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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 2, 2019 2:00am-2:31am BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines: british members of parliament have again failed to agree on any alternative proposals to the government's brexit strategy. they voted on four motions — a very warm welcome to bbc news, all were rejected. broadcasting to viewers prime minister, theresa may, will hold a lengthy meeting in north america of her cabinet later on tuesday and around the globe. my name is mike embley. to discuss what to do next. our top stories: the us supreme court has ruled that a convicted murderer on death row in missouri has no right in respect of mr clark's motion c, to a "painless death". the ruling handed down by five customs union, the ayes were 273, the noes were 276, judges of the supreme court clears so the noes have it. the way for the execution yet again more deadlock of russell bucklew, and division — a convicted murderer. mp's reject 4 alternatives to theresa may's brexit plan. fans and hip hop performers have just 10 days before the uk been paying tribute to rapper is due to leave the european union, and song—writer nipsey hussle. the cabinet will meet on tuesday, the grammy—nominated star was killed outside his clothing store trying to work out what to do next. in los angeles over the weekend. frustration in europe — the brexit coordinator for european politicians says the uk has one more chance to break the deadlock or face the abyss he was much respected for his work of leaving without any agreement. the us supreme court rules in his community. two other people were a convicted murderer on death row in missouri has no right injured in the attack. police are still looking for a to a "painless death". the child victims of the war
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in yemen, now in its 5th year — suspect. we have a special report on how the medical services is on the brink of collapsing. british members of parliament have again failed to agree on alternative proposals to the government's brexit strategy. they had voted on four motions but all were rejected. the british prime minister, theresa may, will hold a lengthy meeting of her cabinet on tuesday to find a way forward. without an agreement the uk is set to leave the eu in ten days time. it won't be easy as mps across the house and within her own conservative party remain seriously divided. caroline rigby reports. in respect of mr clark's motion c, customs union, the ayes were 273,
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the noes were 276, so the noes have it. another day but still the same outcome. as option after option was put to the house, each one was rejected. the noes to the left. once again mps failed to unite. ken clarke's proposal for a customs union came closest, losing byjust three votes but, though parliament chose to take control of brexit, mps we re chose to take control of brexit, mps were unable to speak with one voice. what we are all asking ourselves in this deadlock is what compromise each and every member would be prepared to accept in the national interest. after his motion to stay in the single market was defeated, nick foles made this dramatic announcement before walking out of the chamber stop my party refuses to
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compromise. i regret therefore to announce that i can no longer set for this party. oh, nick, don't go. while some fell on their side, some wa nted while some fell on their side, some wanted to get on with brexit. in ten days from now we are due to leave the european union which is why people voted for. at the end of the day, the people are sovereign, not members of parliament. we do not elect their people, they obey us and if they gave us an order to leave so for gods let's just leave. if they gave us an order to leave so for gods let'sjust leave. whatever their position, it is clear many people both in the uk and abroad are losing patience with westminster‘s inability to move forward. the european government brexit co—ordinator said...
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on tuesday, theresa may's deeply divided cabinet will meet to debate their next move but time does not stand still for anyone so, despite this apparent political paralysis, the clock continues to tick down towards an ideal brexit on april 12. ——a towards an ideal brexit on april 12. —— a no—deal brexit. earlier, our uk political correspondent rob watson gave his thoughts on the likelyhood that theresa may might bring her deal back before parliament for a fourth time and what that deal might look like. there wouldn't be any change in the substance, but two things might have changed. that is, mps won't have been able to find an alternative — although who knows, they may have another vote on wednesday — and the other thing that is happening is the clock continues to tick down to a no—deal brexit on april the 12th.
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i don't have any doubt that if she can, theresa may will bring her deal back because everyone watching needs to understand theresa may has certainly convinced herself, if not all the politicians, that her deal is the best and only way to deal with the results of the referendum in 2016. the question is, could it really get through parliament on a fourth attempt? in some ways, what has happened in the last few hours is not helpful to theresa may, and if you bear with me a second, i will explain what i mean. of course it is good for her that an alternative hasn't appeared yet, but it is bad in the sense that she can't threaten those on the pro—brexit right wing of her party with a "wow, look, mps are coalescing around a softer brexit", she can no longer hold that threat against them now. tuesday, the thing to look out for is a meeting of the cabinet. that is the focus of senior ministers in the government, and it should be extraordinary. they have planned five hours, and why does it matter? why is it interesting? in many ways, absolutely nothing has
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changed in british politics in the last couple of years, and theresa may is facing a cabinet profoundly divided. the governing conservative party is profoundly divided, some pro—brexit, some pro—eu, mired in indecision and struggling to find a way forward. so watch this space very carefully tomorrow. and for the view from brussels our correspondent, damian grammaticas, gave us his assessment following the results of monday night's votes. there is now an expectation that on wednesday this week, the uk parliament will hold another series of votes to see if they can finally agree a preferred option. if not, the uk is on an automatic path, having triggered the brexit process, to quit the eu at the end of next week, friday the 12th of april, and without any deal in place, the uk will leave with no deal. so, crashing out, as some people call it,
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the hardest of brexits, and that i think is what the eu side fear the most — that this process is not leading to any clarity on the uk side, and without that the automatic process leads to the uk being out next week. the key decision—making will come on the 10th of april, when the leaders of the other 27, the remaining 27 eu countries, they will gather here in brussels for a final emergency summit next week, two days before that deadline when the uk would be out, and they would consider that one of two things. either the uk needs to have come up with a plan by then and presented it to the eu for its preferred path forward, whether it is new negotiations on the future to a future relationship, or the leaders will sit to consider their policies, their response, for how to mitigate the impact of a no—deal brexit at the end of next week. it is a stark choice, but at the minute, all the decision—making
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is on the uk side. the uk has to take some affirmative action, decide on a clear path forward, or the automatic process happens at the end of next week. all correspondence will be reporting on what is to come. let's get some of the day's other news: algeria's president abdelaziz bouteflika will step down before his mandate expires on 28 april. for a week, there've been huge protests, demanding he stand down, since he suggested he would stand for a 5th term. he's 82 and has been in powerfor 20 years, but he's rarely been seen in public since suffering a stroke in 2013. taiwan's president tsai ing—wen has ordered a "forceful expulsion" of china's fighter jets if they cross the "median line" which separate the self—ruled island from the chinese mainland. she made the statement via facebook after china sent two jets across the taiwan strait at the weekend. venezuela's supreme court has requested that the opposition
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leader, juan guaido, be stripped of his parliamentary immunity. the court's request is expected to be approved by the government—controlled constituent assembly in the next few days. last week, mr guaido was banned from holding office for a period of fifteen years. british scientists say a new blood test could improve the speed and accuracy of pre—eclampsia diagnosis. the condition mainly affects pregnant women and can prove fatal if left untreated. researchers say the blood test, which measures the levels of protein, is more reliable than the traditional methods of using blood pressure and urine samples. a british man, who left the uk to fight for the islamic state group, and is now being held by kurdish forces, is one of at least seven male students from the university of westminster who travelled to syria. it's thought to be the highest number to go from a single british university. one of the key radicalisers was qasim abukar, he was being closely monitored at the time by counter—terrorism police and m15. this exclusive report from our correspondent daniel sandford starts with one
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of the men who were radicalised. seriously injured and detained by kurdish forces, the british its fighter found by the kurdish forces, the british its fighterfound by the bbc in kurdish forces, the british its fighter found by the bbc in a kurdish forces, the british its fighterfound by the bbc in a jail in northern syria. —— it. just five yea rs in northern syria. —— it. just five years ago he was an enthusiastic student at the university of westminster but he abandoned his degree and became one of at least seven young men from the university who went tojoin seven young men from the university who went to join is. we intended to fight. that is the honest truth. there is a part who wants revenge and there is another part that wants to live in this supposedly utopia.
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the bbc has found he was one of a strea m the bbc has found he was one of a stream of students and former stu d e nts stream of students and former students at westminster university who went to fight for is in syria. jihadi john who went to fight for is in syria. jihadijohn was one. who went to fight for is in syria. jihadi john was one. another was killed in syria in 2013. then to friends in 2014. both were injured a few months ago. stripped of british nationality. three men killed in syria, one an older student. he is his perhaps the most extraordinary story. he began his studies in westminster in 2012 and, at the time, he was monitored by m15. he had been to somalia to fight but, despite all that, he was able to play a key role in and radicalise
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inc students on campus. court papers show a judge actually reduce the restrictions on qasim abukar. as soon restrictions on qasim abukar. as soon as restrictions on qasim abukar. as soon as they expired, he left for syria. an independent report commissioned by the university was written five years ago. this man thinks that the university failed in its duty of care. there was no challenge to views that were clearly islamist and extremist in nature. when you have no challenge to those kind of views and they become part of the norm. these events took place almost five years ago. in a statement university says it takes its responsibility in regards to safeguarding very seriously. with the war in yemen now in its 5th year, medical services in the country are on the brink of collapse. the conflict involves
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the yemeni government, backed by a saudi coalition supported by the us and the uk, fighting the houthi rebels backed by iran. a ban on civilian flights to the capital sanaa has left many sick children trapped. our international correspondent orla guerin has been following the story of a girl and a boy in need of urgent help, and reports from the jordanian capital amman. laughter. playtime in the park. little yusra loves the swings, welcome respite from the war back home in yemen and from her battle with cancer. this is how we first saw her last october, trapped with herfamily in saw her last october, trapped with her family in the yemeni capital, because of a saudi ban on civilian flights. a tumour in her eye was
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already threatening her life. after we highlighted her case, several organisations struggled for months to get the six—year—old tojordan. she is now being treated at a cancer centre. 0k funded through donations. —— her care. with her mother by her side, it is time for a checkup two weeks after major surgery. for yusra it is not easy. her surgeon is pleased with her progress. he says that she is a brave beyond her years and enjoyed one of the most difficult operations he has ever carried out. this is the abnormal eye and this is the tumour. very big. yes, it is a big. so big he had
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to re m ove big. yes, it is a big. so big he had to remove her eye. if she had been able to leave yemen a few months earlier, she could have been spared this. unfortunately, because they did not come at that time we lost the chance to save her life. it is good we save her life but i wish i could have saved her eye as well. this little boy urgently needed treatment abroad but was hemmed in by the saudi blocade and the wall. we met the three—year—old last year in the capital's main hospital where her mother was speaking the world to save her son. finally he got an offer of treatment abroad for his congenital heart treatment and help to leave yemen. injanuary, mother and son set off for a hospital in sudan. by then, he was a desperately weak. at journey‘s and,
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sudan. by then, he was a desperately weak. atjourney‘s and, there was heartbreak. this happy little boy, who loved football, did not survive surgery. who loved football, did not survive surgery. another precious yemeni child who died a needless death. tell me about your doll? for yusra at least, there is hope. she is due to getan at least, there is hope. she is due to get an artificial eye in a few months and returned to her troubled home. having suffered war and cancer, she is the picture of resista nce cancer, she is the picture of resistance and is now asking her motherfor a resistance and is now asking her mother for a backpack so she can start school. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: tributes to nipsey hussle — we look at the life and legacy of the rapper tragically killed in a shooting.
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the accident that happened here was of the sort that can at worst produce a meltdown. in this case, the precautions worked, but they didn't work quite well enough to prevent some old fears about the safety features of these stations from resurfacing. the republic of ireland has become the first country in the world to ban smoking in the workplace. from today, anyone lighting up in offices, businesses, pubs and restaurants will face a heavy fine. the president was on his way out of the washington hilton hotel, where he had been addressing a trade union conference. the small crowd outside included his assailant. it has become a symbol of paris. 100 years ago, many parisians wished it had never been built. the eiffel tower's birthday is being marked by a re—enactment of the first ascent by gustave eiffel.
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this is bbc news. the latest headlines: for a second time, british mps vote on alternatives to theresa may's brexit plan. four proposals went forward. all are rejected. frustration in europe — the brexit coordinator for european politicians says the uk has one more chance to break the deadlock or face the abyss of a hard brexit. the us supreme court has ruled that a convicted murderer on death row in missouri has no right to a "painless death". the ruling handed down by five judges of the supreme court clears the way for the execution of russell bucklew, a convicted murderer who'd argued that he should not be executed by lethal injection as his rare medical condition could mean an agonizing death. our north america correspondent peter bowes is in los angeles. give us more on the background of
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this, would you ? give us more on the background of this, would you? russell bucklew had been on death row for 20 years, more than 20 years, after he was convict that of a particularly gruesome series of crimes back in 1996 involving rape, kidnapping and murder —— convicted. he does not dispute he was guilty of those crimes and does not dispute the death sentence that he is arguing with the nature of the sentence and how it is carried out. the lethal injection. he says and his lawyers have been arguing that the method would be cruel and unusual, which of course is banned by the us constitution, because he has a rare medical condition that produces tumours on his neck and face that could swell during the lethal injection, causing him extreme pain and the possibility of choking to death. he had argued, in the argument with the supreme court, but nitrogen gas would be a better form
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of execution. the court has said that they do not buy that, they do not believe he has sufficiently argued that execution through nitrogen gas would result in significantly less pain. the five justices, the five conservative justices, the five conservative justices, also argued essentially, his legal opposition to this, which camejust his legal opposition to this, which came just days before his legal opposition to this, which camejust days before his original execution date, we simply a stalling tactic, delaying tactic, to delay his eventual execution. peter, there is quite a lot of legal movement on the death penalty generally across the death penalty generally across the us in several states. is this ruling likely to have further implications? it could well have wider implications. there has been a lot of controversy in a number of states about the apparent secrecy behind the methods used and especially as it applies to lethal injections in a number of states so
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this could have wider reaching implications and of course a lot of people pointing out the political differences on the supreme court, we have five conservative justices here, believing that this execution should go ahead as a lethal injection. the liberaljustices dissenting from that, just to quote you, one of the justices saying" there are higher values that ensuring execution is run on time macro quote —— then execute —— ensuring execution is run on time." peter, thank you. at least 30 people have been killed and hundreds more injured by a violent thunderstorm in southern nepal. the freak storm destroyed houses, and uprooted trees in bara and pa rsa districts. special forces have been sent to the area to help with rescue operations. david campanale has more. the aftermath of freak weather in
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nepal. thunderstorms are common in spring but only rarely are they violent enough to cause so many casualties. locals caught up in the devastation call the storm's impact unbelievable and like nothing they had seen before. the storm's power torn down houses, ripped off roofs, overturned vehicles and brought down power lines. whole villages have been flattened and families have been flattened and families have been left mourning the death of relatives killed by trees and the debris. as it swept across southern nepal, the storm's winds were so fierce, a bus carrying passengers was overturned, killing many on board. injured victims of the storm have flocked in huge numbers to local hospitals. mats are cast onto the floor when the beds run out. with local medical facilities barely coping, national help is being sought. some of them who are seriously, severely wounded, they
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are, asi seriously, severely wounded, they are, as i said before, six of them have been airlifted to kathmandu and all the injured people, they are undergoing the treatment in the nearby hospitals. officials say there is no a desperate need for food. the army is present, clearing a path for aid to arrive. but rescu e rs a path for aid to arrive. but rescuers are struggling to reach more distant settlements locked by fallen trees. police have given a warning that when they do, the death toll could rise. david campanale, bbc news. fans and hip hop royalty alike have been paying tribute to rapper and songwriter nipsey hussle. the grammy—nominated star was killed outside his clothing store in los angeles over the weekend. two other people were injured in the attack. police are still looking for a suspect. the bbc‘s sophie long has more. # breaking down a swisher in front of your building #. nipsey hussle was a rising star in the music scene. his album victory lap was recently nominated for a grammy. but here, in south los angeles, where he grew up, he
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was as well—known for his community work he was for his music. he made no secret of his early life in a street gang. i grew up in la in the ‘90s. gang culture was what was going on, you know, outside of my family structure. on sunday afternoon, nipsey hussle tweeted. he said "it's a blessing to have strong enemies." within an hour, he'd been shot dead in a burst of gunfire outside his clothing store. now people have come to pay their respects and to mourn the loss of a man they call a legend. he was a strong, talented, compassionate, amazing human being, who was on his way to doing a lot for a lot of people and i'm just hard to see that light no longer shining. he was a really beautiful young man that was kind of a different type of a rapper, you know, in entertainment. he was actually trying to change the community, bringjobs, help people, stimulate business and stuff like that. yesterday, it was nipsey,
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every other day it's somebody else. and we've got to do better. and online, tributes from friends and colleagues in the music industry. rihanna said her spirit had been shaken. john legend spoke of his shock. ice cube of love and respect. nipsey hussle was due to meet los angeles police today to talk about ways to stop gang violence. instead, they're investigating why he was shot dead in broad daylight in the community he was trying to save. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. a new tourist attraction in the heart of a danish forest is drawing crowds, a 45 metre hourglass lookout. it takes about 15 minutes to walk the twisted path from the forest floor to the top of the tower which rises about 20 metres above the treetops. it is the highest
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building in the region. from the top they can see all the way to neighbouring sweden. and you can get in touch with me and most of the team on twitter. i'm @bbcmikeembley. hello there, good morning. the next few days are going to be significantly colder, and to illustrate the point, this was gosport, in hampshire, where the temperature on monday was 17 degrees. lovely in the sunshine. same place, tuesday, 9 degrees, so quite a drop. any remaining warm air that we've had across southern parts of the uk is getting swept away by this developing north to north—westerly wind and that will push colder air across the whole of the country. now, the colder air comes behind this band of cloud and rain here, that's pushing its way south—eastwards across the uk, with showers, some of them wintry, following in behind. for the rush hour, heading across the midlands, in particular, this rain still could be quite heavy. through the morning, it pushes into east anglia and the south—east. behind it, a couple of hours of dry weather and sunshine. then showers come packing
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in and almost anywhere could catch a shower. they may well be heavy, could be some hail and thunder in there and some wintriness over the hills, especially in the north. those temperatures are back down to 8—10 degrees. colder air, then, arriving across the uk. and we set up more of a north to north—westerly wind strengthening on wednesday. that area of low pressure bringing wet weather back in from the north sea. maybe a few icy patches early in the morning. a touch of frost around as well. maybe a bit of snow over the tops of the north york moors. but most of the wet weather looks like it's going to come back into scotland now on wednesday. rain with some sleet and snow over the hills. elsewhere, some sunshine but also a few sharp showers. the winds will be a bit stronger for many of us on wednesday, especially across northern and western areas. and although these the sort of temperatures we're looking at — so well below average for this time of year — when you add on the strength of the wind, it will feel significantly colder, especially in scotland. combined with that wet weather, it will be a pretty miserable day
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for this time of the year. so we're pushing down colder air. at the same time, we have this area of low pressure and that's going to sit around probably until thursday as well. so we're left with this sort of weather pattern, with spirals of cloud and showers, along with spells of rain, with some wintry weather over the hills. the position could change quite easily but at the moment, it looks a little bit drier for eastern parts of england. but again, those temperatures are struggling to hit 8—10 degrees. and that is the main story over the next few days. it will be quite a bit colder. there will be a lot of these april showers to come. and over the high ground, it will take on a wintry flavour. and with clear skies at night, there may well be some frost as well.
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