Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  April 2, 2019 11:30pm-12:01am BST

11:30 pm
welcome to newsday. i'm babita sharma in london. theresa may says the uk needs the headlines: another extension to brexit, and offers to sit down with labour'sjeremy corbyn to end the stalemate. seven hours of talks with a divided this debate, this division, cabinet. theresa may says she will cannot drag on much longer. ask for another brexit delay in it is putting members of parliament office to consult the opposition. and everyone else under immense this debate, this division cannot pressure, and it is doing drag on much longer. it is putting damage to our politics. members of parliament and everyone else under immense pressure. we need labour leaderjeremy corbyn has said to ensure that parliament has an opportunity to vote on proposals that prevent us crashing out of the he is very happy to meet the prime minister to ensure parliament can vote on proposals to prevent the uk eu in the end of next week. crashing out of the eu at the end of next week. shortly after theresa may's statement she appeared to receive celebrations in algeria as president abdelaziz bouteflika resigns after some support from donald tusk, who 20 years in power, going to weeks of pressure and protest. tweeted to eu leaders, let us be patient. a neo—nazi is facing a jail sentence for plotting to murder the labour mp rosie cooper. jack renshaw, who was also a convicted paedophile, brought a 19
11:31 pm
inch knife to kill her. four other people were stabbed in edmonton over the weekend. welcome to our to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. it is all about brexit, when do we leave, how do we leave? will we leave? hard to believe all of this is still up for grabs. confused ? to believe all of this is still up for grabs. confused? we will attempt to clear everything up, attempt being the key word. the metro leads with theresa may's offer to meetjeremy corbyn to end the deadlock over brexit. the express brands the prime minister's move a massive gamble, as she makes a pitch for national unity.
11:32 pm
the financial times says the conservatives‘ internal battle on europe has been deepened by the prime minister's statement, in which she also said she would ask the eu for a further brexit the same story makes the front page of the times, which says theresa may's strategy will prompt hostility from her own party. the daily mail reports that the prime minister rejected calls from her ministers to prepare for a no—deal brexit. the mirror says brexiteers in the cabinet are furious that theresa may's offer could lead to a softer exit. and the sun also warns that mrs may's announcement will result in a softer brexit. so brexit dominating all of the front pages. let's see what our reviewers make of it all. the front page of the times, the pm risks tori rath as cross—party talks are open to a softer departure. —— tory wrath. i think she is perhaps
11:33 pm
hoping that the spectre of her and corbyn sitting down together to construct corbyn sitting down together to co nstru ct a corbyn sitting down together to construct a brexit deal to go through parliament may prompt some people on her own side who have been holding out to finally get behind her. she is offering to sit down with corbyn, she has offered that before. she is offering indicative votes, they are already going on, but it is clear this is different. when she meets corbyn this time, this will be seriously talking, not going through the pretense of your redlines on my redlines, but what can we actually do here? the indicative votes which would come about if she and corbyn can't agree ona about if she and corbyn can't agree on a way forward, she has said the government would be bound by them, she has not said that before. initially, nothing has changed, it is brad hogg day, but i think this is brad hogg day, but i think this isa is brad hogg day, but i think this is a seismic day in the history of brexit. theresa may famously has certain redlines. what redlines do you believe could turn a bit pink? or actually disappear? or disappear
11:34 pm
entirely, and as owen rightly says, up entirely, and as owen rightly says, up until this point she has made quite clear, even though she has set down for conversations with jeremy corbyn before, she wasn't prepared to budge from her sort of key areas. for example, that she didn't want to see a customs for example, that she didn't want to see a custoitis union for example, that she didn't want to see a customs union and a softening of brexit, because that could thwart written's ability to strike independent trade deals. that she wouldn't go for a second referendum, because yesterday number ten was saying the prime minister would support a second referendum in any circumstances, because that would undermine the feel that the public have about politics and our parliament and be bad for democracy. so there are some really key areas where she has made quite clear previously she wouldn't budge, even as she sat down for the cameras and suggested she would work with corbyn. what is different this time as she has suggested she would
11:35 pm
budge, she has said she would abide by the will of parliament, and numberten made by the will of parliament, and number ten made quite clear that she was addressing these talks in what she called a constructive spirit, and the talks i had in downing street afterwards didn't rule out the prospect of a customs union or a second referendum. basically jeremy, and has the ability to go in there and has the ability to go in there and set out his own redlines, if you like, and suggest that he will negotiate with her if she budgets towards labour's position on a softer brexit. this is quite a powerful position. the danger for corbyn, of course, is that if he decides not to sit down with her or talks fall apart he looks like he is risking a no deal brexit, which nobody wants. if he sits down with herand nobody wants. if he sits down with her and strikes a deal then he becomes responsible, in part, for delivering brexit, and that is really problematic for a party which is still predominantly amongst its members and mps remain. irrespective
11:36 pm
of striking out to leave voting seats. i really hope that this genuinely is done on both parts in the national interest. there is so much frustration amongst mps, let alone the public, about the prospect of yet more stalemate and gridlock, and people want to see their way through this. it is a really difficult balance and juggling ahead. the sun doesn't look too impressed. the pm tojeremy corbyn, after seven hours of lockdown, theresa may has gone soft stop is that your bright idea? jeremy corbyn ina that your bright idea? jeremy corbyn in a lightbulb, which reminds me of... for the last one leaving britain turn the lights off. the sun front page, it is what they tend to bring out at moments of crisis. thank you leader and front—page writers at the sun. this idea that jeremy corbyn could be the saviour,
11:37 pm
of course there will be a whole section of the conservative party who think that is absolutely appalling, and as a result, it could be frightened, as you were suggesting earlier, into voting for her deal. well, nothing has frightened them so far, so some people would say these people can't be frightened. it seems to me that the dup are completely out of the game, they have said we will not vote for this withdrawal agreement the way it is. you need to change it and it can't be changed. she might have made a calculation i have to write off erg, and 20 members of the erg. -- write off erg, and 20 members of the erg. —— right of dup, and 20 members of the erg. she might have said i am not going to get the dup, i will approach labour. i was not expecting that, but when you knock down the options she has tried so far, it is like she has pulled the string, what
11:38 pm
does that do? she has pushed a button, what does that do? i am not sure it is a big plan. it does come down to parliamentary arithmetic, and despite the indicative votes la st and despite the indicative votes last night, it looks like there could be a majority across the house for a softer brexit. the problem theresa may faces is that by pivoting to that softer brexit and relying on labour votes, she has triggered an almighty row within her owfi triggered an almighty row within her own party, the membership is predominantly brexiteer. if those are questions about her leadership, she has already said if she gets to deal through she will step down, and what sort of leader takes over afterwards? one thing labour will wa nt afterwards? one thing labour will want to know is if we look at the future relationship, that is not binding. numberten insist future relationship, that is not binding. number ten insist there are links with the withdrawal agreement, so links with the withdrawal agreement, soa links with the withdrawal agreement, so a future leader is tired, but you if you end up —— if you end up with borisjohnson or dominic raab, all
11:39 pm
bets are off. that is another thing, theresa may is already going. she doesn't have to think i am going to save my political career, because she knows she is on her way out. she has played all her cards, and they have played theirs as well. winner ta kes have played theirs as well. winner takes it all, exactly. or waterloo, whichever. the front page of the daily mirror, help me, jeremy. desperate theresa may delays eu brexit. is she now thinking about legacy? was she stung by the words of the last week, especially after her comments after number ten last week criticised parliament and attacked mps for not being able to get their act together? is there a sense she is looking to her legacy and wants to be seen as someone who genuinely tried to reach out and bring everyone together? it may have
11:40 pm
failed, it may succeed, but at least she has been seen as inclusive, in a way that some thought she wasn't. when you think about theresa may and what motivates her, one of the things that motivates her is that david cameron walked away at the moment the country really needed a leader, as she sees it. she feels that if a second conservative party leader was to do that, it would be so leader was to do that, it would be so damaging to the brand of the conservative party. i think she feels like she needs to get this through. i think for a long time she was putting party above country. i think now this might be seen as putting country above party, that is perhaps how she will see it. other people would disagree, but she will say, you know what? i have tried to do it to help the tory party, now i need to do it in a way that ends this for the country. ok, pippa, this for the country. ok, pippa, this is your paper, of course. theresa may probably has more reason to lose her redlines thanjeremy
11:41 pm
corbyn stop yes. she is an australian —— he is in a slightly stronger position, she has gone to him for help. there are those in the labour party who think that jeremy corbyn, who was originally quite eurosceptic, wants more than anything else a clean hands brexit. it creates a situation where labour could swoop in and be the good guys and clearup could swoop in and be the good guys and clear up afterwards without having in any way been responsible for delivering brexit. the position here is different, because if they help them deliver it they take on a degree of responsibility for which brexit we end up with at the end of it. he has internal issues, really quite difficult internal issues, to grapple with as well, in that a large numberof grapple with as well, in that a large number of his own mps support a second referendum. while that is one of the options that remains on the table under the rather complicated hierarchy of the labour party's own
11:42 pm
complicated hierarchy of the labour pa rty's own conference complicated hierarchy of the labour party's own conference motion on brexit, it clearly isn't jeremy corbyn's favourite option. he thinks it would be really difficult for labour mps it would be really difficult for labourmps in it would be really difficult for labour mps in these seats, i think about 30 out of 40 top labour target seats in the next referendum, which it needs to take to form government, are in these areas. he is very conscious of the electoral viability of pushing a referendum. however, his membership, momentum, is grassroots support group, and his mps, are overwhelmingly in favour. he will find it very difficult to resist going into see theresa may. whatever deal they come up with and managed to thrash out, adding on a second referendum to it, it will interesting to see how he manages that. —— interesting to see how he manages that. -- it interesting to see how he manages that. —— it will be interesting. interesting to see how he manages that. -- it will be interesting. is there a sense that we are seeing a deep fracturing, potentially, within the conservative party?” deep fracturing, potentially, within the conservative party? i think there is. obviously the europe issue has always divided the conservative
11:43 pm
party. i was speaking to a lot of erg mps tonight who stayed and watched it around a television in the committee rooms of parliament, and they were furious, in disbelief, they couldn't believe it was going on. they voted down the deal three times, so what did you think was going to happen? some were considering resigning, and they are not going to act in haste. but is there a sense that they have cocked this up, that they have overplayed their hand in saying no, no, no, to everything, and at the very last minute, iain duncan smith and boris johnson, whatever, something from a very long spoon and deciding they will vote for this deal, but they have left it so late? i think that someone have left it so late? i think that someone like jacob rees—mogg who saidi someone like jacob rees—mogg who said i was right to back the deal on friday, because brexit is getting even softer, some will disclaim personal responsibility, and will
11:44 pm
a lwa ys personal responsibility, and will always blame theresa may. the reason theresa may ‘s leader is because you wa nt theresa may ‘s leader is because you want a conservative party election, and the reason why she is still leader is because she has won a no—confidence vote. they will have to look at themselves and think why didn't we back someone different in the campaign in 2016? was it right to bring a no—confidence motion when we did it? i don't feel like they are at this position emotionally to ta ke are at this position emotionally to take responsibility. they are still going through the grief first. even though theresa may is going to go, what happens to the next leader? the next leader will need skills like bobby kennedy to bring everyone together, those bobby kennedy style speeches. i am together, those bobby kennedy style speeches. iam not together, those bobby kennedy style speeches. i am not sure who there is in the tory party who can bring these sides together. the suggestion is, it would need to bea the suggestion is, it would need to be a brexiteer in order to deliver brexit. that's what many are suggesting. bring the country together. it depends when the contest takes place. there are those
11:45 pm
such as boz contest takes place. there are those such as bonohnson wanted to be sooner such as bonohnson wanted to be sooner rather than later. — boris johnson. there are suggestions that some in numberio, johnson. there are suggestions that some in number10,cchq, johnson. there are suggestions that some in numberio, cchq, fora longer process over the summer with a new leader ready in place by the conservative party conference, a less polarising figure, one of the youngermps, less polarising figure, one of the younger mps, not as tainted by the brexit campaign is borisjohnson. who can maybe get some endorsements from senior brexiteers and senior remainers. a neat segue into the front pages of the daily telegraph. these are the 14 mps i think, owen, who made it clear that they were not particularly happy with theresa may's plans to talk tojeremy corbyn and one suspects the new leader of the party could well be beaming out from us. these are the 14 who were
11:46 pm
in the cabinet meeting of seven hours without doubt bones. like they we re hours without doubt bones. like they were a bunch of kids. there are some who might suggest that is the case anyway. they said they would rather have no deal than a delay or softer brexit. the question is, what happens now? if you have leadership ambitions in your electorate is conservative party, do you now stand out as saying, i can't countenance this course of action and you might become the hero. you do that horse trading. michael gove has gone out on the airwaves. he is really tying himself to these —— this deal. where is liam fox? there are high—profile brexiteers who should be out there.
11:47 pm
michael gove sees himself as the great unifier. a lot would say that irrespective of how they feel about his politics or his role in the brexit campaign that subsequently by staying in government and being loyal to the prime minister, he... he famously didn't do that before. he famously didn't do that before. he is showing himself as a pragmatist which is what they could need. we haven't had any resignations yet. let's not get that after last summer, it took a couple of days for the david davis and borisjohnson showdown. we could yet see senior resignations. there is a big prize at the end of this discussion as opposed to after the chequers speech which is the leadership. but someone to decide
11:48 pm
they are going to resign now and seriously now the colours to the mast. it's dangerous. if you resign now, there is no way other than resigning because you want to be the next leader. it would be firing the starting gun on the leadership. whoever starts as favourite, never wins. nobody wants to be the first one to do it. we talked a little bit about nick bowles. the bottom of the times they are. he says, this is the worst cabinet in history in his opinion. pretty strong words. nick bowles quitting without any predetermined plan to do so. the result of the indicative boats were announced. his norway plus plan was rejected by mps and he did the
11:49 pm
mental maths and worked out that it hadn't gone through. he made this very short and emotional speech and left his seat and walked out of the house of commons. an interview with the bbc today in which he is quite frank about his views on the cabinet and the tory party. the cabinet is common for a bit of the beating over the last few days. the most ill—disciplined cabinet, and from former cabinet ministers and senior ministers. on the one hand, for not standing up to theresa may, and on the other hand, capitulating towards a softer brexit. either way, this bunch of people, the party is not
11:50 pm
particularly enamoured with them right now stop the telegraph, i suspect a lot of us will need this wonder drug. with all aged as a result of the brexit process.|j wonder drug. with all aged as a result of the brexit process. i feel this should be a bigger story. it's a story that perfectly good. it can ta ke a story that perfectly good. it can take ten years a few, clive, and you would feel 50 again. ouch! owen did look up on wikipedia exactly how old you were. look up on wikipedia exactly how old you were. everyone knows i'm 27. it sounds like you changed it. this struggle tackle alzheimer's, and parkinson's and cancer and all that but it can slow or even reverse ageing. this should be big news. you would ink so. to be clear, have they done trials? there is not much there
11:51 pm
on the front page. i might volunteer. after a couple of years of covering brexit to —— covering brexit... of covering brexit to —— covering brexit. .. can of covering brexit to —— covering brexit... can we of covering brexit to —— covering brexit. .. can we go of covering brexit to —— covering brexit... can we go back of covering brexit to —— covering brexit. .. can we go back to 2015? not that you are suggesting there should be a second referendum. we just want to make that clear. peace and quiet, that's what it's about. some decent sleep. owen and pepper, thank you so much for looking at some of the headlines. there was an anti—ageing drug there as well. that is it for the papers tonight. it's all there for you, all of the front pages on line at the bbc news website at bbc.co.uk/papers and if you miss any of the magic, you can relive it all on the bbc iplayer.
11:52 pm
good night. good evening — here's your latest sports news. full of then relegated from the premier leave that —— can be a league after being thumped by watford. they went 1—nil down early but they were given a slight bit of hope when a ryan babel strike drew them level, but 3 second half goals from the host sealed their fate. bitterly disappointed really, devastated for the football club, for the fans. i think we all knew it was a tough ask but i suppose it's not so much a relegation, it'sjust the way we've lost the game tonight which is probably most disappointing me, to be fair. also this evening, wolves ca m e me, to be fair. also this evening, wolves came behind to beat manchester united. putting united
11:53 pm
ahead. wolves equalised 12 minutes later. diogojota finished well from a rauljimenez pass. ashley young was then sent off for united — and the home side took advantage of the extra man and a mix up in defence to win the game 2—1. united missed the chance to move third — and stay outside the top four. england will be joined by scotland for the first time at the world cup. the deal will also take in the next european cahmpionship that will be held in england. northern ireland and wales have been involved in a joint home nations deal before, but the republic of ireland are included for the first time. and england's record goalscorer who retired from the international game in 2014, thinks deals like this will increase the players profile
11:54 pm
my my role models were males growing up andi my role models were males growing up and i would have loved to have a female role model. my female role model was sally gunnell, who was in athletics. if some of these players can push the women's game and be on billboards and make them household names, young girls can look up to them and say i want to be like a jewel scot and so they can have a pathway and a career to make it as a woman's football. bolton's next to home games could be played behind security fences. the championship side, who are in the relagtion zone, say that they they are unable to address the obligations of its safety certificate until after tomorrow's high court hearing; the club faces a winding up order over an unpaid tax bill. the players also went on strike yesterday after they weren't paid on time for the second month in a row. england cricketer alex hales has told the bbc its part of his job
11:55 pm
to be a role model. hales faced no criminal charges for his part in 2017's bristol nightclub fight but he was suspended and then fined by a cricket discipline commission. now he wants to move on, with lessons — he says — learned. all six of us were caught up in the wrong place at the wrong time and if you could go back and change things, we would but we can't so we have to live that people deserve a second chance and that's the only way i'm looking at it. it's how much we are in the public eye as cricketers are not put yourself into that situation at 230 in the morning after a game is not the place you want to be as an international sportsman so i would say being a bit more mature and sensible with decisions. danny cipriani has signed a new deal. the fly half is believed to have agreed a three—year deal at the club, which could see the england international end his career at kingsholm.he joined gloucester from top—flight
11:56 pm
rivals wasps last summer. i'll have more for you in the next hour. it feels like winter has made a comeback. lots thrown at us over the last four hours. big hailstorms affecting the uk and the sunshine coming out in between is led to some wonderful rainbow pictures. we are seeing short sharp bursts of cold airfrom the arctic. seeing short sharp bursts of cold air from the arctic. you seeing short sharp bursts of cold airfrom the arctic. you can seeing short sharp bursts of cold air from the arctic. you can see how the colder air has plunged. the cloud in the north sea is coming back into scotland and northern england which is why we are seeing sleet and snow. some hide patches. a cold start to really, with a pretty miserable morning across the far north of england and scotland. rain and sleet and snow. that wetter weather clears away. pushing its way into northern ireland. some really heavy showers with hail and thunder possible. many central and eastern
11:57 pm
parts of the uk, showers could hang around but it will be windy in the north and west of the uk. these other temperatures. it will feel colder in the wind. especially northern and western scotland. that's how it will feel the wind. we got low pressure dominating our weather at the moment. it's why we are seeing all these downpours. it's cutting off that supply of cold air mind you on thursday. we got that when the frontal wrapped around so that's the focus. some wetter weather curling back into south—west england, moving into wales in the west country. if few heavy showers elsewhere but a fair bit of sunshine around. nota bad elsewhere but a fair bit of sunshine around. not a bad day for northern england, southern scotland and those temperatures are creeping up to around nine or 10 degrees and as we head towards the end of the week, it's an improving sort of story. a
11:58 pm
bit warmer. any places will be dry and some sunshine around. we got our low pressure thursday to friday. instead of a northerly wind, we're going to find a bit of a south or south wind. we've still got the threat of some downpours in the south—west of england and wales. it should be drier in northern scott. eastern scotland, eastern england, those temperatures continuing to climb up to 13 or 14 celsius.
11:59 pm
12:00 am

16 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on