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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 30, 2019 12:00pm-12:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 12: the prime minister and her cabinet look for ways to bring may's eu withdrawal agreement back to the commons for a fourth time after it was defeated by 58 votes yesterday. i think what we have to do is to make sure that we deliver on the will of the people at the referendum. we have to keep trying. that's what people voted for and i'm quite sure that's what the prime minister continues to be determined to deliver. the bbc understands the pilot of the plane which crashed with footballer emiliano sala on board was not qualified to fly at night. eurostar says passengers using st pancras in london should expect numerous cancellations and severe delays after a trespasser spent the night on a roof near the tracks. thousands of palestinian protesters have gathered on the boundary between gaza and israel to mark a year since weekly demonstrations began.
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masterchef saw its first all—female final last night — but who was the winner? and at 12:30, click investigates the sexual exploitation of children on encrypted messaging apps in the philippines, and the undercover bot trying to catch the perpetrators. theresa may is discussing ways of bringing her eu withdrawal agreement back to the commons for a fourth time next week after yet another commons defeat yesterday. it was the third time the prime minister's plan was rejected by mps — this time by a majority of 58 — including the dup and 35
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mps from her own party. despite that, a number 10 source insisted that efforts are "going in the right direction", given the size of defeat was narrower than the previous two votes. meanwhile mps from all parties are considering how they might be able to get support for an alternative brexit plan in a second round of "indicative votes" on monday. here's a quick reminder of the tone in the commons yesterday. mr speaker, i fear we are reaching the limits of this process in this house. this house has rejected no deal, it has rejected no brexit, on wednesday, it rejected all the variations of the deal on the table, and today, it has rejected approving the withdrawal agreement alone, and continuing a process on the future. the house has been clear — this deal now has to change. there has to be an alternative found, and if the prime minister can't accept that, then she must go, not at an indeterminate date
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in the future, but now, so that we can decide the future of this country through a general election. today a number of cabinet ministers have been given reaction to yesterday's defeat on behalf of the government. thejustice secretary has been giving his reaction to the government's latest defeat. it's very disappointing that the government lost yesterday. i think that has put the country in some difficulty and i think the best way forward is the prime minister's deal but we'll see what the options are. the cabinet will need to consider the next steps forward. will you back a soft brexit? i think it's very important we leave the european union in an orderly manner. white might do you think the only way to break the deadlock if none of that happens is another general election? i don't think the general election
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is an answer to the situation we are in. i've got to get my son to rugby, thanks very much. you did say you would resign and feed of crashing out without a deal. i don't think the right answer is to crash out without a deal. we should leave in an orderly manner. the shadow transport secretary, andy mcdonald, said everyone in parliament needed to work together to resolve the problem. i think we would be better concentrating on a compromise, between the various opinions here, and i think that is the process we are undertaking on monday, and through the week, and i think that is within our grasp, if people would just simply look at these things in the round, and i think it calls on all opposition parties in particular, to see where the consensus lies. let's cross over to our leicester newsroom and speak to the conservative mp, andrew bridgen who voted against theresa may's deal yesterday.
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thanks for coming in to speak to us. let me ask you first of all, you are pa rt let me ask you first of all, you are part of the group of mps who have written to the prime minister, urging herto written to the prime minister, urging her to pursue and no—deal brexit. given that she has watched the numbers against withdrawal agreement fallen three previous occasions, it would be surprising if she went for that option. surely it's much more likely she will give us one more chance. it's much more likely she will give us one more chance. | it's much more likely she will give us one more chance. i think no deal is the only way we're going get out fulfilling our manifesto pledges and the commitment we made to the british people after the referendum. ultimately when we triggered article 50, parliament knew that we were leaving after two years. it should have been the 29th of march and it's clear that it is with or without a deal. i don't think there is any way that the european union are going to give the uk a deal that is
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acceptable, certainly not the withdrawal agreement, for all the reasons we have heard. it would be a situation where if we signed up to that, we would be for the first time in our nation's history, a huge amount of our laws would be decided bya amount of our laws would be decided by a foreign power over which we have no control or influence. it would be vassal edge and when it came back yesterday without the political declaration, a future partnership was the only way out of the backstop. it was rather worse yesterday because all you had was two years of transition where we would be paying in under the european union laws without representation then moving into the backstop which there was no end to because the political declaration had been removed. in terms of the practicalities of this, my point stands, the numbers have been falling so isn't it logical she is going to go for that option one more time? she's put so much of her not only political passion into it but
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effectively her political career stop she said it is over for her as prime minister, shejust stop she said it is over for her as prime minister, she just wants to get the deal delivered. prime minister, she just wants to get the deal deliveredlj prime minister, she just wants to get the deal delivered. i was offered that a couple of weeks ago, people said to me vote for the withdrawal agreement, the prime minister announced her resignation effectively as long as the deal goes through, and i agree with the analysis, the dealer is very, very bad. it's nothing i could sign up to. it's so bad that the prime minister is going to end up resigning over it. if the deal is that bad that the prime minister has to resign for bringing it forward, why on earth would i be compelled to vote for such a bad deal? are you clear in your own mind why others of your colleagues who felt as passionately about this, nonetheless we re passionately about this, nonetheless were prepared to vote for it? that's a judgment call all members of parliament have got to make. at the risk of delivering no brexit at all
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against the strictures it would place honours going forward and it is guaranteed the withdrawal agreement will never give us brexit. so you would rather have no brexit? ona point so you would rather have no brexit? on a point of principle, we voted to ta ke on a point of principle, we voted to take back control, that was not taking back control, it was giving away control, and there's no way when we arejudged away control, and there's no way when we are judged in history, away control, and there's no way when we arejudged in history, no matter what happens to be electorally going forward that i'm going to have my name on a piece of paper that signed our country into perpetuity. no way whatsoever. you think our current position, our status quo position as members of the eu, is however much you loathe it, better than the other options that are being presented thus far? the even an extension to article 50, a longer extension, at least while we are in the article 50 process, we
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voted to leave and can leave. once we going to the withdrawal agreement, we can't leave without the permission of the european union and at least 27 vetoes from the other remaining countries. that, for me, is giving away control of our laws which is worse than toughing it out with an extension to article 50, hopefully with a new prime minister who is going to stand up for the uk interests and be willing to actually leave on a managed no deal, which is something i think negotiations have failed, because the european union never believed that theresa may and her team were ever willing to leave with no deal. so there is a credibility gap where you think a future prime minister could say, i'm willing to do it. are you not concerned by the warnings and expressions of real, deep anxiety across a range of organisations, businesses, trade unions, never mind politicians,
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about the consequences and risks of doing this. we heard it from all the same voices, if we voted to leave they were going to claim it was going to be catastrophe, the economy has gone really well since then, record levels of employment and female employment at the highest economic growth in europe despite all those siren calls and if i remember, 20 years ago, the thing that got me interested in politics was the threat of us joining the euro. i worked to keep us out of the euro. i worked to keep us out of the euro andi euro. i worked to keep us out of the euro and i seem to remember the tuc and cbi joint forces and told us that if we didn'tjoin the euro it would be the end of our economy. i think your viewers know how that turned out. thanks very much for coming in.
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outside the houses of parliament yesterday thousands of leave supporters gathered to protest against the delay to brexit and mark the moment when the uk would have left the eu. our home affairs correspondent, dominic casciani, reports. brexit! they'd come from all parts of the uk, determined to not just be seen by mps, but also to be heard. brexit supporters from a wide range of backgrounds and groups, but all with the same message to parliament — "you have let us down." i can't think of any time in history in which a greater betrayal of a democratic vote has ever happened in any country in the western world. nigel farage, the former ukip leader pledged to stand again for the european elections. if there is a long delay, he predicted leave would also win another referendum, but for many, friday
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was still the day democracy died. but for many, friday let's get out! but for many, friday let's have brexit! but for many, friday very, very sad! but for many, friday very disappointed. but for many, friday the deal's rubbish. but for many, friday it's not leaving. but for many, friday democracy! but for many, friday police have flooded westminster, fearing trouble. in the end, just five arrested. officers will be back today, because more protests are expected. while there's no end in sight for brexit itself. from today, millions of eu nationals will be able to secure their right to stay in the uk, as the home office fully launches its settlement scheme. there are more than three million people expected to be eligible to apply to carry on living and working in the uk. some 200,000 have already secured their status during private and public test phases. speaking on last night's edition of the hit bbc sounds podcast, brexitcast, the bbc‘s political editor laura kuenssberg laid out the position the government now find themselves in. they were able to show today — this is the positive gloss — the government was able to show today that they have made some progress in banging heads together on their own side to get brexiteers
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to realise this is, in their view, as good it is going to get for you, so get on board, and since the progress of all of us over the many, many months that we've been doing brexitcast, the idea that iain duncan smith, borisjohnson, jacob rees—mogg, all those kinds of people would vote for the prime minister's deal... dominic raab. dominic raab, blimey! a few weeks ago, that would have seemed not that likely, so they have shown progress, so 10 downing street have managed to buy themselves a bit more time. the question tonight is, is there any life left in that deal or is itjust going to be subsumed into the parliamentary compromise that will see next week? that we'll see next week? a former minister and a thoughtful mp texted me today and said, "i need to build more brick wall
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in my office on which to bang my head." but there is a feeling in government it might be crazy to think this, it's nuts to have even had another go, but they managed to show some progress, except it's not really in their hands any more. and you can see the latest edition of brexitcast on your television this afternoon just after 2:30 on bbc news and you can also hear it now on bbc sounds. the pilot of the plane which crashed into the english channel with footballer emiliano sala on board, wasn't allowed to fly at night. the bbc has been told that david ibbotson was colour—blind and restricted to daytime flights only. both men died when the piper malibu crashed in january. kayley thomas has more. it has been ten weeks since the plane carrying cardiff city's record £15 million signing, emiliano sala, crashed into the sea off guernsey in the channel islands. the man tasked with getting him to his new club in time
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for training was david ibbotson, a private pilot from north lincolnshire. but he should not have been flying at night because he was not licensed to. the bbc has been told that he was colour—blind and had a restriction on his license stating he could fly in daylight hours only. the ill—fated flight set off from nantes over one hour after sunset. there has been much speculation about the legality of the flight. the piper malibu was registered in the us and could not be operated commercially with paying passengers. the air accident investigation branch said that licensing continues to be a focus of its investigations but a full report into the crash is not expected until early next year. the headlines on bbc news... the prime minister and her cabinet look for ways to bring theresa may's eu withdrawal agreement back to the commons for a fourth time after it was defeated
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by 58 votes yesterday. the bbc understands the pilot of the plane which crashed with footballer emiliano sala on board was not qualified to fly at night. eurostar says passengers using st pancras in london should expect numerous cancellations and severe delays after a trespasser spent the night on a roof near the tracks. a 44—year—old man has been arrested for trespass, after spending the night on a roof near the tracks of st pancras railway station. thousands of people had faced delays in london after eurostar trains were suspended earlier. eurostar say their normal services have resumed, but may incur further disruption. national rail have confirmed all train lines are open again. we spoke to some passengers who've been caught up in the disruption. ourtrain was our train was planned for 12.24, in
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one hour. we are going to be stuck in london for the day. we are stuck here and we would like to have more information, but otherwise that's fine, it's sunny. we can enjoy the moment. there are a lot of cancellations, it has been affected bya cancellations, it has been affected by a trespasser or something on the line. i'mjust by a trespasser or something on the line. i'm just hoping we'll get on a train at some point. i saw it on the news that it was delayed so we weren't sure. we've been here for a couple of hours, just hanging around. let's speak to our news correspondent vishala sri—pathma who is at london st pancras station now for us. what is the explanation for why the station was shut in this way? we've heard this man was on the roof, not actually on the tracks, but was there a concern that he might pose a safety risk? actually, he started off on the tracks according to
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eyewitness reports and then made his way onto the roof where he spent the night, which doesn't sound very co mforta ble! night, which doesn't sound very comfortable! they had to switch off the electricity, therefore trains weren't able to come in and outside the station which is why eurostar suspended services, as did south eastern. services have been resuming slowly. that may be because people have managed to get on trains but also it could be that they cancelled their plans. eurostar were quite keen for passengers to do that this morning. they tweeted if you have plans today, services are going to be disrupted so cancel free of charge, but passengers were fairly upbeat given that some of them were waiting around for hours.|j upbeat given that some of them were waiting around for hours. i suppose a travel disruption always feels like a way of life in this country
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at times —— almost feels. the only consolation presumably to people whose travel has been disrupted or cancelled is that this wasn't on a weekday and therefore the station wasn't quite as busy as it would normally be. nonetheless, this is a beautiful spring weekend. presumably lots of people were hoping to travel to the continent and welcome people from the continent, not least because it's mother's day tomorrow. a popular weekend to go away to paris or brussels. in that station earlier on, you couldn't move. it felt like a monday morning because there are so many people trying to find out information about their trains. this weekend, i weekend in paris is quite a popular choice, a popular destination for people. we've met hindus and various birthday parties, groups of people that are hoping to travel to paris and brussels and they were disappointed that it might not happen today. also lots of people
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live and work in london or commute to paris or london or vice versa and plans to go home at the weekend were disrupted as well. south eastern when affected. those services are resuming slowly so it will be interesting to see what happens through the rest of the afternoon and see if trains are back to normal inafew and see if trains are back to normal in a few hours' time. thousands of palestinians have been gathering along the israel—gaza border to mark the first year anniversary of border demonstrations in which nearly 200 protesters and an israeli soldier were killed. earlier today the gazan health ministry said a palestinian had been killed by israeli shrapnel, hours before the start of the demonstration. dubbed the great march of return, weekly protests have taken place demanding palestinians be allowed to return to their ancestral homes, now in israel, and an end to the gaza blockade. our correspondent yoland knell is in southern israel, and gave us this update.
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well, so far things are relatively calm. we can see that on the palestinian side there is a big crowd. that's just to the east of gaza city, which we can see adjacent to us, and according to the israeli military, at least five protest camps are spread out along the length of gaza, there are currently about 11,000 palestinians gathered and they say some have had some palestinians throwing stones and grenades at israeli soldiers. there have been some attempts to broach the fence but on this side, tear gas has been used by israeli troops at the moment and we have not seen the same kind of numbers of palestinians approaching the fence as we have on previous occasions and that's when israel says that it changes its response and when there are attempts to broach that fence, which could prove to be threatening to israeli
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communities, and here we are very close to nahal oz, a small agricultural village of a few hundred israelis not farfrom gaza, israel says that is when it uses live ammunition and that has been a big issue over the past year, that use of force by the israelis. a un paneland palestinians and human rights groups have suggested this is excessive force. israel replies that no, itjust acts to defend its soldiers and civilians. what about the significance of these protests lasting for almost a year now, why have they been sustained? originally these were supposed to lastjust for a matter of several weeks, but at the beginning they were more of a civil society protest but then
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hamas, which rules gaza, saw the potential to increase leverage over israel over the tight economic blockade and one year into the protest, it is under a lot of pressure to show that they are, in palestinians' views, making some kind of achievement. right now if you look at the political context, hamas has had a lot of economic unrest, very unusual protests against its rule in gaza in the past couple of weeks. it is ten days away from the israeli election where security is a main issue. spoiler alert, if you missed the first ever all female final of masterchef last night and you want to catch up on the final later, then look away now. are masterchef champion 2019 is...
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after competing against 5a other determined contestants and through seven gruelling weeks of culinary challenges, the mastechef winner 2019, irini was crowned last night. a little earlier, i spoke to irini and started by asking her what she was trying to achieve with her cretan—inspired menu. it wasn't for the benefit of the judges really, a lot of it was for my benefit because i wanted to reconnect to my roots but also for the benefit of the viewers, ultimately, of the programme because in the a0 years i've lived here, i've sensed that people have an idea of greek food that is a little bit outdated and i had the chance to
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masterchef to actually allow the playfulness and my character to come out so it was a little bit of a play for me to take traditional produce and present it in a contemporary way so yes, i grew up with these dishes, my mother and grandmother cooked it but totally differently and i thought, surely i can do it in a way that we can identify more today and ican that we can identify more today and i can show to the british audience that the people who love greek food, try something different next time, seek out this amazing food that is being produced now. and you cooked the rosemary lamb in that puree, cracked wheat cooked and soured milk. the combinations are the really striking thing, it's the extra touches you added to quite traditional greek dishes. did you
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surprise yourself a bit?|j traditional greek dishes. did you surprise yourself a bit? i did, i excited myself. i've been on a high since i was accepted then i started trying to cook different things and i was saying to my husband john, if they don't take me, if i don't make it to london, i will be a much better cook and a much happier person because i'm enjoying what i'm doing. in the process, i started writing about it and that took me back to my childhood and memories and the whole thing was an amazing journey. it was such a personal thing. the food was just the medium but it was irini coming out every time and how likely am i —— how lucky am i that the judges saw it and loved it? they certainly did, i was looking at what they said, the real sense of passion that you brought to it. gregg wallace said
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your little touches of greek ingredients are nothing short of inspired. it's love and passion, it's from the heart every time she cooks. john toll road said she has a magic in herfingertips and a cooks. john toll road said she has a magic in her fingertips and a fire in her belly. what is the favourite dish for yourfamily in her belly. what is the favourite dish for your family at home? john by now must be desperate for a straight omelette! because he has tried every dish under the sun and when i was practising that apple dish, which i had a minor disaster on the show with, john was so fed up eating cooked apples so there isn't a standard dish because i like to experiment a lot. i'm a bit naughty and cheeky with even the food so i don't like to do straight... don't ask me to boil you an egg or make an omelette, give me a five page
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recipe! irini, one last thought for you, you said this has been an amazing journey, you hope it's not over yet i guess. what would you like to do next? now that you have been inspired by the experience of masterchef, where would you hope this will take you ? masterchef, where would you hope this will take you? already i have a fantastic sense from last night of the overwhelming response that i need to do more with greek food and i don'tjust need to do more with greek food and i don't just mean need to do more with greek food and i don'tjust mean cook it, i mean research at more, perhaps televise the people who produce it, the people who cook it, the people who grow things, there such a wide range of stuff that the dream for me is to showcase more. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor.
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the weather front spread through northern ireland and scotland and northern ireland and scotland and northern england overnight and it pushes into wales and east anglia. the cold front will separate the slightly less cold air from the colder air tomorrow morning but a lovely mother's day, start of british summer time sought less time in bed through tonight. across england and wales, the cloud is much more extensive but the greatest chance of one or two showers brightening up through the midlands, wales and east anglia through the morning but an easterly breeze developing. it will feel much cooler thanit developing. it will feel much cooler than it has done over the past few days and actually feel continues into next week, a week of april showers.
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the prime minister and her cabinet look for a way to bring her deal back to parliament for a fourth time. i think what we have to do is make sure that we deliver on the will of the people at the referendum. we have to keep trying. that is what people voted for and i'm quite sure thatis people voted for and i'm quite sure that is what the prime minister continues to be determined to deliver. the bbc understands the pilot of the plane that crashed with emiliano sala on board wasn't qualified to fly at night. eu rostar fly at night. eurostar says passengers should expect delays after a trespasser spent the night on the roof. thousands of palestinian protesters are gathering on the border between gaza and israel to mark one year since weekly demonstrations

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