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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 1, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben thompson. another important day in the brexit process as lawmakers try to break the deadlock. live from london, that‘s our top story on monday the 1st of april. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: teachers and nurses could be legally obliged to warn about young people at risk of violence — that's one of the ideas ahead of a special knife crime summit today. mps are to vote again on alternative brexit options after failing to find it may be april fools‘ day but it is a majority on any of the plans no laughing matter in parliament. mps will once again vote put to them last week. on theirfavoured option for leaving the eu. we‘ll be looking at what two years it comes as the conservative chief of uncertainty has meant for investment in the uk. whip attacks the way the cabinet has also in the programme... behaved during the china‘s cheerful after a manufacturing up—turn in march brexit negotiations. as you are aware, it's not as good as it should be. this is the worst
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example of ill discipline in cabinet in british history. compensation when things go wrong. broadband and landline customers should find it easier to get money back from today. i'll be talking to the regulator about what's changed. lucky liverpool are back on top of the premier league, and they deserve their good fortune according to manager jurgen klopp as they beat tottenham to move above manchester city again. it is turning colder this week and there is some frost around in the northern half of the country. also, a bright start with sunshine and showers, rain will come in from the north—west later. i will have more details in a few minutes. it's monday the first of april. our top story: teachers, nurses, charity workers and the police could be held accountable if they fail to spot the "warning signs" of violent crime in youngsters. that's just one proposal which will be discussed at downing street during a summit hosted by theresa may. it follows another weekend
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of bloodshed in the capital. our correspondent, james waterhouse, joins us now from edmonton in north london, where four people were stabbed. all of these four people that were walking alone the other night were approached and stabbed in the back. two are in a critical condition, a third is thought to have sustained life changing injuries. this comes as the number of fatal stabbings hit the highest since records began in england and wales last year and the pressure has not gone away. today, the home secretary sajid javid have floated plans that will see certain
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workers being held to account, if you like, if they fail to spot evidence of violent crime. it is being called a public—health duty. it would put the responsibility on teachers, nurses and police officers to spot the early signs that a child is being pulled into violent crime. once the alarm is raised, the idea is that social services and specialist and anti—gang charities would step in and help turn the young person's life around. it is modelled on scotland's success in treating knife violence as a disease that needs treating at its root. the conference at downing street will hear from young people whose lives have been affected by violence and their views on where the government is going wrong. also there will be the new boss of the national police chiefs‘ council, martin hewitt, who, in a blog post, said an extra £970 million promised by ministers isn't enough to meet all the challenges that police face. it comes as police in england and wales get more powers to use stop—and—search to deal with knife crime.
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we have seen that the reduce of funding for youth clubs and grassroots organisation has led to an increase of violence in the community where young people were once occupied in the youth club or occupied by a charity, third—sector organisation service provider, yet they are no longer getting that sort of activity, so they get up to other things, they get influenced by others. i know many of these initiatives and i have seen their case studies and their social impact and they are proven to be very effective. however, they don't get the type of support necessary to move on and to continue the great work that they are doing. campaigners are also calling the move disappointing and a step backwards. that is the broader picture. people
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have been charged for grievous bodily harm. they think their main motive was to inflict harm because none of the victims were robbed and there were no conversations between them and the attacker when it happened. they are describing the suspect as a slim, six foot three, black, wearing dark clothing at the time. if anyone has any information as to who he might be, call 999. and we'll be speaking to the crime minister, victoria atkins, at around 7:40am. the commons will vote again on alternative brexit options later. a customs union with the european union is thought to be the most likely preference. mps failed to find a majority for any of the plans put to them last week and theresa may's deal was rejected for a third time. our political correspondent nick eardley is at our westminster studio.
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take us through the alternative options? what might there be today? another voted to try and find something parliament can get behind. you might remember there was some last week that failed to get any majority at all for any of the options that were voted on. another round today. what we have seen is that parliament seems to favour the idea of a closer relationship that the eu is proposing. it might be able to get enough support in parliament today. there will be other options discussed, things like the single market. potentially another referendum or leaving without a deal at all. the big question is whether there is anything that parliament can agree on. the chief whipjulian smith has also
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said some pretty strong words? extraordinary, the chief whipjulian smith, the man who is basically in charge of discipline for the government, firstly saying the government, firstly saying the government should have been more honest about the fact that closer relationship was probably likely after the tories lost their majority and that snap general election back in 2013. also saying that the cove na nt in 2013. also saying that the covenant does my current government doesn't manage to keep to the line enough. let's have a listen. how will you get people on site? as you are aware, discipline is not as good as it should be. this is a result of ill discipline in cabinet in british political history. anyone paying attention will know there have been attention will know there have been a number of arguments in the government over brexit but for the chief whip to come out and say that publicly is quite something was up
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you can see more of that documentary tonight. in the meantime, parliament will try again to find out what it wa nts. will try again to find out what it wants. thank you very much. that documentary is called the brexit storm. by laura kuenssberg. there is good news for dissatisfied broadband customers this morning, steph is here to tell us more. yes, maybe they don't have the right to service, an engineer has missed an appointment to fix things, they got it fixed but it's not working properly still. there are 7.2 million cases each year where broadband or landline customers suffer delayed repairs, installations or missed appointments. but compensation is currently only paid out to about1 in 7 of them. from today, new rules coming in which means customers just have to report the fault to their provider and providers will start paying out automatically if the repair takes too long.
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if your service has stopped working and isn't fully fixed after two working days — then compensation is £8 each calendar day the service isn't repaired. if your provider promises a particular date and doesn't deliver, then compensation is £5 for each calendar day of delay, including start date. an engineer doesn't turn up or cancels with less than 2a hours notice — then compensation is £25 per missed appointment. will you have to apply? we will find out the details from the regulator in about a0 minutes but the idea is that yes, you should automatically get the money if you have complained. it slightly annoys me that they always say "up to". it cove rs that they always say "up to". it covers quite a big band, doesn't it?
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iimagine covers quite a big band, doesn't it? i imagine they will be a lot of people wanting to get in touch about that. —— there will be. more than two million workers will receive a pay rise from today as the minimum wage increases by almost 5%. the hourly rate for those over the age of 25 increases from £7.83 to £8.21. forfull time employees, that's worth an extra £690 over a year. the increase comes into effect 20 years on from the introduction of the national minimum wage. a comedian is on course to win the most votes in the opening round of the presidential election in ukraine. volodymyr zelenskiy plays the ukranian president in a tv show and now exit polls suggest he has a clear lead over the incumbent president poroshenko. the two men are likely to face each other in a run—off in three weeks' time. sales of sparkling wine in the uk have fallen for the first time in five years. 21a—million bottles of champagne,
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cava and prosecco were sold in 2018, three million fewer than the previous year, according to research by accountancy group uhy hacker young. a preference for trendier tipples — like artisan gin and rum cocktails — has been blamed for the drop in sales. charges for using the toilet at all of britain's busiest railway stations are being scrapped from today. edinburgh waverley, london liverpool street and london kings cross are the last of 20 network rail stations to make their loos free to use. they previously charged up to fifty pence per visit. you can't charge 50p for a wee. you can't charge 50p for a weelj tell you what, it was free on
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saturday and the queues were a lot longer. you shouldn't have to pay! there is a place in sheffield called ca lver there is a place in sheffield called calver and it is pronounced the same as cava. it is amazing the things that can whizz through your head in the morning. interesting day in the premier league yesterday. even juergen klopp have admitted liverpool were lucky with the lastgasp win. that's what it's like
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at this stage, it's all about who gets that little moment of lock. liverpool have lea pfrogged manchester city again to go back on top of the premier league, after beating tottenham 2—1 at anfield. a blunder from the tottenham keeper hugo lloris led to the own goal that gave liverpool the victory. james forrest scored a late winner for celtic in the old firm derby, that also finished 2—1. celtic are now 13 points clear of rangers at the top of the scottish premiership. charles leclerc should have been celebrating his first formula one win but his ferrari suffered problems in bahrain. lewis hamilton inherited the victory and did his best to console leclerc. and roger federer‘s title tally is now 101 — he beatjohn isner in the final of the miami open — he said it was unbelievable to win the event again, 20 years after he first played in it. i have only just i have onlyjust remembered it is the first of april. have you done an
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aprilfall in your the first of april. have you done an april fall in your sports? i've got a really good one for you! there is one here. there is a giveaway somewhere, one of the papers. one of the stories is written by flora poil. even if you know anything about anagrams... what is occurring, carol? last week we had high pressure, this week, low pressure. once again, a return to overnight frost. the high
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pressure that has been dominating is pushing into the new continent. low pressure is coming our way and today this weather front will come in and introduce rain later in the day. before that across scotland and northern england, a cold start with frost. it means it's not as cold for you, northern ireland. not quite as cold as in the north. we have a scattering of showers in the north—west and later on in the day, i returned to rain. for most of england and wales, not a bad day with sunny spells, the occasional shower. temperatures eights or nines in the north. that's the last time we will see that this week. as we head through the evening and overnight, the weather front continues to move south. they will be snow in the hills and ahead of this, once again, we are still in the milder conditions. behind, there
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isa the milder conditions. behind, there is a cold front. it will be colder with frost and ice. the weather front is what we call a waving front. it is waving backwards and forwards but eventually will clear off to the south—east taking the yellows with it indicating milder conditions and you will notice the blues coming in because it is colder. there goes the weather front from the east, taking its rain. behind it, colder. sunshine but showers around. some of them will be heavy. at lower levels, looking at a combination of hail and thunder and lightning as well as rain. on higher ground, snow. down to about 300 metres. lower than that in some of the heaviest showers. at times, some slushy accumulations. then in wednesday, see the wraparound, the low pressure. there is still
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uncertainty but what we think at the moment is it will bring in rain and heal snow as it pushes westwards this time across parts of scotland. the grampians, the southern uplands and the pennines. that could change so keep an eye. ahead of it, showers but equally sunshine. note the temperature is 6—10. we haven't seen temperatures that low for a wee while. we will have a look at the front pages before we look inside the newspapers this morning. the daily mail takes a break from brexit, they lead instead on theresa may's "radical rethink" over knife crime. that is something we're looking at this morning as well. mrs may and home secretary sajid javid now say it should be treated like an infectious disease. the times reports that two members of the cabinet — chris grayling and penny mordaunt —
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are prepared to quit the government if the prime minister chooses to back a customs union with the eu. it also shows a recently unearthed fresco from pompeii, which may look grand but actually adorned the wall of a snack bar, apparently. the telegraph also leads on a call by chris grayling for the tories to appoint a eurosceptic to lead the party in the next phase of the brexit negotiations. the paper carries as well a column by former foreign secretary boris johnson, who labels himself as a "one nation" tory, in what they call "his pitch for leader". and the mirror reports that labour leader jeremy corbyn is "ready for power" as the conservative party is on "the verge of collapse". it also has a picture of mickjagger, after he was forced to postpone the rolling stones's latest tour on the advice of doctors. a big night of tv last night. one of the most read stories on twitter overnight. the final episode of blue planet live on bbc one attracted plenty of comments — many of them concerned
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for the welfare of a baby turtle. the baby turtle was released right before the end and then, have a look at what happened if you have not seen it. but you know, these totals are going to spend at least 100 yea rs are going to spend at least 100 years in the oceans if all goes well. surely it is our responsibility to safeguard their futures. scientists cannot do it alone, this is a blue planet to protect our actions and the making of voices heard, so we hope that we have inspired you to grab that responsibility both hands. that is goodbye from asking the great barrier reef, a big thank you to all of the sciences to have helped us here, but that is not all from the programme, back over to chris. watching live, weren't you? honestly, there she isjust releasing six little, tiny totals into the sea and talk about wrapping opportunity. is the goal comes in behind, nick's one of the turtles.
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—— turtles. —— nicks. behind, nick's one of the turtles. -- turtles. -- nicks. you would normally think they would get to the sea, wouldn't you ? normally think they would get to the sea, wouldn't you? that is awful. it has caused real heartbreak on social media, but then line of duty was on afterwards. i watched the first five minutes. it is a big... there is a big moment. what on earth was that? that is him not telling me what happened. a handbrake turn. i will not ruin it for you, but very good. we should do on april fools' day alert, shouldn't we? iwas joking about flora poil in the daily telegraph, actually there april fools' day joke is telegraph, actually there april fools' dayjoke is that traditional april fools' day joke fools' dayjoke is that traditional april fools' dayjoke sabine band this year under an archaic parliamentary order, amid warnings the public can no longer tell the
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difference between reality and farce. —— jokes have been banned. yesterday, liverpool getting that late, late winner. that is the back page of the daily mirror, the back page of the daily mirror, the back page of the daily mirror, the back page of the daily mail having the same thing. luck for chelsea, they say that officials handed them a lifeline. absolutely fuming yesterday after chelsea's second goal, which you can see here, he was clearly offside. so good luck and bad luck for everybody yesterday and lewis hamilton was lucky yesterday in the formula! because he had a little bit of a stroke to go ahead and win. yes. did you have an april fool's as well? all right, did you wa nt fool's as well? all right, did you want me to share mine? this is not sporty, this is from yesterday. you know the clocks change yesterday? this is a proper tweet on the officials at stonehenge. —— from the
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officials. steph, what have you got? there is a story in the papers this morning about when you book hotels online, how the big online booking firms mean everyone is paying more in quitea firms mean everyone is paying more in quite a few people to warn that —— her own things like bed and brea kfasts —— her own things like bed and breakfasts have had enough. there's a guy who owns a bed—and—breakfast in richmond in north yorkshire, lovely of the world, he has owned it for 15 years and he has decided to withdraw from all booking sites because he says they take the direct dozens away from you and you end up paying them commission and actually, but ends up taking a big chunk out of his profits he is saying is enough. i try to book directly with the hotel. i know, it is better for them if you do but obviously, the big booking sites dominate the listings whenever you do a search on the internet. i think this is an aprilfool ‘s the internet. i think this is an april fool ‘s joke, the internet. i think this is an
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aprilfool ‘sjoke, larry the the internet. i think this is an april fool ‘s joke, larry the cat, according to this, but i do not think it has really happened, has been given his own little cat flap at number ten. he is of course the chief mouser. the spokesperson said it would allow a swift, soft exit and re—entry. it would allow a swift, soft exit and re-entry. come on. also, the cat flap, given the fact that it has just been literally put in, it looks like it is being well used. what about this? give a dog a drone, for walkies, this is. apparently, there isa walkies, this is. apparently, there is a deluxe richmond walker, where allowed middle—class voice shouts fenton, fenton a dog. unfortunately, it is more powerful than they first
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planned. —— at your dog. so four dogs ended up being snagged in trees after being lifted off the ground by after being lifted off the ground by a drone and there are reports that an excited yorkshire terrier was spotted over gatwick before christmas. i think that is true, i believe that. do you know what? it has kind of lightened the mood of it, hasn't it? see later, everybody. —— see you later. for both victims and witnessess of crimes, giving evidence to police can be a difficult and often traumatic experience. now, police are hoping that a strategy already used in america could help people through the process, with just a bit of help from man's best friend. breakfast'sjohn maguire has more. oliver the labrador personifies man's best friend, loyal, and coming. he has been trained as a facility dog, the idea is that he sits with a vulnerable victim or witness being interviewed by the police and offers silent support, evenin police and offers silent support, even in this demonstration we are filming today, oliver knows exactly what to do. oliver is lying on
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rachel and when he does that and rachel and when he does that and rachel strokes in like that, that releases oxytoci n rachel strokes in like that, that releases oxytocin in both oliver and rachel, so oxytocin is our social bonding hormone, it releases the hormone, so we naturally come over more relaxed and more calm and it allows rachel to come over more calm when testifying in an interview. allows rachel to come over more calm when testifying in an interviewfi owner is a psychology lecturer here at canterbury christ church university, she brought him over from north america having heard how successful the facility dog programme has been there, where it has been running for 20 years. he is highly trained. so when he has his cape on, he knows he is working. so ifi cape on, he knows he is working. so if i puta cape on, he knows he is working. so if i put a tree down and anyone who has a love it that labradors love treats, he will not touch it. there are over 200 of these dogs across north america and have been for the last 200 years that there is no
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research. so what we're doing at the moment is we're working the kent police and examining the benefits and effectiveness of oliver in dogs like oliver in providing companionship when victims and witnesses are being interviewed in a police interview process. this the creation of a police interview room at the university is used to study the psychology of the process. kent police are working with the university to determine the programme's effectiveness. anything thatis programme's effectiveness. anything that is going to be able to support our witnesses and victims being able to help us and give the evidence to make it, can only be a good thing. at the moment, we are in the research gathering stage, so we're going to be using this research to see actually, on an evidence base, whether oliver is a support to witnesses and victims while they give their evidence to the police. good boy. oliver has been in place in september and in that time, has helped four people. he is the first of its kind in europe. it is yet another new role for working dogs.
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she purges to drug detectors to guides for those who can't see, not just a friend but a co—worker and a great comfort. john maguire, bbc news, canterbury. and what a beautifully trained dog that was. yes, very impressive. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we”ll be back at 6:30am. a very good morning. i'm asad ahmad. teachers, nhs workers and police officers could be held accountable for failing to spot violent crime among young people. it's being proposed by the government, who are going to examine whether there's a "public health duty" to report concerns over children at risk. there's more on that story on bbc breakfast in a few minutes's time. well, a man and a woman remain in a critical condition in hospital this morning, after a spate of what police describe as "cowardly and senseless" attacks in north london. four people were stabbed
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within a short distance, within hours, over the weekend. all were approached from behind and knifed in the back in edmonton. two men have been arrested, but police have asked the public to be remain vigilant. now to a story which our transport correspondent calls "the most radical plan you've never heard of." it's the ultra low emission zone, which comes into effect in central london a week today. i'm telling you now, because if you haven't checked whether your vehicle is exempt, driving into town will cost you £12.50 — on top of the congestion charge. so do go to our website for more details, in case you get hit with a hefty bill. the address is on your screen. from today, if you want to spend a penny at some of the country's busiest train stations, you don't need to because toilet facilities, from this morning, will be free. london liverpool street and king's cross stations are among those scrapping the 50 pence charge. water fountains are also
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being introduced to the stations, which is handy. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes, tfl has minor delays between liverpool street and stratford due to an earlier fire alert. on the roads, the m25 anticlockwise is slow on the approach to junction 23, because of a fire alert. a lane was closed. and the minories, near tower bridge, is closed southbound for emergency water works. now the weather with lucy martin. hello. good morning. the first of april today and it looks like it is a decent start of the month although there is change to come through this week, it is going to turn much cooler and we have got some showers to come as well. it is a chilly start of the day—to—day, temperatures the low single figures but it will be a dry day with some good, prolonged spells of sunshine and with light winds, it will be feeling pleasant in the sunshine,
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highs around 1a, 15 celsius. going through this evening and overnight, it will start after i was simply spells but as we move through the night, the going chance of seeing one two shops hours pushing their way north. elsewhere, good deal of dry weather, temperatures fall into an overnight low of around a6 celsius. tomorrow, that is when we start seeing a shift in the weather. —— fourto start seeing a shift in the weather. —— four to six. the biggest change however, temperatures are real deep to come, struggling to get into the double figures, have around nine celsius. bye. yes, feeling much colder this week, i think. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. after more stabbings in london this weekend we'll hear from the crime minister, ahead of a knife crime summit hosted
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by the prime minister. bowel cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the uk but most who are diagnosed early survive. the bbc‘sjeremy bowen, talks to us for the first time about his diagnosis and his hopes for better screening. also this morning, the women with devastating scars who are proving beauty is more than skin deep. they've all entered a unique new pageant for people with disfigurements. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. teachers, nurses, and the police could be held accountable if they fail to spot the "warning signs" of violent crime in youngsters. that's just one proposal which will be discussed later at a downing street summit on violent crime. ministers have come under increasing pressure to tackle the crisis after a spike in knife attacks and violent deaths.
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the commons will vote again on alternative brexit options later. a customs union with the european union is thought to be the most likely preference. the chief whip, julian smith, has questioned the government's approach to brexit — arguing that it was inevitable, after the conservatives lost their majority in the last election, that they'd have to move to a "softer" brexit. mps failed to find a majority for any of the plans put to them last week and theresa may's deal was rejected for a third time including by northern ireland's dup — which the government relies upon for support. our message to the prime minister is do what you should have done at the very start and what you promised you would do and that is only sign an agreement which treats northern ireland the same as the rest of the united kingdom. that's what you promised to do, that's the road you promised to do, that's the road you promised to do, that's the road you promised to take and you did not do that and that's why you are in the trouble you are at present and if she doesn't change her mind, we will continue to argue for it.
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from today, broadband and landline customers will receive compensation automatically when experiencing issues with their providers. under the new rules, households who suffer from delays to installation or repairs, as well as missed appointments, will get five—pounds deducted from their bill for each day of disruption. until now, only one in seven customers have received financial compensation. more than two million workers will receive a pay rise from today as the minimum wage increases by almost 5%. the hourly rate for those over the age of 25 increases from £7.83 to £8.21. forfull time employees, that's worth an extra £690 over a year. the increase comes into effect 20 years on from the introduction of the national minimum wage. two prescription drugs used by millions to treat pain, anxiety and epilepsy are being reclassified today as class c controlled substances. the move comes over concerns linking pregabalin and gabapentin to almost 600 deaths in england over the last 5 years. in most cases they are safe when used as prescribed — but doctors and pharmacists say they have been increasingly handed out too readily and been
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used recreationally. cases of diabetes, fuelled by the uk's obesity crisis are rising at a ‘frightening speed', according to a warning from a leading health charity. figures from diabetes uk suggest more than 200,000 people a year are diagnosed with the preventable type 2 condition in england and wales alone. window with type 2 diabetes there area number of window with type 2 diabetes there are a number of risk factors that make it more likely you are going to get it. it is like your age, whether it is you and your family or not and your ethnic crown. ——we know. another big factor is your weight.
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tougher rules on fixed odds betting machines have come into force. from today the maximum stake that can be played has been cut from one hundred to — two pounds. the machines have been described as the crack cocaine of gambling. charges for using the toilet at all of britain's busiest railway stations are being scrapped from today. edinburgh waverley, london liverpool street and london kings cross are the last of 20 network rail stations to make their loos free to use. they previously charged up to fifty pence per visit. i went on saturday and it was free but there was a queue. i am sure there is some kind of spend a penny going on there. liverpool probably feel quite lucky this morning according to their boss juergen klopp. that is not me saying
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that, that is whatjuergen klopp said. liverpool have lea pfrogged manchester city to go back on top of the premier league after beating tottenham 2—1 at anfield — their winner coming after a blunder from keeper hugo lloris. ben croucher reports. juergen klopp said liverpool one ugly. the 29 year weight to a title took just ugly. the 29 year weight to a title tookjust 16 minutes for roberto firmino been given that tottenham defence. —— weight. staring at a fourth defeat in five, there was a sub ordered. —— wait. lukas meijer had space to equalise. liverpool's prayers were answered in the most dramatic way. liverpool's divine intervention... commentator: it is
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an own goal and liverpool has won the game! it may not have been the best looking game fans will see a thing of beauty. we compete with man city. tell me now, to better teams in the world at the moment. we compete with them and put them under pressure and i said a couple of weeks ago they would want to get rid of us. it is important. cardiff manager neil warnock described premier league officials as the "worst in the world" after his side's contraversial defeat at home to chelsea. cardiff were ahead until six minutes from time, when cesar azpilicueta's equalised — it certainly looked offside. ruben loftus cheek scored a very late winner — warnock didn't hold back afterwards.
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the best league in the world and probably at the minute and probably the worst officials we've got at the moment. i don't know what they teach the linesman. i've seen so many. it's difficult to say because what cani it's difficult to say because what can i say? the linesman were brilliant today, absolutely brilliant. celtic have all but secured an eight scottish title in a row, after winning an eventful old firm derby. they were leading 1—nil when alfredo morelos was dismissed for the fifth time this season. and after rangers had equalised, james forrest scored a late winner. celtic are now 13 poinst clear of their glasgow rivals, with only seven games to go. over 85,000 people were at wembley to watch portsmouth beat sunderland on penalties to win the checkatrade trophy. it was 2—2 after extra—time, oli hawkins scoring the winning spot—kick. only barcelona's win over espanyol drew a larger crowd across europe this weekend. arsenal women are guaranteed champions league football next season, after katie mccabe's goal gave them victory over birmingham and kept them at the
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top of super league. they're still a point ahead of manchester city, who beat liverpool. lewis hamilton consoled the young ferrari driver charles leclerc, after mechanical problems denied him his first grand prix victory in bahrain. he was leading with 11 laps to go, when his car lost power, allowing hamilton to pass. his mercedes team mate valtteri bottas finished second, with leclerc third — hamilton said it was obviously devastating for him but he had a great future ahead. roger federer won his 101st title, beating john isner in straight sets in the final of the miami open — he said it meant a lot to take the title again, 20 years after his first played in the event. toulouse will play leinster in the semi—finals of rugby union's european champions cup, afterjust edging past racing, winning by 22 pionts to 21. toulouse finished runners—up behind leinster in the pool stages. —— points.
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britain's adam yates narrowly missed out on winning the tour of catalunya. he launched a late attack, aided by his brother simon, but he finished just 1a second behind the winner miguel angel lopez of colombia. most athletes would spend the few days before a major event honing their skills and taking late training sessions. but the british sailing team joined hundreds of sailors from around the world in a beach clean in majorca, ahead of the princess sofia trophy regatta, which starts today. they were trying to raise awareness of plastic pollution. olympic gold medallist hannah mills was among them — she said "as olympic athletes we have a responsibility to be role models and set an example". it isa
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it is a strong image. they believe so passionately. anyone who is —— has watched any of the bbc documentary, blue planet, they will know it is a huge problem they are trying to fix. "a disease rotting our society". that's how the home secretary, sajid javid, has described the rise of violent crime in the uk. it comes ahead of a special summit in downing street which brings together ministers, community leaders, experts and young people, in order to find ways of tackling the crisis. one of those who'll be attending is barry mizen, whose 16 year old son jimmy was murdered ten years ago. he joins us now from our london newsroom. what do you make of all of this news about another person killed injured?
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the statement that it's a disease, it is borderline epidemic. these people stabbing people in the back, it's perhaps another worrying trend. this is serious. when my son was killed, i tried to bring some change. very, very worrying times. killed, i tried to bring some change. very, very worrying timeslj know you will be part of the summit today and we have heard a sajid javid talking about it being a public duty for doctors, nurses, teachers as well, to intervene earlier in the lives of children. is that the right rout, do you think? it seems such a shame that we have got to go to legislation to come forward with information. we also then go down the line to blame perhaps other people. for me, i am more and more emboldened by the
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community. i believe it's the way forward. ten year programmes, fine, but we have been talking about it for a year now so we should be one step closer to trying to resolve these things. for me, it's an immediate response. what about the person that is going to be stabbed and attacked today? what are we doing for them for? i personally can't see any other way forward and to encourage and enable the police to encourage and enable the police to do what they are supposed to be doing and that is trying to keep us all doing and that is trying to keep us a ll safe. doing and that is trying to keep us all safe. we have to take perhaps some of the shackles off and let's look on this as a short—term measure. at the police allow them to do theirjob. is it that the house is on fire. let's put the fire out before we start talking about the fire project —— fire prevention systems. we know that police forces in england and wales are giving further stop—and—search powers. that isa further stop—and—search powers. that is a good thing, in your view? what other choice do we really have for these people that are dying every day. the bereaved parents, ask some of them what it — make what they
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think about stop—and—search. let's not think about this is the only way of doing things. what can we do for our most asked ——at risk young people? let's not just our most asked ——at risk young people? let's notjust condemn. if people? let's notjust condemn. if people are at risk and have issues in their lives, let's do what we can for them. but in the short term, we have to try and put the fire out. what do you find makes a difference? our young people want to do something and want to get involved, let's enable that. the previous head of ofsted said our young people are living in fear. that needs the
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response of every single one of us. that is you, me and every single one of them. and we'll be speaking to the crime minister, victoria atkins, at around 7:a0. let us know what you think about that today. as usual, you can get in touch about anything we talk about on the programme. as ever, you can find us on social media. there is often a rather healthy debate going on on our facebook page during the programme as well. carol has been talking about rather cold conditions, good morning. that is right, it is going to turn rather colebee but you can see lovely blue skies here. some of us will still have a today because there is still some milder air around. have a today because there is still some milderairaround. —— have a today because there is still some milder air around. —— cold day. temperatures have fallen below
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freezing but for the rest of the uk, it is not as cold because there is a bit more cloud around, particularly in northern ireland, parts of wales in the midlands. we say goodbye to high pressure this week, eases off into the near continent hello to this area of low pressure, a cold front will bring in some rain but before that we will see quite a few showers in western scotland and northern ireland in particular, see you can see how the cloud builds ahead. some wintriness on the hills in the north but as we come further south across england and also wales, there will be some cloud abound but equally, we will enjoy some lengthy sunny spells by the way across the south coast, the winds to ease into east anglia and northern england but the cloud will build to the day as it will across scotland and northern ireland, with the arrival of the showers and then later on, the arrival of this band of rain. so as we go through the day, these are the kind of temperatures you can expect. eight and nine on the north, ten to
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16 in the south. it is the last time we are likely to see 16 this week. the evening and overnight, our two bands eventually merge, bringing the vein steadily southwards. there will be some snow in tops of the hills in scotland, variable amounts of cloud, not quite as cold in the south head of the weather front as it is going to be behind it, and with the wet surfaces and cold temperatures and frost, there is the risk of some ice and untreated services. as we head on the tomorrow in sioux spain, because france and the low countries, they hang onto the milder airas we do countries, they hang onto the milder air as we do initially across the south—east, but look at these blues coming our way. they are following on behind a weather front, indicating it is going to turn colder. the weather front continues to move towards the east, bringing its vein with it. a northerly wind, colder direction for us and sunshine and showers. on the hills, the showers are likely to be wintry but some of the heavier showers at lower
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levels, we could see a bit of a wintry flavour with some slush possible in some accumulations. highs of ten as we come down towards the south. on tuesday into wednesday, the centre of the low pressure there. we have what we call the wraparound occlusion around it. we think at the moment what that is going to do is introduce vein from the east heading towards the west, preceded by snow over the hills of the grampians, the southern uplands and also the pennines. we might be seeing quite a bit of snow from this but that could change. the rest of us, a mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers but note the temperatures ranging from six to about ten, and then as we head onto the latter part of the week, still some showers to get rid of it as we head towards the weekend, temperatures slowly start to recover. gosh, snow again. thank you very
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much, carol. i was gosh, snow again. thank you very much, carol. iwas knocking gosh, snow again. thank you very much, carol. i was knocking the heating down. i wasjust about to get the shorts out. there is good news for dissatisfied broadband customers this morning, steph has got it. good morning. yes, this is all about the compensation you get when you are dissatisfied with your broadband. every year, there are over 7 million cases of customers who have suffered delayed repairs, installations or missed appointments with their broadband or landline. but compensation, in the past, has only been paid out to about one in seven of those cases. from today, the rules have changed. sharon white is the chief executive of ofcom, which regulates the broadband providers. tell us about the major change today. it is a major new scheme for broadband and landline customers. if you are kept waiting for your broadband or landline service to be
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installed or repaired, you will now get your money back without having to fight for it. ok, so how will it work then? if you are someone who has had a delay on the repairfor their service, what happens? so if you have been waiting for a fault to be repaired and you have been waiting for more than two working days, you will get £8 a day for every day after. if you have ordered a new broadband line or landline and it is not up and running in time, you will get £5 every day, and more than that, if your engineer fails to turn up on time, you will get a 1—off payment of £25. turn up on time, you will get a 1-off payment of £25. ok, and when you say this money will be coming back automatically, how does it actually work? do you ring up and thenit actually work? do you ring up and then it goes into your bank? do they credited to your account? how does it work? hello that is light, so obviously will need to let your provider know that something has gone wrong and from that very moment, the clock starts ticking and you should get a credit on your account within 30 days, and it is pa rt account within 30 days, and it is part of a broader fairness agenda,
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really. we want to see all customers treated fairly, guaranteed broadband speed, when you take your contract out, providers letting you know when your contract is coming to an end and giving you the best deal possible. so what happens? if you win your provider and say you have got a problem, but they disagree with you? what the new scheme means is that that will not happen, so if you are a customer of bt or talktalk orvirgin or you are a customer of bt or talktalk or virgin or sky, they have now committed to deal with your problem straightaway and that is why it is now automatic. it is a voluntary scheme that they have signed up to, why is it not compulsory? it is volu nta ry why is it not compulsory? it is voluntary and the reason for that is that it voluntary and the reason for that is thatitis voluntary and the reason for that is that it is the fastest way to get money into people's pockets. we have been very pleased that every big broadband and landline provider has signed up and that is more than 95% of customers today will now be
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eligible for compensation. so, fingers crossed it all goes to plan. what happens if it is not and you are customer who has made the call, reported the fault, you are due compensation and you do not get it? if there is a problem, then obviously get in touch with your provider in the first instance but if the scheme does not work as well, then ofcom, as the regulator, we will step in. so this is about problems getting things repaired, missed engineer appointments, what about those people out there who not happy with the speed that they are getting? every time we talk about broadband, people will always talk about the fact that it is up to however many megabytes, what can be done about that? when you take a contract out with a provider, they have got now to give you a guaranteed speed and as you say, there are still too many of us who do not get a decent speed in the
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first place. the numbers are coming down, they are halved in the last year that we are also introducing what we call a new broadband guaranteed, which will mean everybody up and down the country will have a right to a decent broadband. thank you very much for your time. that is the chief executive of ofcom, the regulator. so many people be interested to see that, thank you very much, we will see when a bit, thank you. —— see you ina see when a bit, thank you. —— see you in a bit. after suffering third degree burns to 70% of her body as a child, rochelle barrett had spent years feeling self—conscious and covering her scars with clothing and make—up. determined to be a good role model for her daughter, rochelle has launched miss unique beauty uk — the first ever beauty pageant for survivors of burns, scarring or disfigurement. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin went along to meet the women taking part. so, here... ugly, contagious, disgusting, and along here... those words just disgusting, and along here... those wordsjust made me disgusting, and along here... those words just made me feel completely
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inferior. when rochelle was badly burned as a baby, her mother was told she might not survive. she did with physical and emotional scars a lifetime of low self esteem, until she had her own children. when you are telling your own children it doesn't matter what anyone says, invasive self who you are, you're beautiful, i am telling this and then i am going upstairs, looking at myself in the mirror and hating what iam seeing, myself in the mirror and hating what i am seeing, it is when i realised rochelle, it is time to change. it is saturday night. this is it, yes. let's do this! and the change rochelle dreamt of is about to take base here in sheffield. miss unique beauty uk! the first ever beauty pageant to survivors of burns, scarring or disfigurement.” pageant to survivors of burns, scarring or disfigurement. i am beautiful. i am beautiful! well
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done. maxime, how are you feeling? a? very nervous, excited, static. mid on, b. when i was going up, a lot of people did not know about cleft palate and i was bullied. but this is about you owning your moment. that's right, putting all that past behind me and celebrating the differences and uniqueness inside of me. come here, you. i was burned at the age of 18 camping accident. it has been a long journey to feel confident in my own skin, from having anxiety attacks at school to now walking the stage, flaunting. this is rochelle will become an annual event, to send a
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message to other young women and survivors. i have got six of the most incredible young women, just seeing the transformation in them where they felt low comments on now seeing them smile, love themselves. iam so, seeing them smile, love themselves. i am so, so proud. you are all winners and you all queens and you all deserve this night. my message to other women out there is to raise how you are now, don't think about changes that you have to make, that you need to lose weight, that you need to cover yourself up, that you are not worthy or attractive. you are, tell yourself i am beautiful, i am powerful, and worthy, and this is me. she isjust she is just brilliant. she isjust brilliant. and thank you very much to rochelle for taking the time out for us. absolutely. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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a very good morning, i'm asad ahmad. teachers and nhs workers could be held accountable for failing to spot violent crime among young people. it's being proposed by the government, who are going to examine whether there's a "public health duty" to report concerns over children at risk. home secretary sajid javid said he'll use "all the tools" at his disposal to end violent crime. the public are being asked to remain vigilant in the edmonton area of london, after four people were stabbed at the weekend, within hours of each other. police described the attacks as "cowardly and senseless". all were approached from behind and knifed in the back. two men have been arrested, and bbc breakfast will be live in edmonton in a few minutes's time. now to a story which our transport correspondent calls "the most radical plan you've never heard of." it's the ultra low emission zone, which comes into effect in central london a week today. i'm telling you today, because if you haven't checked
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whether your vehicle is exempt, driving into town will cost you £12.50 — on top of the congestion charge. so do go along to our website for more details, just in case you get hit with a very hefty unexpected bill. from today, if you want to spend a penny at london's busiest train stations, you don't need to, because toilet facilities, from this morning, will be free. london liverpool street and king's cross stations are among those scrapping the 50 pence charge. water fountains are also being introduced to the stations, which is handy. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube board, there's been a points failure at denmark hill for the london overg round. that's causing delays. and that's affecting tfl rail too. on the roads, the m25 anticlockwise is slow on the approach to junction 23, after a lorry fire. but it is still on the move, as you can see. and the minories, near tower bridge, is closed southbound for
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emergency water works. now the weather forecast with lucy. hello, good morning. the first of april today and it looks like it's a decent start to the month, although there is change to come through this week. it is going to turn much cooler, and we have got some showers to come as well. it is a chilly start to the day today, temperatures in the low single figures, but it will be a dry day with some good, prolonged spells of sunshine, and with light winds, it will be feeling pleasant in the sunshine, highs around 1a, 15 celsius. going through this evening and overnight, it will start with some sunny spells, but as we move through the night, the growing chance of seeing one or two showers pushing their way north. elsewhere, a good deal of dry weather, temperatures falling to an overnight low of around four to six celsius. tomorrow, that is where we start seeing a shift in the weather. the biggest change, however, temperatures a real dip
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to come, struggling to get into the double figures, around nine celsius. bye— bye. good morning welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: teachers and nurses could be legally obliged to warn about young people at risk of violence — that's one of the ideas ahead of a special knife crime summit today. mps are to vote again on alternative brexit options after failing to find a majority on any of the plans put to them last week. it comes as the conservative chief whip attacks the way the cabinet has behaved during the brexit negotiations. compensation when things go wrong. broadband and landline customers should find it easier to get money back from today. i'll be talking to the regulator
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about what's changed. lucky liverpool are back on top of the premier league, and they deserve their good fortune according to manager jurgen klopp as they beat tottenham to move above manchester city again. it is turning colder this week and there is some frost around in the northern half of the country. also, a bright start with sunshine and showers, rain will come in from the north—west later. i will have more details in a few minutes. it's monday the first of april. our top story. teachers, nurses, and the police could be held legally accountable if they fail to spot the "warning signs" of violent crime in youngsters. that's just one proposal which will be discussed at downing street during a knife crime summit hosted by the prime minister. our correspondent, james waterhouse, joins us now from edmonton in north london,
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where four people were stabbed at the weekend. thank you for coming on and telling us more thank you for coming on and telling us more information about this. a huge campaign is taking place today and it feels quite timely given this happened near to where you work this morning? that's right, the timing is a bit wary. it was during a ten hour. over the weekend between saturday night and sunday morning, that four people, three men and woman, all of whom were walking on their own, where seemingly randomly attacked as they walked. they were attacked as they walked. they were attacked from behind without warning and stabbed in the back. two of those people are in hospital with critical injuries and a third, 29—year—old man, sustained what i thought to be life changing injuries as well. it comes off the back of last year where there were record highs, since records began, a number of fatal stabbings in england and wales and there are calls for the government to do something about it and there —— they aren't doing
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anything —— they are not getting any quieter. sajid javid are announcing that people are going to be legally held to account for not stopping exporting violence in young people. —— spotting. it would put the responsibility on teachers, nurses and police officers to spot the early signs that a child is being pulled into violent crime. once the alarm is raised, the idea is that social services and specialist and anti—gang charities would step in and help turn the young person's life around. it is modelled on scotland's success in treating knife violence as a disease that needs treating at its root. the conference at downing street will hear from young people whose lives have been affected by violence and their views on where the government is going wrong. also there will be the new boss of the national police chiefs' council, martin hewitt, who, in a blog post, said an extra £970 million promised by ministers isn't enough to meet all the challenges that police face. it comes as police in england and wales get more powers to use stop—and—search to deal with knife crime. we have seen that the reduce
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of funding for youth clubs and grassroots organisation has led to an increase of violence in the community where young people were once occupied in the youth club or occupied by a charity, third—sector organisation service provider, yet they are no longer getting that sort of activity, so they get up to other things, they get influenced by others. i know many of these initiatives and i have seen their case studies and their social impact and they are proven to be very effective. however, they don't get the type of support necessary to move on and to continue the great work that they are doing. campaigners are also calling the move disappointing and a step backwards. and that is what the decision—makers are doing on a national level but here in edmonton off the back of the four stabbings on the weekend, there have been two arrests, two men have
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been arrested. police are still on their toes because they are trying to work out whether either of those sub —— suspects acted alone. none of the victims were robbed, there was no conversation between them and the attacker during what happened and they are saying if anyone has any information that could identify who this man is who has been described asa this man is who has been described as a six foot three, black, wearing dark clothing at the time, they should call 999. dark clothing at the time, they should call 999. and we'll be speaking to the crime minister, victoria atkins, at around 7:a0. the commons will vote again on a series of alternative brexit options later, after failing to find a majority agreement on any of the plans put to them last week. our political correspondent nick eardley is at our westminster studio.
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more votes. this time, what are they on? alternatives to the government's brexit strategy. something that happened last week and failed to get a majority for anything. the hope is this week from those proposing it, that minds might be focused slightly and something will get over the line so we can now say is what parliament wa nts. so we can now say is what parliament wants. although nothing got majority last week, we did see options meaning a closer relationship with the eu than the one the government wa nts, the eu than the one the government wants, seeming to be the most popular. they will be a lot of attention on them today on things like potentially a customs union, a closer relationship, whether anything that does make anything can command a majority or support of mps is still not clear. the chief whipjulian smith has also
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said some pretty strong words? yes, this is the man who is responsible for making sure that the conservatives keep disciplined, basically. he is less than impressed with the way the government ministers have been going freelance quite a lot and not toeing the party line. let's hear what he told a documentary. how are you going to get people onside? as you are aware, discipline isn't as good as it should be. this is i think the worst example of ill discipline in cabinet in british political history. he said in the programme the government should have been more honest in the 2017 election that it might need to opt for a softer brexit, a closer relationship with the eu. we will see whether today parliament gets behind that idea. from today, broadband and landline customers will receive compensation automatically when experiencing issues with their providers. under the new rules, households who suffer from delays
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to installation or repairs, as well as missed appointments, will get five—pounds deducted from their bill for each day of disruption. until now, only one in seven customers have received financial compensation. you will need to let your provider know that something has gone wrong and from that very moment, the clock will start ticking and you should get a credit on your account within 30 days. it is part of a broader fairness agenda, really. we want to see all customers treated fairly, guaranteed broadband speed when you ta ke guaranteed broadband speed when you take your contract out, providers letting you know when your co ntra ct‘s letting you know when your contract‘s coming to an end and getting the best deal possible. more than two million workers will receive a pay rise from today as the minimum wage increases by almost 5 percent. the hourly rate for those over the age of 25 increases
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from £7.83 to £8.21. forfull time employees, that's worth an extra £690 over a year. the increase comes into effect 20 years on from the introduction of the national minimum wage. cases of type 2 diabetes, fuelled by the uk's obesity crisis are rising at a ‘frightening speed‘, according to a warning from a leading health charity. figures from diabetes uk suggest more than 200,000 people a year are diagnosed with the preventable type 2 condition in england and wales alone. we know from type 2 diabetes there area number of we know from type 2 diabetes there are a number of risk factors that make it more likely you will get it. those are things like age, whether it is your family or not and your ethnic background. a big factor also is your weight. that is the one risk factor we can do something about. tougher rules on fixed odds betting machines have come into force. from today the maximum stake that can be played has been cut from 100 to 2 pounds. the machines have been described
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as the crack cocaine of gambling. rihanna has led tributes to the the grammy—nominated american rapper nipsey hussle who is beind reported as having been shot dead outside his clothing shop in los angeles. she paid her respects to the 33—year—old in a tweet. just hours before he had himself tweeted that "having strong enemies" was "a blessing." charges for using the toilet at all of britain‘s busiest railway stations are being scrapped from today. edinburgh waverley, london liverpool street and london king‘s cross are the last of 20 network rail stations to make their loos free to use. they previously charged up to fifty pence per visit. i refuse... sometimes you can't refuse to pay. i feel like it's fundamentally wrong. thank goodness it‘s gone now.
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mps will vote again today on possible alternatives to the prime minister‘s brexit deal. the outcome of which could influence the government‘s next steps. a customs union with the eu is thought to be the most likely preference, and it was this option which came closest to securing a majority in the last ballot. labour mp helen goodman is in our westminster studio. she supports staying in a customs union with the european union. thank you for coming on and discussing what might happen today. i know it is hard to predict but tell us exactly what you will be voting for and against today. what are your plans? i am supporting the motion on the customs union because i think this is really good for jobs, is good for manufacturing and it keeps a soft border with ireland
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which is a problem. i am worried about a crash out and food and medicine shortages. we don‘t yet know which options the speaker is going to select for votes. it‘s a bit difficult to be absolutely precise. the thought is it might go forjust precise. the thought is it might go for just three to precise. the thought is it might go forjust three to give a clearer picture. i am sure some people listening to what you are saying this morning might be asking this of themselves if they are eating their brea kfast themselves if they are eating their breakfast or getting ready for whatever they are doing today, doesn‘t staying in a customs union go again the result of the referendum? how do you counter that? after the referendum, i had ten public meetings in my constituency and asked them what they liked and disliked about europe and what they said was they liked the old initial common market which we joined in 1973. that has now been renamed as
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the customs union and that is the economic relationship. what people we re economic relationship. what people were more nervous about was the political union, things like a european army. with the customs union, you get the first bit, you get the close economic ties with with cooperation without being involved in a shared political union. can i ask you, we are running an interview with the chief whip, laura kuenssberg is running it and he has talked about this being the most ill behaved cabinet in british history. mps need to take some element of responsibility for the situation we are now in. that is what we are trying to do. that is why we have set aside, last wednesday, today, next wednesday, for mps to vote on the options which they prefer. up until now, for the last six months, we have been voting
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on what the prime minister wanted us to vote on. the choices she wanted to vote on. the choices she wanted to put in front of us. now we are voting on the things that we as ordinary members of parliament want and as you can see, because ken clarke‘s customs union motion came within six of the majority, we are doing a lot better and getting a lot closer to building a consensus. i think really, the british public wa nt think really, the british public want us to heal the divide, they wa nt want us to heal the divide, they want a consensus, they want to see a clear sense of direction now. and a clear sense of direction now. and a clear sense of direction now. and a clear sense of direction requires a majority. do you think that is a possibility? do you think something will bring the house together?” really hope so. i think it probably well. i can see the big smile on your face, saying that. well. i can see the big smile on yourface, saying that. is well. i can see the big smile on your face, saying that. is that the case that ——is that what your fellow mps share? i think members of
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parliament know they are responsible to their constituents. they know that business and industry is looking for a resolution. the cbi and tuc have been very clear indeed that this uncertainty we have got at the moment is really damaging so now mps are concentrating on what we can do to get a clear sense of direction. i think the other thing is, we are in the end game now. people know they are not necessarily going to get their first choice. they might have to settle for their second choice and that‘s the process we‘re going through. but to be fair to us as members of parliament, we‘ve got a lot closer in a week than the prime minister has in the previous six months. thank you for your time this morning. an interesting assessment of what the mps will be doing today, indicative votes, we could see more
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of those throughout the week as well but as helen goodman was saying there, no sign of majority yet but this one that she was talking about, the customs union, that came the closest to getting approval. six votes from getting approval and being the one that the mps thought i wa nt being the one that the mps thought i want that one. it is another crucial week. we do know that lots of things are going on though. carol has got the details on the weather, good morning. good morning. you‘re absolutely right, both. it is a cold start across scotland and northern ireland, there is no heatwave in other parts of the uk too. it is still chilly it is going to be dry for most of us, some of the seeing lengthy chilly spills. —— spells. we say goodbye to the high pressure that has given us the and unsettled weather of late and hello to this area of low pressure and later this
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cold front, which is the demarcation between the milder conditions and the cold air. first thing this morning, we have some cloud across parts of wales and the midlands. that will melt away. we also some showers coming in across scotland and northern ireland and later on, we will see some main coming your way too. to the afternoon, there will be some further cloud around across the channel islands, the isles of scilly, a brisk wind across the english channel starting to ease. a cloud building though across northern england, northern ireland and also northern scotland, this is where we have got the showers in the west, followed by some rain later on. temperatures today, we‘re not quite in the cold air yet. 16 will be our top temperature. will not see that for the rest of the week but eight and nine further north, so as we head to the evening and overnight, we have our showers followed by rain and eventually, the twain shall meet to possibly cause some hill snow and continuing their journey moving further south—east. ahead of that cold front, not quite as cold as it is going to be behind
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it, once again we could see some frost, possibly the risk of ice on untreated surfaces. tomorrow morning, we start clearly with a cold front is, so milder air ahead of it. a northerly wind behind it, there is the vein continuing to journey into the south—east through the day and behind that, we‘re looking at sunshine and showers, bite spells. some showers will be heavy and foundry with hail and we will see some wintriness in them on the tops of the hills and mountains, but in some of the heavier showers, we could see a wintry mix at lower levels, so one or two places would see a slush accumulation but that will not be widespread but you will notice it is going to feel colder, especially so if you are exposed to the wind. as we head onto tuesday, there is the centre of the low pressure and we have got this weather front wrapped around it and what we think is, that is going to
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bring in some rain from the north sea, pushing towards the west, and on its leading edge, we will see some snow in the grampians, southern options and the pennines and quite a bit of snow that, however, this could change. so if you have got travel plans, to watch the forecast. —— southern uplands. some showers again, some of them with some hail under in them that on the hills, some sleet. carol, thank you very much. see you ina bit, carol, thank you very much. see you in a bit, thank you. let‘s take a look at some of today‘s front pages. the daily mail takes a break from brexit and leads instead on theresa may‘s "radical rethink" over knife crime. mrs may and the home secretary sajid javid now say it should be treated like an infectious disease. the times reports that two members of the cabinet — chris grayling and penny mordaunt — are prepared to quit the government if the prime minister chooses to back a customs union with the eu. it also shows a recently unearthed
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fresco from pompeii, which looks grand, but it apparently adorned the wall of a snack bar. the telegraph also leads on a call by chris grayling for the tories to appoint a eurosceptic to lead the party in the next phase of the brexit negotiations. they‘re carrying a column by former foreign secretary boris johnson as well, who labels himself as a "one nation" tory. the telegraph calling it "his pitch for leader". and the mirror reports that labour leaderjeremy corbyn is "ready for power" as the conservative party is on "the verge of collapse". it also has a picture of mickjagger, who made the papers after he was forced to postpone the rolling stones‘s latest tour on the advice of doctors. there‘s a lot about last nighttv as well. line of duty during regularly well. line of duty during regularly well. —— line of duty doing particularly well. and here‘s one of the most read stories on twitter overnight. the final episode of blue planet live on bbc one
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attracted plenty of comments — many of them concerned for the welfare of a baby turtle, which appeared to be snatched by a gull as it made its way to the sea. if you did not see it, it wasjust at the end of the programme. they we re at the end of the programme. they were releasing the six hatchings into the water, it was a big moment and then this happened. but ,you know, these turtles are going to spend at least 100 years in the oceans, if all goes well. surely it‘s our responsibility to safeguard their futures. scientists cannot do this alone. this is our blue planet to fiercely protect, through our actions and through making of voices heard, so we hope that we‘ve inspired you to grab that responsibility with both hands. a big thanks to all of the scientists who‘ve helped us here, but that‘s not all from blue planet programme, it‘s back over to chris. the way it drops off at the end with a turtle in its mouth as well. it was quite a thing to watch but of course, that is nature and we talked about it before, only one in 1000 totals makes it. you can see why, as she said in her tweet, the seagulls
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need to feed their newborn chicks as well. hard to watch but we can‘t do anything about it. i was reading this from zoe as well, one of the popular tweets today. saying i finally got my mum to watch blue planet live, only for a seagull to sweep down and eat the baby turtle they were releasing. she is now beside herself and will not speak to me. i was not even sure it actually happens. we watching on your own or with someone? is one those moments when you went to that, did that, did that just happen? when you went to that, did that, did thatjust happen? it was incredible programme and as she says, that is part, what happens.” programme and as she says, that is part, what happens. i am sure lots of you washed it, so we have ruined it for you. for victims and witnessess of crimes, giving evidence to police can be a difficult and often traumatic experience. now, police are hoping that a strategy already used in america could help people through the process, withjust a little bit of help from man‘s best friend. john maguire has more.
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oliver the labrador personifies a man‘s best friend, loyal, unconditional, and calming. he‘s being trained as a facility dog. the idea is that he sits with a vulnerable victim or witness being interviewed by the police and offers silent support. even in this demonstration we‘re filming today, oliver knows exactly what to do. oliver‘s lying on rachel and when he does that and rachel sort of strokes him like that, it actually releases oxytocin in both oliver and rachel. so oxytocin is our social bonding hormone, it releases the love hormone, so we naturally come over more relaxed and more calm, and in doing so, it allows rachel to communicate more openly oliver‘s owner is a psychology lecturer here at canterbury christ church university. she brought him over from north america, having heard how
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successful the facility dog programme has been there, where it‘s been running for 20 years. he is highly trained. so when he has his cape on, he knows he‘s working. so if i put a treat down — and anyone that has a lab knows labs love food — he won‘t touch it. there‘s over 200 of these dogs across north america and have been for the last 20 years, but there‘s no research. so what we‘re doing at the moment is we‘re working with the kent police and evaluating the benefits and effectiveness of oliver, and dogs like oliver, in providing companionship when victims and witnesses are being interviewed in a police interview process. this recreation of a police interview room at the university is used to study the psychology of the process. kent police are working with the university to determine the programme‘s effectiveness. anything that‘s going to be able to support our witnesses and victims being able to help us and give their evidence, to make it better, can only be a good thing. at the moment, we are in the research gathering stage, so we‘re going to be using this research to see,
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actually, on an evidence base, whether oliver is a support to witnesses and victims while they give their evidence to the police. good boy. oliver‘s been in place in september and in that time, has helped four people. he‘s the first of his kind in europe. it‘s yet another new role for working dogs. from sheep herders to drug detectors, to guides for those who can‘t see, notjust a friend but a co—worker and a great comfort. john maguire, bbc news, canterbury. and what a beautifully trained dog as well. very pretty. you can email us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk. or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. and we have jeremy and we havejeremy coming up little bit later on, bbc correspondent, talking about his bowel cancer diagnosis. he will be here at around about 8:10 a.m.. also, alex kingston
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and sarah, you might remember her. she is from miranda. they have come together in are two of the stars in this new plan they will both be here to talk about that. you‘re watching breakfast. also to come this morning... with four stabbings in less than 2a hours in london, we‘ll hear from the crime minister, ahead of a knife crime summit hosted by the prime minister today. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we‘ll have the national headlines for you injust a we‘ll have the national headlines for you in just a few minutes‘s time. a very good morning, i‘m asad ahmad. teachers and nhs workers could be held accountable for failing to spot violent crime among young people. it‘s being proposed by the government, who are going to examine whether there‘s a "public health duty" to report concerns over children at risk. home secretary sajid javid said he‘ll use "all the tools"
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at his disposal to end violent crime. the public are being asked to remain vigilant this morning in the edmonton area of london, after four people were stabbed at the weekend, within hours of each other. police describe the attacks as "cowardly and senseless". all were approached from behind and knifed in the back. two men have been arrested, and there will be extra police patrols in the area. now to a story which our transport correspondent calls "the most radical plan you‘ve never heard of." it‘s the ultra low emission zone, which comes into effect in central london in one week‘s time. the reason for telling you about it today is so you have time to check whether your vehicle is exempt or not. otherwise, driving into town will cost you £12.50 — on top of the congestion charge. go to our website for more details, and don‘t get hit with an unexpected bill. from today, if you want to spend a penny at london‘s busiest train stations, well, you don‘t need to — because toilet facilities, from this morning, will be free.
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london liverpool street and king‘s cross stations are among those scrapping the 50 pence charge. water fountains are also being introduced to the stations, which is handy. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube board, there‘s been a points failure at denmark hill, affecting the london overg round. that‘s causing some delays there. on the roads, the m25 anticlockwise is slow on the approach to junction 23, because of a lorry fire this morning. a lane was closed. and the minories, near tower bridge, is closed southbound for emergency water works. it is worth avoiding the area because it will be slow. now the weather with lucy martin. hello, good morning. the first of april today and it looks like it‘s a decent start to the month, although there is change to come through this week. it is going to turn much cooler, and we have got some showers to come as well. it is a chilly start to the day today, temperatures in the low single figures, but it will be
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a dry day with some good, prolonged spells of sunshine, and with light winds, it will be feeling pleasant in the sunshine, highs around 1a, 15 celsius. so going through this evening and overnight, it will start off dry with some clear spells, but as we go through the night, the growing chance of seeing one or two showers pushing their way north. elsewhere though, a good deal of dry weather, temperatures falling to an overnight low of around four to six celsius. now, tomorrow, that‘s where we start to see this shift in the weather. there will be more in the way of cloud and also the chance of seeing some showers. the biggest change, however, temperatures, a real dip to come, struggling to get into the double figures, around nine celsius. bye— bye. no april fools‘ dayjokes us this morning. is that the same for va nessa morning. is that the same for vanessa phelps on her radio show on bbc radio london? you can find out. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main stories from bbc news. teachers, nurses, and the police could be held accountable if they fail to spot the "warning signs" of violent crime in youngsters. that‘s just one proposal which will be discussed later at a downing street summit on violent crime. it comes a day after it was announced police in england and wales are to be given greater stop and search powers to tackle rising knife crime. it‘s something that has been welcomed by barry mizen, whose son jimmy was murdered 10 years ago. what about the person who is going to be stabbed, attacked today? what are we doing for them? i can personally see no other way forward, at the moment, than to encourage and enable the police to do what they are supposed to be doing and that is trying to keep us all safe. i think we need to take perhaps some of the shackles we need to take perhaps some of the 5 ha ckles off we need to take perhaps some of the shackles off and let‘s look upon this very much as a short—term measure. let the police, allow them to do them — make theirjob.
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the commons will vote again on alternative brexit options later. a customs union with the european union is thought to be the most likely preference. the chief whip, julian smith, has questioned the government‘s approach to brexit — arguing that it was inevitable, after the conservatives lost their majority in the last election, that they‘d have to move to a "softer" brexit. mps failed to find a majority for any of the plans put to them last week and the prime minister‘s deal was rejected for a third time including by northern ireland‘s dup — which the government relies upon for support. our message to the prime minister is do what you should have done at the very start and what you promised you would do and that is only sign an agreement which treats northern ireland the same as the rest of the united kingdom. that‘s what you promised to do, that‘s the route you promised to take and you did not do that and that‘s why you are in the trouble you are at present and if she doesn‘t change her mind, we will continue to vote for it if she brings it back 100 times. from today, broadband and landline customers will receive compensation automatically when experiencing issues
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with their providers. under the new rules, households who suffer from delays to installation or repairs, as well as missed appointments, will get five—pounds deducted from their bill for each day of disruption. until now, only one in seven customers have received financial compensation. you will need to know —— let you know that something has gone wrong. you will need to let your provider know that something has gone wrong and from that very moment, the clock will start ticking and you should get a credit on your account within 30 days. it is part of a broader fairness agenda, really. we want to see all customers treated fairly, guaranteed broadband speed when you take your contract out, providers letting you know when your contract‘s coming
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to an end and getting you the best deal possible. more than two million workers will receive a pay rise from today as the minimum wage increases by almost 5%. the hourly rate for those over the age of 25 increases from £7.83 to £8.21. forfull time employees, that‘s worth an extra £690 over a year. the increase comes into effect 20 years on from the introduction of the national minimum wage. two prescription drugs used by millions to treat pain, anxiety and epilepsy are being reclassified today as class c controlled substances. the move comes over concerns linking pregabalin and gabapentin to almost 600 deaths in england over the last 5 years. in most cases they are safe when used as prescribed — but doctors and pharmacists say they have been increasingly handed out too readily and been used recreationally. making the actual prescriptions a little bit more difficult to actually, a bit more scrutiny in dishing out these prescriptions, could reduce the supply of tablets on the black market. cases of type2 diabetes, fuelled by the uk‘s obesity crisis are rising at a ‘frightening speed‘, according to a warning
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from a leading health charity. figures from diabetes uk suggest more than 200,000 people a year are diagnosed with the preventable type 2 condition in england and wales alone. we know from type 2 diabetes there are a number of risk factors that make it more likely you will get it. those are things like age, whether it is your family or not and your ethnic background. a big factor also is your weight. that is the one risk factor we can do something about. tougher rules on fixed odds betting machines have come into force. from today the maximum stake that can be played has been cut from one hundred to — two pounds. the machines have been described as the crack cocaine of gambling. rihanna has led tributes to the the grammy—nominated american rapper nipsey hussle who has been
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shot dead outside his clothing shop in los angeles. she paid her respects to the 33—year—old in a tweet shortly after his death. hours before he was killed he had himself tweeted that "having strong enemies" was "a blessing." sales of sparkling wine in the uk have fallen for the first time in five years. 21a—million bottles of champagne, cava and prosecco were sold in 2018, three million fewer than the previous year, according to research by accountancy group uhy hacker young. a preference for trendier tipples — like artisan gin and rum cocktails — has been blamed for the drop in sales. charges for using the toilet at all of britain‘s busiest railway stations are being scrapped from today. edinburgh waverley, london liverpool street and london king‘s cross are the last of 20 network rail stations to make their loos free to use. they previously charged up to fifty pence per visit. it is officially free to wee.
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i was waiting for that one. did you see mo salah‘s face when it was made to—1 liverpool have lea pfrogged manchester city to go back on top of the premier league after beating tottenham 2—1 at anfield — in the dying moments of the game? a huge a huge their winner coming after a blunder from keeper hugo lloris. goal. ben croucher reports. juergen klopp said liverpool won ugly against spurs. the 29 year wait to a title took just 16 minutes for roberto firmino been given that tottenham defence. staring at a fourth defeat in five,
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there was a sub ordered. lukas moira had space to equalise. liverpool‘s prayers were answered in the most dramatic way. the 90th minute, mo salah‘s header. liverpool‘s divine intervention... commentator: it is an own goal and liverpool has won the game! it may not have been the best looking game fans will see a thing of beauty. we compete with man city. tell me now, two better teams in the world at the moment. we compete with them and put them under pressure and i said a couple of weeks ago they would want to get rid of us. it is important. cardiff manager neil warnock described premier league officials as the "worst in the world" after his side‘s contraversial defeat at home to chelsea. cardiff were ahead until six minutes from time, when cesar azpilicueta‘s equalised — it certainly looked offside. ruben loftus cheek scored a very late winner — warnock didn‘t hold back afterwards.
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the best league in the world and probably at the minute and probably the worst officials we‘ve got at the moment. i don‘t know what they teach the linesman. i‘ve seen so many. it‘s difficult to say because what can i say? the linesman were brilliant today, absolutely brilliant. __my ——my lads were brilliant. celtic have all but secured an eighth scottish title in a row, after winning an eventful old firm derby. they were leading 1—nil when alfredo morelos was dismissed for the fifth time this season, for elbowing scott brown. and after rangers had equalised, james forrest scored a late winner. celtic are now 13 poinst clear of their glasgow rivals, with only seven games to go. over 85,000 people were at wembley to watch portsmouth beat sunderland on penalties to win the checkatrade trophy.
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it was 2—2 after extra—time, oli hawkins scoring the winning spot—kick. only barcelona‘s win over espanyol drew a larger crowd across europe this weekend. arsenal women are guaranteed champions league football next season, after katie mccabe‘s goal gave them victory over birmingham and kept them at the top of super league. they‘re still a point ahead of manchester city, who beat liverpool. lewis hamilton consoled the young ferrari driver charles leclerc, after mechanical problems denied him his first grand prix victory in bahrain. he was leading with 11 laps to go, when his car lost power, allowing hamilton to pass. his mercedes team mate valtteri bottas finished second, with leclerc third — hamilton said it was obviously devastating for him but he had a great future ahead. roger federer won his 101st title, beating john isner in straight sets in the final of the miami open — he said it meant a lot to take the title again, 20 years after he first played in the event.
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toulouse will play leinster in the semi—finals of rugby union‘s european champions cup, afterjust edging past racing, winning by 22 points to 21. toulouse finished runners—up behind leinster in the pool stages. britain‘s adam yates narrowly missed out on winning the tour of catalunya. he launched a late attack, aided by his brother simon, but he finished just 1a second behind the winner miguel angel lopez of colombia. most athletes would spend the few days before a major event honing their skills and taking late training sessions. but the british sailing team joined hundreds of sailors from around the world in a beach clean in majorca, ahead of the princess sofia trophy regatta, which starts today.
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they were trying to raise awareness of plastic pollution. olympic gold medallist hannah mills was among them — she said "as olympic athletes we have a responsibility to be role models and set an example". sailors a the sea is their message. powerful images. you talk about the trophy, sunderland fans in trafalgar square, thousands of sunderland fans taking over. i thought it was photoshopped. unbelievable! the only game bigger in europe was barcelona against espanol. "a disease rotting our society". that‘s how the home secretary, sajid javid, has described the rise of violent crime in the uk. it comes ahead of a special summit in downing street,
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which brings together ministers, community leaders, experts and young people, in order to find ways of tackling the crisis. here‘s how it has unfolded so far this year. two teenagers have been stabbed. boy has died... it has been hard to go out, as soon as it gets dark i won‘t —— i don‘t want to leave the house. the home secretary has led -- asked for a sense — make an end to the senseless violence. 17-year-old boy is the second teenager to be stabbed to death in less than 2a hours. police are continuing to search for the killer of a man who was stabbed to death in front of his teenage son. if there was ever an issue to unite rfs and inspire us to stand together, this is it. ——to
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unite us. the numbers are still going up. we heard in edmonton over the weekend, four people stabbed. how is it going to end? you are right. our thoughts are with those affected in the recent stabbings. the reason the prime minister is calling the summit across four days this week and bringing more than 100 people into downing street to deal with this is precisely because we, asa with this is precisely because we, as a government, have these as a top priority. we want to stop the killings from happening, we want to stop people taking the terrible decision taking a knife as they leave their homes. we want to stop the criminal gang leaders who are ensnaring a lot of children into
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criminality —— criminality. there is a lot of work to do but as a community, i believe we can make it stop. would you agree there is a link between police cuts and crime? i have listened carefully to the police commissioner and we are investing up to £970 million more into policing this year. with the health —— with the help of the police and crime commissioners. we have meetings with police. there are £100 million extra being given to the met police who are seeing the largest impacts of knife crime. as the commissioner herself agrees, this is about more than just knife crime, it is about early intervention, investing in young people and ensuring we are reaching young people primarily before they make that terrible decision, as i say, to become a knife. mentioned the £970 million. already one of the deck —— delegates who is going to be there today says that is not enough to help police meet the challenges they have. as i say, we had to make
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some tough decisions in 2010 because we had inherited the economy in a very poor state. we have now been able to put the economy back into a better shape and that is why we are able to invest more into policing. knife crime summit and the ideas and plans arising out of that are about more than simply law enforcement because law enforcement is important but not the only solution to this. i wish it were that simple. this is why we are bringing in health leaders, education leaders, victims and families affect that by knife crime to see what they can do. every minister is coming in to tell us what they can do to help tackle this. one of the things i understand you‘re talking about today‘s teachers, nurses, doctors being legally responsible, so they have to
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report incidences. they then become legally responsible? what do you mean by that? lol, we‘re launching consultation process. -- well. we wa nt to consultation process. -- well. we want to see if we can convene all of the people we should be sharing worries about children, whether we need to have a legal duty and we‘ll see what the consultations is of great interest. you say it is a consultation, so what, they could be prosecuted if they do not pass on what you say is a legal duty? we're going to see what the consultation says. i mean we want to make sure that everyone should be sharing information is doing so. some areas do this really well, other areas, as we travel around the country, we have regional shows, events to bring together partners, and it is clear that some parts of the country do not do this as well as perhaps they should. we want to help share this information so that everybody knows what they should be doing and also,
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making sure that everybody‘s focus is on intervening because it is much better that we intervene before harm is done, rather than waiting until that moment when a child has invested having committed perhaps a very terrible crime. and i also asked about what the chief whip been talking about in the cabinet over the past weekend? saying that the current crop of senior ministers is the worst example of indiscipline in british political history, would you agree? lol, the chief whip is in a position to give his view. i am just focus today on the knife crime summitand focus today on the knife crime summit and trying to tackle this terrible scourge of violence that is hitting our streets. -- well. what would you say to ministers who might be talking out of turn?” would you say to ministers who might be talking out of turn? i would like them to concentrate on the work that iam them to concentrate on the work that i am trying to do today, for example tackling serious violence and in fairness, the ministers involved in this a very, very committed, so this is such an important piece of work and of course, backs it is important that there is so much else that is
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equally important and it is really vital that we as a government keep on working on these areas, such as we are today with the knife crime summit. —— brexit is important. victoria atkins, crime minister, thank you very much for your time p1 brea kfast. carol has information about not quite plummeting temperatures, but it is certainly chillier, isn‘t it? good morning, everyone. you can see these lovely pictures. — this lovely picture but a weather watcher has sent in. some of us have one or two showers but wherever you are, it is a chilly start, there is some foster because northern scotland and also northern england. now, we say goodbye to high pressure and all the settled weather we have had for the last while and hello to low pressure, as well as this front
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coming our way today. it is a cold front so behind it, will start to introduce cold air. this morning, we have lost, a good bit of cloud to get rid of across parts of wales in the midlands. that will tend to melt away, then lengthy sunny spells because much of england and wales but showers across scotland and northern ireland and then later some rain. this afternoon, there will be some cloud, for example across parts of the channel islands, the isles of scilly, the breeze because the british isles easing with dryer and largely sunny conditions. in northern ireland and scotland, we had the shower showers wintry in the hills and then later on, the rain is going to come our way too. —— showers wintry. we could still squeeze out a 16, for example, in 16. generally eight to about 13 or 14 16. generally eight to about 13 or 1a today, the this evening and overnight, our two bands, 1a today, the this evening and overnight, ourtwo bands, one 1a today, the this evening and overnight, our two bands, one of showers and one of rain tend to merge, as they continue their
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journey moving southwards and eastwards. behind the cold front producing the vein, it is going to turn colder, there will be some showers, when on some frost, possibly the risk of ice on untreated surfaces. ahead of that fund, not quite as cold. as we start the day tomorrow, you can see across spain and france, all this milder air still clinging on than the blues come in. we have a street northerly coming in from the arctic, cold direction so tomorrow will feel much colder than it has today for most of the uk. there goes the vein pushing to the south—east, behind it, sunshine, bite spells and showers, some of the showers will be heavy and thundering with some hail, be wintry on hills but in some of the heavier showers, we could see a bit ofa heavier showers, we could see a bit of a wintry mix at lower levels, not everywhere just here and there. you could see some slushy accumulations and then as we head from tuesday into thursday, watch this fund as it
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wraps its way around the area of low pressure. what we think is going to happen is it is going to bring some rain infrom happen is it is going to bring some rain in from the north sea, proceeded by hail across the southern uplands, the hills and the pennines. this could change quite a bit, you could say artsy or it could travel a bit further west. we had the northerly wind, sunshine, bite spells and showers. and again, the showers wintry on the hills. is that the northerly wind? or knobbly? northerly. you are terrible, muriel. the thing is, if you stay up late watching things that scare you, that is what happens. line of duty has done in, i need to talk to someone about that but you have watched it. i cannot
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talk about it i will get in trouble. after suffering third degree burns to 70% of her body as a child, rochelle barrett had spent years feeling self—conscious and covering her scars with clothing and make—up. she was determined to be a good role model for her daughter, he launched miss unique beauty uk — the first ever beauty pageant for survivors of burns, scarring or disfigurement. brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin went to meet her. so, here... ugly, contagious, disgusting. and along here... those words just made me feel completely inferior. when rochelle was badly burned as a baby, her mother was told she might not survive. she did, but with physical and emotional scars and a lifetime of low self esteem — until she had her own children. when you‘re telling your own children it doesn‘t matter what anyone says,
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embrace yourself for who you are, you‘re beautiful, i‘m telling them this and then i am going upstairs, looking at myself in the mirror and hating what i‘m seeing. it‘s when i realised rochelle, it‘s time to change. ooh, i felt that. it‘s saturday night. this is it, yes. let‘s do this! and the change rochelle dreamt of is about to take place here in sheffield. miss unique beauty uk! the first ever beauty pageant for survivors of burns, scarring or disfigurement. i am beautiful. i am beautiful! well done. i am beautiful! maxine, how are you feeling? very nervous, excited, ecstatic. bring it on, baby. when i was growing up, a lot of people didn't know about cleft palates, and i was badly bullied.
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but this is about you owning your moment. that's right, that's right, putting all that past behind me and celebrating the differences and uniqueness inside of me. come here, you. i was burned at the age of eight in a camping accident. it‘s been a long journey to feel confident in my own skin, from having anxiety attacks at school to now walking on the stage, flaunting. well done, you. this, says rochelle, will become an annual event, to send a message to other young women and survivors. i‘ve got six of the most incredible women, just seeing the transformation in them, where they felt low, to now seeing them smile, love themselves. i‘m so, so proud. you are all winners and you are all queens, and you all deserve this night. my message to other women out there is to embrace how you are now, don‘t think
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about changes that you have to make, that you need to lose weight, that you need to cover yourself up, that you‘re not worthy or attractive, you are. tell yourself i am beautiful, iam powerful and worthy, and this is me. go on. if we upbeat message this morning, rochelle gave it to us. love her. lots of price rises kicking in today for energy bills, prescription costs and more. steph is going to run us through a few of these. the new tax year starts in a couple of days and so to roughly coincide with that, prices start to go up. there are quite a few numbers to quote you here, but i think it is
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important for people. the good news is there‘s going to be a minimum pay rate rise. if you‘re over 25, it‘s going up to £8.21 an hour. between 21 and 2a, it‘s £7.70. between 18 and 20, it‘s £6.15. that affects around 2 million people, 60% of whom are women interestingly, on those figures. but unfortunately, quite a few bills are going up as well. council tax is going up on average about a.5% in england. water rates in england and wales are going up as well, they are going up by 2%, about £8 on the average annual bill. not a huge amount but still never good news to hear that bills are going up, is it? energy bills as well, no shock to hear that they are going up stop abounds 11 million people will be seeing their standard variable tariff going up and that is it you with the regulator‘s tariffs on that, which has been lifted. —— to
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do with. again, these are all averages, so do not forget different providers have different rates in different levels, yours might be more or less. and more? s, prescription and dental costs are going up as well. if you are someone who gets a prescription regularly, thatis who gets a prescription regularly, that is going to rise to £9 in england, wales and northern ireland and scotland actually do not have prescription charges, that is just in england figure. your checkup at the dentist is going up as well to £22.70. that is just a the dentist is going up as well to £22.70. that isjust a initial checkup, that you might have quite regularly. other things going up to two, the television licence, car tax. is there anything else not going up? mobile phone contracts, there are a few providers who are putting them up today. if you are going on any long haulflights in the future, import duty taxes going up the future, import duty taxes going up well, and some tv and broadband packages. should ijust go home now?
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i‘m sure there are lots of people at homejust going boo. i‘m sure there are lots of people at home just going boo.” i‘m sure there are lots of people at homejust going boo. i know, no, so they should. unfortunately, this time of year, this just happens. let‘s get rochelle back. time of year, this just happens. let's get rochelle back. you are brilliant, you are beautiful. bills might be going up, but don‘t forget, your beautiful. nicely turned around. thank you so much for that. and line of duty started last night, and there was the planet live. i need to talk to you about this, watch it. a very good morning, i‘m asad ahmad. teacher and nhs workers could be held accountable for failing to spot violent crime among young people. it‘s been proposed by the government, who are going to examine whether there‘s a "public health duty" to report concerns over children at risk. home secretary sajid javid said
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he‘ll use "all the tools" at his disposal to end violent crime. the public are being asked to remain vigilant this morning in the edmonton area of london, after four people were stabbed at the weekend, within hours of each other. police describe the attacks as "cowardly and senseless". all victims were approached from behind and knifed in the back. two men have been arrested, and there will be extra police patrols in the area. well, now to a story which our transport correspondent calls "the most radical plan you‘ve never heard of." it‘s the ultra low emission zone, which comes into effect in central london in one week‘s time. this is not an april fools‘ day joke, it is absolutely true. the reason for telling you about it today is so you have time to check whether your vehicle is exempt or not. otherwise, driving into town will cost you £12.50 — on top of the congestion charge. go to our website for more details, and don‘t get hit with an unexpected bill.
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now, from today, if you want to spend a penny at london‘s busiest train stations, you don‘t need to — because toilet facilities, from this morning, will be free. london liverpool street and king‘s cross stations are among those scrapping the 50 pence charge. water fountains are also being introduced to the stations, which is handy. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube board, the london overground has delays after a points failure at denmark hill this morning. and the victoria line has no service between walthamstow central and seven sisters, after a person was taken ill on the line. moving onto the roads, the m25 anticlockwise is slow on the approach to junction 23, after a lorry fire. that was earlier this morning and elaine was closed there. and the minories, near tower bridge, is closed southbound for emergency water works. and in mitcham: cricket green remains closed northbound for roadworks. now the weather with lucy martin, hello, good morning.
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the first of april today and it looks like it‘s a decent start to the month, although there is change to come through this week. it is going to turn much cooler, and we have got some showers to come as well. it is a chilly start to the day today, temperatures in the low single figures, but it will be a dry day with some good, prolonged spells of sunshine, and with light winds, it will be feeling pleasant in the sunshine, highs around 1a, 15 degrees celsius. so going through this evening and overnight, it will start off dry with some clear spells, but as we go through the night, the growing chance of seeing one or two showers pushing their way north. elsewhere though, a good deal of dry weather, temperatures falling to an overnight low of around four to six celsius. now, tomorrow, that‘s where we start to see this shift in the weather. there will be more in the way of cloud and also the chance of seeing some showers. the biggest change, however, the temperatures, a real dip to come, struggling to get into the double figures, a high of around nine celsius. bye— bye. i‘m back with the latest in half an hour.
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bye for now. good morning welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. just gone eight o‘clock. our headlines today — teachers and nurses could be legally obliged to warn about young people at risk of violence — that‘s one of the ideas ahead of a special knife crime summit today mps are to vote again on alternative brexit options after failing to find a majority on any of the plans put to them last week it comes as the conservative chief whip makes an unprecedented attack on the way the cabinet has behaved during the brexit negotiations. compensation when things go wrong. broadband and landline customers should find it easier to get money back from today. i‘ll have more shortly. lucky liverpool are back on top of the premier league, and they deserve their good fortune according to managerjurgen klopp as they beat tottenham to move above manchester city again.
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good morning. it is turning colder this week, cold start across northern scotland and northern england with some frost but for many of us today we will see lengthy spells of sunshine but showers followed by rain in the north west. i will have more in 15 minutes. it‘s monday 1st april. our top story. teachers, nurses, and the police could be held legally accountable if they fail to spot the "warning signs" of violent crime in youngsters. that‘s just one proposal which will be discussed at downing street during a knife crime summit hosted by the prime minister. our correspondent, james waterhouse, is in north london. where there were a series of incidents. in a ten hour period over saturday night into sunday morning four people were stabbed in separate seemingly random, police say, tax,
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when they were walking around the streets when they were attacked without notice from behind and stabbed in the back. two of those victims are in hospital in a critical condition. a third, 29—year—old man, has sustained what have been described as life changing injuries. this comes as the number of fatal stabbings in england and wales reached the highest level since records began, in fact, last year. what comes with that is the pressure on ministers to do something about it and today the home secretary sajid javid has announced what has been called a public health duty where certain workers will be morally and legally obliged to raise the alarm if they spot worrying signs that young people are being roped into violent crime. it would put the responsibility on teachers, nurses and police officers to spot the early signs that a child is being pulled into violent crime. once the alarm is raised, the idea is that social services and specialist and anti—gang charities would step in and help
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turn the young person‘s life around. it is modelled on scotland‘s success in treating knife violence as a disease that needs treating at its root. the conference at downing street will also hear from young people whose lives have been affected by violence and their views on where the government is going wrong. also there will be the new boss of the national police chiefs‘ council, martin hewitt, who, in a blog post, said an extra £970 million promised by ministers isn‘t enough to meet all the challenges that police face. it comes as police in england and wales get more powers to use stop—and—search to deal with knife crime. we have seen that the reduce of funding for youth clubs and grass roots organisation has led to an increase of violence in the community where young people were once occupied in the youth club or occupied by a charity, or third—sector organisation service provider, they are no longer getting
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that sort of activity, so they get up to other things, and get influenced by others. i know many of these initiatives and i have seen their case studies and their social impact and they are proven to be very effective. however, they don‘t get the type of support necessary to move on and to continue the great work that they are doing. campaigners are also calling the move disappointing and a step backwards. well, the government will hope this summit will be a step forward in trying to deal with violent crime. in the meantime, police have made two arrests, two men arrested on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm in edmonton. but they are telling the public to remain vigilant as they try to establish whether either of these suspects are in fact the attacker. they believe he worked alone. he‘s been described as six of a slim build, black, and at the time of the attacks he was wearing dark clothing. they say his aim was to inflict harm on the basis none of the victims were robbed and
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they are saying mental health issues could be a factor. —— six feet three inches. the commons will vote again on a series of alternative brexit options later, after failing to find a majority agreement on any of the plans put to them last week. our political correspondent nick eardley is at our westminster studio. take us through the alternative options. what is going to happen today? the big question today is whether parliament can finally get behind something that it wants brexit to look like. there was a bunch of votes last week. a majority. we did see most mps seem to favour a close relationship with the eu than the one the government is proposing. so they are bringing options back today, and there is a hope that some will compromise a bit and not just hopeful what hope that some will compromise a bit and notjust hopeful what —— vote for what their first option might be but look at some alternatives and
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say, i could live with that, so i could back that this evening. the truth is it is far from clear whether that will pay off and it is possible we could be sitting here tomorrow without a majority for anything again. it is also worth mentioning we have seen quite a rare public intervention from the chief whip, haven‘t we? public intervention from the chief whip, haven't we? yeah, the man in charge of making sure that tories toe the line is less than impressed with what some of theresa may‘s top tea m with what some of theresa may‘s top team have been doing over the last month. here is what he said to a documentary about cabinet discipline. how are you going to get people on side, though? as you are aware, discipline is not as good as it should be. i think this is the worst example of ill discipline in cabinet in british political history. pretty damning indictment there of how the government is working. worth pointing out, julian smith also said in that interview he thinks the government should be more honest after it lost its majority at
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the election in 2017 at a closer relationship with the european union was more inevitable. will mps back that tonight? we will have to wait and see. nick, really good to talk to you again, thanks very much. and that interview is part of — the brexit storm: laura kuenssberg‘s inside story which is on at 9pm on bbc two. there is good news for dissatisfied broadband customers this morning, steph is here to tell us more. you are telling us the prices are going up but if you are struggling with your broadband, or worry that you are not getting the service you think you need or have paid for this is good news. yes, this is specifically about people who have problems when their service isn‘t working and they are delayed in getting it fixed, or perhaps an engineer hasn‘t turned up when they said they would, or there are problems with a new service and again it is delayed. now, this happens annually to about 7 million cases every year and people complain and don‘t necessarily get
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compensation. only one in seven of those cases tend to get the compensation they should do for when something goes wrong and that is what is changing today. ofcom, the regulator, i was talking to the regulator, i was talking to the regulator earlier, were saying this has got to change and it‘s gotta be easier to get your money back. what kind of compensation you get? it's interesting, this... i can‘t even speak now... i have some numbers on it because it‘s interesting to see what you get. if your service has stopped working and it isn‘t working for more than two days, after two working days you will get £8 a day. this is money that will be credited to your account, so £8 a day for that. if you have ordered a new service and it is delayed, you will get £5 a day for that if the provider doesn‘t get it, and again it should be credited to your account. if an engineer doesn‘t turn up account. if an engineer doesn‘t turn upforyour account. if an engineer doesn‘t turn up for your appointment and don‘t give you more than 2a hours notice then you will get £25 for a missed appointment. what they are saying is
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they should come to you automatically, you just need to ring up automatically, you just need to ring up and complain and say it is delayed and it will automatically kick in and you‘ll get the money within 30 days credited to your account. it's a bit like the delay repay on trains. yes, and it does seem to work. we will see whether it works in this case. 8:11am. more than two million workers will receive a pay rise from today as the minimum wage increases by almost 5%. the hourly rate for those over the age of 25 increases from £7.83 to £8.21. for full—time employees, that‘s worth an extra £690 over a year. the increase comes into effect 20 years on from the introduction of the national minimum wage. two prescription drugs used by millions to treat pain, anxiety and epilepsy are being reclassified today as class c controlled substances. the move comes over concerns linking pregabalin and gabapentin to almost 600 deaths in england over the last five years.
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in most cases they are safe when used as prescribed — but doctors and pharmacists say they have been increasingly handed out too readily and been used recreationally. cases of type 2 diabetes, fuelled by the uk‘s obesity crisis are rising at a frightening speed, according to a warning from a leading health charity. figures from diabetes uk suggest more than 200,000 people a year are diagnosed with the preventable type two condition in england and wales alone. rihanna has led tributes to the the grammy—nominated american rapper nipsey hussle who is being reported as having been shot dead outside his clothing shop in los angeles. she paid her respects to the 33—year—old in a tweet. just hours before he had himself tweeted that "having strong enemies" was "a blessing." jakarta is one of the world‘s busiest and most crowded cities and getting around isn‘t always easy. once upon a time you
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might have used a bemo, a small, motor—powered rickshaw. the indonesia government banned them on the roads two years ago but now one former bemo driver has come up with a brand new way to use his old vehicle. tim allman explains. sutino hadi, known as kinong, is a man on a mission. he used to drive passengers around jakarta. now he is trying to broaden minds. he‘s turned his old bemo into a mobile library. and it‘s the minds of the young he really wants to broaden. translation: when i first started, i never imagined i could inspire that many children. but after a few years of driving around i began to see the positive benefit. ithought, i‘m nearing retirement anyway, it‘s my responsibility to be a good human being and help others. bemos used to be a regular sight injakarta. for decades they buzzed around the streets weaving through traffic. but they weren‘t always safe and they weren‘t exactly good for the environment. so, eventually, they were banned.
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kinong‘s novel use of his vehicle is just one example of a larger movement aiming to make indonesians learn to love books. translation: our challenge is how to instil an interest to instill an interest in reading in children during the age of technology. we believe it is important that our volunteers teach children to understand the importance of learning. from what we have seen, indonesia‘s education system is moving in a positive direction, and we are grateful for that. kinong hopes he can help transform these children‘s lives, and he says this journey has taken him to places he never thought possible. tim allman, bbc news. it is 8:1aam. good morning, you are watching breakfast from bbc.
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bowel cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the uk and almost a2,000 people are diagnosed every year. a new test, which is less invasive and more reliable, is currently only used in scotland, but is due to be rolled out in england and wales later this year. we‘re joined now by the chief executive of bowel cancer uk, deborah alsina. and also by the bbc‘s middle east editor, and of course, former presenter of this programme, jeremy bowen. welcome back. it is always nice to be back on a sofa. i bet it is, there is a reason you are here to talk about bowel cancer.” there is a reason you are here to talk about bowel cancer. i was diagnosed with it, last october i had funny pains in my legs and my back when i was in iraq last may and when i came back i had to go to hospitalfor a when i came back i had to go to hospital for a couple of days but they didn‘t mention cancer. they said it was to do with some scar tissue i had from a previous surgery. anyway, ithought tissue i had from a previous surgery. anyway, i thought i should get a test, so i went to my gp. i‘d had no symptoms, none of the classic
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bowel cancer symptoms, nothing at all, but i thought i should get a test. so i got a test and it came back positive, i had a colonoscopy, where they put a camera on a stick up where they put a camera on a stick up your bottom, it‘s not nearly as bad as it sounds, they give you lots of drugs. and from that they found out i had a tumour and i had surgery, got taken away, and now i‘m having chemotherapy. it's a bit of a shock to the system. well, it's not the thing you really want to ideally choose, but i‘m very confident that i‘m getting very good medical treatment and i‘ll be ok. i‘m getting very good medical treatment and i'll be ok. the key thing is you got diagnosed quite early on. well, relatively, it could have been a bit earlier but had it been later it would have been much more serious. the key thing is to get tested. i‘ve been saying to all my friends, get tested, so there have been a whole lot of people who i know who have been queueing up at their doctors to get tested as a result of the diagnosis that i had.
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people with things to do with your bowels are not normally things they wa nt to bowels are not normally things they want to talk about but it‘s part of all our lives and you need to work on it because if you feel a bit embarrassed and leave it too long, someone sent me a message on twitter this morning, a gastroenterologist tweeted, tell people don‘t die of embarrassment, for gods sake. we mentioned in the introduction, deborah, had jeremy lived in scotla nd deborah, had jeremy lived in scotland it would have been different because he would have been tested earlier. that's right, the screening system works differently in the four nations of the uk, in scotland they test from 50—7a, whereas in england, wales and northern ireland it is a 60—7a, although the good news is the government of england and wales have committed to 50 so injeremy's case that means he would have been screened at least three times by the time he was diagnosed, which could
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have meant he could have had his can potentially prevented by the detection of a precancerous polyp. you talk about screening. what does it involve? screening is for people without symptoms and it is looking for tiny microscopic traces of blood within a stool sample, and it does that because tumours and their precursors polyps bleed. it doesn't mean to say if you have a positive screening test that you have cancer but it is giving us a warning sign that there may be something wrong that there may be something wrong that needs checking out. one has to think, if your arm was bleeding you wouldn't leave it, if you have some blood in your digestive system somewhere you need to make sure you are checked out and treated, because the great news about bowel cancer is it can be successfully treated. the great news about bowel cancer is it can be successfully treated“ found early enough, that‘s the key, isn‘t it? found early enough, that‘s the key, isn't it? well, it makes it a lot easier. most people are diagnosed at the earlier stages of bowel cancer do survive but it gets harder as the disease develops and spreads. but
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actually, the statistics, as we have been talking about, are meaningless in some ways because lots of people get hung up about them but they are about a whole population is not an individual. for example, i know lots of wonderful long—term stage for survivors as well, so there is hope throughout but it is a lot easier if you get picked up earlier. you didn‘t have any of the classic symptoms, did you? no. blood in your to, i've said the word twice now! this is part of the message. pain and a lump in your tummy, so if you are getting some pain, but also unexplained weight loss, or extreme tiredness for no reason. that could perhaps be caused through the bleeding and it could be a sign of iron deficiency anaemia. those are the five classic signs we ask people to look out for. but i had none of
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them. that's one of the other key things, you may experience one, none, or some, but if something doesn't feel quite right, asjeremy experienced, go to your doctor and get checked. is that because of the way you found out you had it, you didn‘t have any classic symptoms, is that one of the reasons why you decided to speak out publicly about this because you are thinking about your friends, as you said? it was bowel cancer awareness month, and i had kept quiet about it except to my nearest and dearest friends and so on and! nearest and dearest friends and so on and i thought why not, and if me coming on your programme means a few extra people decide to get tested and asa extra people decide to get tested and as a result get there cancer is caught, then it‘s time well spent. thank you for that. jeremy went to his gp. can you ask for a test? how does it work? if you have symptoms, then you would go to your gp and they will make a decision about whether or not you need to be referred for further diagnostic
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testing. gradually, across the uk, they are introducing what is called a triage test, a faecal nuclear chemical test to see if somebody is bleeding but the gp cannot help you ta ke bleeding but the gp cannot help you take part in the screening programme, you need to contact the local screening centre and there is a phone number perhaps you could put on your website in each country where if you have decided you won't ta ke where if you have decided you won't take part in any country for any reason and you have changed your mind, you can phone that number and they will send you the test. this is a really practical way, this is what makes a difference, somebody will watch this today and think, ok, i‘m going to do it. do it, because there are something is wrong with you it is far better to do something and there is great treatment and it is more reassuring in a sense to know that something is being dealt with them thinking, my god, i‘d better go and get it treated but i wait until
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next week. don‘t wait until next week, do it now. using very positive. i am a positive kind of quy- “ positive. i am a positive kind of guy. -- you seem positive. does that help in the treatment?” guy. -- you seem positive. does that help in the treatment? i hope so, it is not nearly as bad as i thought it would be in terms of side effects but it affects people differently and i‘ve been lucky to tolerate it better than i expected. but you‘ve got to keep positive about things in life. it‘s all part of the journey. do you miss the early hours? yeah, i really miss getting up at 3:30am! most mornings at 3:30am when i wake up most mornings at 3:30am when i wake upi most mornings at 3:30am when i wake up i think i wish i was going to work! monday is always tough, isn't it? monday was always tough because ifi it? monday was always tough because if i wasn‘t knackered the night before it was hard to get to sleep. this is the conversation i have with myself every sunday night, why am i not tired enough?! i remember it
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well, it is seared into my memory. lots of viewers will be happy to see you back on the sofa. i feel very co mforta ble you back on the sofa. i feel very comfortable up here! thank you for telling us about that. if you are watching we will put the details on our social media pages. lots of organisations are out there to offer help and support. if you‘ve been affected by any of the issues raised during that interview, you can find a list of organisations offering help and support on the bbc actionline website — go to bbc.co.uk/actionline. we need to do the weather. do you wa nt to we need to do the weather. do you want to do it? carroll? what about the weather? good morning! it‘s lovely to see you back, jeremy. you should stay and join us all again. early mornings are not that bad! if you are just stepping out it is a chilly start but some beautiful weather watcher pictures like this one from sutton coldfield in birmingham. many of us are starting with sunshine but some of us are starting with a bit of cloud and
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some of us with some showers. through the day the high pressure that has been keeping our weather so settled continues to move away onto the near continent being replaced this week by an area of low pressure and with this weather front it will introduce some colder air behind it. first thing we have frost across northern scotland and northern england, a bit of cloud across wales and the midlands, that will melt away and lots of dry weather. showers coming in over northern ireland and scotland followed in hot pursuit by some rain. this afternoon, a fine afternoon, dry and sunny across much of england and wales. it is breezy at the moment across the english channel and that will tend to ease. a bit more cloud building through the afternoon across northern england and the far north of wales, and for northern ireland and scotland we see the showers continuing, some of them likely to be heavy and wintry on the hills. temperatures today, the last day we are likely to see values as high as 16 degrees for example in cardiff. but we will generally be looking at 8—1a, but it turns colder
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behind this weather front here. so, through this evening and overnight, the weather front producing the rain and the showers ahead of it emerge and the showers ahead of it emerge and they will continue pushing south—eastwards depositing some snow on the hills of scotland. ahead of the weather front, what you will find is it‘s not going to be as cold, mind you, with temperatures for — seven, there is no heat wave in prospect either. you can see where we have this mild air as indicated by the yellow, clinging on to the south—east but this northerly from the arctic means as the weather front sinks south—east the cold air follows behind. there is the weather front producing the rain, slowly edging into the south—eastern corner. behind, bright spells of sunshine and showers, some of the showers will be heavy and thundery with sam hail, on the hills they will be wintry but in some of the heavier showers we could even see a bit of a wintry mix at lower levels. by bit of a wintry mix at lower levels. by no means everywhere but some places could see some slushy accumulations. temperatures, 6—10, just in the south. as we head from
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tuesday into wednesday, you can see the weather front wrapped around the area of low pressure, still a northerly wind and a cold day in prospect and it looks very much like we will see some rain preceded by snow across the grampians, southern uplands and pennines and we could see quite a bit of snow at that. this could change, it could stay in the north sea, it could drift further west, but away from it, bright spells of sunshine and showers and again, wintry on the hills. thank you, carol, a little bit of snow! you‘re watching breakfast. still to come this morning. alex kingston from er and sarah hadland from miranda will be here to talk about a new play arriving in the uk from broadway. that‘s coming up shortly. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. headlines here in a couple of minutes. we are going to talk to carrie grant about why autism isn‘t just a boy is‘ problem. a very interesting one to talk about. we
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will talk to her shortly. —— boys‘ problem. hi, there, good morning. last week, we had high pressure, temperatures in the mid to high teens, it felt like spring. this week, this is no aprilfool, but it‘s going to be much colder, rain and showers, there will be some snow over the higher ground and we see the return of some overnight frosts. now, this morning, quite a bit of cloud across scotland and northern ireland and with that, some showery outbreaks of rain. those turning wintry over the higher ground. a bit of cloud too for northern parts of england but for much of wales, the midlands, eastern and southern england, it stays largely dry and sunny today and, actually, today, temperatures still getting up to about 1a—16 degrees but a bit chillier further north. it is overnight tonight where this rain begins to move its way gradually southward and eastward,
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colder air is is going to start to dig in behind and so temperatures dropping down to three or four celsius in scotland and northern ireland, ahead of this rain, temperatures still overnight 5—7 degrees. but during tuesday, that milder air that is still in place in the south—east will be replaced by this colder air moving in from the north north—west, so you can see this arctic air streaming its way southwards across the uk, so while it will be quite wet in the morning across central and eastern parts of england, that rain will gradually clear. behind it, there will be some sunny spells, also, though, some showers, which could turn wintry particularly over higher ground, some thunder mixed in with that and a much, much colder feeling for many of us, those temperatures down to around 7—10 degrees. so that colder air is still going to be with us as we go through the rest of the week, really, low pressure close by, keeping a close eye on this area of low pressure here, this front that could move its way further westward and that could well bring some snow,
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particularly for the scottish mountains, the pennines, throughout wednesday. a chilly day again and some sunny spells and showers by thursday. bye for now.
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