu in the form may standing down. he is now saying energetic bunch of mps are trying to of extra documents which would be build something better. i hope part of the vote today. people will be excited by that. we have heard from the attorney he would back the deal. maybe the european elections will general that while they give added ta ke maybe the european elections will take place, maybe there will be a reassurance, there is no guarantee the damaging and destructive change uk. that could be one outcome that there would be any time limit or unilateral exit extension means we will never leave the european union and if we stand for northern ireland. if mrs may loses today and up the european union and if we stand up to all of those people we have to parliament presses for a longer that is why, as we speak, the dup says it will vote get those people what they ask for extension for brexit. against the withdrawal agreement. and that is to leave the european did you put it this is what we would the other aspect is union, and this is the only way. mr be discussing on this day, the day the political declaration. we we re be discussing on this day, the day we were due to be leaving the eu? it is not being voted speaker, what a shambles it has been that is what is happening inside the upon today but is part of the overall package, and today we see desperate measures commons. the process still under bya it is non—binding, about 26 pages. and today we see desperate measures by a desperate government. we hear way. we will have full coverage from it is important, it sets out that members of the government party the boundaries of the future
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inside there in a while. are at loggerheads with each other first, a business update. our top and to add insult to injury, we now economic relationship, as we heard debated in the commons, know that this issue, this hugely do we want to be in a customs union story is to do with brexit, and or single market or both? important constitutional issue, the confidence, personalfinance biggest issue of my lifetime, is now and where we set out the boundary story is to do with brexit, and confidence, personal finance first, that confidence has increased for our future security policy, going to be the centre of a future foreign policy. slightly but it remains low compared conservative party leadership contest. that tells us what we need to last year,. this is a consumer the formal negotiations on all that only after brexit happens. to know, this has stopped a long spending survey. the report looks at labour is saying they fear a blind time ago being anything about the big ticket items, spending fell four brexit, if they vote for the withdrawal agreement referendum in 2016 or anything about without knowing the political declaration, we are voting the british people, and is points despite a robust labour for something where we have no idea everything about the party that where it will end. market with wages going up more thank you. purports to be our government today. quickly than prices. the feeling is we have seen repeated mistakes, consumer confidence is being dragged down by fears over the economy and first of all a referendum passed with no rules and no planning, not brexit delay. you are head of market even half a dozen civil servants in the basement of the treasury or cabinet office working out what might have happened if the vote went let‘s cross inside the commons dynamics, one can point to brexit and uncertainty, but we have full the way it did. then the prime and listen to the debate. minister triggering article 50 in employment, we have low inflation, we have wages rising slightly faster she said it remains my intention to bring the deal back to the house. march of 2017 in order to rush in to
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than inflation, it is good news, why not part of the deal, the deal. she a process with again, no plan. then are people miserable? went on to say that, i intend to put if we unpick the index, it is forward the motion as soon as recklessly to call a general concerns about the wider economy election a month later when she lost dragging the numbers down since the possible under section 13, and make the argument before the withdrawal. even the big wreath of a majority. referendum. we are ok about our she hasn‘t come back with the deal, now we see it pm incapable of personal financial situation where she hasn‘t put forward a motion we have control, we are optimistic. negotiation of that two—year period, under section 13. i suspect that our a government that was secretive and it is the bigger picture where we i checked the public accounts european friends may find when they committee and we have worked hard have no control which is dragging look at the detail of this, they along with other committees to try numbers down. a lot of the hard have been gravely misled into the fa cts , numbers down. a lot of the hard facts, the headline news pointing to and get information in what was confidence should be higher, i am council decision they made. we know they are angry at the way the happening in preparing for brexit. glass half full, the fact it is the answer is none. and that the banister negotiated the deal which late head of the cabinet office is sta ble she sought to renege on by glass half full, the fact it is stable is great news. do people really think, i am worried said they would... supporting the bailey amendment. —— about brexit, i won‘t buy a fridge. studio: it is the day in which mps the prime minister negotiated. not as such. but we have seen, think will vote on the withdrawal about the last big financial agreement and there is fevered downturn, we saw consumer confidence i suspect the prime minister really speculation around which mps might needs to concentrate on delivering support it. the anticipation is numbers plummet ahead of the the will of the british people and there is still no way theresa may financial cycle. people stop allowing no deal on the 12th of
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would be able to get it through with spending. my concern is that will april to proceed. the dup saying they will continue to happen again. numbers remain robust. vote against it and they both said they will not support it. we are it isa april to proceed. it is a pleasure to follow the for the last few years it has honourable member for christchurch, hearing that those who may —— we may ido honourable member for christchurch, i do not agree with much of what he bounced south of positive. that is says, but i will say in his favour, at least he is consistent with the have expected not to support it such arguments he has made repeatedly in as dominic raab is not standing up when we stop spending and look to this case as to why he believes this and saying he will support it. there save. people say it is a great time isa this case as to why he believes this is a bad deal, why he and i will be in the same lobby tonight, perhaps are many demonstrations outside of to save. how many people are saving? westminster today and extra police for different reasons, but at least have been drafted in to keep a check historic lows across the board, on demonstrations and another he has been consistent. much of what though. he has been consistent. much of what he says about this deal i do agree political development is the if we have some kind of resolution, with him. it is quite bizarre, independent group of mps saying they are now going to formally register asa are now going to formally register as a political party, the are changing their name and are now over brexit, will we see a jump back forgive me, i am going to be called change uk. the in the economy? with him. it is quite bizarre, forgive me, lam repeating comments i would hope we did. that means if i made a few days ago, that reason for that happening is because honourable members think it is we didn‘t want to be in a recession, entirely proper and honourable that there are european elections and we didn‘t want to be in a recession, we would say we didn‘t want that to candidates have to be fielded in they should be allowed to change because of a delay in the brexit happen. my crystal ball is broken. their vote and they should be allowed to change process they want to be able to theirvote and their they should be allowed to change their vote and their mind, that they stand in those elections. let‘s if there is positive news out of denied the british people exactly the same right on this matter speak to the conservative chairman brexit. i gently... the honourable
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this process, it impacts on hearts of the culture select committee, and minds and wallets. i am looking damian collins. how will you be gentleman. building who voted voting? i'll be voting in favour of forward to that day. against the deal —— for spalding. the agreement today. i have previously voted against it on other thank you very much indeed. look at occasions. i do not think it is a the markets. but now, he is voting for it good deal and i think there are a tonight. i think we have sunk to lot of risks, but i think the risk sports direct, mike ashley‘s of not passing the deal is far real depth if i may say today. i greater than the risks of not. i am seemingly failed attempt over wa nt real depth if i may say today. i want to explain why that is. it concerned about the withdrawal agreement as it stands because of isn't good enough for people to the backstop and ifeel debenhams. stand up and say, as we have heard, agreement as it stands because of the backstop and i feel it will lock us the backstop and i feel it will lock us permanently in the customs union. they are now going to vote for the i think if you look at the indicative votes and think, if this deal, not because they think it and the pound looking reasonably might actually be rather good for deal does not go through,... the strong. our country or good for our constituents, but because it will other options would be a lengthy that is all the business news. let us go over to the weather. delay to brexit or a second stop, i see, constituents, but because it will stop, isee, i constituents, but because it will stop, i see, i have got your note, i referendum, both would be damaging, have four minutes. i want to make so if you look at the realistic we have lots of sunshine, it is alternatives they all run more this point. to say you are going to inherent risks than the deal itself. quite out there. you can see some what would you say to dory mps who now back the deal because it. an extension, even though the wa nt what would you say to dory mps who want brexit still going to vote government has made clear no further
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against it? —— tory mps.|j extensions would be allowed, is cloud in the north—west bringing perverse. to say you are going to outbreaks of this afternoon. vote for the deal because it stops want brexit still going to vote against it? -- tory mps. i think we need to get the party and country north—eastern scotland seeing sunny at the european parliamentary spells. england and wales, blue elections, these are not good back together. we have to deliver on reasons. others have said they will the results on the referendum, skies and sunshine, and a warm vote for the prime minister is deal deliver brexit and recognise this is afternoon, top temperatures, 18 going to be a process will be on the basis of the prime minister will stand down? that isn't acting working on for many years. i think degrees. tonight, we continue with the consequences of not accepting thatis with honour. that isn't acting with that cloud in the north—west, some outbreaks of rain working its way south east words. there will be a principle. whilst i will be voting the consequences of not accepting that is we could rip ourselves with the right honourable lady, at mixture of clear spells, apart, be in total paralysis and be unable to break out of the position temperatures close to freezing. we are in. people are right to be least she has been true to her under the fog, temperatures may angry, the process has failed and principles and she stands and she the prime minister has failed, that says she will not vote for this state up to six. another warm day in is why it is right she said she will deal, and she says quite rightly she go. we have to be this process but will be held to account by her we cannot have this process in our the capital at the weekend. it will constituents, and i congratulate her politics forever. it is still for that. we don't always agree but looking like it will not get turn colder. by sunday, temperatures on many points we do agree as to why through, the labour party and dup down to 9 degrees. this withdrawal agreement is bad for saying they will not vote for it. our country. i pay tribute to the what happens in that event? you are dup. as individuals shot the
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right, it could be the numbers are not there to get it over the line. honourable gentleman at the front decries that. as a grouping, i have then we would have to go on monday in which they would be an attempt to grave difficulties. as individuals i find most of them pleasant. at least bring back indicative votes on the customs union, and the other options the right honourable members who sit would be a second referendum or a here have been consistent. on this, lengthy delay. all of those are i agree with them. unpalatable but on monday that is this is bbc news, i‘m joanna gosling the reality where we will be. on live at westminster. the headlines at midday. anna soubry, mp, saying she pays newsnight last night, someone said on the 29th march — the day tribute to the dup because they have the uk was due to leave the eu — been consistent on their position on last night courting it cabinet mps will vote yet again on a plan for brexit — the debate‘s well under brexit. criticising the mps who have minister, saying he is beyond caring way in the house of commons. and it is like the living dead. the changed their mind and having by taking the step of approving prime minister has taken the withdrawal agreement today it previously not voted for theresa responsibility for the shambles and will set out a clear and certain pathway to our departure may‘s deal, who are now deciding a lot of cabinet members should look at themselves and ask if they have from the european union. they will vote for it, saying they failed during this process? the idea have a right to change their minds ina hung but they haven‘t given the british failed during this process? the idea in a hung parliament to try and we are here today, mr speaker, force through a policy that was because this government has people the same right. plenty more a lwa ys force through a policy that was always going to be objectionable and manifestly failed on its central on brexit throughout the day. a special programme on bbc one. try and do it by running down the policy over the last two years. clock and intimidating parliament to support it was always going to be a
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a special programme on bbc one disastrous strategy and a number of as mrs may battles on to save her and the news channel to bring senior members in parliament you you the results of the vote look at themselves in the process deal ministers claim today is the in the house of commons. that‘s from 2.15 this afternoon. and should have done more to try and set a different course much earlier last chance to save the sort of you can also follow on. the she had to go today whatever brexit promised to british people. developments on 5live. time for a look at the and the other stories weather now with darren. on bbc news this hour. happens? i think the prime minister more than 20,000 people attend a national remembrance is to go as soon as practically service in christchurch, new zealand for the 50 people shot our weather is set to change at the possible. i hope my concerns about dead in two mosques a fortnight ago. the backstop and the withdrawal both members of the up—and—coming weekend. after that mist and fog agreement are not founded and there liverpool band — her‘s — can be ways of getting a better this morning, plenty of sunshine has have been killed in a road accident lifted temperatures. up to around working relationship with the best of europe but i think we need it in the us. process over the summer of resetting 18. that will change at the weekend. and healing there is a process and bringing the government back we have these gentle south—westerly together again. thank you very much. breeze as bringing warmth. colder let us go back inside the commons. let‘s listen in. airwill breeze as bringing warmth. colder air will sweep down across many parts of the country this weekend. let us go back inside the commons. let's listen in. he had the by parts of the country this weekend. by sunday, this will be a typical privilege of serving as a secretary maximum temperature. the changes of state. he knows as i know in the welcome to bbc news live three years i spent negotiating for coming in behind this band of cloud the last labour covenant in europe, from westminster where mps will vote you cannot negotiate the changes again this afternoon needed to be negotiated in the two on theresa may‘s brexit plans — but only will bring rain and drizzle across
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weeks or even up to the 22nd of may. on the withdrawal agreement. we rely on working together while we proposals for the uk‘s future the north of scotland. elsewhere, relationship with the eu won‘t be considered. are still members with the other 27 dry, with sunshine. temperatures up to 18. the debate before the vote is nations in the european union and we need to make that change. we have underway in the house of coomons — it gets cold quite quickly under we‘ll bring you some of what has been good at this, dramatic skills been said shortly. clear skies. we may see mist and low and talent of the government, had but first let‘s take a look at exactly what mps are being asked cloud forming across wales, western achieved a lot when the european union so it is apparent to achieve a to vote on today: mps will vote on the withdrawal agreement — england, and a band of cloud moving or divorce deal — that lot but not in two weeks. which settles our leaving bill further into scotland and northern of £39 billion guarantees ireland. under clear skies, agree with me that what is most citizens‘ rights. temperatures will be close to hurtful, those of us who sit in all mps will not vote on the political declaration on the future freezing in rural areas. a chilly start to the weekend. we benches, who heard the voice of the relationship with the eu. people in the referendum but are the government says that have areas of cloud and patchy fog committed to getting a deal that is if the withdrawal agreement alone particularly through the midlands a decent deal, a good dealfor the goes through, the eu and western coasts. there is our will extend brexit to may 22nd. people in our constituency, we‘ve not turned our backs on them, we are main band of cloud producing rain listening but we want to give them let‘s show you the house of commons and drizzle. to the north, sunshine the chance to decide if the deal is good enough for them?|j where that debate is continuing. arriving. those showers could tell the chance to decide if the deal is good enough for them? i agree, but sammy wilson of the dup is speaking. we must above all rule out no deal. wintry in the afternoon. this main studio: that is the debate under way between northern ireland and the rest of the united kingdom imposed area of cloud moves southwards with on us for everfrom
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in the commons, the vote at 2:30pm. rest of the united kingdom imposed on us for ever from the eu, drizzle over the hills. sunny spells rest of the united kingdom imposed on us for everfrom the eu, it rest of the united kingdom imposed on us for ever from the eu, it would change irrevocably the constitutional position of northern to the south. temperatures up to 19. ireland where we would have the laws we have in brussels instead of much colder to the north of that you can watch that vote on bbc london. i thank the honourable area of cloud. parliament. let me bring it some the cloud on that weather front gentleman for giving way. does he agree with me that having nothing reaction from michel barnier, he changed about the backstop since it overnight into sunday changes to says the agreement is the best was first introduced, that the compromise for both sides and it is people of northern ireland, the prounion people of northern ireland, high pressure. more cloud across crucial london is new relationship southern england and wales. a sunny whatever way they voted, remain or with the eu. he said today is the start for the north but the cloud leave, will see anyone who voted to will bubble up. a dry day, light responsibility of every member of date with this agreement, whether the european parliament to tell us they mean it or not, it will be seen winds. but feeling chillier. what they want with their future as not supporting the right of relationship with the eu. today they people in northern ireland to be pa rt are not voting on the future people in northern ireland to be part of the united kingdom? that is relationship but on the withdrawal agreement. there will be more in the thejudgment with commons on monday and what that part of the united kingdom? that is the judgment with which we have made. for us who have gone through a could look like. well with me now are christopher hope, terrorist campaign of a0 years to the daily telegraph‘s chief try and remove us from the united political correspondent, and nicola bartlett, political correspondent kingdom, we are not prepared to see for the daily mirror. our constitution position being welcome both of you. another day of altered by brussels in a fit of
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high drama. nicola, what do you expect is going to happen?|j pique against the united kingdom for high drama. nicola, what do you expect is going to happen? i think daring to leave the eu. let me just it is inevitable the vote will fail and prime minister will be faced make it a second point. the second with the realisation that this deal is not going to get through the reason why i will be opposing this commons. there were various suggestions of movement through the agreement is because i believe it week but the dup have come out betrays the wishes of the vast strongly against it and she really majority of people who voted to needs their votes. the numbers of the that need to come over, i do not leave the eu. i note the honourable think they are there yet. is there lady for edinburgh and south has any signs they are coming? there is described those who voted to leave and are standing outside today speculation that dominic raab is standing up and saying he is supporting it. he has hanging out protesting as a mob, and that is the with the spartans he will never move kind of disdain that those who had voted to leave feel and they are at all. there are reports that at 11 o'clock the dup might come around but are reports that at 11 o'clock being stable of this withdrawal the dup might come around but another source said that is wrong agreement. i will give way. —— and the dup are out of the window. i disdainful. does my honourable cannot believe we're coming back for a time in the parliament rogues. as friend also agree that every vote for this deal tonight or this
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afternoon, we will be for the first time in almost 300 years of our constitutional history drawing a labour not in a chicken position line between northern ireland and because they previously said they had no problem with the withdrawal the rest of the united kingdom? it agreement but the political may only be a trade barrier but that declaration, they are not looking at is how these things start and that will be under the direct control of it today? that is the point the the eu. tories are trying to make, the studio: that is sammy wilson of the attorney general and others in the common. the problem with splitting dup, the dup and its ten mps in the of the withdrawal agreement as it is comments are critical to theresa may if you wants to get her business not the full picture and it is not a cce pta ble through the comments and they are not the full picture and it is not acceptable to the eu viz passes and clear they will not beat supporting we thought actually theresa may announcing she would leave might help this process, but i think it the withdrawal agreement later. they are unhappy about the withdrawal has hindered her because she is not agreement and the potential for going to get labour to vote for the different regulatory agreement in withdrawal agreement on its own, northern ireland for the rest of the knowing that in the future it is uk, which is why they say they will going to be a tory leadership contest which decides what kind of not support the withdrawal agreement, the controversial issue around the backstop has dogged this brexit or brexit atoll, the country debate ever since article 30 was ends up with. that has put them in a triggered two years ago. it was difficult position. there were
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people considering this but i would culminating today in the deep we be surprised if it is more than a we re culminating today in the deep we were due to leave the eu. the debate in the commons has been under way handful of labour mps who vote for this. that is ultimately what for more than two hours. eve ryo ne it was opened by the attorney this. that is ultimately what everyone in there is worried about, general geoffrey cox whatever happens with locking down mr speaker, the minimum the withdrawal agreement the future necessary to secure our legal right to an extension, relationship is dependent on who therefore, is that this withdrawal next as the keys to number ten and agreement is approved where the political majority is if there is a election? and all negotiated exits that any member of this house might conjecture or dream of will require paying £39 billion with no guarantee this withdrawal agreement. is even worse than the actual deal. therefore, the house has before it a clear choice this morning. i can't see it going through. it is it can either approve this a last throw of the dice. it feels withdrawal agreement knowing that like the end of this administration. by doing so it secures its right if it doesn‘t go through today, we have the debate on monday on to an extension or it can decline alternatives. we have no guarantee to do so, and know in doing so, we are going out. that by next week there will be no ifa right to an extension, we are going out. if a customs union will go through that any extension applied for it will require some clear indication on monday, that is against the 2017 of the pathway forward
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and a stable majority behind it. manifesto of the tory party. it is and thirdly, that it is subject to the veto of those 27 member states. ha rd manifesto of the tory party. it is hard to see what result there will be apart from another election. it was seem they have the wrong leader in charge. it is a mess for the the attorney general opening the debate earlier. the debate will be tories. labour, not so bad, they closed by theresa may around about have a leader who will happily take 2pm shortly before the mps get to on the pm. vote on it. the labour response came from the shadow solicitor general, nick thomas—symonds. that is interesting for labour. mr speaker, we used to say everyone said labour have a brexit fudge, what do they stand for? at that the political declaration this point, the idea of hedging your was so vague it was a blindfold bets doesn‘t look so bad. except if we have a general brexit but what we also now know, election, what are the manifestos? because the prime minister has made clear that she intends they have to be really clear. there to leave her office, is rather than being a blindfold brexit the party opposite are asking us not only to be blindfold but led was no clear majority in parliament into a different room by a different for any option. there were movements
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for any option. there were movements for any option. there were movements tory prime minister. for a customs union, a suggestion there could be a consensus. oliver letwi n there could be a consensus. oliver letwin may have played a blinder and may be able to get everyone to and let us be clear coalesce behind one position on as well, mr speaker, monday, the problem is, we are looking at what happens in the next it is a prime minister ultimately few days rather than weeks, we can‘t chosen by conservative party members tell. as someone put it, it is like binge who constitute a tiny part of the wider electorate. watching a drama. and the party opposite can talk about the national interest, thank you. thank you both very much. it is not in the national interest for the future of our country to be decided by a tory leadership contest. we will keep watching what is happening inside the commons. if you the former tory leader and brexit supporter iain duncan smith, who has wa nt criticised the pm‘s deal, happening inside the commons. if you want coverage of the commons, you has told the commons he will be can watch that on bbc parliament. we voting with the government later. will have full analysis throughout the day. i say to my colleagues that, for me, this is not an easy decision because there is a lot about this bill that i do not like, and i stand on that
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position. a special programme on bbc one but i do say that if we do not send and the news channel to bring this forward to look at the you the results of the vote legislation, we will rue that day, in the house of commons. that‘s from 2.15 this afternoon. because we will end up having to you can also follow accept what i think is a damaging and destructive extension, meaning we will never leave developments on 5live. the european union. and if we say we stand up for 17.4 million people, then, we have to get those people what they asked my my opportunity for a moment of calm. for, is to leave the european union, and this, now, is the only way. the morning fog has cleared from the south—west. more cloud for scotland and northern ireland. maximum that was iain duncan smith saying he temperatures in aberdeen up to 15. would be supporting the deal. i patchy rain in the far north—west. spoke earlier to damian collins saying he will be supporting the deal and now we‘re hearing from our editor saying that dominic raab, elsewhere, a quiet weather day, temperatures up to 18, feeling quite sources are confirming, he will back warm. tonight, we continue with the government today but reserve judgment on the next bit of the cloud and rain in the far
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process. he was seen as one of the north—west. otherwise, lengthy, clear spells, turning chilly into hardliners he was going to hold out and come what may, but he will be saturday morning. patchy fog developing in southern areas. voting with the government today so temperatures will vary. saturday slowly more mps are coming behind the prime minister pass withdrawal agreement later today but labour and will be a fine day for many, temperatures potentially up to 19 in the dup are saying they will vote london. by london. by sunday, there‘s temperatures will against it. without the support of calm down, about 11 in london. fine the dup and their ten mps it is hard and dry weather. to see whether the government can get enough support but there may be labour mps who will defy the labour whip and vote with the government so it is going to be very interesting when that vote gets under way at 2:30pm. well, veteran eurosceptic sir bill cash believes may‘s deal to be bad for the country. here‘s what he said in the commons. it is exactly the same as when the european scrutiny committee last march, a whole year ago, made a report saying we should never ever have accepted the sequencing or,
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for that matter, the terms of reference laid down by the european union. we have capitulated. this is not a compromise, mr speaker, this has been capitulation. well, let‘s go to central lobby in the houses of parliament now where we can speak to our assistant political editor norman smith. some of the tory hardliners are saying now they will back the deal. very interesting, dominic raab coming on board and you get a sense of tension and turmoil within the european research group with still a ha rd european research group with still a hard but diminishing group determined to vote against mrs may. on the labour side there are emerging signs of some labour mps preparing to back mrs may if she would agree to some sort of amendment that would give parliament amendment that would give parliament a bigger role in the brexit‘s negotiations. i‘m joined by a labour mp, what do you say to the likes of
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gareth snell who says you cannot have a long delay and have to deliver on what people voted for in constituencies like his in stoke which were pro—exit. constituencies like his in stoke which were pro-exit. gareth is a wonderful colleague and i work closely with him but today is a desperate and cynical attempt by the government to force through this agreement. we currently hear some conservative mps think they have the right to change their mind when presented with fresh information. all i am asking for is the british people get the same opportunity to look at what is on offer and decide how they proceed. i should not be mps can change their mind but the british people cannot. we have had two opportunities to build down in big numbers what the government has proposed and i am not prepared to subcontract the government's future, the jobs of my constituents to a tory leadership campaign. you surely have to be honest about the sort of delete you would be willing to have to secure that the second referendum. what sort of delay do
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you think is acceptable? the most important thing is we get this right. this will be defining for our country and define who we are and what we can do for generations to come. that means it takes us a bit longer to get that right, so be it. my constituentsjobs, longer to get that right, so be it. my constituents jobs, livelihoods and workers' rights are at stake and we, asa and workers' rights are at stake and we, as a parliament, have to make time to make sure we what we put a bit of the country is sustainable. thank you for your time, all sorts of subplots today. a huge day. i suppose the government will be encouraged by the signs of the likes of dominic raab at this late stage climbing on board. let us take a peek inside the commons and andrew mitchell is speaking right now and in front of him, iain duncan smith who said he would be supporting the government. the government is trying to win the support of some of those
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brexiteers hardliners who have said they would vote against the government and there were 27 labour rebels who voted against the labour whip on the second referendum. perhaps some of them will be voting with the government, that is what they will be hoping for. i spoke to one of the conservative mps who have changed their mind and outside they will back today‘s motion despite having serious reservations. damian collins is chair of the digital, culture, media and sport committee. i will be voting in favour of the agreement today. i previously voted against it on two other occasions. for me, i think the deal is not a good deal, i think there are a lot
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of risks for the next phase of negotiations, but for me now, the risks of not passing this deal are far greater than the risks of it getting through. so, what are the risks for you in the next phase? well, for me my big concern about the withdrawal agreement as it stands was the backstop and the fact the backstop could be used as a mechanism to lock us permanently in the customs union. i think if you look at the indicative votes earlier in the week, you could probably say, well, if this deal doesn‘t go through the chances are there will be an attempt to attach permanent membership of the customs union to a withdrawal agreement. other than that the other options we would be facing would be very lengthy delay to brexit or a second referendum. both which i think would be incredibly damaging so i think when you look at the realistic alternatives to the deal, you can see they all run more inherent risks than the deal does itself. what would you say to tory mps who say they want brexit but are still saying they will vote against this? i think we have got to recognise that, the big challenge we face now is to try and bring our broken politics back together and bring the country back together. none of us are probably going to get the ideal version of brexit
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we were all hoping we would get, this is going to involve some sort of compromise. i think what we have got to do is deliver on the result of the referendum, deliver brexit and recognise this is going to be a process we are going to be working on for probably many years and i think, the consequences of not accepting that, it is going to mean compromise and working together, will be that the rep ourselves apart as a country and in politics, a total paralysis in parliament and be unable to break out of this terrible position we find ourselves in. people have a right to feel angry. i mean this process has failed, the prime minister has failed and that is why it is right she says she is going to go. we have to reset and restart this process but we cannot have this paralysis. damien collins speaking to me earlier. with me now is snp mpjoanna cherry. thank you forjoining us. slowly but surely there are mps hardline brexiteers tory mps is that they would never support this who are coming on site, this may get through. it looks like this is a possibility, for example, the only scottish tory mp who was voted against the deal twice has tweeted this morning he will support it so
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thatis this morning he will support it so that is all the scottish tories behind it in direct contravention of their constituents. every local area in scotland voted to remain. there are people shouting behind us, we have ways of making new vote and it is clearly an intimidating atmosphere but i can assure you is in scotland and across the uk the scottish national party will not be voting for the steel today. there are reasons there are strong feelings as there was a referendum. i know that scotland, in itself, voted to remain but it was not done ona voted to remain but it was not done on a regional basis. scotland is not a region, it is a nation. it was a union of the three nations and the province of northern ireland and two out of the four voted to remain and prime minister has taken no cognizance of that from the beginning, and she has not tried to
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build any consensus. i am not suggesting the use of the scots should override the views of the english but no it should be views of the english overrides the views of the english overrides the views of the scots. there was an opportunity in the past to build a consensus on this and some of us have still been trying to build a consensus in the last week. we did well on the indicative votes on monday because we had more people to vote on a second referendum than anyone thought we would not is why the tories are so desperate to get this through today to try and stop us getting a bigger coalition behind a second vote on monday. as things stand, it could be their withdrawal agreement goes through today and that process will continue in the comments giving mps their voice, potentially on monday, there could bea potentially on monday, there could be a convalescent behind it, a customs union. in that case, is that the sort of... the customs union is not enough for the scottish national
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party. the crucial thing is freedom of movement is fundamental to scotland‘s demographic and economic needs. it is notjust me saying that but independent commentators and businesses in scotland. freedom of movement boosted the scottish economy, if we lose it the economy will shrink which is why smp mps abstained on the customs union only motion earlier this week. because it‘s union on its own is not enough. the snp compromise was to stay in the customs union... what would your next steps be if the deal was to go ahead? i'm not point to anticipate what is going to happen later today because it is very close. what i am working on today is arguing against this political fix the tories are
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putting through. make no mistake, they are trying to dress it up by making the attorney general read by a legal necessity but the tories need to get this withdrawal agreement through so they can get rid of theresa may and install an unelected right—wing conservative readers who will negotiate a canada style free trade agreement to turn the united kingdom into some singapore style economy with minimal rate for eu workers and citizens. the s&p will not stand for that so we are concentrating our fire to stopping this fix. i have got more labour mps backing this next week if i change the wording slightly so i‘m working carefully and anxiously cross party to date to try and bring that back next week. thank you very much. staying with brexit,
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the eu‘s chief negotiator, michel barnier, has tweeted that today‘s commons vote is "important". our correspondent in brussels, adam fleming, told me more about what mr barnier was saying. it is important because the eu‘s plan a as agreed with theresa may and the senate last week. it was if the withdrawal agreement, not the accompanying political declaration on the future relationship, is approved by mps today then brexit happens on the 22nd of may, that is the extension to the article 50 process. if that does not happen it is into plan b, which is the uk would have two weeks to come up with an alternative course of action which would be agreed by the eu by the 12th of april. the 12th of april becoming the new cliff edge. we think that means if the deal does not go through today donald tusk, the president of the european council, will call for a emergency summit of eu leaders in a week that includes the 12th of april. we think it will happen
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on the 10th of april and there will be a binary choice. does the uk leave with no deal on or around the 12th of april or is there a longer extension to the brexit process, and by long that would mean towards the end of this year or next year and would almost certainly involve the uk having to take part in the european parliament elections which would be due on the 23rd of may. there have been some classic quotes coming out of the eu during this whole process. i depends who you speak to which i realise is a copout answer. some people are confused about what is happening in the uk and think it is a roller—coaster experience with who knows what happens next. some people say, if there is going to be no deal, we have our ducks in a row and it
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needs to happen. there is a tiny handful of people who think the whole indicative votes process about knocking out alternative to the deal, could eventually lead to people voting for the deal but that is just a handful. the big trend is people starting to think that no deal is becoming more and more likely. there was a meeting yesterday with the eu ambassadors from the 27 other countries and michel barnier and people from the european council, they started discussing what would be the terms for the uk coming back to the table with the eu to negotiate some kind of future relationship out of the rubble of no deal. they say the uk would have to make pledges on citizens‘ rights, the eu budget and the irish border. if there was no deal in the next couple of weeks we are back to square one because, you will probably remember it, that is where the brexit negotiations started with those three big issues. let‘s speak now
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to dr simon usherwood, deputy director of the uk in a changing europe programme and reader in politics at the university of surrey. iam i am looking at the website and it says 1a days, nine hours, 36 minutes and eight seconds and counting until we leave europe. it was supposed to be today but it has changed and it may not even be the 12th of april. what are your thoughts as we look towards today? i think it is indicative that here we are on the day we are programmed to leave we do not know what is going to happen. the vote this afternoon looks finely balanced, i think a lot of uncertainty on both sides but also once we get this vote passed we still haven‘t resolved the situation. we still have to find out if it is passed whether the government is able to get the necessary legislation approved by
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the 22nd of may which beat the new deadline. if it doesn‘t we fell back onto the indicative vote process which carries on next monday. a lot are still going on in and around this process. in terms of the process that indicative vote process continues. the withdrawal agreement gets agreed today it is the shape of the political declaration, what the commons would like things to be in the future remains undecided. is it possible this gets locked down today but it is still mps in control for it now? i think that is the government‘s thinking and the argument it is making that by separating the withdrawal agreement, the legally binding part of the process , the legally binding part of the process, by the political declaration which is what we would like to achieve in the future they could let mps on monday reached some decisions and required the government to renegotiate that declaration without actually changing the terms on which they
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leave. the withdrawal agreement is about ending whereas the political declaration is about the future and what might come afterwards. thank you very much, you can hear the protesters are getting noisier and noisier behind us here at westminster this lunchtime. let‘s just show you some pictures of brexit supporters gathering in parliament square in the past hour. there have been banners and protesters outside parliament ever since article 50 was announced and there have been an ebb and flow in numbers. let‘s go inside the commons. i do not take the decision i‘m going to take today in terms of how i vote following this debate at all likely. there is grave disappointment and nothing upsets me more than being here, listening to the debate and listening to members of parliament who want to renege on
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the commitments. ultimately, i will bejudged on the the commitments. ultimately, i will be judged on the choice the commitments. ultimately, i will bejudged on the choice i make and the decisions i make today and rightly so, by the people of my constituency. the constituency that voted overwhelmingly to leave the european union and if i may say so, leave m ea ns european union and if i may say so, leave means reeve and i think that is exactly what the british public voted for today. they did not vote for emotion after motion in this house offer members of parliament to come here, say one thing to their electorate and do something else in this house, individual members of parliament will have to make their ownjudgment today parliament will have to make their own judgment today and not listen to what will be, what ebbs and buts, so many colleagues have said it is a balance of risk and probability. we all know this but ultimately we, as all know this but ultimately we, as all members of parliament, should be judged by how we felt today by the constituents who elected us.
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finally, is it any wonder that trust in british politics is broken when we listen to some of the most extraordinary contributions, and rightly so, but ultimately, the fact of the matter is many of the pledges we have made to our electorate are being moved away from. wera hobhouse. thank you mr speaker, todayis hobhouse. thank you mr speaker, today is a sad day. not because we should have left the eu but haven‘t, but because to date signifies the pinnacle of a process in which a government has refused to respect and listen. studio: we are going to leave the commons for it now. do not forget if you want to watch everything in the comments you can do so on bbc parliament. we will have all the development in brexit and the reaction throughout the day. there‘ll be a special programme on bbc one
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and the news channel to bring you the results of the vote in the house of commons. that‘s from 2.15 this afternoon. you can also follow developments on 5live. i will be back shortly with the bbc news. time for a look at the weather now with darren. it is not hotting up getting warmer in the sunshine and temperatures are many places are going to be 16—18d after a restart, and murky around the western coast and we have a band of cloud pushing into scotland and northern ireland. that cloud will move slowly southwards and there will be a little more rain and drizzle perhaps over the top of the mountains and some snow. the head of it clearer skies and my mist and fog forming, especially over the western side. mist and fog will take a while in the morning to left and mid to late morning it will have gone and we will see lengthy spells of sunshine but we have that cloud
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moving southwards into northern england and wales. we have sunshine following to the north and maybe a couple of showers for the five north but here, it is going to feel colder thanit but here, it is going to feel colder than it has done for a while. still one in the south—east, 18—19d but the cool air will arrive with the second half of the weekend but it looks like it will be dry and there will be sunshine at times.
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