Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  March 29, 2019 11:30pm-12:00am GMT

11:30 pm
from the south to bring us more hello there. of next week. this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow towards the middle of next week. 00:00:04,771 --> 2147483051:36:49,586 there has been a chance of rain and 2147483051:36:49,586 --> 00:00:00,940 wintry showers morning's papers in a moment. unsettled weather as we first though, the headlines: and mps have rejected theresa may's withdrawal agreement for a third time — throwing the uk's brexit strategy into further confusion. the implications of the house's decision are grave. the legal default now is that the united kingdom is set to leave the european union on the 12th of april, injust 1a days‘s time. that is not enough time to agree, legislate for and ratify a deal. this deal now has to change, there has to be an alternative found. and if the prime minister can't accept that, then she must go, not at an indeterminate date in the future, but now. protestors shouting: brexit! when do we want it? now! there's anger on the streets of westminster, as thousands of pro brexit supporters protest
11:31 pm
the brexit delay. meanwhile, in brussels, the eu says it regrets the decision in westminster and says the probability of a no deal brexit on april the 12th is now a "likely scenario". hello there and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me, i've got the author and journalist rachel shabi, and claire cohen, the women's editor at the daily telegraph. lovely to see you both. before we have our chart, let's just look at some of tomorrow's front pages. —— chat. the financial times leads with theresa may's warnings of "grave implications" for the uk, as her brexit plan was once again defeated by mps. the sun, meanwhile, says mps have betrayed the 17.4 million people who voted for brexit,
11:32 pm
and that a general election may now be inevitable. according to the guardian, the prime minister is planning one final attempt to get her deal through parliament next week. the daily mail claims the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, has been conspiring with hardline eurosceptics to block brexit. cabinet ministers are urging theresa may to embrace no—deal, in order to end the brexit deadlock — so says the telegraph. moving onto the express, which carries a photo of protesters venting their anger at the delay to the uk's eu departure and insists that they will never give up on brexit. and according to the mirror, declan donnelly considered dropping his tv partner ant mcpartin, after he was caught drink—driving. so, brexit dominating most of the front pages. let's turn back to the daily express and that claim, the paper says, but we will never give up. and that claim, the paper says, but we will never give uplj
11:33 pm
and that claim, the paper says, but we will never give up. i am sure the daily express will never give up, we can well believe it. we should have left the eu by now. this is the hour upon which... yeah, it was over 30 minutes ago. brave new world, so listen, i can understand the frustration of people who did vote for brexit. they were promised that something would happen and it has not happened, so i completely understand that sense of frustration. i do not think it is a cce pta ble frustration. i do not think it is acceptable and that frustration leads into anger or calling people, calling mps traitors or some of the aggressive behaviour that we have seen outside parliament today. of course, that is completely unacceptable. but yes, it is a problem when people have been promised by parliament, by democracy, that something that could not happen, that is not possible, it was never possible for us to leave the eu with all the benefits of being in the eu but with none of the drawbacks of leaving, that is not a
11:34 pm
thing that was ever going to be deliverable. we have had two and a half years of parliament insisting that it half years of parliament insisting thatitis half years of parliament insisting that it is possible. now we can see, given the mood and the anger that it stirred up, that lack of honesty has led to this intractable, divisive situation. it is quite an amazing situation, the really stark contrast between the anger of these protesters outside and then the mp is going to their process and failure to break the deadlock yet again, behind closed doors, especially when you had theresa may la st especially when you had theresa may last week on the doors of the house of commons appealing to the public. —— downing street. and then the mps going to that sort of closeted process. have you ever really seen such a disconnect in recent memory between parliament and the public displayed on the streets so angrily
11:35 pm
in this way? let's turn to the guardian and incredibly, we could see theresa may's deal back on the table again next week. yeah, it is... well, a fourth vote, we're told apparently is going to happen and this would be a run—off between her withdrawal agreement and a softer brexit plan b, which is presumably what would be the outcome of monday's further indicative voting by mps. she cannot come up with a plan b herself, so she's got to leave it up to the best of the house of commons to do it for her. i mean, it is absolutely incredible to mean, it is absolutely incredible to me that this deal is still on the table for months after the first tabled it. it is disgraceful really, talk about kicking the can. i know it isa talk about kicking the can. i know it is a phrase we've used a lot to me, it is absolutely unbelievable that we are here and that she is really allowing dictate timetable. what do you think about this? you a lwa ys what do you think about this? you always get this, it wouldn't be fair to call it a threat? one last vote,
11:36 pm
otherwise it is a general election. are they going to fall for that? she did say initially, vote for me and i will stand down, that is now moved on. it is a weird threat, i mean threat to her party. presumably other bits of the party will be thinking that is not a threat, bring it, bring the election. we cannot wait to get rid of you. this has been, everything else that is going on in the country, advising homelessness, the record levels of child poverty, the increased use of food banks, the economic stagnation, the wage stagnation, the anxiety, the wage stagnation, the anxiety, the insecurity, perhaps people in the insecurity, perhaps people in the country are thinking actually yes, we do want to have the opportunity to get rid of you after all this kind of misery and chaos that has been inflicted on the country, but i guess that it is a threat to her own party because presumably, the last thing they want to do is go through another election and certainly not with her as leader. you are so right to mention
11:37 pm
all those other issues because that is the point really, the tory party have let brexit absolutely consume them and yet really frighteningly, have not managed to solve it. no, i mean she still has, she still has a block you are implacably opposed to her deal regardless, right? —— bloc. to the dup are not going to vote for it. -- to the dup are not going to vote for it. —— so. to the dup are not going to vote for it. -- so. the self-styled spartan. yeah, so they are saying we are not going to vote for it, she is not going to vote for it, she is not going to vote for it, she is not going to be able to peel away labour mps either because he's been absolutely rubbish in doing that. she has tried to either bribe or bully them into agreeing. are you referring to this £100,000 was mentioned in one of the papers? we will get to that in a moment actually. it is true, that is corruption. we would call that corruption. we would call that corruption if it happened anywhere
11:38 pm
else. we just corruption if it happened anywhere else. wejust go back corruption if it happened anywhere else. we just go back to the sort of basic thing we always knew about theresa may, we always knew this about her, she does not have friends in parliament and now that is coming back to bite her. don't you think this was a poisoned chalice, whoever had taken this job on at this stage that it was offered? we would have beenin that it was offered? we would have been in the same position. no, i don't actually. i do think you're right, it is a poisoned chalice is in that brexit was going to be horrible no matter who tried to do it but she has created this crisis, it but she has created this crisis, it is her redlines, it is her inability to beach because the house and seeking consensus, especially it was clear after the 2017 election that parliament was opposed to a ha rd that parliament was opposed to a hard brexit. —— to reach across the house. it is her inability that has created this precise mess, that is on her. i do not know, i think it is
11:39 pm
possible to think all that and have no sympathy with theresa may and yet also recognise that she was always face an impossible task and it was a poisoned chalice and that arguably, she was balanced on the cliff. well, talking about stepping down, do not know if you have caught news tonight but we're hearing now that dominic grieve has lost a vote of no—confidence in his constituency, and this was brought forward by the ukip candidate john conway, and this was brought forward by the ukip candidatejohn conway, who says it has got nothing to do with his staunch supporter of the eu. basically, he has gone back on his word and he has been disloyal to the party and the prime minister and he has not delivered what he promised his constituents. we have been hearing this quite a fair bit today in that, i think the conservatives we re in that, i think the conservatives were saying that this is no longer about careers, political careers, this should be national interest. this is the way politicians should be behaving, leave your political
11:40 pm
careers behind, think about the national interest when it comes to voting. yeah, a lot of people would say that dominic grieve actually has been acting in the national interest in that he has tried to prevent what would be absolute damage of a brexit that, the extreme kind of leave zealots of his party were trying to engineer. i am zealots of his party were trying to engineer. iam not zealots of his party were trying to engineer. i am not a zealots of his party were trying to engineer. iam nota big zealots of his party were trying to engineer. i am not a big fan of this whole conversation around loyalty to the party, not doing that kind of terminology, to me, sounds very authoritarian and troubling. so, yeah, ithink authoritarian and troubling. so, yeah, i think that is a really bad indictment of the sort of political climate that we are in. indictment of the sort of political climate that we are inlj indictment of the sort of political climate that we are in. i think we left national interest back a long time ago, don't you think? it has been relies on the naked self—interest of a lot of our politicians that got us into this position. 0k, well, let's move on.
11:41 pm
it is that election again that faces on the front page of the times, one government source saying that it is now really close. do you really think that is going to happen?m now really close. do you really think that is going to happen? it is really close, she will get it next time. the times is drawing attention to the fact also that britain will now very likely have to participate in the european pulmonary election. good or bad? what you think about this? well, confusing. we were discussing earlier what the implications of that are. —— parliamentary. do we have any mps until we leave the eu? how will that process work? durably, it will create even further division because remain and leave campaign are candidates, who will flourish. so i do not see how it will be in any way beneficial. let's turn to the telegraph and this idea of no
11:42 pm
brexit. —— telegraph. —— of a no—deal brexit. wasn't it voted out with those indicative votes? yes, it was several times parliament voted that a no deal was absolutely off the table. however, the sort of legal reality we are in, as the eu is kept pointing out to us and did so is kept pointing out to us and did so again today, is that if we do not have a deal secured or approved by the 12th of april, then either we exit with no deal or we will need an extension and a long one, and we need a very good reason to have one, i.e. a general election or a settled referendum, some kind of reset to facilitate that. and now we have, according to the daily telegraph, we have bits of the cabinet saying to theresa may that she now needs to get behind no deal and embrace, quote, no deal, which obviously is patently absurd because anyone who has anything to do with this
11:43 pm
country's general economic well—being has said that no deal would be an utter disaster. and presumably, we need this to be a manager no deal. the thought of crashing out in 1a days, i'm not sure what they would have.” crashing out in 1a days, i'm not sure what they would have. i was really interested to hear mervyn king backing it this morning on the today programme any actually came down on the side of no deal and said that he did not think that leaving, i think he was suggesting we have a sort of six—month extension to prepare for it but he did not think that would leave us in a worse economic position and staying in the eu, so some big names blowing wind in that direction. had through... there is now talk of a softer brexit, customs union, this 2.0 deal as well, some are saying the softer brexit is not brexit.
11:44 pm
that was always the trouble. what is expected to happen on monday is indicative votes, there will be more parliamentary support for a customs union perhaps with a second referendum attached then there will be for any other scenario. and that was always the picture, since basically the general election of 2017 that that is what parliament would prefer. but that does not satisfy anybody. there are leaders to say that is not really leave, remains don't want any kind of deal that takes us out of the eu. there is this weird kind of compromise. it sounds, compromise sounds good, but in this situation does not sound like it will work. the longer this process goes on the softer brexit becomes essentially and the hard brexiteers, there perfect brexit died when theresa may lost her majority. you hinted thereat collaboration, some people are now saying that this is the only way
11:45 pm
this is going to happen, to break this is going to happen, to break this deadlock that we are in at the moment. do you really see cross— party moment. do you really see cross—party collaboration taking place? everybody is talking about it, and they are saying this is the only way forward. will those labour backbenchers say we will get on board and figure this out... do you think that will happen? personally i think that will happen? personally i think a general election is more likely than that. even if you did get that cross—party collaboration and upward some kind of customs union being that had a second referendum attached, this government would not let that through. and it will break them in two. then what do you do? it is hard to see that lead to anything other than a general election again. i don't think it is possible, the parties themselves are so possible, the parties themselves are so divided, they are still insisting on whipping votes, as long as that goes on i can't see how we will have cross—party goes on i can't see how we will have cross— party collaboration. goes on i can't see how we will have cross-party collaboration. let's turn to the daily mail, which concentrates on the labour party,
11:46 pm
the headline got you really upset earlier. i am still upset. we talked about how it is just irresponsible, we are in a climate that is very volatile politically, this is inflammatory. in the daily mail must know because it lives in the same country that we do in the same reality that we see, the threats and the abuse that mps are subject to, the abuse that mps are subject to, the threats and abuse are —— that journalists are subjected to. the generally hostile and aggressive environment we are in, and to pump this sort of language into this environment isjust stra ig htforwa rdly environment isjust straightforwardly irresponsible and they should really know better and i let down. one of the things they are talking about here is thatjeremy corbyn is calling for an election. i'm sure he is. good move on his part? we know jeremy corbyn has been
11:47 pm
speaking to the eu and seems to suggest that he has got his own plan and deal in place, what the detail of that is, who knows, whether it be ina labour of that is, who knows, whether it be in a labour manifesto if there is another election, who knows. i think he is being naive if he thinks he can sweep the board at a general election. i think there is a lot of malaise amongst voters, to kill young voters when it comes to labour, obviously in 2017 —— obviously young voters. i had name,
11:48 pm
11:49 pm
11:50 pm
11:51 pm
11:52 pm
11:53 pm
11:54 pm
11:55 pm
11:56 pm
11:57 pm
11:58 pm
11:59 pm
12:00 am

3 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on