Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  March 30, 2019 11:30pm-11:46pm GMT

11:30 pm
employees to declare the pay difference between their male and female workers, but thousands haven't yet done so. palestinians take part in protests on the border between gaza and israel, to mark a year since weekly demonstrations began. mick jagger is forced to postpone the upcoming rolling stones tour of the us and canada as he needs medical treatment. down and out for huddersfield town, who are relegated from the premier league after they lose at crystal palace. colin farrell, michael keaton and danny devito started a new version of dumbo by the director tim burton, see what mark kermode thinks about and the rest of the week past similar leases in the film review. —— thinks of that.
11:31 pm
—— cinema releases. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with us are james rampton, features writer at the independent and the guardian columnist, dawn foster. welcome to you both. many of the front pages are in. here's the observer, it reports that conservative mps from across the party are "furious" with the prime minister after suggestions that she may call a snap general election next week. they're threatening to vote down any attempt to do so. the mail on sunday says that number 10 is "at war" over the prospect of a snap election, which is being seen as "suicidal." the paper's own poll says that labour currently hold a five point lead over the tories. the sunday telegraph quotes senior conservatives, who warn that the party risks "annihilation" if an election is called. the sunday express claims that if mps vote to remain in the customs union on monday, then that means the uk will be "forced" to "remain under eu rule" permanently. while the sunday times reports that if mrs may accepts a deal that keeps the uk in the customs union or leads to the uk's inclusion in this year's
11:32 pm
european elections, then brexiteer ministers will resign, leaving the cabinet on the brink of collapse. and the independent on sunday understands that the eu would be willing to delay the uk's exit once again, but only for a general election or another referendum. so, let's start with the sunday times, james. cabinet close to collapse, couldn't she just bring a few more people into a place them? i meanjeremy few more people into a place them? i mean jeremy corbyn has few more people into a place them? i meanjeremy corbyn has a planet she is cabinet many hasn't he? hello it is cabinet many hasn't he? hello it is revolving door policy and it has been recently for the government as well, three resigned last week in order to vote against the covenant weapon it may well be that more do this week. however, both sides, remain and brexiteers are in this deadlock about whether they can have a general election, because one cabinet ministers saying that that
11:33 pm
would be the act of ultimate self—harm. the new polls are suggesting that the toys are down by as much as seven points and labour five points ahead on 41, which still fondly enough, would not givejeremy corbyn a majority. —— tories. he would still be 19 seats short of a majority but it would be a wipeout for the tories and it would be that old cliche, turkeys voting for christmas, it seems, if the tories called a general election. the suggestion here is that the queen could block a soft laxative mps in parliament tried to take control away from the executive. parliament tried to take control away from the executivelj parliament tried to take control away from the executive. i think at this point, this is hard brexiteers kind of grasping at straws and looking at the fact that essentially the queen is not going to step in, the queen is not going to step in, the queen is not going to step in, the queen needs to appear neutral, she needs to have a hands off approach to democracy and i think at this point, people are desperately grasping at straws, looking at all possible options and begging the queen to get involved is one of
11:34 pm
them. she won't and they're not going to do it and even if they did ask her, she would not in anyway. so it isjust desperation really. she would say i am washing my hair that week. she's got a headscarf on. yes, but that might be why she needs to wash it, i don't know. the sunday telegraph's headline is that a general election would annihilate the tories. theresa may is said that she feels the house has come to the end what it can do in this process, maybe we should not be surprised if she were to consider a snap election. yeah, i think that was a very, very loaded statement from her. it was designed to, she tried to inspire the inter party by saying they would crush up with no deal. the problem is a lot of tories wanted that. —— into her party. she tried to get them behind it by being
11:35 pm
somebody's baby with no deal, i think now she is certain to move to a general election and that would properly so the bus. does you can off a ny properly so the bus. does you can off any more about them to stop that from happening? but does she also have any other option apart from a general election at this point? —— does she care about them enough anymore? there would also be some sort of revenge, i think by the electors, that is what they are worried about that people have become completely fed up with the com plete become completely fed up with the complete self—indulgence of the tory party, that theresa may's al modus operandi for the past three years seems to been how can i keep my party together, not what is good for the country but what is good for the tory party and voters are likely to seek revenge for that extreme act of self—indulgence. —— whole modus operandi. the date when this whole eu summit takes place, when we are
11:36 pm
supposed to have an idea of what we wa nt to supposed to have an idea of what we want to do if you want to leave the eu without crashing up without a deal on the 12th of april. this is about the eu may be wanting to let us about the eu may be wanting to let us have a bit more time. this is a good story, i have not seen it so authoritatively counts before that he is suggesting that an eu official quite high up is proposing the idea that if the uk government promises to have a referendum, then we could have an extension. who knows how long it would be? a year, perhaps even two years in order to sort it out and i think that would be, for those of us who think the no deal be a catastrophe, i think that is quite a catastrophe, i think that is quite a decent lifeline from the eu. but some people may well feel that that means that brexit will never happen. yes, absolutely. ithink means that brexit will never happen. yes, absolutely. i think what is interesting about the story is that, we have known for a while that in order to get another extension of article 50, something would have to change in the uk, so they would have to put forward an alternative plan,
11:37 pm
whereas this senior eu official has said it has to be a general election or another referendum. they were not entirely set on what the referendum could be, so it could be no deal or remain, it could be remaining or it could be theresa may's deal or it could be theresa may's deal or it could be theresa may's deal or it could be a second referendum, but the eu have said these are the two options, general election, which causes a lot of upset, or another referendum. because at the moment, obviously, as theresa may's deal has shown, parliament is completely deadlocked, so we can't keep going back there. what questions you put to the people in another referendum? because you could end up with the same result in your no further forwards, are you? well, i mean one solution would be for the government to save, i think the labour party have suggested this, the choice of either backing the withdrawal deal thatis either backing the withdrawal deal that is on offer all remaining. -- you are no further forwards. that is on offer all remaining. -- you are no further forwardslj that is on offer all remaining. -- you are no further forwards. i think that would resolve it, you can't say
11:38 pm
it would be the best of three or we will play stone, scissors, paper. that has to be the way of resolving it because as you say, it is totally gridlocked at the moment. what does that do for democracy in this country, when people were led to believe that the outcome of the referendum would be respected? would be upheld? and we would leave? well, it shows that it was too simplistic a choice, just leave or remain. there are so many different shades of leave, that parliament was unable to resolve what sort of leave could work, now some people are suggesting a customs union, some people are saying a form of single market, norway, canada, expeller doses, any number of different, bizarre formulae are being put forward, but the binary choice of leave or remain was too facile, and with all the complex, different, nuanced opinions
11:39 pm
that there were there were not able to work that out and i think it is not necessarily a failure of democracy it is a failure of parliaments to come to a settled view. snap election, there is a concern as well that they could be some conservative mps would find that they would leave that lose their seats in very staunch pickup leave areas to ukip candidates or others who stand on that ticket. -- expialadocious. yes, a lot of conservatives were very angry it was called in many respects, and they are now saying that they would block are now saying that they would block a general election. may wants an election, she either has to get two—thirds majority in the house of commons, she does not get that, she has to call a no—confidence vote in a self or get somebody within parliament to do that. —— if theresa may wants. if you got all of labour
11:40 pm
to do it, all of the snp and some tories, that might pass the tories here are saying that they will block it regardless. the mail on sunday, sorry, shows a similar story, theresa may could call pole as soon as thursday, suicidal over snap election. is this another suggestion to get people to coalesce around no deal? it possibly is, but it is einstein's definition of insanity, isn't it? —— poll. they you have tried something again and again and do it the same way and expect the same result. it is a different result. well, yes, exactly. expect a different result, sorry. she's got the same result every time and if she brings back to the fourth you just think what on earth is going on? but the margin by which she loses is decreasing. well, yes, i think if they do a 23 more times, she will get... she needs at least 19 more goes. 0k, well, we've got
11:41 pm
time. if we get an extension from the eu over the next two years, we could certainly do it. but in the meantime, the electorate will be tearing its hair out. is that what you have done? i have done. at the beginning of brexit, had a full set of hair, people used to comment because, you have got such lovely habits inspects it, i have all out, all of my lustrous locks have gone. we could be tied to the eu forever, in the sunday express. this is the idea that the second referendum could get more backing than anything else. yeah, i think this is what the cities are worried about, we had the indicative boats coming forward and the customs union only lost by about eight votes i think, it could easily become the big option here. labour
11:42 pm
had been pushing for a customs union to be inserted in there, it would have to be ratified than before a lot of ha rd have to be ratified than before a lot of hard brexiteers, for people like the daily express, that would be seen as a betrayal. it shows the bind, either you make be seen as a betrayal. it shows the bind, eitheryou make brexit be seen as a betrayal. it shows the bind, either you make brexit softer and labour), oryou make it harder and labour), oryou make it harder and then people definitely won't but whatever happens, you are definitely going to have a lot of unhappy people in parliament. zverev thoughtful history politics teachers, one day they are going to have to teach this. it is a weird thing. it is a ratings winner for news and the parliament channel. things about serial killers are much more uplifting than talking about brexit. let's look at the observer. it is not about brexit. yes, well, is it? teachers volunteerfor £7,000 pay cut to save jobs, this is at a
11:43 pm
school in wandsworth.” pay cut to save jobs, this is at a school in wandsworth. i only slightly sort of flippant remark there is is it a non— brexit story? because we are just ignoring all these really important things are going on in society, the terrible problem with homelessness, the disastrous effects of the austerity programme, and this is a very good example, a story that in any other era would have been very much front and centre, i commend the observer for pointing it out. teachers in south london are volunteering to ta ke south london are volunteering to take a south london are volunteering to takea £7,000 south london are volunteering to take a £7,000 pay cut to save their colleagues's jobs, i mean take a £7,000 pay cut to save their colleagues'sjobs, i mean what take a £7,000 pay cut to save their colleagues's jobs, i mean what sort of state has this country got to? and these are classroom assistants who are helping children with special educational needs, who need extra help within the classroom and as well as this, we are seeing schools around the country asking parents for donations to, for paper, scissors, glue sticks, and there are a couple of schools in the midlands we re a couple of schools in the midlands were now closing early on friday because they can't afford to stay open anymore. —— who are
11:44 pm
because they can't afford to stay open anymore. “ who are now because they can't afford to stay open anymore. —— who are now closing early. that in turn impacts on parents, who have to find extra childcare will do some work. parents, who have to find extra childcare will do some workm makes me livid the amount we are spending on brexit, read this week that we have spent £12 million buying a flat in new york with seven bedrooms for a potential, very posh negotiator to go out and supposedly swung through a trade deal with the us. i mean don't they read the papers? they will see what a crisis we in, they willjust laugh at us if they think a swanky fight is going to convince them to make a deal with us. “— to convince them to make a deal with us. —— swan. 12 million quid, imagine how many teachers that could have paid for. that is it for the papers tonight, do not forget that all of the front pages are online. it's all there for you seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers, and if you miss the programme any evening, you can watch it later
11:45 pm
on bbc iplayer. james and dawn, lovely to see you. thank you very much. dubai newspaper tomorrow. coming up next, the film review. —— hello. welcome to the film review here on bbc news, and taking us through this week's cinema releases we have dr mark kermode. what do you have for us? we have the new version of dumbo, directed by tim burton, which is kind of live action — kind of. we have out of blue, the new film by carol morley, who made the falling.

19 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on