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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  April 1, 2019 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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i'm simon mccoy in westminster, hello, you're watching hello, you're watching afternoon live. as yet another critical week afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy in westminster in the brexit process gets underway. i'm simon mccoy today at 2.30: in westminster, as yet another as yet another critical week in a stinging attack from critical week in the brexit theresa may's chief whip, process gets under way. the brexit process gets under way. over the government's today at three... today at four... handling of brexit — he also as mps prepare to vote accuses ministers of in another session to break trying to undermine her. the brexit deadlock, a stinging attack from a stinging attack from theresa may's chief whip mps will try again later to find theresa may's chief whip over the government's hello, you're watching over the government's handling handling of brexit. a way forward on brexit — of brexit — he also afternoon live. accuses ministers of after failing to find a majority trying to undermine her. i'm simon mccoy in westminster, mps will try again later to find in the coming hours, on any alternative plans last week. a way forward on brexit — mps will try again to find as yet another critical week in teachers and nurses could be legally a way forward on brexit the brexit process gets under way. after failing to find a majority obliged to warn about young after failing to find a majority a stinging attack from people at risk of violence — on any alternative plans last week. on any alternative plans last week. theresa may's chief whip that's one of the ideas over the government's handling of brexit — he also accuses ministers of being discussed at a knife teachers and nurses could be legally obliged to warn about young people trying to undermine her. crime summit today. mps will try again later to find at risk of violence — that's one of the ideas the minimum wage goes up, being discussed at a knife crime summit today. teachers and nurses could be legally a way forward on brexit affecting two million workers — in the recent months, obliged to warn about young people but a string of household we've seen an appalling number at risk of violence — after failing to find a majority of young lives that have been cut that's one of the ideas bills go up, too. short or devastated by serious being discussed at a knife on any alternative plans last week. crime summit today. welcome back to westminster, violent crime, including a number in the recent months, teachers and nurses could be legally where later today of horrifying incidents that took we've seen an appalling number mps will vote again on a series place just over this weekend. of young lives that have been cut obliged to warn about young people at risk of violence — of alternatives to theresa short or devastated by serious that's one of the ideas may's brexit deal in an attempt violent crime, including a number being discussed at a knife to break the deadlock of horrifying incidents that took here at westminster. crime summit today. a customs union with the eu the minimum wage goes up, place just over this weekend. affecting two million workers — the minimum wage goes up, in the recent months, is thought to be the most popular but a string of household affecting two million workers, but a string of household of the ideas under consideration. bills go up too. bills go up too. we've seen an appalling number the shadow foreign secretary coming up on afternoon coming up on afternoon of young lives that have been cut live, all the sport. live, all the sport. emily thornberry is here. short or devastated by serious violent crime, including a number ole gunnar solskjaer has set about
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of horrifying incidents that took we will be hearing from ole gunnar this is the common market to point keeping hold of his best players place just over this weekend. solskjaer, who says that despite the minimum wage goes up, out, and label will support this? despite interest from real madrid. affecting two million workers — interest from real madrid, star man the first thing is we have a run paul pogba won't be going anywhere. he says paul pogba won't be leaving but a string of household bills go up too. the club. sometime today might feel coming up on afternoon live, amendment in managed code form which thanks , and we'll bejoining is not on the order paper, but it is you for a full update just after half—past. all the sport withjohn watson. speaking again to our essential pleasant, but even if you get policy. we are happy voting for that we will be hearing from ole gunnar sunshine over the next few days, it is going to feel cold. you will need solskjaer on changes at the top at because that is our policy. and that sunshine beer will be with us, but manchester united. your big ang jacket. it's a forecast and matt taylor has all the weather. does say not being a member of the get ready for a push our clouds and matt. single market, but being as close to the much colder feel. the single market as we can be. your big ang jacket. it's a forecast you won't want to miss —— you will probably feeling quite nice in that how man's best friend can help both need your big jacket. sunshine, simon, but even there we close alignment to the single market, being in the customs union, thanks. will see sunshine over the next few also coming up — victims and witnessess of crimes. on news nationwide — days, it will feel much colder. dynamic alignment of rules and a drug prescribed to treat nerve regulations, and being in eu pain and epilepsy has been there are some big april showers on the way. institutions. that's what we want. reclassified as a class c controlled substance — controlled thanks, matt. freedom of movement? part of the substance — from today. also coming up... how man's best friend can help both problem of the single market is the issue of freedom of movement. that victims and witnessess of crimes. issue of freedom of movement. that is why we have said for the last good afternoon. couple of years it is difficult for us couple of years it is difficult for us to be in the single market. we have talked to the europeans about this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy at westminster, this is afternoon live. it and have talked to the europeans about itand said, have talked to the europeans about it and said, we cannot pretend that where in the next hour mps the debate in the country was not will begin another debate partly about freedom of movement on the options ahead for brexit. when it came to the referendum. we and tonight, they'll take part in a second round of votes i'm simon mccoy at westminster, on alternative proposals. are not comfortable with the idea of none of the eight options proposed where in the next hour mps will begin another debate being in the single market. not by mps secured a majority
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good afternoon. in the house of commons last week, on the options ahead for brexit. this is afternoon live. but those which received the most comfortable? is it not time to get and tonight they'll take part votes were a customs union in a second round of votes simon mccoy live at westminster, off the fence? that's why i'm saying with the eu, and a referendum on alternative proposals. on any deal. where mps are preparing to take part voting will begin at in a second round of votes eight‘o'clock this evening. on alternative brexit proposals. we have our policy, we hope it will but despite mps rejecting all this comes as the chief whip has none of the eight options proposed be voted on if the speaker selected. theresa may's brexit deal by mps secured a majority in the house of commons last week, for a third time on friday, levelled strong criticism against we are in the 59th minute of the uncertainty among mps about the way but those which received the most the conservative party cabinet, votes were a customs union forward means the prime minister describing them all at some of the 11th hour. we are trying to find could bring back her deal most badly behaved in history. with the eu and a referendum something, trying to find a for a fourth time. on any deal. meanwhile, the conservative chief compromise. what the prime minister none of the eight options proposed whipjulian smith has said by mps secured a majority ought to know, we know, people the government should have made in the house of commons last week, voting will begin at clear after the 2017 election that britain would "inevitably have but those which received the most eight‘o‘clock this evening. instinctively know, compromise means to accept a closer relationship votes were a customs union give—and—ta ke. therefore we with the eu after brexit". but despite mps rejecting instinctively know, compromise means give—and—take. therefore we will be with the eu, and a referendum voting for things which are broadly on any deal. theresa may's brexit deal in line with our policy, even things for a third time on friday, that are not exactly in line with voting will begin at eight‘o'clock this evening. uncertainty among mps about the way our policy. therefore the nick boles but despite mps rejecting forward means the prime minister theresa may's brexit deal what goes on in here, for a third time on friday, could bring back her deal uncertainty among mps about the way for a fourth time. 10 downing street, amendment, however you want to call forward means the prime minister is normally a secret. could bring back her deal meanwhile, the conservative chief for a fourth time. whipjulian smith has said it, it is not exactly in line with but brexit has laid divisions the government should have made at the heart of government bare. clear after the 2017 election that our policy but it is going to be better than theresa may's deal and now the chief whip, the man meanwhile, the conservative chief britain would "inevitably have in charge of discipline, whipjulian smith has said to accept a closer relationship better than theresa may's deal and better than theresa may's deal and is making his frustrations clear. the government should have made with the eu after brexit". better than no deal, so we will vote clear after the 2017 election that nick eardley reports. for that. and you will hold your as you're aware, discipline is not britain would "inevitably have nose as you do so? i'm just as good as it should be. to accept a closer relationship with the eu after brexit". nick eardley has this report. this is the worst example of ill what goes on in here, explaining our policy, the reasons discipline in cabinet what goes on in here, 10 downing street, why we are where we are. but we have in british political history. is normally a secret. 10 downing street, but brexit has laid divisions to be pragmatic at this stage. and is normally a secret. with parliament still figuring out what we are trying to do is pull what it wants, he thinks a closer
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relationship should have been but brexit has laid divisions at the heart of government bare. people together. what you are really at the heart of government bare. now the chief whip, the man trying to do is ruin any chance of on the cards much sooner. in charge of discipline, now the chief whip, the man the reason getting her deal through. what goes on in here, is making his frustrations clear. in charge of discipline, 10 downing street, as you're aware, discipline is not is making his frustrations clear. now, what we are trying to do is as good as it should be. look afterjobs as you're aware, discipline is not now, what we are trying to do is this is the worst example of ill as good as it should be. look after jobs and now, what we are trying to do is look afterjobs and the economy, first and foremost. we have said discipline in cabinet this is the worst example of ill in british political history. the conservative party went to get discipline in cabinet that the referendum result was a majority to deliver brexit... in british political history. to avoid all of this. with parliament still figuring out what it wants, he thinks a close 52-48, but failed to get a majority. with parliament still figuring out that the referendum result was 52—48, but you just cannot forget the government probably relationship should have been the 48. and the 48% of people who have been clearer of what it wants, he thinks a closer the consequences for that. on the cards much sooner. wa nt to the 48. and the 48% of people who want to remain, the very least you the parliamentary arithmetic relationship should have been would mean this would be the conservative party went to get can do as a states person is, whilst inevitably a softer brexit. but any move towards a closer a majority to deliver brexit, relationship would provide failed to get a majority. leaving the european union, not go a headache for theresa may. on the cards much sooner. staying in a customs union very far. and we have got to a stage or accepting a single market the government probably have been clearer of would mean that some the conservative party went the consequences for that. whereby everything is so of the manifesto pledges made controversial that whatever is going at the general election to get a majority in order to bea would be compromised. to deliver brexit. .. the parliamentary arithmetic controversial that whatever is going to be a viable way of leaving the and such is the tension around to avoid all of this. would mean this would be here that some tories failed to get a majority. inevitably a softer brexit. are prepared to consider voting against the government the government probably have been but any move towards a closer eu, whatever ends up when the music in a confidence motion if it relationship would provide stops as being the way in which we does reluctantly accept clearer that there were the customs union. a headache for theresa may. are supposed to be leaving, we say consequences for that staying in a customs union or accepting a single market needs to be put back to the people would mean some of the manifesto and the parliamentary arithmetic pledges made at the general election so that we can break this impasse, we are approaching the point now would mean this would be inevitably a softer brexit. would be compromised. because it is so controversial now. where the stakes are so very high but any move towards a closer and such is the tension here that and so transcend party politics relationship would provide a headache for theresa may. and what this country is about, staying in a customs union some tories are prepared to consider your manuscript, is there anything and the fundamental british value or accepting a single market that political power rests would mean that some on consent, that i think these else the party would back? i'm of the manifesto pledges made voting against the government things are coming onto the table. at the general election would be compromised. in a confidence motion and such is the tension around if it reluctantly accepts trying to be helpful, i'm not trying at the same time, some in government here that some tories
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the customs union. are prepared to consider voting we are approaching the point to avoid... because we haven't say the pm has to listen to mps. against the government decided what is going to be voted in a confidence motion if it where the stakes are so very high on, and only when we have got the the prime minister has said does reluctantly accept that she will listen a customs union. and so transcend party politics decision on how it is voted do we to the house and one and what this country is about, we are approaching the point now announce what our whipping process of the reasons we are in this and the fundamental british value difficulty, and it's where the stakes are so very high is. all i can tell you is there are another very serious week, is because of the numbers and so transcend party politics a number of motions that are close in the house. and what this country is about, last week, mps didn't give a clear and the fundamental british value that political power rests that political power rests to our policy, and i suspect that we on consent, that i think these will be encouraging people to vote answer when asked what they thought things are coming onto the table. for them. there is kenneth clarke of brexit options. at the same time, some in government tonight, they'll try again. on consent, that i think these av for them. there is kenneth clarke a's customs union. common market say the pm has to listen to mps. the prime minister has said things are coming onto the table. options they could that she will listen vote on include... to the house and one some tory mps will argue again of the reasons we are in this 2.0, peoples vote, after a major difficulty, and it's at the same time, some revolt, whatever you want to call for no deal, but others think another very serious week, in government say the pm has is because of the numbers it. let's see what else the speaker the only solution to all of this in the house. to listen to mps. is asking you again last week, mps didn't give a clear the prime minister has said answer when asked what they thought she will listen to the house and one in another referendum. selects. the common market 2.0 seems of brexit options. of the reasons we are in this it's possible parliament difficulty is because of to be the one that seems to be still won't be able to agree tonight, they'll try again. the numbers in the house. options they could last week, mps didn't give a clear on a course of action, answer when asked what they thought gaining traction, the snp say they but mps have been discussing will back it as well. if that does compromise, about backing notjust vote on include... of brexit strategies. tonight they will try again. the exact brexit they want, options include... but something similar. some tory mps will argue again that could mean that parliament for no deal, but others think get a big majority, and is chooses a much closer relationship some tory mps will argue again stand—alone the one, what next? the only solution to all of this for no deal, but others think with the eu than the one is asking you again the only solution to this is asking get a big majority, and is stand-alone the one, what next? we the government wants. in another referendum. you again in another referendum. can't have all 650 mps getting on it's possible parliament the key thing for us is that we stay it's possible parliament still won't be able to agree the eurostar and going off to europe on a course of action, but mps have in the european union. still won't be able to agree been discussing compromise to negotiate it. the way that our we want to revoke article 50 and put system works is that we have to rely about backing not just on a course of action,
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the exact brexit they want, on the executive and the leader of but mps have been discussing but something similar. it back to the people, compromise, about backing notjust the exact brexit they want, the executive is currently the current prime minister who says that but we will be prepared but something similar. she is not going to do anything. so to compromise on the basis who knows? who knows. she says she of protecting jobs, staying that could mean that parliament in the single market and customs chooses a much closer relationship union, so we will vote that could mean that parliament for the boles amendment. with the eu than the one is only prepared to listen to things that might not be enough the government wants. chooses a much closer relationship to deliver a clear verdict. the key thing for us is that we stay in line with our manifesto. she is the pm might bring her own deal with the eu than the one not prepared to compromise. i don't back in the coming days. in the european union. the government wants. know what will happen next. all we the brexit stakes are high. we want to revoke article 50 and put the battle to define it continues. can do is the best we can in the we want to revoke article 50 and put it back to the people and you can see more it back to the people, but we won't be prepared of that interview with current circumstances. the fact we the chief whipjulian smith but we will be prepared to compromise on the basis are doing this at the last minute is this evening at 9pm on bbc two — to compromise on the basis of protecting jobs, staying because we have a prime minister who of protecting jobs, staying in the single market and customs the brexit storm: laura in the single market and customs union, so we will vote has been essentially insisting on union, so we will vote for the amendment. her way or the highway until now. kuenssberg's inside story. for the boles amendment. that might not be enough that might not be enough to deliver she will argue that it is all very to deliver a clear verdict. the pm might bring her own deal a clear verdict. earlier, i spoke to the shadow the pm might bring her own deal well, even common market 2.0, if it foreign secretary emily thornberry — back in the coming days. she confirmed that labour will back the brexit stakes are high. back in the coming days. the battle to define it continues. the brexit stakes are high, emerges as the current winner, you a plan to stay in the single the battle to define it continues. still need to sort out the divorce. market and customs union and you can see more of that interview with you still need to back that part of in tonight's votes. and you can see more the chief whipjulian smith the deal which rimmer says she will this evening at 9pm on bbc two — of that interview with the chief whipjulian smith the brexit story: laura bring back here on thursday. we need we are in the 59th minute of the this evening at 9pm on bbc two in the brexit storm: some sort of certainty. she says her 11th hour. we are trying to find a kuenssberg's inside story. deal offers that. she is not telling compromise, and what the prime laura kuenssberg's inside story. minister ought to know, we know and i'm joined by hilary benn, the labour mp who is also chair you the truth. the truth as it is people instinctively know that of the brexit select committee. earlier, i spoke to the shadow incredibly uncertain as to what it compromise means give and take. foreign secretary emily thornberry — she confirmed that labour will back means. basically what it is, is that therefore, we will be voting for let's just pick up on the vote things which are broadly in line a plan to stay in the single market and customs union tonight. a lot of people will be she has relied on all kinds of, with our policy, even things that in tonight's votes.
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are not exactly in line with our we're in the 59th minute of the 11th hour. policy. therefore, the nick boles we're trying to find confused about so many different things need to be invented that options. in a nutshell, what are you haven't been invented, there needs amendment. common market 2.0. a compromise, and what the prime all voting on later? well, there is to be unicorns found, rainbows minister ought to know, we know involved. you need all of that, and however you want to call it. it is and people instinctively know that compromise means give and take. all voting on later? well, there is a range of propositions that have not exactly in line with our policy, therefore, we will be voting been put in from leaving with no then the european union, in but it is better than theresa may's for things which are broadly in line agreement at all, a no deal vote, exasperation, and one can understand deal and certainly better than no with our policy, even things that all the way through to a close it, ok, to reason, if that's what deal, so we will vote for that. are not exactly in line with our policy. relationship like norway anything you want, but we want an insurance policy in case that does not work. and the conservative mp nick boles therefore, the nick thatis and this is not ideal that has said he's pleased labour will be boles amendment... relationship like norway anything that is called common market 2.0. supporting his motion during tonight's indicative votes. then there is a customs union where businesses can invest in, that he tweeted: "very good to see people can understand where their labour giving its official however you want to call it. we would charge the same tariffs future will be. we need more it is not exactly in with no restrictions on the flow of certainty than this. this will not support for common market 2.0. line with our policy, it comes closer to labour's stated but it is better than theresa may's goods between our countries. and we policy than any other brexit do. we have said this for years, but deal and certainly better than no are also voting on what is called a compromise and now has a real chance she doesn't listen. the conservative of winning the majority deal, so we will vote for that. that has eluded the pm." let's cross over to the houses confirmatory referendum. that is the speaking to reporters outside of parliament and our party have just been about keeping parliament, the dup's brexit chief political correspondent, the conservative party together. it proposal that whatever deal is spokesperson sammy wilson has said vicki young. eventually agreed and negotiated the party will "not has not been about lifting their be changing its mind it was interesting talking to emily with the eu, you would then put that rise above themselves and looking at on the withdrawal agreement" to the british people and say, here what is good for the nation. and we and will not be supporting thornberry, because she is very much the common market 2.0 motion is the leave option. if you want to holding her nose when she backs this really have been trying to engage in the indicative votes leave on that basis, the only one with them, and saying, we think this process later today. particular motion tonight. it also we will not be changing our mind that has been negotiated, then vote is the way forward. but we have been has the backing of the snp and it for it. if that doesn't carry, we on the withdrawal agreement. seems to be coming up as the clear rebuffed. at the very last minute we we made that quite clear. would remain. the two that came out favourite now? they think so, but may have a chance, but it does mean there is nothing in this withdrawal having said that, i have spoken to in practice that of course somebody of last week in top place where ken from the executive, the prime agreement which is good either mps from all the various camps, and clarke's proposal and another, both minister, whoever that is, we don't for delivering brexit they all still think that their
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orfor maintaining northern ireland even now, will need to go off and as part of the united kingdom. option is in with a chance. but i looking at the relationship with the european union in terms of a customs negotiate on behalf of britain in the european union. thanks for and if the alternatives think you're right, the common union or customs union and single joining us. market 2.0, because labour are now which are being presented market. i am voting for both of at parliament today actively backing it, ie they will be are a dilution of brexit, telling their mps to vote for it, we will not be supporting them. those. we have defeated the prime what about common market 2.0? there are about 100 labour mps last minister's deal three times. we voted against leaving with no deal time who either abstained or voted against it. a lot of them were three times. therefore, the prime the dup spokesperson has said the party will not be changing its mind people who are pro another second minister makes a fair point when she on the withdrawal agreement and will not support the common market 2.0 referendum, so you can see what's says ok, so what are you for? that motion in the indicative vote going on here. there are different is why, together as a cross—party process today. we will not be camps not backing each other‘s plan the common market 2.0 plan because they want theirs to come out first of all does not ensure that there is not on top. we don't yet know which ones group, we are running this changing your mind on the withdrawal have been selected. we will wait to indicative vote process. we defeated agreement, we have made that clear. hear from the speaker. but the fact the government last week and that there is nothing in that agreement that the snp have decided to get was why we had the first go on a hard border on the island which is good eitherfor delivering of ireland is determined behind that as well does mean that wednesday and we are having another by the withdrawal agreement. brexit orfor so we have abstained it is in with a chance. but what go tonight. since it took the which is good eitherfor delivering brexit or for maintaining northern on it last week. ireland as part of the united we will probably do the same this does that mean if it goes through? government two years to come up with kingdom. if the alternatives which week again, but we will not be is the hole going to accept it? a deal that was defeated overwhelmingly, it would be harsh to giving our endorsement. have a go mps for not sorting it out are being presented to parliament do you think it is inevitable tomorrow, there will be this lengthy are being presented to parliament area are being presented to parliament are a dilution of brexit, we will that we are now heading not be supporting them. the common for a softer brexit? two cabinet meetings going on for i don't think it is inevitable. in go. everything is if. if five hours, where they will react to it's only inevitable if the prime minister decides whatever happens tonight. but the something emerges tonight, a clear market 2.0 plan firstly does not that is the route she wants feeling amongst most mps here who to go down. majority that you feel comfortable ensure that there is not a hard she has still got the opportunity don't like theresa may's deal and to negotiate hard with the eu. border. as determined by the they don't want no deal is that with, would it be enough to then, they need an agreement as much as we need an agreement. something has to get some kind of withdrawal agreement. we have why should we comply
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say theresa may brought her deal with an agreement which suits majority later. we have also spoken back on thursday, to say that on the their needs and not with the views basis that you are only talking of the people of the uk to liam fox, the international trade abstained on it last week. we will secretary. he has of course been about the withdrawal part of the expressed in the referendum? agreement, we might back you? well, probably do the same this week will you be abstaining backing theresa may's deal. but he again. but we will not be giving it on all options today? we don't even know what all did vote for no deal in one of the that doesn't quite work. she tried our endorsement. i don't think it is the options are, so we will have bringing just the withdrawal to wait until we see them. earlier votes. he thinks it's a agreement. that is the money and the thank you. let's cross over to the houses betrayal and is not a proper brexit of parliament and our if any of these other compromises go transition period. it's the divorce chief political correspondent, inevitable. it is only inevitable if vicki young. bit. but the argument from my point the prime minister decides that as so you have got the vote later and of view is not about that, the the prime minister decides that as the route she wants to go down. she then we are hearing there will be a through. argument is about our future has still got the opportunity to five—hour cabinet meeting tomorrow? i think ithinka i think a customs union is a relationship. the reason why i have negotiate hard with the eu. they that's right. we will get the continued to vote against the prime betrayal of brexit. voters chose to need an agreement as much as we need results of those votes sometime ta ke minister's deal is because it offers betrayal of brexit. voters chose to take back control and now mp5 are an agreement. why should we comply no clarity about the future. but by between 9:30pm and 10:30pm. and your voting to give even more away. the with an agreement which suits their european union would be able to make voting against it, you don't even important question — are there the rules and we would have to needs and not with the views of the get into the second part of the enough mps coalescing around one of follow them. they would be able to negotiation. i don't want to get people of the united kingdom those options? if there are, that expressed in a referendum? will you negotiate access to uk market such into the second part of the puts pressure on theresa may and the negotiation when we have no idea as agriculture, whether or not they be abstaining today? we don't even cabinet, who will be meeting wanted it, and we would simply have where businesses are going. businesses come to me and say, sir tomorrow morning. they will have a to lump it. what is even more know what the options are, so we political cabinet first and a normal hilary, how is it going to work with will have to wait until we see them. cabinet afterwards and a total of inexplicable is that the left in the this deal? and i have to say to five hours of discussion about exactly what they are going to do labour party now seem to want to them, i haven't got a clue. why should we as mps be asked to take and how they are going to react to have agreements like ttip, which all of that. but with the snp they opposed, imposed upon them the country on this huge journey getting behind this idea of common against their will. none of this into the complete unknown?m let speak to the brexit spokesperson for the liberal democrats. labour market too, that is looking like the make sense. it's time we went back toa the country on this huge journey into the complete unknown? it is a journey that the british public have make sense. it's time we went back to a proper brexit. of course, if asked you to set in motion and there have put three manuscript proposal option most likely to get support.
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let's speak to labour because mike is huge frustration that the first this afternoon. what do you make of lucy powell, who is backing that that? firstly i'm surprised they're step hasn't been taken.|j option. it is worth recapping what liam fox is to get theresa may's is huge frustration that the first step hasn't been taken. i understand that, but the prime minister has putting forward a manuscript we are talking about when talking deal through, he has to persuade the refused to make the choices that amendment because all the motions are down there on the order paper. i about common market two. what does remaining conservative mps who in three attempts have not got behind confront the country. in two and think someone on the web's office is it mean? well, there's this other three quarters years, we have thing that is not the eu that is the government's deal. there was a learned that the fantasy peddled by going to be sacked for submitting sign today that at least one of them this late. let's look at the the leave campaign that you can have called the european economic area, which we are already members of who did vote for it last time and all of the sovereignty and all of spoke to us on friday straight after the economic benefits with no sembrant to that, which other problem is not true. that is why the vote, he came here and did an proposals. we have heard labour are countries like norway, iceland and they are angry about mrs may's deal, interview with us saying he was backing it, some more keenly than others are part of. they are not ashamed of what he had done because because it confronts them with the pa rt of others. the snp said they will back others are part of. they are not part of the eu, but they are part of he had changed his mind. he backed truth about the false promises they it as well. it is emerging as some the economic area, which is what theresa may's deal and today in the made. but she has avoided making sort of favourite. what is your many people thought they were house of commons, he made it clear signing up to in the 705 and 805. my that he regretted what he had done. choices like remaining in a customs stance? sort of favourite. what is your sta nce ? let's sort of favourite. what is your stance? let's talk specifically about the common market 2.0, which parent5 signing up to in the 705 and 805. my pare nt5 and signing up to in the 705 and 805. my parents and grandparents, that is union, which is essential as a is customs union and single market. what they know. so we would be in starting point to keep the border the single market, but we would be although doing what i believe to be with northern ireland open and to enable the free flow of goods. then if you look at it, it is a very out5ide the single market, but we would be outside the eu. we would be leaving in the country? best interests at detailed motion. it is a wish list. the time, i quickly realised i the option is a no deal, and that is fi5herie5 outside the eu. we would be leaving fisheries and agriculture, leaving should not have voted with the the european court ofju5tice and looking more likely. no, because there are lots of things the uk is the european court ofju5tice and the jurisdiction of that. we would going to have to seek and i would be paying a hell of a lot less in. government deal. we have to make an parliament voted by 400 votes to 160 so many of the things that whether almost impossible choice. it seemed argue no guarantee that we would to be either the prime minister's last week to reject leaving without secure them. it is a unicorn. the dividing i55ue5 so many of the things that whether dividing issues the referendum, but deal or a long delay, european a deal. on that, parliament is we would be part of the economic clear. the prime minister said a 5ingle elections, a softer brexit and a other issue with that, it sets out we would be part of the economic single market, which would give us week ago today that unless frictionle55 trade. thi5 more political uncertainty. what i parliament votes for it, we will not quite clearly that it is the be living with no deal and i expect single market, which would give us frictionle55 trade. this was the model that many of the leading leave should have done and did not was to
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political declaration that will have her to honour her word, which is why to be amended to reflect the content campaigners argued for in the run—up trust my instincts and those of the she will have to write a letter to of the motion, and therefore there to and including the referendum. british people. he says theresa may the eu to say, we are going to need some more time. how much more? that wouldn't have to be a long nigel farage, bori5johnson and other5. nigel farage, bori5johnson and depends on what they have to offer. others. i used to argue against this extension, and therefore the model, they used to argue for it. so should not bring back her dealfor a they have talked about a longer possibility of a peoples vote would be ruled out, and that is what we fourth time and he thinks she should extension, but we remain in a mess, i feel like i model, they used to argue for it. so consider her position and resigned. not for the want of trying. maybe we are pressing for is a party. ifeel like i have model, they used to argue for it. so i feel like i have compromise and come a long way. this is the sort of the two important things we are will get a majority for something looking out for later this evening, tonight, but even if we did, we will be ruled out, and that is what we are pressing for is a partylj be ruled out, and that is what we compromise that people are now are pressing for is a party. i vote for article 50, that is what you still need to negotiate with that coalescing around. you have not of the lot of those indicative votes, with the eu and we are not going to wa nt to for article 50, that is what you want to see. yes, that is down there, and if you recall last week, course mentioned freedom of movement, because many would say probably around 930 or ten o'clock do that by the 12th of april. thank that a lot of the people who voted there, and if you recall last week, the motions came out on top where a tonight. has anyone got a majority customs union but also people's vote to leave the eu were concerned about you. let's speak thank you. and if so, how will the cabinet which of the largest number of votes to our chief political immigration. this puts us back where correspondent, vicki young. command also revoked. and we hear react to all of that tomorrow we we re immigration. this puts us back where we were with freedom of movement. it does look as if there are a morning? vicki young in central theresa may might want to bring back immigration. this puts us back where we were with freedom of movementm couple of near winners, at least two her deal on thursday. as i doe5 we were with freedom of movementm does include freedom of movement, but with some critical extra power5 lobby, thank you. with me here is sienna rogers that we don't currently have in the proposals are emerging as the understand it, she might bracket the leaders of this vote tonight. it is two. if something comes out on top eu. so there is what's called an from the labour list website. about a customs union and or a emergency brake. there is a today, if a majority vote for a unilateral power that we would have interesting talking to emily single market. that's right. as you particular proposition or perhaps a5 unilateral power that we would have as members of efta and the eea where thornberry this afternoon, because the largest number of mps vote for a there was an element of nose holding say, they are not there yet and we we could say there are extra particular proposition, so she might about backing the common market 2.0 people are trying to find a put that up against her own deal, pre55ure5 we we could say there are extra pressures on our society or there is compromise behind the scenes. we a new countryjoining the eu, and we have heard so many times that motion tonight, but that is now and if it is customs union try to eve ryo ne have heard so many times that everyone says people have to scare some of our members into wa nt a new countryjoining the eu, and we want to freeze free movement. that labour policy? yeah. it's compromise, but no one wants to i5a backing her deal because they would want to freeze free movement. that is a unilateral power. it is the compromise, but no one wants to compromise on the thing they want. see the customs union as being not 5ame brake that david cameron 5pent interesting that... because last
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the snp say they would be willing to months trying to get from europe week, labour did give advice to mps get behind one of these options now. brexit. customs union sigel market before that referendum, because he iamjoined by get behind one of these options now. i am joined by the conservative mp raises the issue of free movement of knew it was still free movement, but to vote for it but did not wait for thi5 daniel kaczynski. you have backed knew it was still free movement, but this is a significant additional it, but now it is whipping for it. people. do you have a view on that? power that we would have. when i but freedom of movement is what theresa may's deal, having changed talk to people on the doorstep, they single market membership means. we favour free movement of people. your mind. you also voted for the no said they felt they didn't have any the uk has benefited from that and leave seat mps within the labour deal option in indicative vote last powers to stop it, even when there party are very concerned about that. over a million people in the uk time. what will you do this time? benefited from that in times of but there is an opt out, isn't was a large movement of people two we want to vote against all the going to work and live another eu there? yes, which stephen connect across europe, as there was in the and lucy powell —— stephen kinnock options which are put to us today, countries. wouldn't this ensure mid—20005. because we want to send a clear across europe, as there was in the mid-2000s. if you do manage to get message that actually, there is talking about article 102 and 103 withdrawal agreement put forward by that? the motion ensures nothing, this grouping to back this evening the prime minister is the most and labour say they will now get realistic option and the one that behind it, and we have the snp because it is out with your list, which put brakes on the immigration respects our manifesto. the customs behind it, and we have the snp and if it ends up in competition behind it. you will have some stuff. and in terms of state aid, they are pushing these ideas for conservatives. it is sustainable for union, the second referendum, the with the prime minister's deal, those leave seat mps who are norway model, all the other models do not fulfil what we stood for when there are conservatives and the dup possibly he will swing behind it that group of people to vote for concerned and saying, don't believe because they will see that as not something time and again to get it everything you read. it is more we stood as conservative being brexit. whereas they might through? these are questions for the complicated than that. eyebrows are parliamentary candidates. i also argue that the prime minister's deal prime minister as well. what myself, hope the prime minister brings back being raised that labour have a her deal so that we can get it would be flawed, but represented a manuscript motion, meaning they have nick boles and many of the mp5 left things a bit late with this. across the line this time. those more accurate version of what brexit looked like. we are dealing in involved in this over the last few what is going on? to be honest, i'm conservative members of parliament months have been trying to build is who are still holding out for this a careful consensus from not sure why labour didn't table hypotheticals, but should it go this on friday but they are tabling possibility of a purest form of through in terms of the clear leader conservative leavers like george isa their brexit plan today. and what
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brexit, that is for the birds. it's eustis through to the snp, labour through in terms of the clear leader is a majority, the common market 2.0 not going to get through the house proposal. if it that sort of would be in there? it is corbyn's of commons and i hope they will finally realise that they are colleagues and others. we have been majority, would you then say, we working hard to meet all of their five demands that he has been would support that because it at potentially putting brexit at risk pushing for months. it is further by voting against the withdrawal least moves is on? we have always demands and build that consensus. agreement. that is interesting than customs union membership. it is that is what the prime minister should have been doing for months workers' rights guarantees, dynamic because at the last indicative said there are deals we would hold now. but we have been doing it our noses over as long as they were alignment and other things. a lot of votes, you did put no deal is one of linked to a people's vote. you could instead. today we would like to see people will look at what labour is your options. but you now think that is not going to happen? 400 mps that breadth. the dup are going to doing and there is an element of not put up the common market 2.0 version being sure why they are doing what voted against it. theresa may against staying in the eu. we would they are doing and when they are abstain. we have seen many of the suggested that without a vote in facilitate that. but that is all we doing it. is it ticking, are they opposition party supporting it. if parliament, it couldn't go ahead. so wa nt to facilitate that. but that is all we just trying to make it as difficult you think no deal is not an option? want to do. we don't want to we have a good chunk of facilitate the customs union are for theresa may as possible? of common market 2.0 on its own because conservatives, that is sustainable well, in an ideal world, majority and if i was the prime course. and as the opposition party, you think no deal is not an option? well, in an idealworld, i you think no deal is not an option? well, in an ideal world, i would wa nt it is valid for labour to be looking well, in an ideal world, i would want to keep no deal on the table, we think neither are as good a sting minister, that is what i would pivot in the eu. plenty more from towards. one of the key things about at this situation and thinking, particularly as we are still in an our proposal is that we could enact theresa may is faced with three ongoing negotiating process with the choices. it is no deal, which she european union. but i have to it quickly. this institution of efta westminster, but let's catch up with and the eea already exists. we could doesn't want, a general election, or realise that the british people at the business news. then will bring be in it byjuly, and wouldn't it be shifting towards a customs union or the last election gave no party in single market membership. all of majority in the house of commons. is that shortly in a moment. lovely to have this done and by those are difficult for her, so whatever comes out of that, either this place behind me is more remain then? that might be a compelling the tory party is splitting over a thanit this place behind me is more remain customs union shift, or we get a than it is brexit, and they are not going to allow a no deal to get theresa may's chief whip attacks the government's general election, so it is win win handling of brexit — argument tonight for mps. the through the house of commons. one of and accuses ministers of trying question is what theresa may will do for labour. is it more important to to undermine the prime minister. the things we voted for brexit was if mps do back later. split the tory party right now than to sort a national crisis out?” to take back control and to make question is what theresa may will do if mp5 do back later.|j question is what theresa may will do if mps do back later. i will be mps will try again later to find asking you that either later tonight
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sure that this parliament makes the a way forward on brexit think labour would say that they are after failing to find a majority or tomorrow! vicki young in trying to sort a national crisis out decisions to hold the executive to on any alternative plans last week. westminster, thank you. by improving may's deal. so if she account. we can't have that and then teachers and nurses could be legally obliged to warn about young ignore what the house of commons people at risk of violence — brings it back on thursday, there is says. so i think no deal is off the that's one of the ideas being discussed at a knife table. and what happens if theresa mps will also be the debating the no question that some labour mps crime summit today. mightjust think, as a divorce deal, may's deal doesn't get through. it here's your business petition to revoke article 50 today. looks like a softer brexit, doesn't it? the irony is that the most headlines on afternoon live. if that is separate from the future negotiations, at least it moves two million uk workers on minimum mike galsworthy from things forward. there is some of wages are now receiving a pay rise — the campaign organisation scientists for eu is here. eurosceptic part of the conservative that feeling and on friday the prime but a string of household bills party, the european research group, have also increased. minister did say that the amendment which i am a member of, if those 30 6 million is a huge number, but it workers aged 25 and over plus mps continue to vote against on the national living wage is not 17 million. no, that you are will receive £8.21 an hour tabled, she would have accepted that the prime minister, the irony is from today, that's that we could end up with a much talking about 2016 now. when you about parliament taking control of up 4.9%, from £7.83. have spent millions of pounds the next stage of negotiations. but softer brexit than any of us would there is also hesitating because wa nt softer brexit than any of us would mobilising the whole nation. in want or envisage. we could also end there is also hesitating because there was a statement a couple of easyjet has warned that customer terms of petitions, if you want to weeks ago which really angered look at the comparable leave up demand for ticket sales petition for leaving on a per the labour mps because they were being want or envisage. we could also end up with another referendum or we blamed for the chaos when actually, could end up with a government run for the next six months, 12th, it has about 150,000. this 6 she is the one who has not been which includes the peak summer by mr corbyn. so the dup and i have season, is unexpectedly weak. compromising this whole time. so said this on northern ireland million is record—breaking. it was there is a lot of hesitation, even the airline blamed uncertainty record—breaking in terms of speed television this morning. the dup now over the global economy amongst the mps who do want some and brexit for the slowdown and in terms of number and it gives have to explain why they continue to you an idea of the sentiments right kind of deal to get through. common in advance bookings. vote against this deal, when it five uk broadband and landline now. people are totally frustrated. market 2.0, would that be the one providers will now automatically you think will emerge tonight as the could end up with a corbyn compensate customers when services just get on with it doesn't work, government. also, lady hermon, the because it is to just get on with favourite? i think a customs union do not work.
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independent mp, and many people in opening pandora's box and having will come as the favourite tonight. northern ireland, are telling me from today, people will get more brexit for the next years. if but common market 2.0 has a good that the people of northern ireland people want to get rid of it, they compensation without having to ask, i'iow that the people of northern ireland now want the withdrawal agreement to are saying to just revoke it and get chance. customs union is the kenneth when repairs or installations are delayed, or if an rid of it. does that argument go clarke option. we will find out engineer doesn't show up. bt, sky, talktalk, virgin media tomorrow if you are right! thank you and zen internet have be back. hopefully it will be fourth also for the eu, that the eu you very much. you're watching afternoon joined ofcom's scheme, time lucky for the prime minister when shipping is that they are back. wa nted also for the eu, that the eu you wanted to remaining two years ago is now different and we are getting a you are talking about the european but it's not compulsory. sense of a different direction, research group of brexit ‘s are perhaps, and emmanuel macron may putting mps. one of them, steve have a different view now that the light. birmingham prison is being baker, has said today that he might french leader did two years ago? permanently ta ken back into public ownership in a move which will end g4s's vote against the government in a involvement with the jail, totally. we have been away for two bbc news has learned. no—confidence vote. he has said he the private security company would stand down as a conservative was awarded a 15—year contract before he did that, but is that and a half years. we have been a to operate hmp birmingham, while and navel—gazing for two and a something you would consider? i also known as winson green, in 2011. half years and in that time, there it's the second time in three years have been lots of great developments that g4s has lost a major public from the eu. in terms of workers' sector contract; the contract would stop campaigning for the conservative party when they put me rights, they have sorted the postal six feet under in the ground. we all there've been some workers directive. that wasn't us, was due to run until september 2026. technical issues hitting airlines in the us today — resulting in delays it was the french. in terms of our home affairs correspondent and and a lot of anger. a number of major us environmental standards, and danny shaw is here to explain more. now have to take a break and realise airlines have experienced plastics, they are getting ahead on system—wide computer outages. that. in terms of the science why is this happening? it is that we have been elected on the united airlines said it was unable to create paperwork as a result. programme, they have ramped it up conservative party manifesto. we delta air lines and southwest both hugely, with big plans going forward happening because birmingham prison need to come together as a party. of said on their social media accounts to the future, all stuff that we isa happening because birmingham prison is a very difficult person to that they were experiencing could and should be on board with, operate. there were extremely a system—wide outage. michelle fleury is at course there are concerns about the the new york stock exchange. but because we have done this brexit difficult problems there last year. withdrawal agreement. but what i prison inspectors went in last would say to steve baker and other what effect is the outage thing to ourselves, we have been caught out of the game. one of the summer prison inspectors went in last summerand prison inspectors went in last people who want to vote against the having on passengers? summer and declared it to be the
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worst day they had come across. it government at this stage is, bank from our personal life we know how things that i know affects the scientific world is movement of was in the state of crisis and much it disruption can cause people. we have a movement later what we have. we have banked a huge which may mean that some sort of chaos, terrible conditions at the annoyance, frustration, chaos. and present. at that point, the you apply that to the airline amount with this withdrawal customs union and remaining in the agreement. bank what we have and industry, the ripple effect of that government decided to step in and is huge. this morning we have seen ta ke government decided to step in and take over the running of birmingham move agreement. bank what we have and m ove o nto agreement. bank what we have and move onto the next step of the single market gets voted through. is from g4s. a new governor was negotiations with a new leader, with that something you would support? a new opportunity to carry on appointed. that was initially for several airlines here have been getting the sort of deal that we six months. that period was then affected by a system outage, absolutely. free movement, as has want. to put everything at risk now a p pa re ntly affected by a system outage, apparently for 40 minutes in the been analysed by our own government, extended in february, but now the by voting against their withdrawal department has decided that g4s' isa been analysed by our own government, is a benefit to our nation. it agreement, i am convinced will lead case of south—west airlines, they enriches our country and that said this meant system wide they had to either no brexit at all or a enrichment should be put through all an issue. at stake in particular was contract should be ended altogether. the communities. it is also a it was a 15 year contract. about brexit that we don't recognise. this benefit to our own citizens because it gives us more rights. so the fact halfway through that contract, worth lea k brexit that we don't recognise. this leak that came from ollie robbins this piece of software that looks at some time ago from the bar in that even the labour party haven't the weight and balance of the plane. been championing this as much as £25 million a year, that contract is brussels was a warning sign. it was they could have really gets to me. being ended and it will return to correct. if we don't vote for this, is this enough to fix all the the public sector. formally, it we will end up with no brexit at that data needs to be in the system science problems? no, because when all, and i don't want to do that before an aeroplane is clear for returns injuly but the public sector. formally, it returns in july but at the because if we did, i shudder to take—off. it wasn't working, and as we we re science problems? no, because when we were in the eu, and we still are, the public sector. formally, it returns injuly but at the moment, the operation of the day will think what the consequences would be a result these planes were grounded but when we were properly in the eu, continue with the same governor in for the conservative party, for a period of time waiting before we we re place. this is a move that has been electorally speaking. thank you. so but when we were properly in the eu, we were setting the science policy. we were designing the programmes. we they could be cleared for take—off. we re widely welcomed by the prison another round of indicative votes we were designing the programmes. we were ruling that roost. we were happening tonight. we will not know making sure that european science officers association, the everything is working now, but the was beating american science. so to independent monitoring board. they the votes results until ten o'clock are visitors who go into the jail ripple effect we are starting to see cut ourselves out of that and not this evening. thank you. is delays in aeroplanes at the start have that policy voice is a really and they have welcomed ending the of the working week. and i suppose uncertainty over the dozen. and the
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daft thing to be doing to yourself. poa, the union, regards it as a science is the future economy. science is the future economy. victory because they have always the eu commission president, science and tech, this is what we jean—claude juncker, for the airlines, the knock—on should be doing in our universities, has made some strong comments today effect, aeroplanes being out of campaigned against prison on brexit speaking in germany, privatisation. starting in july, where he addressed the regional location, not being ready to take on parliament of saarland, working with local communities to with staff presumably just mrjuncker called david cameron — the next flights. and some anger provide this for everyone. why would privatisation. starting in july, with staff presumablyjust returning to the public sector and moving who instigated the 2016 referendum — among passengers as well. yes, i you cut yourself off from that? good "one of the greatest destroyers of modern times", and said to talk to you. across. what are g4s saying? they think in this particular instance the eu commission had been prevented from speaking up you're watching afternoon live, regard this as a decision that is of in the referendum campaign. it's going to be mainly about he said if the commission had been these are our headlines: mutual benefit to everyone. this was theresa may's chief whip able to participate, frustration amongst passengers, especially those catching early attacks the government's it could have answered many a difficult prison for them to questions that are handling of brexit — flights, five in the morning, and accuses ministers of trying manage. when you consider that this now being asked. turning up and having to wait to undermine the prime minister. isa mps will try again later to find manage. when you consider that this is a global security firm worth around. because it was short enough a way forward on brexit — speaking about the votes after failing to find a majority millions of pounds with contracts in the system is back up and in parliament, he went on: on any alternative plans last week. all over the world, this is probably "nobody knows the direction. running, hopefully it won't be too we only know what the uk teachers and nurses could be legally not the biggest contract for them, parliament does not want. obliged to warn about young people we could not find out but it is a troublesome contract, so problematic, but we have seen in the at risk of violence — yet what they want. that's one of the ideas there will be some people in g4s who in comparison to the british parliament, past just last week, a being discussed at a knife a sphinx is an open book. problematic, but we have seen in the pastjust last week, a couple of we need to get the sphinx speaking. days ago, the system that looks at crime summit today. will be relieved that they no longer we've had enough of the silence". reservations was also down. ba has have the burden of having to run in sport, following interest from birmingham prison. they have four had problems in the past with its other jails that they real madrid, ole gunnar solskjaer birmingham prison. they have four otherjails that they run booking system. these can have big successfully in england and wales at the moment. they also have two says world cup winner paul pogba impacts on these airlines who are will remain at old trafford, where eight alternative options have more and more reliant on technology, he will build his team around him. immigration removal centres. but it is the second time in three years been put forward by mps. so it is a big issue for the airline queens park rangers have sacked and the speaker will this afternoon select which ones will be voted on. adjusted mclaren after less than a that the ministry ofjustice has
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the bbc‘s reality check industry and a source of frustration correspondent chris morris for passengers. and behind you, yearin adjusted mclaren after less than a year in charge. qpr eight points stripped g4s of a major contract. is here to give us a summary above the relegation zone following medway secure training centre in one winning 15 league matches. and kent, remember all the problems that of what these proposals include. we re kent, remember all the problems that were exposed there by the bbc‘s those traders are getting ever is here ofgive us a summary is here ofgivt sphinx! mmary younger! panorama programme, that contract thanks. leigh halfpenny said he feared for his career after suffering a head is here ofgivs sphinx! mmary went back to the public sector in of what these pmosals include. injury. he was out for three months 2016 and now we have birmingham with concussion after suffering a is here ofgivs sphinx! mmary the ftse100 is higher, blow to the head against australia going back into the public sector. of what th none flosals include. getting a boost from mining stocks and bank shares. in november. more to come on all of this is not a good day for g4s in is here ofgivs sphinx! mmary of what th noi customs; include. a survey showed uk manufacturing is here ofgivs sphinx! mmary of what th noi customs union de. is here ofgivs sphinx! mmary of what th noi customs union with a if you are in a customs union with a country or a bloc of countries, those stories that 3.30. grew at an unexpected terms of their reputation, even there are no tariffs on goods moving 13—month high in march — though in terms of their global but it's largely driven concerns, it may not be the biggest between the two, so no import taxes, by stockpiling as companies build up ministers are considering a store of parts and materials contract they have. thank you. which is great for a lot of to make sure they can keep trading whether teachers, police officers businesses who move stuff around and if there's a no—deal brexit. don't want to have that kind of the mood among investors has been and people working in the nhs added cost. but it also means that lifted by data from china showing in england and wales should a surprise increase in factory have a legal duty to report concerns you're watching afternoon live, you then have to apply the same activity in march for that children are becoming involved these are our headlines. tariff to goods coming in from the first time in 4 months. in knife crime. theresa may's chief whip the idea was discussed at a meeting attacks the government's elsewhere in the world. therefore, that's boosted metal handling of brexit — in downing street this morning, and accuses ministers of trying the uk wouldn't be able to have an and mining share prices. amid rising concern over mps are preparing to vote again easyjet shares down the mounting number sharply after the warning of knife attacks. on a series of alternatives entirely independent trade policy if about a slowdown in bookings. 2017—18 saw 285 deaths to theresa may's brexit deal in an attempt to break it was in the customs union, because from stabbings, the most ever the deadlock in the commons. it was in the customs union, because recorded in the uk — it wouldn't be able to do its own that's all the business news. free trade agreements on goods with and this weekend four people were stabbed in north london police and education chiefs have another country, it would have to in what police believe been attending a youth violence were potentially linked attacks. have the same tariffs as the eu. it here's our home affairs summit in downing street to discuss could do trade deals on services, correspondent dominic casciani. new ways of tackling knife crime. but at the moment most free—trade we are entering peak holiday season. with that drop in bookings, will be knife crime's rising, theresa may said the issue needed deals are about goods. but services more bargains out there? at and so is public concern. a "great cooperative long—term effort" from numerous bodies. for us is a big deal? it is a big there have been 40 deaths
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potentially what airlines have to do from stabbing so far in 2019. deal and it is one of the missing in sport, following interest from it bookings are down, they have to factors in the entire debate. we a fifth of knife offences real madrid and their manager attract people by cutting prices. last year were committed customs union and car but that is not great news for the by young people under 18. zinedine zidane, ole gunnar talk about the customs union and car parts, but far more of our economy solskjaer says world cup winner paul is the service sector. i have spoken airlines because their profits take police chiefs have described pogba will remain at old trafford, airlines because their profits take the statistics as a national a hit. but i'm guilty of it. we had emergency that society where he will build his team around and government must tackle. to people in businesses who say, why and today in downing street, a summit and week—long conference their star player. queens park is no one talking about it? we are that heatwave weekend a couple of hosted by theresa may. rangers have sacked manager steve weeks ago, and i thought, i could go mccla ren rangers have sacked manager steve mcclaren after less than a year in the ones being pushed under the bus away, and then thought, stay and charge. qpr eight points above the because the whole deal on services enjoy it. it's an issue that families abd relegation zone following one win in is being put to one side. another young people and communities 15 league games. across the country are concerned proposal of the ceiling involves not and the wares and scots full—back two prescription drugs used just the customs union, but staying leigh halfpenny said he feared for in the single market as well. the by millions to treat pain, about and want to see us tackling. his career after suffering a head thing about just being anxiety and epilepsy in the single market as well. the thing aboutjust being in the customs union is that it doesn't are being reclassified as class c injury. he was out for three months more than 100 experts taking part, with concussion after suffering a solve the issues which arise with controlled substances. blow to the head against australia notjust police but education, health and community leaders. the irish border or even the issues their task is to find new ways that erase the potential fear of the move comes over concerns linking pregabalin in november. more to come on all of and gabapentin to almost 600 deaths to intervene in the lives of young long delays between dover and those stories at 4.30. calais. the single market would mean in england alone people most at risk of crime. that we have the same rules and between 2013 and 2017. regulations on everything from the ministers are considering whether teachers, police officers rules we set for the pharmaceutical law enforcement is important, and people working in the nhs in most cases they are safe but it's not the only solution. industry or the chemical industry, i wish it were that simple. in england and wales should when used as prescribed, have a legal duty to report concerns food standards, animal welfare, but doctors and pharmacists say this is why we're bringing in health that children are becoming involved they have been increasingly handed out too readily and been leaders, education leaders, in knife crime. those are single market rules. the used recreationally. victims and families affected big thing about the single market is louise fewster reports. by knife crime to see what they can the idea was discussed at a meeting do, what we can all do. the four freedoms, freedom in downing street this morning, amid rising concern over big thing about the single market is the fourfreedoms, freedom of the mounting number movement, goods, services, capital and people. and i get the fourth one she was such a lovely of knife attacks. this isn't the first time girlgrowing up. the government has committed 2017—18 saw 285 deaths
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is the most politically contentious she was so helpful to me. to tackling youth violence. from stabbings, the most ever recorded in the uk — here, the reddest of the prime she was the oldest over the last 20 years, and this weekend four people were stabbed in north london minister's red lines is to end of ourfour children. there have been seven strategies in what police believe freedom of movement of people. but and reports which have all come if you stay in the single market, happy memories of a daughter to the same conclusion — were potentially linked attacks. here's our home affairs you basically have to keep it. the they lost a year ago. there needs to be morejoined up thinking and early interventions sarah jolly was a recovering in the lives of the young. idea which is called common market alcoholic and was turning so critics are asking what's correspondent dominic casciani. 2.0, one of the options being her life around for different about today. her three children. in a blog marking his first day discussed today, is staying in the as the chair of the national single market but not in the eu. you she had had help to come off police chiefs council, can do that through the european assistant commissioner martin hewitt has a clear message. knife crime's rising, the drink, she was looking and so is public concern. free trade association. and there there have been 40 deaths are some ways in which you can forward to the future and to find from stabbing so far in 2019. restrict freedom of movement, but out that she had died was an a fifth of knife offences last year were committed only if there is a sudden surge of absolute enormous shock. he says this year there by young people under 18. the inquest into sarah's police chiefs have described people coming in. it is probable will be £970 million more the statistics as a national that the big surges from eastern death showed she had emergency that society and government must tackle. europe have already taken place. six times the prescribed dose for policing which is positive, and today in downing street, of pregabalin in her system. but not enough to meet all a summit and week—long conference when theyjoined, europe have already taken place. the doctor had given hosted by theresa may. when they joined, there europe have already taken place. when theyjoined, there was a surge her the drug for back the challenges the service faces. of people. if you look at the pain. ministers say england and wales can learn from how scotland has cut statistic since the referendum, the it was this, combined with other right of people coming from the rest prescription drugs, that knife crime by treating it of the eu has fallen substantially. killed her. as a public health problem it's an issue that families abd the rate of immigration is coming you don't think that your gp and are proposing putting doctors, young people and communities across the country are concerned from the rest of the world. you can teachers and others under a legal about and want to see us tackling. is going to give you duty to report early warning signs. more than 100 experts taking part, something that could potentially notjust police but education, understand that after the cause an addiction and, once you are health and community leaders. referendum. and also on a practical addicted, could potentially cause your death. pregabalin and gabapentin level, the value of the pound has their task is to find new ways are used to treat nerve fallen. so if you come from poland to intervene in the lives of young pain, epilepsy and anxiety. people most at risk of crime. and want to send money back in a serious youth violence is a disease, different currency, the pan doesn't
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buy as much stuff. hilary benn was in most cases, the drug an illness and we need to have that law enforcement is important, is safe when used as approach of a public health model prescribed. but it's not the only solution. where you have different i wish it were that simple. saying no deal is not going to agencies working together to safeguard young people. police in seven areas of england happen, but there are mps who want a and wales are also piloting this is why we're bringing in health last year, over 14 million an enhanced stop and search power. no deal. what economic relationship leaders, education leaders, would we have with the eu, should prescriptions were issued there be a no deal, which is still victims and families affected for the drugs. by knife crime to see what they can on the table somewhere. there will in 2013, there were just they can now use it in any do, what we can all do. 41 deaths linked to neighbourhood where they think this isn't the first time the medications but in 2017, violence may break out. the government has committed probably be some form of no deal there were four times as many. that could prove controversial. to tackling youth violence. today, the government theresa may previously vote today. we know there is not a has reclassified the banned it amid fears that majority for it in the house of drugs to be class c controlled officers used it unfairly. substances in a bid to prevent the question is whether these commons, with a substantial number over the last 20 years, of tories like the idea of leaving misuse and addiction. measures will finally get results. there have been seven strategies now it is a class c with me now isjohn apter, and reports which have all come to the same conclusion — with no deal. i get confused by drug, a patient has to chair of the police federation. there needs to be morejoined up this. if nothing happens, don't we request it every single thinking and early interventions in the lives of the young. come out without a deal? if nothing you were in one of these meetings in time that they need it. so critics are asking what's different about today. downing street. do you get the sense in a blog marking his first day happens and the famous clock does they can't have patches as the chair of the national that within the world of politics eventually stop taking, if you of prescriptions in hand. police chiefs council, haven't got a deal, you leave with assistant commissioner martin hewitt and elsewhere, that people get it? has a clear message. no deal unless you revoke article 50 also, it means that doctors are generally and stop the whole thing. but you're advised not to prescribe more some certainly get it. i believe the right, leaving with no deal doesn't home secretary and the home office mean we wash our hands and never understand the crisis we are in. i trade with europe any more because than 30 days' worth of tablets. he says this year there they are our closest neighbours and didn't meet the prime minister biggest trading partner. what most will be £970 million more no tories want it to end up with a today, but i have been very clear where i lay the blame for the for policing, which is positive, problem we are in, and it is with but it's not enough to meet all free trade agreement, a bit like the the prime minister. there is a lot the challenges the service faces. eu has with canada. that gets rid of we need to invest in drug treatment, ministers say england and wales can most ta riffs learn from how scotland has cut eu has with canada. that gets rid of most tariffs on goods but it doesn't something that provides an
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get rid of a lot of the alternative for gps to refer people of cynicism about these meetings, knife crime by treating it but you actually say what you think? as a public health problem infrastructure surrounding that. and into who do become dependent on who and are proposing putting doctors, teachers and others under a legal they think might need some help and the term free—trade agreement is not i get the cynicism, because we can't duty to report early warning signs. serious youth violence is a disease, support. solve this problem byjust having a families like the an illness and we need to have that jollys have welcomed today's move and hope stricter summit at downing street or having a nearly as close an economic nice chat and then nothing happens. approach of a public health model relationship as being in the single controls will help patients in the where you have different future. in the session i was in, it was agencies working together market or the customs union. so it's for my daughter to people from policing, from charities, from youth and community a looser relationship and it die from prescribed to safeguard young people. probably wouldn't solve the irish groups, and the police minister was medication, it is really hard border question unless this to take in some respects. there. and people will share police in seven areas of england mysterious technology people keep with the reclassification experiences, but also highlight the promising is available actually of the drug, and wales are also piloting becomes available. the technology to hopefully families will never have problems. i represent 120,000 police an enhanced stop and search power. keep the irish border open isn't in to go through this again. they can now use it in any officers who talked about the neighbourhood where they think immense pressure they are under, the operation at any border anywhere in for both victims and witnessess violence may break out. the world. maybe it will come in the of crime, giving evidence that could prove controversial. pressures because of cuts to theresa may previously next few years, but it is not with to police can be a difficult policing, the lack of ability to banned it amid fears that and often traumatic experience. officers used it unfairly. us next few years, but it is not with us right now. one of the protester now, police are hoping that deal with what they want to deal the question is whether these a strategy being used with. that is why we are in the seems to be losing his voice, which in america could help people position we are in. am i cynical? is good news. we had a whole through the process, with some help from man's best friend. measures will finally get results. our correspondent yes, but i am also optimistic interview without disruption. thank you! chris morris from our reality because i have to be. i believe in john maguire reports. policing. and what i want to see now check team. much more on what's oliver the labrador personifies from these meetings is something happening in the political world earlier i spoke tojohn apter, a man's best friend. chair of the police federation throughout the afternoon here from who told me the outcome of today's loyal, unconditional and calming. meaningful, and that is going to westminster. cost money. £970 million is not summit must really be about the public sector actually ministers are considering whether teachers, getting the support it needs. police officers and people working he is being trained i do believe the home secretary as a facility dog. enough? it is not enough. it sounds in the nhs in england and wales the idea is that he sits and the home office understand should have a legal duty to report a lot and it is, but it is about the concerns that children are becoming the crisis we're in.
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with a vulnerable victim or witness way the funding is applied. it is i didn't meet the prime minister involved in knife crime. the idea was discussed at a meeting being interviewed by the police in downing street this morning, and offers silent support. today, but i've been very clear smoke and mirrors. it is down to amid rising concern over even in this demonstration where i lay the blame the mounting number of knife attacks. we're filming today, local crime commission is to oliver knows exactly what to do. for the problem we're in, increase the local council tax. that and it's with the prime minister. 2017—18 saw 285 deaths is not how policing should be oliver is lying on rachel funded. policing should be funded there is a lot of cynicism from stabbings, the most ever about these meetings, and when he does that and rachel recorded in the uk — centrally by government, and it is but do you actually and this weekend four people sort of strokes him like that, say what you think? were stabbed in north london it actually releases oxytocin not. that is why policing is on its i get the cynicism, because we can't in what police believe in both oliver and rachel, were potentially linked attacks. so oxytocin knees, as are many other public solve this problem byjust having here's our home affairs is our social bonding hormone. a summit at downing street or having bodies. when we talk about knife a nice chat and then correspondent dominic casciani. crime, a lot of people point to nothing happens. it releases the love hormone, in the session i was in, glasgow and their experience in knife crime's rising, so we naturally become more relaxed treating it like a disease. police it was people from policing, from charities, from youth and so is public concern. and more calm and in doing so, and community groups, and the police minister was there. there have been 40 deaths it allows rachel from stabbing so far in 2019. are amongst those professionals and people will share experiences, a fifth of knife offences to communicate more openly being asked to look at this as when testifying in an interview. last year were committed there are over 200 of these dogs perhaps more of a social issue. what by young people under 18. across north america and have been but also highlight the problems. for the past 20 years, is your response to that? firstly, but there is no research and what we're doing at the moment it's not just about is we're working is your response to that? firstly, it's notjust about knife crime. police chiefs have described with the kent police and we're the statistics as a national evaluating the benefits there is a crisis with the amount of emergency that society and the effectiveness of oliver and government must tackle. people being killed, and it is i, representing 120,000 police and dogs like oliver in providing officers, talked about the immense violent crime as a whole, whether pressure they are under, companionship when victims the pressures because of cuts and witnesses are being interviewed thatis violent crime as a whole, whether to policing, the lack of ability and today in downing street, in a police interview process. that is violence in public places, a summit and week—long conference within the home environment, schools to deal with what they want hosted by theresa may. or places of work. violent crime is to deal with. this recreation of a police that's why we are in an epidemic at the moment. and yes, the position we are in. it's an issue that families abd interview room at the university we do need to look at it more am i cynical? young people and communities is used to study the psychology yes, but i am also optimistic across the country are concerned of the process. because i have to be. about and want to see us tackling. holistically. i think the nhs, i believe in policing.
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kent police are working and what i want to see more than 100 experts taking part, with the university to determine education and police work better notjust police but education, now from these meetings health and community leaders. the programme's effectiveness. together now than we have for many is something meaningful, their task is to find new ways and that's going to cost money. yea rs. together now than we have for many years. but it could be even better. £970 million is not enough? to intervene in the lives of young it's not enough. anything that's going to be able people most at risk of crime. to support our witnesses and victims let me be cynical. have you achieved law enforcement is important, being able to help us but it's not the only solution. and give their evidence, it sounds a lot of money and it is, i wish it were that simple. to make it better can anything this morning? time will only be a good thing. tell. good to see you. but it is about the way at the moment, we are in the funding is applied. the research gathering stage, it's smoke and mirrors. two million workers are getting this is why we're bringing so we're going to use this research a pay rise from today as the minimum wage goes up. in health leaders, education to see actually on an evidence basis but utility bills and the cost of whether oliver is a support leaders, victims and families the tv licence are going up as well. affected by knife crime to see what they can do, to witnesses and victims i've been asking our personal what we can all do. finance correspondent simon gompertz whilst they give their what the increase will mean this isn't the first time the government has committed to tackling youth violence. evidence to the police. for those on the minimum wage. over the last 20 years, oliver's been in place there have been seven since september and in that time strategies and reports has helped four people. the minimum wage system is age—related. which have all come to the same the biggest one is called he is the first of his kind in europe and yet another the national living wage. conclusion — there needs to be new role for working dogs. that's for people aged 25 and over. now it's time for a look it's going up by nearly more joined up thinking and early interventions in the lives of the young. at the weather with matt. 5% to £8.21 an hour. so critics are asking what's so it's an increase of 38p. different about today. in a blog marking his hello. a different month and a different week of weather on the first day as the chair way. not to say we won't have sunshine as we have had today across and the lower level of age of the national police chiefs england and wales, and we will see below that, 21 to 24, council, assistant commissioner skies like that, but it won't feel is also going up by a bit less,
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martin hewitt has a clear message. he says this year there will be as warm. the snow could give a byjust over 4%. it will be £7.70 an hour. £970 million more for policing which is positive, but not enough the tuc unions are saying that lower to meet all the challenges level should be the same the service faces. as the higher level, but of course, teenagers and apprentices have even covering of some spots, and colder lower minimum wages. they'll be seeing some with some overnight frosts. colder increases as well. air behind this front, pushing into but those higher bills we've been parts of scotland and northern ireland today. high—pressure holding talking about will eat into any increase, obviously. ministers say england and wales can learn from how scotland has cut on, england and wales staying star sonny into the evening. further knife crime by treating it yes, the most important one as a public health problem is the increase in energy prices, and are proposing putting doctors, because people who are on something teachers and others under a legal showers which could be wintry over called a standard variable tariff, duty to report early warning signs. serious youth violence is a disease, which is about half of households, the higher ground. and it will feel an illness and we need to have that cold and the wind. tonight, some they're seeing an increase of £117 approach of a public health model a year in their bills. where you have different they can switch. agencies working together to safeguard young people. police in seven areas of england and wales are also piloting an enhanced stop and search power. isolated showers in the south—east, it means they'll be they can now use it in any paying £1,254 on average. neighbourhood where they think cloud and rain over scotland and violence may break out. but there are other increases, that could prove controversial. northern ireland pushes into wales a lot of them timed for april 1st. and west in england later on. either the other big one is council side of the weather front it could tax, which is going up be clear enough for frost, lightly in england by 4.7%. theresa may previously the average bill banned it amid fears that frosty in the north with sunshine officers used it unfairly. and showers to start. the morning will be about £1,750. the question is whether these up as well in scotland and wales, measures will finally get results.
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rush hour will be cloudy, outbreaks in scotland a bit less than that. two million workers are getting of rainfor in wales, a 6.5% increase. a pay rise from today, rush hour will be cloudy, outbreaks of rain for much of england. the as the minimum wage goes up. but utility bills and the cost of the tv licence are going up as well. rain only spreading eastwards very and the licence fee is going up our personal finance correspondent to £154.50, an increase of £4. simon gompertz is here. slowly. sunshine to start in the so how much of an increase for those water bills are also up. a whole host of them today. on the minimum wage? it depends how south—east and east anglia. western old you are, because the minimum wage syste m old you are, because the minimum wage system is age—related. the the party of president erdogan areas see the sunshine come out. of turkey has suffered sweeping biggest one is called the national losses in local elections across the country, losing control living wage. that is for people aged of the capital, ankara. voters appear to have turned 25 and over. it's going up by nearly against his party as the country around western parts of scotland and northern ireland, into wales and the suffers a deep recession. mark lowen reports from istanbul. west, there will be a strengthening 596 25 and over. it's going up by nearly 5% to £8.21 an hour. so it is an breeze. hailstones, sleet and thunder. and feeling cold wherever it seemed to be unimaginable, increase of 38 p. and the lower you are. that continues tuesday into but turkey's opposition candidate looks like he has done it, level before that, 21 to 24, is also taking control of the country's wednesday. the breeze strengthens economic powerhouse, istanbul. going upa from a northerly direction. whether level before that, 21 to 24, is also going up a bit less, byjust over 496. going up a bit less, byjust over 4%. it will be £7 70 an hour. the france could bring some snow to the ekrem imamoglu seems to have won the city byjust a few thousand southern uplands, the pennines, the votes and he's savouring it. tuc unions are saying that lower la ke southern uplands, the pennines, the lake district. —— mike peak level should be the same as the higher level, but of course, district. a scattering of showers, teenagers and apprentices have even it went down to the wire last night. lower minimum wages. they will be and quitea district. a scattering of showers, and quite a breeze to blow through the governing ak party candidate, seeing some increases as well. but quite rapidly. some prolong showers a former prime minister himself, claimed victory here prematurely.
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those higher bills will eat into any close to the western district of there is a turkish saying — increase. yes, the most important wales. temperatures on wednesday whoever wins istanbul, wins turkey, 8-10, wales. temperatures on wednesday 8—10, lower than usual for the time and losing this city will be one is the increasing energy prices, an agonising blow of year, and even colder feeling to president erdogan. because people who are on something 8—10, lower than usual for the time of year, and even colderfeeling in the wind. but his pain didn't stop there. called a standard variable tariff, which is about half of households, in the capital, ankara, they are seeing an increase of £117 the opposition celebrated a win after a quarter of a century, gaining several other cities, too, a year in their bills. they can as the tide turns in their favour. switch. it means they will be paying it was a chastened mr erdogan who addressed his supporters £1254 on average. but there are at the party hq — not the combative triumphalism of the past, other increases, a lot of them time but an acknowledgement that is right for the first. the other he's losing his base. big one is council tax, which is translation: starting tomorrow morning, we will begin our work going up in england by 4.7%. the to identify our shortcomings average bill will be about £1750. up and begin to make up for them. as well in scotland and wales, in with early morning, a parallel reality. scotla nd as well in scotland and wales, in scotland a bit less than that. in the government has put up billboards wales, a 6.5% increase. the licence thanking istanbul for its victory. they have now been taken down as residents take fee is going up. water bills are in a momentous result. also up. a whole host of them today. translation: for istanbul, thank you.
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we were confident, we were sure the party of president erdogan of turkey has suffered sweeping losses in local elections across the country, losing control of the capital, ankara. voters appear to have turned against his party as the country suffers a deep recession. our turkey correspondent mark lowen joins us now from istanbul. for 16 years, president erdogan has dominated turkey. revered and reviled in equal have we got most of the results in measure, the champion of conservative, pious turks has now? we do, and it looks as though transferred the country's he has lost not only ankara, the infrastructure, but he has clamped capital, but it looks like they have down on opponents and burned bridges also lost istanbul. the opposition with the west and is now being candidate here says that he is punished for an economic crisis. for long, president erdogan 25,000 votes ahead of the governing has seemed unbeatable here with a fractured, party. it has really come down to a moribund opposition. that has now changed and it hair because my breath. but the governing party has not conceded yet will breathe life into his opponents and could even prompt talk and it's candidate says there are of his party splitting. plenty of ballot boxes that need to this feels like a watershed moment be rechecked. but we have seen for turkey and its leader as he finally begins across this country that president to lose his grip on this polarised country. mark lowen, bbc news, istanbul. began's usually loyal, conservative and pious voters have turned against him in several big cities, punishing him in several big cities, punishing him for the economic crisis that turkey is now going through. its economy is in recession,
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let's return to brexit now. unemployment is pretty high at 13.5%, inflation is at 20% and lira just before mps start that debate, has dived by a third of its value in the last year. this is showing that and discuss the options, president early gang, who cultivated let's talk with kate proctor, this image over 16 years in power, political reporter for the evening standard of being somehow invincible, and the and tom newton dunn, political editor of the sun. every monday, we say it's a big opposition was written off as week, but now we are getting a frontrunner emerging? possibly. mps hopelessly fractured and divided, but it has managed to come together and show that actually, this are coming back today and they have another set of options to look at. powerful, polarising leader can be beaten. you talk about cultivating this image and it was helped by the and the option that seems to be fa ct this image and it was helped by the fact that most of the media were emerging is the common market 2.0. supporting him one way or another. that is one that has been put but what about the opposition, what happens next? they are determined forward by nick boles. this is a customs union and staying in the single market? yeah. it has been put not to allow their victory in istanbul to be stolen from them. the forward by nick boles and labour's lucy powell. and it is the one that opposition candidate has already changed his twitter handle to mayor most people would term the softer brexit and it is the one a lot of of istanbul. so they are determined for this to go their way, as they conservative mps don't like, but we are starting to see labour whipping believe it has. in terms of whether in favour of it today. the snp are
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also going to back it. and last week they can build on this, this is what happens in turkey‘s local politics. we had the same vote, essentially, it is where parties build their profile through patronage. they but labour suggested, we would like you to do this. it was not as build through grassroots support. strongly enforced as it will be president erdogan himself was mayor today. tom, we haven't got the full of istanbul before he was propelled list yet of what they are going to to power on a national level as go for, but it does seem that if prime minister in 2003, so it is this were the grand national, we are over the last fence and it is agonising personally for him. we are emerging? this is indeed the beginning to see that his hold over nation's most important horse race. this country is now starting to i commend your ability to put this into some form of parable that loosen and i could be spits within anyone can care about! but what has his party. the opposition will hope happened is fascinating. we thought to see this as a kind of springboard a customs union would be the long horse favourite. the kenneth clarke towards national elections in a few yea rs' towards national elections in a few years' time, and they will see this one. the kenneth clarke horse was a asa years' time, and they will see this as a watershed moment for president erdogan and indeed for a deeply good ten furlongs ahead. suddenly, divided turkey. thank you. the nick boles course, which was third or fourth, labour have just time for a look at the weather. come behind in a spectacular switch of horses that they were riding. they had backed a customs union it is lovely today, but? there is before. the significance of that is a lwa ys it is lovely today, but? there is always a but and you will need a notjust that it puts nick boles' waterproof jacket over the next few because i had, it means labour have days. but it is a lovely afternoon.
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ripped upa because i had, it means labour have ripped up a major manifesto commitment to end freedom of the highest of the temperatures will movement. emily thornberry was not be in hampshire, 16 celsius in happy when i talk to her. know, if! spots. but even when the sun comes out tomorrow, the same spots will was in the labour party now, i would only be around 9 degrees. we are be thinking the same thing. they are desperate to have anything win into a different month and the different week can weather this week tonight. if they get a majority, compared with last week. it's going to be one where it will start to get that puts theresa may in the most much colder. there will be a push appalling position. she then has to meet with her cabinet tomorrow for some five tortuous hours, out of our clouds around, producing hail, rain, sleet and snow in quite a which i suspect not everybody will still be a member of the cabinet bitter wind at times. it is all because they are going to have to make an appalling choice, exactly courtesy of this weather front. the the choice that theresa may has spent two and have years trying to cold est areas courtesy of this weather front. the coldest areas to the north—west of it. it is getting closer to the avoid. and you think people will hebrides as we go through this walk out of cabinet? this is the afternoon. before it arrives, there area softer brexit that people didn't afternoon. before it arrives, there are a few showers breaking out in wa nt softer brexit that people didn't want against theresa may's deal, so the afternoon. a bit of a chilly it is the most unpalatable choice they have had to face. but it the afternoon in cumbria. but across choice of the chief whip, as we will england and wales, away from the hear on this programme tonight. he north and west, blue skies to take said it was obvious and inevitable us north and west, blue skies to take us into the evening. temperature after she lost the majority she had. still in the teens for some of you.
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well, the very fact that he has tonight, we will stay clear across the south—east for a while. a small spoken out publicly when it is a role in which he is not supposed to chance of showers from france do that at all means that that briefly. rain for a time across cabinet meeting tomorrow will be pretty fierce. northern ireland and then a scattering of showers. but it will turn wetter across england. one or he was critical about people briefing and said it was the most two bits of frost around to start this unified cabinet they have had. people will go into that being tomorrow morning. a bright start to east anglia and the south—east. furious. it is difficult for labour because they are trying to weave brightening up across north—east this line, trying to make sure the england. but for much of the appeal to voters in the north of midlands and north—east england england, perhaps, people who might toward central parts, a cloudy rush have voted leave, and also having to hour with outbreaks of rain. deal with the big support base they scotla nd hour with outbreaks of rain. scotland and northern ireland, have in london. they are sunshine and showers to start the inconsistent with their brexit message, and i think what emily day. the showers that get going thornberry has done today is during the day will be slow—moving. emblematic of where they are, which isa emblematic of where they are, which is a bit all over the place, but she some areas will avoid them is a bit all over the place, but she is going to have to fall in line. altogether. it stays cloudy through tom, anybody watching now might be confused about the process, but if parts of east anglia and the we have a clear motion emerging as south—east into the afternoon. and for all, a chilly day. it is going to feel colder in the west by the the winner, whatever it is, if it is strength of that wind. the wind
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picks up further tuesday night into common market 2.0, what happens then? theresa may has to join wednesday, coming all the way from the arctic on the western side of common market 2.0, what happens then? theresa may has tojoin it common market 2.0, what happens then? theresa may has to join it to this area of low pressure, which her is? how does it work? the answer would throw some weather fronts into parts of north—east scotland and is we don't completely know yet because this is being made up day by england. it will be cold and the day. whether it is number ten of the north—east was could see a covering of snow during the day. elsewhere in shadow chancellor, what will happen as the cabinet will meet tomorrow the west, it is again sunshine and and decide what are they going to do blustery showers, producing anything 00:32:24,648 --> 2147483051:52:59,264 you can imagine. and a noticeable 2147483051:52:59,264 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 wind—chill. tomorrow about theresa may's deal. they want to bring that back, a fourth time after its defeat last friday by 58. it will come back as a bill, more likely another option in this indicative vote. so there will bea this indicative vote. so there will be a third load of indicative votes on wednesday or thursday where you will have a run—off between... a brex—factor run—off between whatever wednesday night, and the pm's deal. if in that brex—factor run—off,
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where there can only be one, and if it is the lead to an option that wins, then theresa may has the worst possible option. does she implemented, split the party and to she refuse, possibly a general election, and split the party into? we will talk about this again. thank you for giving some clarity. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt. pleasantly sunny afternoon for much of england and wales, but it's a different story west of scotland and northern ireland. cloud and hill snow around. a bit of dry weather between those showers, but a cold day. through tonight, the cloud and outbreaks of rain, sleet and snow across scotland push into northern england, wales and the west. that is going to bring even colder air. widespread frost for scotland and northern ireland into tomorrow morning,
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a few showers around too. isolated showers in the south—eastern corner. that may lead to icy conditions first thing. cloudy through much of england and wales. occasional rain. then a day of sunshine and april showers. the showers are slow moving across northern areas. a brisk wind will push through northern ireland, wales and south west rapidly. it will feel colder in that breeze, as it will on wednesday. and on wednesday, there could be prolonged snow across the hills of northern england. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. i'm simon mccoy in westminster, as yet another critical week in the brexit process gets underway. a stinging attack from theresa may's chief whip over the government's handling of brexit — he also accuses ministers of trying to undermine her. mps will try again later to find a way forward on brexit
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after failing to find a majority on any alternative plans last week. teachers and nurses could be legally obliged to warn about young people at risk of violence — that's one of the ideas being discussed at a knife crime summit today. the minimum wage goes up, affecting two million workers — but a string of household bills go up, too. sport now on afternoon live withjohn watson at the bbc sport centre. and ole gunnar solskjaer my have signed as full time manager and this weekend recored a win but the next task for him is keep hold of his star players. yes, it could be. heading into the summer, players moving, and i guess the big thing for united is keeping hold of star players, and paul pogba is one of those. ole gunnar solskjaer said he wants to build his tea m solskjaer said he wants to build his team around him. this follows interest from real madrid. zinedine zidane has said he likes the player a lot. paul pogba has said that
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playing for the spanish side would bea dream playing for the spanish side would be a dream club for any player to play for. but solskjaer has said he is adamant that he will be staying where he is despite that interest. paul is a very nice and polite man who then answered a general question on... well, zinedine zidane is an icon in france, of course, he is a fantastic manager, is to be a fantastic manager, is to be a fantastic player, i played against myself, and he just fantastic player, i played against myself, and hejust politely a nswered myself, and hejust politely answered that question full stop but paul is happy here. he is going to bea paul is happy here. he is going to be a big part. i've always said it that you like to build your team around him. that hasn't changed at all. queens park rangers are looking for a new manager to build their tea m for a new manager to build their team around after sacking steve mcclaren. the former england manager departs at less than a year in
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charge having onlyjoined last summer. charge having onlyjoined last summer. the club are eight points above the relegation zone. the deciding factor against for the owners was their defeat at the weekend. rangers striker alfredo morrell is has been banned forfour matches after being sent off against celtic. he has been red carded five times this season. he has been suspended for two games now and an additional two matches because of prior offences. manager steven gerard said he can no longer defend the player who will miss more than half of his site's seven league games this season. david price has told the bbc that he doesn't think his opponent intended to hurt him when he bit him in their bout on saturday. ali has had his boxing licence suspended after being disqualified in the fifth round for biting price near his rib cage. a date has yet to be set for a hearing in front of the board of control, but possible sanctions range from a
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fine to a ban. he was also stripped of his fight purse. he has a look in his eyes like a bit of a madman before the fight. i was cool and calm despite the tension in the build—up. but ultimately for me, he done what he done to get out of the fight and get disqualified. he was spent by the time this happened. and it was the easy way out for him was to get disqualified. he thought i would be the one that quite during the fight and it turned out to be himself. halfpenny said he feared for his career after suffering a head injury. he was out for three months having ta ken head injury. he was out for three months having taken a blow to the head in the test against australia. he was cleared to return in february and has played three games so far this season for his region. there was a point where i was constantly having headaches, and would try and
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do something on the bike orjust a lightjog, do something on the bike orjust a light jog, and my do something on the bike orjust a lightjog, and my head would be pounding from it. and i was thinking, when is this going to end? because you think you're coming right, and you think, maybe i can get right to play for this game, and then you are not right. lily owsley scored twice for great britain in their 3—1 win over the united states in the pro hockey league. it was the olympic cabin's first victory in the comp petition following defeats by new zealand and australia and a draw against china. it is a 50th international appearance was that she said the win had been a long time coming. the next match is against argentina on saturday. that's all the sport for now. two men have been found guilty of preparing terrorist acts by a jury at birmingham crown court. hanzalah patel, from leicester, and safwaan mansur,
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from birmingham, had denied attempting to join the islamic state group in syria. they will be sentenced later this month. the government has missed its target of reducing the number of people with learning difficulties being held in secure units in england. its self—imposed deadline of reducing numbers by at least 35% expired last month, and has now been extended to 2020. an investigation into assessment and treatment units — or atus — was launched in 2011 after the bbc‘s panorama exposed abuse of patients at winterbourne view — a private hospital near bristol. the government promised to end their use for those capable of living in the community with proper support, as noel phillips reports. she is my only child. she is everything to me, she is my life. it is just unbelievable, i am living a nightmare. 26—year—old ayla haines has spent the last seven years in psychiatric hospitals after being sectioned at the age of 14 under the mental health act. her mum says her prolonged stay
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has had a detrimental effect on her health. she's got a huge bald patch on her head now where her hair will never grow. she is so desperate to end it all, really, she currently has a toothbrush inside her, because she swallowed a toothbrush. an actual toothbrush? an actual toothbrush. you couldn't imagine this happening to anyone, it is your worst nightmare. she loved dressing up. ayla is currently at a medium secure unit, 200 miles away from her home in cardiff. are you worried that you might never see her again? yes, very much so. i'm 78 years of age and i've got a heart condition. and it's distressing, not only for me, but having to watch ayla suffer, and watch my daughter suffer. and being powerless to do anything about it. i've tried for seven years, and written to
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came under increasing scrutiny in 2011 after the bbc‘s panorama programme exposed horrific abuse of patients at winterbourne view. in 2015, the government set a target to move between 35% to 50% of people with learning disabilities and autism out of inpatient units and into the community. it was called transforming care. but the programme has missed its own five year deadline, only achieving around 20%, and leaving over 2000 people on psychiatric wards. people are spending many, many years in there, and they shouldn't be. awful things are happening to people in there, and they shouldn't be. and in the same way that asylums were closed, these places need to be closed. these are happier times for fazia hussain, who spent 22 months at a secure unit in the east midlands. she has now been reunited with her family. so, i do think we won the lottery, in a way, in the support that we got and the care that she has
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at the moment. there have been 40 deaths in these units since 2015. and nine of those were deaths of people under 35. the government must recommit itself, must re—pledge to close these placements down. the department of health has told us they are determined to reduce the number of people in mental health hospitals, and that the nhs is committed to reducing inpatient numbers by 2020. noel phillips, bbc news. the government has concerns about the precedent this sets, that is a legitimate concern that members of the opposition benches who may one day be in a position themselves to
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be concerned about parliamentary conventions and dangerous precedents. when she last made this point, she pointed out that when the prime minister promised if a deal was not passed she would find time, make arrangements for the house to have indicative votes. had the government done that, this procedural point she is raising would never have arisen. and having got where we are, the situation the country is in, will she reconsider getting up and indicating that the government still intends to resist anything the house passes that it doesn't actually approve of? the whole thing could have been sorted out. the government has promised to put its own arrangement in place for indicative votes had actually been honoured. some internal procedure been discussed there. i short time ago in the house the conservative
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eurosceptic mp was speaking, he backed theresa may's deal on friday but has now apologised for doing so, saying he made the wrong decision. but has now apologised for doing so, saying he made the wrong decisionlj do saying he made the wrong decision.” do not feel i have misled the house, but i do feel i have not been true to myself. although doing what i believe to be in the country's best interest at that moment in time, i quickly realised i should not have voted with the government on friday afternoon. we have to weigh up the balance of risk and make an honest impossible choice. it seemed to be either the prime minister's deal or a long delay, european elections, a softer brexit and more political uncertainty. what i should have done, mr speaker, and did not, was to trust my instincts and those of the british people. i made the wrong call on friday, and let me very briefly explain why. first... order!
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i signalled an acceptance of his wish to raise this matter and he must be allowed to do so. first, i have consistently voted against the withdrawal agreement because it is flawed. second, i believe i let down good friends here in the house and friends and colleagues in the dup. i served on three operational tours in northern ireland, playing a small pa rt northern ireland, playing a small part in protecting the innocent and combating terrorism. i say sorry to the dup and my friend from vauxhall for voting for a deal which could risk the integrity of our country. for that reason and that reason alone, the withdrawal agreement as it stands must never, ever see the light of day again. if the prime minister cannot commit to taking us out of the eu on the 12th of april, she must resign immediately. this is no longer about leave or remain, that was decided in 2016. this is
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about the future of our great country and faith and trust in our democracy. spring is here, time for a new start for us all. let's take our country back in the 11 days' time and fulfil our honourable duty. ina in a moment, ben will have a business news. but let's get the headlines. theresa may's chief whip attacks the government's handling of brexit and accuses ministers of trying to undermine the prime minister. mps will try again later to find a way forward on brexit after failing to find a majority on any alternative plans last week. teachers and nurses could be legally obliged to warn about young people at risk of violence — that's one of the ideas being discussed at a knife crime summit today. here's your business headlines on afternoon live.
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two million uk workers on minimum wages are now receiving a pay rise, but a string of household bills have also increased. workers aged 25 and over on the national living wage will receive £8.21 an hour from today, that's up 4.9%, from £7.83. easyjet has warned that customer demand for ticket sales for the next six months, which includes the peak summer season, is unexpectedly weak. the airline blamed uncertainty over the global economy and brexit for the slowdown in advance bookings. five uk broadband and landline providers will now automatically compensate customers when services do not work. from today, people will get compensation without having to ask, when repairs or installations are delayed — or if an engineer doesn't show up. bt, sky, talktalk, virgin media and zen internet have joined ofcom's scheme, but it's not compulsory.
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big news for bookmakers that operate fixed odds betting terminals, as the maximum stake is cut from £100 to £2 today. the odds have been very much in favour of this happening. it was recommended by the gambling commission last march. that was after a government review found that the machines caused problems for punters who, in some cases, ended up getting into serious debt through addictive gambling. under the previous limit a player could lose up to £300 per minute or £18,000 pounds an hour. the new limit obviously limits those losses. but many leading gambling firms last year declared they would have to cut jobs and possibly close stores because of this change. on the other hand, campaigners welcome the lower limit but fear a rise in online betting — an area of the industry
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which they feel is still under regulated and potentially dangerous, especially for young people. russ mould is investment director for aj bell. we had warnings from the gambling firms. some people would say, they would say that. is there any evidence that this has affected them in terms of profitability with a knock—on effect on jobs? in terms of profitability with a knock-on effect on jobs? the big bookmakers have done a trial in birmingham through the month of march. although there is no firm evidence yet, the racing post have been tracking this carefully, and there are suggestions that the gross win, which is what the bookies when after paying out the punters, has gone down by around 55% in those shops. interestingly, the punters didn't like those machines and went looking for the other machines where the stakes were bigger, and nor did they replace their betting and the machines with betting on horses or dogs. so the suggestion is 55% drop in profits, but that is a limited trial and we will find out more this
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week. you cite the example of people who wanted to gamble at higher sta kes who wanted to gamble at higher stakes seeking out places where they could still do so. because that is what campaigners are saying, isn't it? people will turn to online gambling where it is easier to put higher odds. will the companies put their focus on upping their offerings online? set in the online gambling has been a huge growth area. if you look at the biggest bookmakers in the country, when i was a young man the biggest were ladbrokes, william hill and coral. they have all been taken over, with the exception of william hill. it is lagging in the online business. big betting firms in the uk gbc, paddy power, bet 365, they are all much stronger online, and there is a loophole in this law, there is not yet this £2 cap on online betting, so we will have to see whether customers go from physical betting shops to online. that has to be a possibility, but we will find out.
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do you think the smart move perhaps by these firms who are now making less is to pre—emptively limit the sta kes less is to pre—emptively limit the stakes online to avoid the need for the government to step in and regulate? it something they may well consider. it is something they will wa nt to consider. it is something they will want to see what happens to their shop based activities first. there are other focuses. they have been under regulatory pressure in australia. there has been an online tax increase. and in the uk government has increased online tax from 15% to 21%. what you are seeing with british—based bookies has been a relaxation of the rules in america, so in some ways their strategic focus and investment spending is going there. a long—standing law banning sports betting has been relaxed. some have a base there already and are putting some of their marketing and investment activity stateside.
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always good to talk to you. the ftse100 is higher, getting a boost from mining stocks and bank shares. a survey showed uk manufacturing grew at an unexpected 13—month high in march — but it's largely driven by stockpiling as companies build up a store of parts and materials to make sure they can keep trading if there's a no—deal brexit. the mood among investors has been lifted by data from china showing easyjet shares down sharply after the warning about a slowdown in bookings. that's all the business news. enjoy the sun out there. the grammy—nominated rapper nipsey hussle, reports say he was shot several times at close range outside the clothing store he owned.
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hours before his death, hussle himself tweeted that having strong enemies was a blessing. his death has sparked an outpouring of grief from fellow celebrities as the city's mayor blamed "senseless gun violence." for both victims and witnessess of crime, giving evidence to police can be a difficult and often traumatic experience. now, police are hoping that a strategy being used in america could help people through the process, with some help from man's best friend. our correspondent john maguire reports. oliver the labrador personifies a man's best friend. loyal, unconditional and calming. he is being trained as a facility dog. the idea is that he sits with a vulnerable victim or witness being interviewed by the police and offers silent support. even in this demonstration we're filming today, oliver knows exactly what to do. oliver is lying on rachel and when he does that and rachel sort of strokes him like that, it actually releases oxytocin in both oliver and rachel,
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so oxytocin is our social bonding hormone. it releases the love hormone, so we naturally become more relaxed and more calm and in doing so, it allows rachel to communicate more openly when testifying in an interview. there are over 200 of these dogs across north america and have been for the past 20 years, but there is no research and what we're doing at the moment is we're working with the kent police and we're evaluating the benefits and the effectiveness of oliver and dogs like oliver in providing companionship when victims and witnesses are being interviewed in a police interview process. this recreation of a police interview room at the university is used to study the psychology of the process. kent police are working with the university to determine the programme's effectiveness. anything that's going to be able to support our witnesses and victims being able to help us and give their evidence, to make it better can only be a good thing. at the moment, we are in
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the research gathering stage, so we're going to use this research to see actually on an evidence basis whether oliver is a support to witnesses and victims once they give their evidence to the police. oliver's been in place in september and in that time has helped four people. he is the first of his kind in europe and yet another new role for working dogs. clear blue skies in westminster here. it is clear as mud inside. now it's time for a look at the weather. a different week and a different kind of weather. we will see is guys
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like that, but it won't feel quite as one. a colder week this week, filled with april showers. the snow could give a covering over hills and some spots. and it will be colder with overnight frost. colder air pushing into parts of scotland and northern ireland during the rest of today, high—pressure holding on for england and wales, stay sunny through the rest of the day and into the evening. tonight, one or two isolated showers, cloud and rain across scotla nd showers, cloud and rain across scotland and northern ireland pushing into northern and western england and wales later on. either side of the weather front could be clear enough for frost. in the north, lightly frosty with sunshine
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and showers. the rush hour will be cloudy with outbreaks of rain for much of england, the midlands, wales and towards the south—west. rain spreading eastwards very slowly. sunshine to start in the south—east but it will cloud over. western areas see the sunshine come out, some showers, some slow in scotland and northern england but in western parts of scotland and northern ireland and into wales and the south—west they will come through on a strengthening breeze. rain, snow, sleet and hail. the cold feel continues tuesday into wednesday. the breeze strengthens. weather fronts could bring snow to the southern uplands, the pennines, the peak district. heavy rain around the north—east coast of england. scattering of showers and a breeze
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to blow them through rapidly. some prolonged showers close to western district of wales. temperatures below where they should be for the time of year, and feel even colder in the wind.
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