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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  March 29, 2019 5:00pm-5:45pm GMT

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this is bbc news at 5 o'clock, i'm joanna gosling live at westminster on a momentous day in parliament. ayes to the right, 286. the noes to the left, 344. so the noes have it, the noes have it...unlock. mps have rejected theresa may's withdrawal agreement for a third time, throwing the uk's brexit strategy into further confusion this house has rejected no deal. it has rejected no brexit. on wednesday it rejected all the variations of the deal on the table and today it has rejected the withdrawal agreement alone and continuing the process on the future. this government will continue to press the case for the orderly brexit that the result of the referendum demands.
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the labour leader calls on the prime minister to step down immediately after the latest defeat, this time by 58 votes. this deal now has to change. there has to be an alternative found. and if the prime minister can't accept that then she must go. not at an indeterminate date in the future but now so we can decide the future of this country through a general election. on the day the uk had been set to leave the eu, thousands of leave—supporting demonstrators have been gathering in westminster to protest against the brexit delay. the eu says it regrets the decision in the house of commons, and says the probability of a no—deal brexit on april the 12th is now a ‘likely scenario'.
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it's five o'clock, our top story live from westminster — is huge political uncertainity after the commons voted for a third time to reject the withdrawal agreement which theresa may struck with the european union. the prime minister said the vote would have "grave" implications. the result means the uk has missed a deadline to secure an extension of the brexit process and leave with a deal on 22 may. the prime minister now has until 12th april to seek a longer extension to the negotiation process to avoid a no—deal brexit. mps rejected the withdrawal agreement by 344 votes to 286 — a majority of 58 against the deal. so what happens next? on monday mps will hold more votes on alternative plans, in an attempt to try and find what the majority of
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the house supports. the president of the european council, donald tusk, has called a special meeting of eu leaders on april the tenth. the european commission said a no—deal brexit on april the twelfth was now "a likely scenario". we'll have reaction — and full analysis of the vote — throughout the hour. but first here's our political correspondent jonathan blake. the eyes to the right, 286. the noes to the left, 344. another vote, another defeat for a government and prime ministerfast another defeat for a government and prime minister fast running another defeat for a government and prime ministerfast running out another defeat for a government and prime minister fast running out of options. mps voted by a majority of 58 against the withdrawal agreement, the uk's divorce deal against the eu, on the day but it was supposed to leave the parliament said again, not on those terms. theresa may said
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the vote would have grave implications. mr speaker, ifear the vote would have grave implications. mr speaker, i fear we are reaching the limits of this process in this house. this house has rejected no deal, it has rejected no brexit, on wednesday it rejected no brexit, on wednesday it rejected all the variations of the deal on the table and today it has rejected approving the withdrawal agreement alone and continuing a process on the future. this government will continue to press the case for the orderly brexit that the case for the orderly brexit that the result of the referendum demands. for labour at the options now, a new deal or an election. mr speaker, the house has been clear. this deal now has to change. there has to be an alternative found and if the prime minister cannot accept that, then she must go. not at an indeterminate date in the future but how indeterminate date in the future but now so we can indeterminate date in the future but now so we can decide the future of this country through a general
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election. outside in the spring sunshine people on the march urging the politicians to seek the big picture. some had planned to celebrate today, others to protest, none perhaps wanted more deadlock and more delay. the for it mrs may? first thing a friendly gesture for the prime minister but she needed more than sympathy. no longer in control she came back to parliament for one more try to push a plan for it somehow. we voted against it be first time, we voted against it the second time and we voted against it this time. during hours of debate old arguments held firm. we have capitulated, this is not compromised, this has been capitulation. if you labour mp suggested they could back the deal and some tories dead against it so far decided it was time to switch. the reality is today i am going to support the government in this. mr
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speaker, i will vote for the motion. but in the end they were not enough so but in the end they were not enough so the big question at westminster is what now? the problem is the deal is what now? the problem is the deal is wrong, triple locks us into the institution with the eu, especially if the political declaration has been carried three which is why overwhelmingly it has eurosceptic conservatives opposing it. the houses voted effectively to leave this country, either at the european union with no deal or effectively reversing brexit. i do not think this is what the majority of this country once. the so-called deal is dead. we have to look for other ways for it. on monday parliament goes back to this and i think they will probably come out with a recommendation of eight people's built and ora recommendation of eight people's built and or a customs union.“ recommendation of eight people's built and or a customs union. if we have to we have got the option of relocation because no deal would be disastrous for the economy but the government itself has made it clear that there are clear risks for people. they have even talked about
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the potential civil unrest. but that has tested westminster to its limit. the decisions being taken are so difficult, the division is so deep that parliament again, feels paralysed and the government is once more trying to find something, anything, to stop the process from grinding toa anything, to stop the process from grinding to a halt. downing street suggested there would be no big moves suggested there would be no big m oves over suggested there would be no big moves over the weekend and after yet another setback, the prime minister would continue to try and find support for her deal. our chief political correspondent vicki young joins me now from central lobby in the houses of parliament. i think the big question everyone is asking is whether the prime minister's deal is dead after this third defeat. opposition mps think it is but does she have a plan to bring it back again? there is speculation about some kind of run off between her proposal and whatever mps come up with and coalesce around on a monday. we will
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have to wait and see. it has certainly been an incredibly divisive process, especially for the conservative party, a group of conservative party, a group of conservative eurosceptics sticking to their opposition. lots of them changed their mind, i spoke to one earlier who do not feel good about the decision he had made. earlier who do not feel good about the decision he had madelj personally feel utterly ashamed of myself are betraying everything i believe in. but for the sake of the party and the country, and all the reasons i sat in the debate, i had to swallow everything i believe in and built. now we have lost the vote. there is only one thing the prime minister can vote. there is only one thing the prime ministercan do, vote. there is only one thing the prime minister can do, get us out on the 12th of april, get our country back and deliver what we promised because if we do not, god help us. he was saying no deal on april the 12th is the right way to go. i am joined by a member of the newly
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formed change uk party, an independent group. no deal is still an option on a paltry 12? not realistically because parliament has definitely said no. the economic consequences forjobs definitely said no. the economic consequences for jobs and definitely said no. the economic consequences forjobs and livelihood are unconscionable so we have to find a better path. it is clear the prime minister's deal is not going anywhere and after the results we had on the first preferences of parliament's take convert last week, looks like on monday people will be focusing on a peoples vote. that, to me, has to be the height of the solution and give people the chance to say proceed with this mess or reverse out altogether. what about the idea of a general election. prime minister was talking about the process coming to an end, she was talking about it being a possibility maybe? if you think brexit is complicated, through a general election and to throw everything into chaos. let us get a grip, there
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isa into chaos. let us get a grip, there is a route out of the situation. the deal could go back to the public, we could put a customs union and single market back to the public, ultimately, we have to give people a chance to look at this and see if they want to proceed again. we are going to be getting ready because if we are going to have european elections we want a better choice than corbynism or euro phobia. elections we want a better choice than corbynism or euro phobiam you do not change the number how can any party govern? does of us who have had it with our existing political parties, we said enough is enough from the labour party, conservatives are also on the brink. mps are putting their own positions and careers aside and trying to do things in the national interest, thatis things in the national interest, that is what we are all about. thank you very much indeed. the signals from downing street is not too much might happen over the weekend probably because they are trying to find out what their plan is. thank
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you very much. our reality check correspondent chris morris is here... what happens next? i guess the news todayis what happens next? i guess the news today is two years after we triggered article 50 all options are still open apart from the one option we thought was happening two years ago which is we thought we would be leaving the european union today. what next? let's have a look. today we note there was a vote on the withdrawal agreement which was the third time they tried to get the withdrawal agreement through parliament. it did not happen again which takes us onto next week and the focus is going to be on monday when we will have indicative votes on the brexit options again. what kind of alternatives for the future economic relationship might mps coalesce around ? it economic relationship might mps coalesce around? it is possible that isa coalesce around? it is possible that is a definitive option emerges, something to do with the customs union or a single market or a mixture of both, if a clear
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favourite option of the house of parliament emerges, could the government then say let's have some sort of run—off between that and theresa may's deal? it is worth mentioning whichever one it is they need the withdrawal agreement passed. the reason it needs to be decided next week is the following week is becoming d—day week because on the 10th of april, there is going to bea on the 10th of april, there is going to be a european summit called today by donald tusk to find out from the united kingdom what it thinks its options are, and if there is no new set of proposals from london, then by law on the 12th of april that is when we leave with no deal if nothing else changes. what else can you do apart from brief with no deal? you could revoke article 50 altogether which i do not think is popular in this parliament so the third option is you opt for a long extension. it has to be a long extension. it has to be a long extension because towards the end of may, the 23rd to the 26, we have the
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european elections in the european council has made it clear in the uk is going to have the long extension it has to take part in those elections. finally, how long could that extension be? the absolute outer limit would be the end of the proposed transition period which has been proposed after brexit. that is the end of 2020. that would be a year and three quarters, possibly not that long, but you could be looking at an extension of about a year from the european looking at an extension of about a yearfrom the european union. well let's go to brussels now to find out how all this last minute drama is being viewed by the eu — we can speak to our europe correspondent damian grammaticas what a reaction from there? the eu expected this because within seconds of that boat in london we had an announcement from here that the eu leaders will be called to a special summit, the one chris was telling
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you about, on april the 10th, two days before the new exit date for the uk, and the announcement that uk have to present their new plans before then for them to consider. across eu capitals we have heard a chorus of dismay. let me give you an idea. from denmark the prime minister said, almost out of options and time, very discouraging. from the netherlands the prime minister said, one of only two routes from a orderly —— one of only two routes to an orderly brexit now seems closed. that leaves the other route for the british to make what they want. from austria, the chancellor said, an orderly brexit is becoming less and less likely and from latvia, the foreign minister tweeted, britain, please tell us what you want. that is what the eu is asking now within the next week. yesterday the british chamber
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of commerce told mps their members needed certainty — pleading with politicians to ‘stop chasing rainbows'. has today's vote made any difference? joining me now is iain anderson, executive chairman of cicero —britain's biggest independent lobbying consultants. what is your reaction to what has happened today? more horror from a business point of view. we are stuck. i think we are stuck in a maze. it is absolutely impenetrable and we heard we are having a deal, no deal, the flip—flopping on this from politicians is just no deal, the flip—flopping on this from politicians isjust driving business is absolutely crazy. the real problem is that nobody can plan in this environment. we do not know where we are heading and frankly, at the moment i cannot tell you or are businesses that i advise, where we are heading in the middle of all best politics. we need some certainty and we need some options
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to give major businesses and smes some idea as to where the politics is taking us. what has been the impact so farof is taking us. what has been the impact so far of the process we have been through because when you look at some of the fundamentals of the economy the picture looks rosy, racket employment, the economy growing, wages going up, but you are saying that businesses are worried? where are the evidence? businesses are where are the evidence? businesses a re really where are the evidence? businesses are really concerned. if you have to satisfy your regulator, your shareholders that you have got a plan to be able to make no—deal brexit work. that is the severe outcome for many businesses that have complicated supply chains. you have complicated supply chains. you have to get your plans ready so what has happened is a lot of large businesses have spent a lot of money during the last 12—18 months getting ready for a no deal scenario. i am
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talking to boards of some of britain's biggest businesses who are ruling out those plans. in a waiting economy has been performing through this but before we have actually got to the cliff edge and we are getting pretty close to that cliff edge. thank you very much. let's cross live to the leave means leave rally at westminster — where the former ukip leader nigel farage is speaking. i believe that what has happened over there has notjust turned this day that should have been one of great celebration into a day that history will mark as a day of betrayal. i believe what has happened over the course of the last two years is actually one of the saddest and worst chapters in the history of our nation. what they wa nt history of our nation. what they want is to beat us down, what they
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wa nt want is to beat us down, what they want us is to give up. what they wa nt want us is to give up. what they want is asked to go away. —— they wa nt want is asked to go away. —— they want us to go away. and i? today on march the 29th, i might downcast or disheartened? no, no! i march the 29th, i might downcast or disheartened? no, no! lam more determined to fight back against this political impasse than in any point in my life x! they thought they could simply walk all over us. what these means leave dead with its 50 brave marchers,
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they might back from sunderland to parliament square to tell them, we will not be defeated by your lies and by your treachery! the british public are all with us now that might work with us now than in any point of time. let's hope and pray we can leave on the 12th of april with no deal. i am sorry to say i fear that the betrayal we have seen over today's dates will be repeated on the 12th of april. but let us not be disheartened. i tell you what, if that means we have to fight the
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european elections on the 23rd of may, let me tell you, i will fight them. come on, you'll embarrass me! and in the worst case scenario occurs and the worst case scenario occurs and the voice as to do a second referendum, we will beat them by a bigger amount! this is about our country and our nation and our democracy. it is about who we are as eight people, what we stand for, what those that went before us gave, worked for and sacrificed is that we could be free people. it is about
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out could be free people. it is about our children and grandchildren growing up being proud to be british. that is what this fight is all about. studio: nigel farage addressing protesters. he said he wants to read with no deal but suspect that will not happen and says if the uk needs to fight the european elections he will stand again as a nep. our ireland correspondent, emma vardy is in newry — on the border between northern ireland and the republic. we have had some interesting reaction coming through from nigel dodds who have been speaking to newsnight political editors, talking about staying in the european union. is there a change in strategy potentially coming from the dup?” am not sure it is a change in strategy. i think this is another mark of how much they dislike
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theresa may's deal and the backstop within it. nigel dodds and the dup backed brexit and backed leave in the eu referendum. he is now saying he would prefer to remain within the eu if it protected northern ireland's place within the rest of the uk because it is the union above all else that is the priority for the democratic unionist party as they see the withdrawal deal and the backstop is something that will siphon ireland off from the rest of the uk, as long as that is an issue for them, then staying in the eu would be preferable to backing the deal. that may sound like a surprise because the dup have got alliances with arch brexiteers like jacob rees—mogg and boris johnson with arch brexiteers like jacob rees—mogg and borisjohnson and others in the eog, but it tallies com pletely others in the eog, but it tallies completely with one of the most fundamental principles that the dup
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believes in. in contrast, here around the irish border, many communities are nationalists supporting remain voters and they absolutely feel very bitterly opposed to brexit, very frustrated and angry that this process has been brought to the brink. there are many businesses around here whose livelihood depends on getting a nswe i’s livelihood depends on getting answers about how they are going to trade in the future. south of the border in the republic of ireland, the irish government is watching this with great worry because there could be massive economic shock in ireland if the uk were to leave without a deal. it could mean thousands of job losses, without a deal. it could mean thousands ofjob losses, businesses becoming unviable overnight and there is huge contingency planning donein there is huge contingency planning done in ireland to prepare for that. we heard the irish prime minister saying earlier that he would be open to the idea of a long extension for the uk if the uk was to go away and
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fundamentally reconsider its whole approach to brexit. thank you very much. let us take a pause and we will have more reactions later. time for a look at the weather now with darren. thank you, it will get cooler as the weekend goes on. we have seen temperatures of 90 degrees in south yorkshire in the sunshine. it has not been sunny everywhere, there is cloud over the irish sea coast and it is stretching across northern ireland and scotland. in the north—west there is rain and drizzle that will sink southward into scotla nd that will sink southward into scotland and eventually arrived in northern ireland. ahead of that clearer skies, patchy mist and fog, especially in the west. that mist and fog should not last too long and there is sunshine arriving for the southern half. this band of cloud is moving southwards and some sunshine arriving in scotland and eventually
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across northern ireland but cooler, fresher air with temperatures struggling to make double figures. the real ones is in the south—east of england, 18 or 19 degrees. it will be cooler everywhere on sunday and it should be dry with spells of sunshine. that is the weather but formula 1 and premier league returns this weekend, let's get all the support. liverpool's managerjurgen klopp says he's prepared to take his team off the pitch if they suffer racist abuse. football's european governing body — uefa — are investigating after some of england's black players received racist abuse during their euro 2020 qualifier in montenegro this week. klopp says he couldn't believe what happened in podgorica and believes it's time to take a stand. whatever i could do i would do, and we had to stop games, do everything. i understand gareth didn't do it and ididn't i understand gareth didn't do it and i didn't say come off the pitch but
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we have to make clear it is not allowed and not possible. each punishment, from my point of view, is allowed. a couple of incidents in the last couple of weeks, not only racism but other serious situations like running on the pitch, it is not fun. we have to make clear it is not fun. we have to make clear it is not fun. it. —— still stop it. england's women will go into this summer's world cup as the third ranked team in the world. the lionesses‘ victory in the shebelieves cup this month means they've jumped above france, with just the usa and germany ahead of them. scotland stay 20th. after a disappointing opening race in australia, ferrari are back on top of formula one in bahrain. they topped the time sheets in both practice sessions. sebastian vettel clocking the quickest time of the day, just ahead of his team mate charles leclerc, and more than half a second clear of lewis hamilton's mercedes. boxing authorities in california have suspended the license of bulgaria's heavyweight kubrat pulev after he kissed
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a female reporter on the lips during an interview. footage emerged of pulev embracing vegas sports daily‘sjennifer ravalo after he beat romania's bogdan dinu on saturday. pulev claimed the pair were friends, but ravalo says she'd only met the boxer a day earlier and has called his actions "disgusting". pulev must now appear in front of the california state athletic commission, who said they "take this incident seriously". paula radcliffe wants the court of arbitration for sport to allow the iaaf to limit testosterone levels in female athletes with differences in sexual development. it follows caster semenya's appeal to cas to stop world athletics' plans to deal with the issue. the double olympic champion semenya — who has hyperandroginism — has also received support from the un human rights council. radcliffe says she just wants to protect female sport. i don't think there is an outcome
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fairto i don't think there is an outcome fair to everybody in all of this. sadly we have to go in my view with something that is fair to the majority, to 99 point something percent of female athletes and try and protect the amounts for it as a category. it may at some point down the line come to a stage where we have sport divided into categories according to the range of testosterone that he fell into. but it is essentially what they are trying to do with the rules they have put in place and protect that category of female elite sports. we'll have more for you in sportsday at 6.30. let's rejoin joanna gosling in westminster. welcome back to westminster, where there is huge political uncertainity after the commons voted for a third time to reject the withdrawal agreement which theresa may struck with the european union. the prime minister said the vote would have "grave" implications.
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the result means the uk has missed a deadline to secure an extension of the brexit process and leave with a deal on 22 may. the prime minister now has until 12th april to seek a longer extension to the negotiation process to avoid a no—deal brexit. mps rejected the withdrawal agreement by 344 votes to 286 — a majority of 58 against the deal. so what happens next? on monday mps will hold more votes on alternative plans, in an attempt to try and find what the majority of the house supports. the president of the european council, donald tusk, has called a special meeting of eu leaders on april 10th. the european commission said a no—deal brexit on april 12th was now "a likely scenario". let's hear in full the prime minister's response, just moments after the result was announced.
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mr speaker, i think it should be a matter of profound regret to every member of this house, that once again we have been unable to support leaving the european union in an ordinary fashion. the implications of the house's decision are grave. the legal default now is that the united kingdom is due to leave the european union on 12th april. injust 14 days' time. that is not enough time to agree legislate for and ratify a deal, and yet the house has been clear it will not permit leaving without a deal. and so we will have to agree an alternative way forward. the european union has been clear, that any further extension will need to have a clear purpose and will need to be agreed unanimously by the heads of the other 27 member states ahead of 12th april. it is almost certain to involve the united kingdom being required to hold european parliamentary elections. on monday, this house will continue the process, to see if there is a stable majority for a particular alternative version of ourfuture relationship with the eu.
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of course, all of the options will require the withdrawal agreement. mr speaker, i fear we are reaching the limits of this process in this house. this house... this house has rejected no—deal, it has rejected no brexit. on wednesday it rejected all the variations of the deal on the table, and today, it has rejected approving the withdrawal agreement alone, and continuing a process on the future. this government will continue to press the case for the orderly brexit that the result of the referendum demands. so what next for the prime minister? chris wilkins was director of strategy and chief speech writer to theresa may between august 2016 to autumn 2017 and joins me now. what is her next move going to be? what is her next move going to be? what can it be? the indications are
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currently that the most likely next move is she doesn't believe her deal is dead. remarkably after three votes against it she will try to bring it back again next week and there is the changing context is two things, firstly she indicated in the statement after she was defeated today, there was a hint there about the general election, i think they are using the general election as a way to scare people into voting for the deal. the second will be on monday when the indicative votes come back to parliament. i expect the idea of a customs union to come out on top and that will allow the prime minister to say we are clear, it isa prime minister to say we are clear, it is a customs union a softer brexit or my deal or the ultimate sanction is a general election. so she will have another go and try and scare people into voting for it. she has chipped away at the majority against her each time. do you think it can go further? we did have this morning, various brexiteer tories saying they would support it which gave a sense that maybe that would lead to a larger domino effect than
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it turned out there was, but the dup are standing firm and are getting tougher in their language. they are standing firm. there is a bit with the dup of which bit of no don't you understand. they are not going to cave. today's result was in the end a surprise, if yesterday you would say you would lose by 58, people would have said that is right. today there was more hope. they haven't generate the momentum in that sense, but nonetheless, it was a smaller defeat than on previous two goes, and they still think with that changed context they might be able to get it through and ultimately mps don't want a general election, and nor do a lot of labour mps, so when it really comes down to it with that new context of that being the ultimate sanction and threat maybe people will finally come onboard. evenif people will finally come onboard. even if they do, after four goes and having sort of not convinced people but got people onboard for different reasons you have to question the
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democratic legitimacy of that deal evenif democratic legitimacy of that deal even if it does go through. would theresa may rather even if it does go through. would theresa may a ther even if it does go through. would theresa may a customs union? so, election than a customs union? so, my understanding she has taken the view a general election is the sort of preferable option out of a series of preferable option out of a series of bad options, you could say a referendum might be one thing but she has been against that and find a general election is right. she thinks that rather than a customs union, because the conservative ma nifesto union, because the conservative manifesto ruled out a customs union, now i would argue firstly it was wrong to be so prescriptive in the ma nifesto wrong to be so prescriptive in the manifesto in the first place, but that manifesto didn't command the majority after the election, so i think therefore, it is still possible to embrace it. i think she ta kes possible to embrace it. i think she takes the view embraising a customs union would go against that ma nifesto union would go against that manifesto language and therefore a general election is potentially the way out of that. thank you very much chris. well as you can hear
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it's very noisy here — leave demonstrators have gathered in parliament square in westminster. our correspondent sarah walton is there. there have been various high profile speakers at that leave means leave demonstration, sarah. yes, that is right. a very loud, very lively protest taking place here in parliament square. nigel farage has just finished speaking to the leave mean leave protestors from the big stage behind me. still another rally going on, the other side of the square, there has been organised by ukip earlier the former leader of the english defence league was addressing the crowds there. there are counter demonstration, pro—remain groups demonstrating in central london as well today, but the majority of people here now are brexit supporter, people who have been telling me they were hoping to been telling me they were hoping to be here celebration of the day, the uk left the european union, we know now it isn't happening and people have been telling me they are frustrated and angry with the parliamentary process. a short while ago, the result of the vote in
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parliament was read out here on the loud speaker, the result was greeted by huge cheers, cheers that the withdrawal agreement had been rejected by parliament, people here now telling me that what they want isa now telling me that what they want is a no—deal brexit, and they want the government to get on with it, and not that long ago nigel farage said he hadn't given up hope that brexit would happen. some of these ramries due to go on into the evening, —— rallies. it is a very busy day and continues to be so. we can get the thoughts now of tim montgomorie. the founder of conservativehome, and the economist's senior editor, anne mcelvoy. what are your thoughts?” what are your thoughts? i brought along a copy of the daily mail which asked mps, warned them they had one last chance. to get this right. i think we can safely say now, you know, that chance has gone. you
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know, that chance has gone. you know, you might as well say those people who wanted brexit, those people who wanted brexit, those people who wanted to have anything that a remain dominated parliament wouldn't seriously dilute. that chance has gone. you think brexit is dead? i think brexit isn't necessarily dead but a meaningful brexit, a brexit where remain mps aren't in charge, i think has been lost. i mean the european commission, the european union still saying actually we, that we are very likely to have a no—deal brexit.|j think that is unlikely. i don't think that is unlikely. i don't think it is in interest of any european nation to have the kind of disruption that will face britain but also would face the continent. what we will see, i think in the indicative vote on monday is probably a quite a sizeable vote in favour of a customs union, and then you have a real confrontation between a conservative party that pledged in its manifesto not to have a customs union, and a parliament saying that that is what it wants. i
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think the european union will see that as the first significant step towards keeping britain in the european union, so i have been with a rally with some of the people shouting behind us and some in the scare, they think by voting may's deal down, they have saved brexit. i don't think they have. i think they have really forgeted —— forgeted it. that is an interesting split merging on the brexiteer side of the argument. either way there on the brexiteer side of the argument. eitherway there is on the brexiteer side of the argument. either way there is 58 votes that were still missing after the, going round and round this, however, i don't think theresa may intends... hang on a minute. you have had a minute—and—a—half. iwill say as well, that i think this is still has roads to go. theresa may, her warning today as i heard it at least was that parliament was running out of road. i think she is getting close to entertaining the idea of a general election. what
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would that mean in particularly for her? the last thing she was in the departure lounge and saying if i get my deal go i am going. i think on monday we will know mohr, we will hear the customs union debated and see some more mp5 coming over to to that, but it still doesn't seem clear to me that theresa may is going to give ground on that. she doesn't want to break her red lines of on that, she knows it is the end of on that, she knows it is the end of hercareeras of on that, she knows it is the end of her career as leader one way or the other, i can't see that at the moment. do you... being what is on the table with the eu. i wonder if tim is, as a brexiteer isn't being too pessimistic the time line might get longer and more difficult but still be there. it feels like we are getting to the point where actually, the polarised opposite again are still feeling, maybe feeling more strongly they might get what they
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want, no—deal brexit, or remain. if we go back to the country, it is kind of all to play for again is it? one parliament can't bind another. the people used to say a general election, people di, if you have to have one, you have a second referendum? on a general election, you used to say that wouldn't solve it, it certainly wouldn't but it is now impossible the to see that general election wouldn't also force, you know, push the leaders very strongly. that doesn't mean that a second referendum argument is over at all, and it is still, i think the strategy of people's vote campaign is to let all these other options play out and fail, and it must be said, many of them are failing again and again and again. sol failing again and again and again. so i think that is still in the air, but if you ask me where the mood is at the moment, the divisions are not healing, that is very, very plainly the case, so a major constitutional event might be closer than we assumed. for both of you, theresa may, i mean she said she would go if she got her deal through, she could
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fight another election still? well a general election, the other thing that i think should scare both of the main parties a lot more is the immediate prospect of having to sign up immediate prospect of having to sign up to european election, i think you would easily see in european elections, the beginnings of a major realignment of british politics, you could have a brexit party standing under nigel farage, and you could have the what do they call them, the tigger, the change uk movement a pro—remain pro referendum party, around i think that could easily create a massive drop off in support for the torieses and labour. you look at a different political landscape for a potential general election, unless the tory party decides on a new leader soon, it could be in very serious trouble. one of the things i think is possibly changed there, i think there was a hope we just quickly reconsider. now there are concerns
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about the impact on the european parliamentary election, not usually seen as parliamentary election, not usually seen as vastly dramatic, but this year with a lot of more populist and accuse ward squad voices and from some of the member state, tim is right, the thought of britain having to take part with the mood being as it is here at the moment, and, very heated on both sides but perhaps that sense of some, you, some forces wanting to overturn conventional politics that may in the end mean they are more likely to offer a fudgy extension that risk a more dramatic european elections. thank you. there is everything still to play for. parliament will be discussing again on monday what the potential options, for now that is it from me at westminster. back to ben in two weeks after after a gunman opened fire killing 50 people in an attack on two mosques in christchurch, a sevice of remembrance has been held
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to honour the victims. speaking at the open air service, the prime minister, jacinda ardern, said new zealand was not immune to the virus of hate but could be the nation that found the cure. hywel griffith was at the service and sent this report. linda susan armstrong... the names of the fallen, the 50 who came to pray. as new zealand remembered the victims of the mosque shootings, its prime minister called on the nation to stay united, far beyond these days of mourning. we will remember the tears of our nation, and the new resolve we have formed, and we remember that ours is a home that does not and cannot claim perfection, but we can strive to be true to the words embedded
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in our national anthem. asking thee to bless this place. god defend ourfree land. two weeks' ago, parts of this park were a crime scene. today it was a place of reflection and resilience. unfortunately, we've lost some good friends and family dear to us, so we're here to show support and we appreciate referring the new zealand community. it's unbelievable. it feels important to us because new zealand's quite an open and accepting society, and that a minority group were targeted is something that affects us all, and we feel it is not really part of who we are. since the shooting, people here have been desperate to show the world, to show each other their rejection of racism, and the violent act of terror which changed so many lives. this man was shot in the back as he hugged his son,
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shielding him from the bullets. he watched the gunman walk round the mosque, hunting down the living. this is my wife. but he tells me the legacy of that day will be love, not hate. if the shooter could imagine that this will happen, he will never shoot us. we became more of a unified and the community is one. you feel that christchurch is our one city. new zealand one country. and by the way, i am sure it will change the world. the al noor mosque has now been reclaimed as a place of worship, rather than fear. but armed police officers still stand guard over this city, as it tries to recover, to heal. hywel griffith, bbc news, christchurch. now on bbc news, a look ahead to sportsday at 6.30 tonight. coming up, the premier league returns after the international break

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