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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  April 3, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — 00:00:01,220 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 our latest headlines. theresa may has metjeremy corbyn to try to get his help in breaking the brexit deadlock. the jury in the trial of david duckenfield fails to hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm at westminster. today at 2pm. reach a verdict. hundreds of millions of pounds has been paid to tourism they will meetjeremy corbyn victims of the windrush scandal. in the next half hour to try to get footage emerges of soldiers shooting his help in breaking the brexit ata footage emerges of soldiers shooting at a picture ofjeremy corbyn for deadlock. target practice. time for the sport. i welcome the prime minister's offer for talks, following the meetings another instance of racism stop that that i have held with members is bad enough but then the fallout across this house, and look forward over the way it was handled. to meeting her later today. i am always happy to meet party is bad enough but then the fallout over the way it was handledm is bad enough but then the fallout over the way it was handled. it is leaders across this house. happening all too often in european i want to find a way forward. football at the moment. this i want to find a way forward that delivers on the referendum, incident in italy. stirling was very that delivers brexit and does it as soon as possible. thejury in the the jury in the trial of the hillsborough match commander david duckenfield fails to reach a verdict critical. he suggested his team—mate ona duckenfield fails to reach a verdict on a manslaughter charge against was partly to blame. the striker him. compensation worth about £200 scored late on and stood in front of million is announced for victims of the windrush scandal. the fans who directed monkey chants the ministry of defence investigates, after footage emerges at him. this was a goal yesterday.
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play was stopped by the referee and of soldiers shooting at a picture of the crowd want to stop the chanting jeremy corbyn for target practice. but then after that game... and john watson with the sport. criticism of the italian club juventus for the way it has dealt with an incident of racist abuse. talk to you later, and with the weather, tomasz schafernaker. thank you, a changeable day today, one hour it could look like this, the next hour we've got blue skies, stirling took a stand on the issue, we've had a bit of snow, not unusual for this time of year. confronting montenegro fans while thanks, tomasz. playing for england last month. he also coming up, the salamander smuggled in a cereal box finds a new home at london zoo. clearly feels it is affable that moise could be at fault in any way. that is a view shared by the former manchester midfielder. he says that it is bonucci you let his team—mates this is afternoon live. down. it is totally disrespectful live in westminster, where as you regarding his team—mate. for me, i can see the clouds are gathering.
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theresa may will begin talks with don't want to say worse things, i labour leaderjeremy corbyn in half don't want to say worse things, i don't want to be harsh with him, but an hour's time to find common ground to break the brexit deadlock. she's if you are my team mate, you will defended her decision to hold the talks, telling mps they have a responsibility to deliver the uk's feel let down. a lot of criticism of departure from the european union. she was responding to criticism from the wayjuventus have handled that incident. let's look at something pro—brexit conservatives, who claim she has handed control of brexit to positive. the long—awaited new labour and made it more likely the country labour and made it more likely the opening of the new tottenham hotspur cou ntry stays labour and made it more likely the country stays in a customs union stadium. it was supposed to have with the eu. 0ne minister, nigel been opened at the start of the season. here we are many months adams, resigned this morning, later. they are said to play that calling the move a grave error. tonight, six months later than prime minister, will it be a labour brexit? can you fix the cracks planned. the 1 billion in your cabinet this way? tonight, six months later than planned. the1 billion tottenham hotspur stadium opening its doors as this is not where the prime they play crystal palace right. the minister wants to be, but after failing three times capacity is 62,000, almost double of to get her deal through parliament, the old stadium, white hart lane, she is now looking to labour. and the second—largest club ground in england behind old trafford. they so could an unlikely compromise between these two get brexit through? say the new home will benefit the the prime minister say she can't surrounding area. as far as a change the withdrawal agreement, the way we leave, but she will explore what our future community is concerned, it is a
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deal looks like. massive lift for tottenham and for i think there are a number of areas london and it couldn't come at a better time in view of all the we agree on in relation to brexit. we both want to deliver leaving political situation we have at the the eu with the deal, moment with brexit. we are we both want to protectjobs, definitely open for business. as far i think we both want to ensure as the players are concerned, we are that we end free movement, i think we both recognise all excited and i have every the importance of the confidence they will finish this season very strongly. excitement is withdrawal agreement. what we want to do now building ahead of the netball world is to find a way forward that can command the support cup. 100 days to go before it is of this house and deliver a brexit. labour wants a close—knit stage in liverpool. representatives relationship following eu trade rules through a customs union and that could be the price from all three nations visited the of his leader's support. studios this morning. this isjust mr speaker, i welcome the prime minister's offer for talks following the meetings i have held with members across this outside the studio. 100 days, 100 house and look forward to meeting her later today, and i welcome her willingness goals, 100 girls to mark the lead to compromise to resolve the brexit deadlock. up. england won commonwealth gold there are big differences, last year. results have been patchy but the prime minister is hoping there will be movement last year. results have been patchy as soon as today. last year. results have been patchy if not, proposals would be put to last year. we've had everything thrown at us over this international parliament and the government would accept the verdict. she is warning calendar to prepare us for this world cup and it is a tough tournament and we have got to keep
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all our players fit, healthy and any agreement now could be a trap because promises on the future won't select the best squad for it. the pressure is on from an external because promises on the future won't be legally binding. point of view, but our protocols have been maintained throughout. we it may be unpicked by hard—line prime minister, because, remember, whatever theresa may might agree have been maintained throughout. we have been maintained throughout. we have been following the process. with us right now, by her own admission, she is not going to be finally, snooker news. jamie jones prime minister so she can't has lost his appeal against a 12 deliver on anything. so, take a pause, get rid of this ticking clock, and do this month ban. jones was sanctioned back properly and sensibly. and none of this is as simple injanuary month ban. jones was sanctioned back in january after a disciplinary as just getting a deal hearing found he failed to report an through parliament, winning the votes to get it illegal approach to fix a match. he through the commons. theresa may knows that her party is deeply divided and if she pivots can't return to action until towards labour to try and win some october. there is more about that of their votes, many story and the fallout to the racial of her own brexiteers will be absolutely furious. abuse in italy over on the website welsh 0ffice minister nigel adams right now. for now, that is all from resigned this morning, angry mrs may has offered to work the bbc sport centre. your next with the opposition. update in around one hour's time at around 5:30pm. he wrote...
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let's go nationwide to see what is this is a major moment, and i would happening around the country. simply council my government and my party and my prime minister, stop, think very carefully what you are doing. if you give legitimacy to a man that i think is genuinely not fit to run let's go to hamish marshall in exeter — he's at the heaquarters britain and will do its damage, you will damage the very prospects of flybe, the airline of your own party and, that was forced to cancel dozens of flights this morning. most importantly for people like me, and nick owen is in the prospects for our country. birmingham to tell us about volunteer residents at a care jeremy corbyn could face the wrath home who have been doing of some of his party, too, exercises sitting down if he agrees to a deal that doesn't to see if it's good for their health. can't wait to find out more about lead to a referendum. that one, nick. let's go to hamish every shred of evidence first. huge problems for flybe available says that passengers. this is the head office it's what most labour party voters of flybe. it was a really bad day and party members want to see, so i for the company but also for the am sure he will be very mindful of hundreds of passengers due to get on that. talks this afternoon fighter didn't run this morning. could change what brexit looks like, but westminster dozens of flights. birmingham and belfast among the worst affected places. flybe told us it was is still very divided. operational difficulties but then is that day went on, they said it was a we canjoin we can join vicki young we canjoin vicki young in shortage of pilots. they say it is we can join vicki young in the houses of parliament. quite a risk for both of them? it is, yes. you an industrywide problem exacerbated
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by some of their own pilot using up heard the stick that theresa may was leave at the end of the leave year. getting from mps on her own side, i went inside to interview the chief saying, how could you have said just executive and said to her, did you know this was coming? she said, yes, last week, just a couple of days i had know this was coming? she said, yes, ihada know this was coming? she said, yes, i had a feeling this was coming. and ago, thatjeremy corbyn is not fit to lead the country, and yet here isaid, why you are asking for his help over i had a feeling this was coming. and i said, why are you still selling seats? passengers were only told brexit? she didn't say in her today. her answer was, that is a response, you have driven me to this, but i know that is what some very good question, i am trying to find out why. that is all very well conservative mps field, that that but the company is closing two of small conservative group of mps who its bases and downgrading another have refused to back her compromise one. why are they closing them? that deal so far, it means she can't get her deal through so she is having to presumably means job losses. indeed turn elsewhere and to do a compromise, which actually there are some in the cabinet to say she it does. flybe won't say how many should have done two years ago once jobs will be affected. the bases she did not win a majority in that which are closing are in cardiff and doncaster and the base you can see election. that is the way she is just behind me here, the bit that going at the moment. she says she is looks after the jet planes, that is going at the moment. she says she is going into this, and has not talked about any red lines, although in a going to be changing because flybe is doing away with jets. that is briefing afterwards downing street because they are more expensive so made it clear freedom briefing afterwards downing street made it clearfreedom of movement briefing afterwards downing street made it clear freedom of movement is probably something she would not be able to accept, but other things, there are going to be fewer flybe
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apart from revoking article 50 staff. roots will be affected to altogether, are on the table i think, so this meeting are set for 230 fillon stop likely to go in for an hourorso but spain and to portugal, malaga as 230 fillon stop likely to go in for an hour or so but if more talks are needed they would make sure they can facilitate those, and on the other well. bad news for staff, bad news side, jeremy corbyn, what will he be for passengers as well. flybe had asking for? we were referred to a beenin for passengers as well. flybe had been in financial trouble for quite a while. it lost £20 million in 2017 letter that he sent to the prime minister back in february, where he and it was saying it was on the edge laid out labour demand is calling of ba nkru ptcy for a permanent customs union, uk and it was saying it was on the edge of bankruptcy before it was taken over by a consortium at the start of wide, with a say on future eu trade deals will stop many think that is the year, including virgin atla ntic‘s the year, including virgin atlantic's richard branson. we have not negotiable. labour said it would known about uncertainty are flybe at be with the eu. they are calling for for a while but this is the day that close alignment with the single market. again, more clarity would be uncertainty turned into reality. needed about what exactly that thank you very much, hamish. let's means, participation with eu go to nick a win in birmingham. agencies for example. the key issue forjeremy corbyn, he has trouble on exercising when you are sitting down, nick? the essence of this is his own backbenchers too, not as many as theresa may, but he does, to assess whether secondary exercise because of the issue particularly of can significantly improve the health another referendum, and his and well—being of frail and elderly people. in other words, spokesman this lunchtime saying he and well—being of frail and elderly only supports a second referendum to people. in otherwords, people and well—being of frail and elderly people. in other words, people you can get up and about very easily and if they are, to try some sort of prevent a "damaging tory brexit or a
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fitness regime. they need to do it no—deal brexit". so in that sitting down. the oldest in this scenario, if he feels he can get the group is 92. the university of compromises from the prime minister he needs, he may feel he doesn't need another referendum. that will birmingham... some residents are cause all sorts of problems with taking part in six weeks of dozens cause all sorts of problems with d oze ns of cause all sorts of problems with dozens of his own mps who think that a second referendum is the only way supervised exercise using specially adapted machinery. the machines are forward. we will see if both sides powered by air. it is less powerful are as serious about these talks as they say they are. worth pointing than standard gym equipment. the out theresa may is also meeting nicola sturgeon later this afternoon. vicki, jeremy corbyn machines themselves are intelligent enough to vary the resistance could also use the argument i have been here for two years and here you according to how easy or difficult are approaching me in the last two that volunteers are finding them to minutes of this process, and walk use. the leader of the study is away. yes, he could do that, at the professor anna whitaker. moment as i say he is not sounding as if that is what he is going to do, i thought he sounded particularly positive last night. now there are some on his own side who fear he is walking into a trap here, that he will facilitate a tory brexit, as they would put it, and that actually, having stirred really we've got 80 to 90% of over apart from all of this, he will now 80—year—olds never do any strength training but strength training is crucial for balance and
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be involved in making brexit happen. for keeping your independence and mobility. now, as we know, with the labour equipment is on loan but it is hoped to raise enough funds to make it a party and their constituencies around the country, in some parts of permanent feature in the home. it is the country it will be a positive early days. sessions at taking place thing for him not to be seen to be blocking brexit in any way but in three times a week. reaction does other areas it will be the opposite. both party leaders have a huge seem to be extremely positive and volu nteers seem to be extremely positive and volunteers are already feeling the problem with brexit. we can see how benefit, whether it is helping with divisive it has been over the last couple of years. whether they can their mobility or eating aches and pains. besides helping to improve get into a room and hammer out a muscle tone to make it less likely compromise is anyone's guess, but they will fall, it is also helped you never know. it mightjust be that both of them want to get this first phase done and dusted and try with incontinence, simon. nick owen. to move on. labour are looking for that eyebrow. you didn't need to do reassu ra nces to move on. labour are looking for reassurances in law. what they are that. thank you very much. nick owen talking about here is changes to the political declaration, changes to the future relationship the uk will in birmingham and hamish in exeter. thank you both very much. if you have with the eu. it is not legally binding with the eu but what labour are asking for is it to be put into would like to see more on any of uk law so that if and when theresa those stories you can access them via the bbc iplayer and a reminder may moves on, a future conservative that we go nationwide every weekday prime minister can'tjust may moves on, a future conservative prime minister can't just riff may moves on, a future conservative prime minister can'tjust riff it allup and start afternoon at 4:30pm. you are
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prime minister can'tjust riff it all up and start again. of course, if it doesn't work, these talks, remember the fallback position for the prime ministers to put another series votes, alternatives, to the watching afternoon life. house of lords. —— to the house of commons was not overshadowing that, the clock ticking, in terms of parents of a woman who killed herself at a mental health whatever they come up with, it still hospital say failings in her care were "unbelievable". has to go to the eu, they still will claire greaves from pontypool was a patient at cygnet have to 0k any request for hospital in coventry. an inquest found a series of care extension. yes, so the timetable is failings contributed to her death in february last year. very short, that is why they would paul martin reports. hope to have some kind of agreement, i was 100% focused on dying. now i want to live every believe it or not, today, with second of this life, jeremy corbyn, because then if that because it really is incredible. doesn't happen they need to go to life can change in a minute. that is claire greaves four years this series of votes, although that doesn't look like it would be ago, looking to the future. tomorrow. the house of commons is she'd suffered from an early not sitting on friday, although they age with anorexia and a personality disorder. could make that happen, but, as we know, they have to ask the eu for she was a campaigner, this delay to brexit, a second delay a role that took her to the breakfast sofa, to brexit, head of that summit next where she explained what it was like to be kept wednesday. last time round, they sent a letter of the night before, in a police cell because a mental health bed was unavailable. which was pretty late in the day. i was absolutely terrified at the time. they are not saying, downing street, itjust made the situation a lot thatis they are not saying, downing street, that is how it will happen this worse at a time when i really needed it to be better. time, it could be, but yes, the
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timetable for this is now all but, while campaigning for better extremely tight, and it is very mental health services for others, her own struggle continued. clear from listening to downing street that what the prime minister wa nts m ost in 2017, she was moved to this street that what the prime minister wants most of all is to get a deal. she doesn't want to live without a new specialist hospital in coventry. deal, she wants to leave the eu with but, after a period in seclusion, claire's parents became worried a deal, as she would say, in an about her treatment there. she told us that... ordinary fashion —— orderly fashion she... and to do it as soon as possible particularly to avoid having those european elections. let's go to ..had no furniture in the room. damian grammaticas, who has been gauging reaction in brussels. i am a mattress was brought in at night for her to sleep guessing you were nodding away as on and then taken back out. nikki was saying that clock is she also mentioned ticking, there is a timetable the eu that there had been... are very keen to keep to? damien, ..poor support for her hygiene. can you hear me? oh, simon, yes, i colin and debbie were trying to get claire moved closer to home was not hearing you for a second. when she killed herself you were talking to someone else, i in her hospital room. forgive you! vicki young was saying but an inquestjury did not decide claire's death was suicide. the timetable is crucial and everywhere know where more so than they reached an open conclusion where you are. yes, exactly, and said that failings here at cygnet contributed to claire's death. apologies, we were having some staffing levels were a problem. trouble with our sound connection to
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you, but absolutely, yes, the claire's observation levels were not timetable absolutely critical and increased despite her making several the eu leaders have already laid out self—harm attempts in the days before she died, and her care what they see as the timetable at plan wasn't followed, their last summit. we have just been which meant she was alone in her room when she hearing from jean—claude juncker took her own life. here at the european parliament, and it seems unbelievable here at the european parliament, and he has been reinforcing that, saying that that can happen. the eu is prepared to be flexible about what sort of future they've got these systems in place relationship it could envisage and to make sure that they manage the health care properly, write that into the political but the failings were quite shocking. declaration document but as for the timetable, it stays as it was, this one charity says the case shows the strain specialist mental is what he hasjust timetable, it stays as it was, this is what he has just told the european parliament. health care is under. translation:. the 12th of april is the final date the issue of staffing, mental health staffing, for possible approval. is absolutely crucial, if the house of commons does not but too often we see a shortage adopt a stance before of the right kind of skills and, that date no extension, no short—term extension when people have those skills, will be possible. they are not looked after within the system to be able to continue to do that. applause. cygnet healthcare says it's making a number of changes following recommendations made at the inquest. after the 12th of april, we run paul martin, bbc news. the risk ofjeopardising the correct running of the european elections and the correct functioning of the european union. the withdrawal agreement has crossrail, the new train line
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linking east and west and may not be completed by next year and could run always been a compromise. even further over budget. that is a warning to mps today. a balanced compromise, which has enabled both parties to partially obtain what they wanted but not the line was supposed to open last everything that they wanted. it is with that kind of compromise december and has already cost almost that the european union has been £3 billion more than planned. built from the beginning. our transport correspondent, it's a kind of compromise that has enabled the european project to move tom burridge, reports. on and it is the kind of compromise electrics for cctv and systems are that we need now. still being sorted. this is farringdon. other stations are further behind. on the surface, this station is pretty much good to go. look more closely and there is plenty of work still to be done. under the original plan, passengers would have streamed through here, down onto trains whilst descending. jean—claude juncker very clear, saying until the end of next week the uk has to approve the withdrawal agreement through parliament if it in today's report mps are sceptical wants that short extension, about whether it can be finished otherwise a short extension is not next year. the mps on the public possible. he does not rule out a long extension, though, in that accou nts next year. the mps on the public accounts committee are highly critical of the management of the
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project before the delay and a situation. and of course yesterday they were talking about the fear of significant overspend became public ano they were talking about the fear of a no deal. is there a sense that is last summer. they argue local and looking less and less likely? no, mr central government were fixated on the originalfinish central government were fixated on the original finish date. central government were fixated on the originalfinish date. if central government were fixated on the original finish date. if they hadn't ignored warning signs, say mps, the project might not have veered so drastically juncker said he still thought that of course. was a real concern and a real possibility, because the uk has to consent to something or decide the fact that crossrail wasn't delivered in december last year, as was promised, is obviously a big something by next week. that is for problem, and it's going to be an extra £2.8 billion the eu to be able to respond, so already injected into it, and we are not sure when it's either pass the deal or come back going to be opened or how much more and ask for or agree to a longer money it's going to cost, so at this point we are still blind as to what the outcome will be. extension. so that is a real this is the first train that concern, extension. so that is a real concern, but as mrjuncker was also will run on the eastern overground pointing out, the other real concern branch of the new route... featured in a bbc documentary, for the eu is what he talked about the testing of the trains, marrying them up with digital the good functioning of the european signalling, is still ongoing. it's why there is so much uncertainty. new management at crossrail institutions, the european elections, and that means if the uk will announce a new target finish date later this month. is going to have any longer extension, that condition that the the tunnel, the trains uk has to hold those european and the platforms are much
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elections, seems like it is bigger than on other lines on london's underground. sticking, it doesn't seem there is in purely engineering terms, a new high—capacity rail line any willingness to budge on the eu underneath central london side on that at all. it is of course is an impressive feat. up side on that at all. it is of course up to the leaders of the 27 the government rejects today's report from mps, countries will meet a week today to saying it acted swiftly to strengthen governance ta ke countries will meet a week today to take the final decision, not mr and oversight after crossrail juncker, but i think we can read admitted the delay. tom burridge, bbc news. pretty clearly, from what he's saying, a clear direction that they will stick to that, too. we are obsessed with how politicians they are reacting, i saw some journalists to try to cut overcrowding in behind you, do your colleagues in europe, are they often asking you what on earth is going on? what is the mood among the media about all prisons. this? simon, everybody is scratching mps on the justice their heads, wondering and trying to select committee say some crimes should be punished with community sentences instead, sort of peer into the future, it is to reduce the number of inmates. the favourite guessing game, what do they've warned prisons are in the depths you think will happen now, how will of a continuing crisis. this resolve itself, and nobody four knows is the answer. i think it is of the world's largest amphibians — chinese giant salamanders — have been given a new home pa rt of knows is the answer. i think it is part of the reason we see the eu, at london zoo after customs officers foiled an attempt to smuggle them into the country in a cereal box. the salamanders, which are critically endangered, where patients and frustration has can grow up to six feet in length.
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built, because simply there is not one of the zoo's new residents has any clarity and part of the reason we now see as well —— patients. the gone on display to the public. our science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. a bizarre—looking beast. meet london zoo's latest resident, a chinese giant salamander which can strict timetable, conditions and reach nearly six feet long, demands —— patience. for clear making it the biggest amphibian on the planet. signals coming from the uk, so this clear signal today about from mr today, it's being moved juncker, past the withdrawal to a new enclosure. agreement by the end of next week if the salamander‘s very young, you want a short extension. that is far from fully grown, i think because everybody, whether so a quick weigh—in and then it's it is in the media watching this swabbed to check its health. here, all the politicians and the this animal has already been on quite a journey. bureaucrats in the eu watching it, it was discovered after an attempt has seen, many times, the uk, and to smuggle it into the uk. i was amazed when i got the call ask for or extension changes to from uk border force, documents already made, and then the and actually seeing these critically process has rolled on without any endangered amphibians being smuggled resolution. now is the time, the eu illegally really hit us hard, is saying, the next few days are because they are a species that critical, some sort of clear we've dedicated so much effort decision needed. damien, iwasjust to conserve in the wild. it's such a rare chance to see checking, and for what it's worth it a creature like this up close. is exactly the same atmosphere here. these animals were once widespread across china, you are watching afternoon live from bbc news. but they were taken from the streams
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that they live in and bred in farms for their meat. a recent survey found that there are now barely any a jury has failed to reach a verdict of them left in the wild. chinese giant salamanders are living in the trial of david duckenfield — the poice officer who was the match fossils, virtually unchanged commander on the day of the hillsborough disaster. the former chief superintendent since the time of the dinosaurs. denies the manslaughter by gross negligence of 95 liverpool fans. prosecutors say they will they are unlike any other now seek a retrial. let's go live to our correspondence fiona trott who is outside preston animal on the planet, crown court. just explain what happened today. this afternoon, but it's this uniqueness that's simon, we have had relatives coming making them so highly sought after. out of court hugging each other, telling us that the news is still sinking in, but say there is some the trade of wildlife is rife throughout the world, and i think, as species like the chinese giant disappointment, that there has been salamander become rarer, that can actually place more demands no outcome on the gross negligence manslaughter charge, because for on the trade of the species, them this has been a very long so anything that creates more journey already. 0ver pressure on amphibians in the wild them this has been a very long journey already. over the past 30 is going to be detrimental yea rs, journey already. over the past 30 years, there have been two inquests to their future survival. at london zoo, it's time as we know, and now this court case to move the salamander. the hope is to eventually create here too. as for 74—year—old david a breeding population — duckenfield himself, he has been but, highly territorial, told that the crown prosecution for now it's in the tank alone.
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service is seeking a retrial. let me read you a statement from them. from they don't have scales, they have soft skin... sue hemming, the legal director of the cps will stop she says, i it's a chance for the public to learn about one of nature's recognise this development will be difficult for the families affected giants, even if it is a little shy by the hillsborough disaster. we while it gets used to its new home. spoke with those present in preston rebecca morelle, bbc news. and liverpool before informing the court of our decision, and they say they've been talking with relatives 6—foot and spineless. i'll be back this afternoon, answering any questions they have. meanwhile, in parliament, christopher chope, mp, raised a point of order, suggesting it was unfair for his constituents tomorrow. david duckenfield to face another but for now i'll hand you to rachel schofield. trial. let's just maryam is here and in a moment david duckenfield to face another trial. let'sjust quickly david duckenfield to face another trial. let's just quickly remind ourselves what we have heard in this she will be telling trial over the past i! ourselves what we have heard in this us what's hot and what's not in the business news. trial over the past 11 weeks. the first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. jury trial over the past 11 weeks. the jury heard david duckenfield twice refused requests to open a gate to the prime minister meetsjeremy corbyn for talks about a solution to relieve the crushing at the the deadlock over brexit. a jury hillsborough stadium that day. he agreed after a final appeal but fails to reach a verdict on david didn't consider the consequences of his actions, the court heard. 2000 duckenfield, the former police officer facing people flooded through a gate, duckenfield, the former police officerfacing a duckenfield, the former police officer facing a manslaughter charge over his handling of the through a tunnel, into pens, which
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hillsborough disaster. and we re through a tunnel, into pens, which were already packed. the jury also compensation worth about £200 heard david duckenfield himself told million is announced for victims of the new inquest in 2015, probably i the windrush scandal. wasn't the best man for the job on the day. now, he didn't give evidence in this trial, but his your business headlines. flybe is lawyer, benjamin myers, qc, says he had not been treated as a normal cancelled dozens of flights for person, but as a target of blame, operational reasons, including a shortage of pilots and holiday and he said the hillsborough stadium was potentially lethal. he said it's allowa nces. shortage of pilots and holiday allowances. most of the fighter in like giving a captain a ship that is the uk. they apologise for any already sinking, and judging him on inconvenience caused. how well he sails it. now, a guilty the uk's dominant services sector has shrunk for the first time in nearly verdict today, though, as you say, three years, according to the latest figures. the index came in much for the charge relating to weaker than forecast. it is the first time the sector has 69—year—old graham mackrell, who was shrunk since july 2016, the ground safety officer, immediately after the uk voted effectively the jury saying to him you failed to provide enough to leave the european union. turnstiles for the fans that day, at sse energy services, just seven for some 10,000 fans in the domestic retail arm of sse, is to pay £700,000 after it missed the area where the facial —— fatal targets to install gas smart meters crushing occurred, and he will be for customers in 2018. under a government programme, sentenced at a later date. fiona suppliers are required by law to take all reasonable steps trott, thank you. to roll—out smart meters you are watching afternoon live, the to all homes and small
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headlines. businesses by the end of 2020. the prime minister is due to meet jeremy corbyn in about ten minutes' time for talks to find a solution it has been a good day for the about brexit. the jury fails to market in london at least. investors reach a verdict on david duckenfield are looking to china and the us, over the hillsborough disaster. that i'm going war. it hopes there compensation worth about £200 will be some sort of resolution for that because talks are continuing million is announced for victims of the windrush scandal. between the worlds two biggest and in sport, the teenage aventis economies. in terms of the uk, we've had house—builders and banking stocks in particular holding the market up. explain to me the markets striker moses kean was racially abused last night, that he was partially to blame, something heavily criticised by raheem sterling. tottenham host theirfirst today. the fact that banks aren't match in their new stadium tonight, built at a cost of £1 billion, eight house—builders were up shows that markets were very focused on the fa ct months later than planned, they take markets were very focused on the fact that we could be moving towards on crystal palace. 100 days to go a softer brexit. those are two until the start of the football sectors that would probably be some world cup. england coach tracey of the hardest hit if we did have a neville says the form of her players ha rd of the hardest hit if we did have a hard brexit outcome. the other dipped after the commonwealth games factor is we may be getting close to success. having the trade dispute between the
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us and china resolved. that is let's pick up on one of our headline particularly good for europe because europe has a lot of companies that stories. make cars, trains, planes, luxury about £200 million is to be goods that are bought by china so paid in compensation to those affected by the windrush scandal. the home secretary sajid javid said higher growth in china would be a the compensation would help people benefit to them. the market are less who arrived in the uk before 1973, many from caribbean countries, volatile today than they have been. who were then wrongly detained, denied legal rights, one stock that has been quite threatened with deportation or wrongly deported from the uk by the home office. he set out details of the scheme volatile is super dry. they have had to the house of commons. a torrid time accolade. they are i am confident that the proposals for this scheme are closely aligned with what affected communities down about 70% in the last year. wanted to see. namely, that it is simple, it is accessible and pa rt of down about 70% in the last year. part of it is that retail stocks above all, it is fair. full information is now available have been struggling a lot due to online and via a free telephone hotline number. changing consumer demands but they guidance is being provided to help have had their own drama, so to people understand what compensation speak. the original founder of the they might be entitled to and how to submit a claim, company won a bid yesterday to get and the application process itself is as simple back onto the board of the company. and as clear as possible. however, that saw the rest of the body of the company resign in protest. so now there is a bit of uncertainty about the strategy going forward , uncertainty about the strategy going forward, how they are going to reinvest in the business, when they go into childrenswear, will they
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where the army has launched an expand their existing product line, investigation after a video was will they try to do more line. it is just a bit up in the air at the shared on social media, showing soldiers shooting at an image of moment. let's talk about stagecoach. jeremy corbyn. we had a strong statement from them the footage, filmed in kabul, appears to show personnel using the image of the labour leader as a target today. they do train and bus on a practice range. the ministry of defence said such behaviour was totally unacceptable. services primarily. they are a company which have been doing bog labour described it as "alarming" — and the prisons minister, with digital, wi-fi company which have been doing bog with digital, wi—fi on buses. they are trading in the uk. up almost 7%. rory stewart — who served in the army — called it "outrageous". speaking to sky news, the commander the uk bus business was upjust over nick perry —ish said the video 796. the uk bus business was upjust over 7%. they are planning to get out of showed a serious error ofjudgment. the us bus business which is where they were losing money. all in all, the video show is totally a good set of results for them. good unacceptable behaviour and a serious error ofjudgment that unacceptable behaviour and a serious error of judgment that falls far below the behaviour that we expect to talk to you. thank you very much of our soldiers in the brigade. so indeed. let's take a look at those what now, what have you established market figures. the market are in what is the next step? the army looking strong. that's not the right figure for the paris stock market. it is actually up. the marketer is conducting a full investigation looking good. hopes renewed that and taking this extremely seriously there could be some sort of and taking this extremely seriously and we want to get to the bottom of
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what happened. can you tell us any revolution between the and china. thank you very much indeed. more about the individuals in the video, why they are in afghanistan, what their role has been? we have about 400 soldiers from the brigade conducting force protection in afghanistan and working closely with public health england say the both nato and afghan partners and problem is primarily down to drugs these soldiers are doing an being over prescribe. there may be outstanding job in theatre, but this serious error ofjudgment outstanding job in theatre, but this serious error of judgment is outstanding job in theatre, but this serious error ofjudgment is being fully investigated by the army. the target is the leader of the hopein being over prescribe. there may be hope in the form of honey. 0pposition, jeremy corbyn. it is a central pillar to the british armed tim muffett reports. forces, not just the central pillar to the british armed forces, notjust the army but the armed forces is a wider body, that they are apolitical, and this would seem to fall short of that, would you agree? so, let me be clear, the i was gravely ill, gravely ill. when debbie contracted a urinary tract infection, she assumed antibiotics would take care of it, army is and always will be a totally but things went downhill fast. apolitical organisation, and this is apolitical organisation, and this is a serious error of judgment. i developed sepsis, where your body kind of goes into overdrive and it attacks itself. they started pumping antibiotics into me and then as each day passed, they found that mps have warned that crossrail — antibiotic was not working the new trainline linking and i was deteriorating day by day. east and west london — may not be completed by next year, why weren't those antibiotics working?
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they found that i had and could run further over budget. anti—microbial resistance. the line was supposed to open last it is becoming more and more common, which is what the alarming thing december and has already cost almost £3 billion more than planned. is and why they have to do something. 0ur transport correspondent, tom burridge, reports. anti—microbial resistance is what happens when not a single new crossrail microorganisms such as these evolve station is complete. electrics for cctv and tannoy and antibiotics can no longer kill systems are still being sorted. them. this is farringdon. other stations are further behind. anti—microbial resistance is predicted to kill more people 0n the surface, this station than cancer by 2050, and if we get to the is pretty much good to go, stage where we have no but look more closely working antibiotics, and there is plenty of work still to be done. it would essentially mean the end of modern medicine. under the original plan, research aims to clear up the question of why can bacteria not passengers would have streamed through here down onto trains last survive in a beehive? december. one of the main reasons as things stand, the new line for that is the natural won't be ready this year — antimicrobial properties of honey. but, in today's report, honey has been used as a treatment mps are sceptical about whether it can be finished next year. for infection for centuries, it contains natural antibiotics, which can kill bacteria. the mps on the public accounts committee are highly critical of the management of the project before the delay and a significant the problem is, it's sticky, overspend became public last summer. which means it's very difficult to use in they argue local and central surgery or on a wound. government were fixated on the original finish date. we're taking it from something if they hadn't ignored warning signs, say the mp5, that is thick and sticky the project might not have veered
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and turning it into sprays, creams and powders, that can be easily applied to lots so drastically of course. of different parts of the body. the fact that crossrail wasn't delivered in december last year, honey—based medical gel has as was promised, is obviously a big already been developed. the team here want to problem, and it's going to be take that idea further. an extra £2.8 billion this is our simulated wound, already injected into it, and we are not sure when it's it's killing the bacteria. going to be opened or how much more here we have our emulsion, that has got the droplets money it's going to cost, of the honey, and this could be used so at this point we are still blind preventively as well, as to what the outcome will be. so before a surgeon makes an incision. would that work potentially this is the first train that as well as an antibiotic prescribed by a doctor? will run on the eastern overground yeah, so this is an alternative branch of the new route... featured in a bbc documentary, to using antibiotics, the testing of the trains. marrying them up with digital and what is really promising signalling is still ongoing. about this honey is that it's why there is so much uncertainty. it has already been shown to kill new management at crossrail bacteria that are resistant will announce a new target finish to conventional antibiotics, date later this month. such as the superbug, mrsa. the tunnel, the trains and the platforms are much the six antibiotics doctors bigger than on other lines tried on debbie did work, but she very nearly died on london's underground. and she welcomes another approach in purely engineering terms, to fighting infection. a new high—capacity rail line underneath central london part of being a survivor is the fact that so many is an impressive feat. people do not make it.
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the government rejects we have to support today's report from mps, research so that we find saying it acted swiftly other methods of treating infections. to strengthen governance it's hoped that if funding is found, these products will be and oversight after crossrail brought to medical trial admitted the delay. in the next few years. tom burridge, bbc news. tim muffett, bbc news. the prime minister is in various the south—east asian country of brunei important meeting this afternoon, has introduced strict islamic laws to make sodomy and adultery one of them withjeremy corbyn. we punishable by stoning to death. arejust the move has sparked one of them withjeremy corbyn. we are just hearing via the daily international condemnation, including from high—profile stars such as george clooney, mirror's reporter thatjeremy corbyn and the country's gay community has expressed shock and fear. 0ur lgbt correspondent has said that... we hope to have ben hunte reports. the sultan of brunei, one of the richest men in the world, ruling over a small south—east asian nation. and it's in this country more on that in the 5pm hour. first, where strict new islamic laws are being introduced, making gay sex between men and adultery offences punishable the weather. more of the same today. by stoning to death. translation: anyone visiting sunny spells, occasional dark clouds the country will attain good looming on the horizon and wintry memories, and are able showers, sometimes tail, and to experience our peaceful sometimes slate, snow. we have
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and harmonious environment, already had that in the last 204! and the best hospitality. homosexuality was already illegal was. you can see low pressure in brunei, and those caught could face up to ten spinning around. it is stuck around years in prison. but the sultan, who is the world's north—western part of europe. it is second longest reigning monarch not just us but is calling for stronger north—western part of europe. it is notjust us but front north—western part of europe. it is not just us but front as well. islamic teachings. north—western part of europe. it is he wants brunei to become more notjust us but front as well. you can see these clouds moving around this area of low pressure. that it aligned with the islamic has seen this afternoon. it is faith and sharia law. chilly out there. cold in the if this law is actually enforced it north—west with gale force winds will be a real setback for the human rights of the people of brunei. around north—western scotland, and we are talking about a country northern ireland. pretty blustery which has maintained a moratorium on the death penalty since 1957, so they have not executed around western areas. tonight, the return of heavy showers in anyone since 1957. south—western part of england and wales. the problem will be snow across the hills as well. clear because of its oil wealth brunei has an investment agency, spells around. watch out for icy which owns some of the world's top hotels, including this one, patches the first thing tomorrow the dorchester in london. it's these properties that some morning. thursday, the low pressure campaigners are calling for people to boycott. is pretty much stationary across the campaigners with huge public uk. it is not moving anywhere. it is platforms, eltonjohn tweeting that he's already refusing to stay slap bang in the middle of the uk at these hotels, as well as other big celebrities asking their followers to rise up and all that is happening is that and do something now. areas of cloud, wind and rain are just circling. that means the
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weather will be very changeable tomorrow. watch out for some rush george clooney has said we are putting money hour winter weather during the in the pockets of those who choose to stone their citizens. course of tomorrow. the loan is brunei's lgbt community has expressed shock, whilst there is a small hope still with us on friday but there is that the new laws may not actually be widely enforced, a tendency in the forecast for it to people still say they are powerless. shift away out to the atlantic. it before, lg bt people were living in secret. now, they are living in fear. ben hunte, bbc news. is at the same time drawing up some slightly milder airfrom is at the same time drawing up some slightly milder air from the southern climes so you will notice here with me is stephen cockburn these temperatures on friday climbing as we go through the course of the day. still some showers from amnesty international, what is your reaction? we think it is a huge backward step, brunei has not around but winds are blowing out of executed anyone since 1957 so it is quite hard to understand why these the south—east. slightly warmer air very cruel punishments have been out of the continent. you will brought in at this time for issues notice a difference. double figures of same—sex acts, adultery, across the country but it will still amputation for robbery as well. it be quite showery. as we go towards isa amputation for robbery as well. it is a huge backward step and we hope the weekend, you can see these the government will rethink. they milder winds blowing out of the are not going to come are they? hope isa are not going to come are they? hope is a wonderful thing but is there continent and temperatures will continue to rise. we could hit the anything that can be done internationally? the more we see the mid teens over the weekend but it
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spotlight on brunei the stronger the will be pretty chilly on the north message will be and the more likely sea coast though. that's it. it could be that first of all the punishments aren't used and then hopefully in the medium term could be repealed. we have seen very strong statements from governments across the world, from the un, goodbye. activist from different celebrity as well and we want that spotlight to continue, we want there to be a feeling that brunei regrets its action and certain to be a deterrent to use it and hopefully turn away today at five, we're from stop you talked about the live at westminster, where theresa may and jeremy corbyn have been holding talks, celebrity endorsement, george clooney and elton john, to try to break the brexit deadlock. celebrity endorsement, george clooney and eltonjohn, do you think the government in brunei will take any notice of that whatsoever?” prime minister, will it think the general spotlight on brunei is quite important, people will find their way to make the be a labour brexit? statement, whether that be state m e nts statement, whether that be statements to the un, petitions, across party approach, the latest people will be shining a light on this and i think that does help to deadline isjust nine across party approach, the latest deadline is just nine days away as they have been spelling out their show some solidarity to the lgbt demands. but the brexit minister is community in brunei, it does show there is a cost to doing these sorts one of two ministers to resign from of things and i think it is really the government, criticising the important to know what the rest of the world is doing. the rest of the prime minister's approach. the leaders of other parties held talks world is moving away from this type of cruel punishments and brunei is going on the wrong direction.
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of cruel punishments and brunei is going on the wrong directionm there evidence of other countries today. this is the scene live may be following a similar path? the in the house of commons, where mps are debating their own trend is going on the opposite options on the way ahead. direction, there are fewer and fewer countries using the death penalty, we'll have the latest on events just a handful of countries left in at westminster, as progress is attempted on several the world to use the death penalty fronts at the same time. for same sex. there are threats from sri lanka to bring it back after 40 yea rs, sri lanka to bring it back after 40 years, there are some countries using it more but globally it is being useless. the risk is and you say the hope is the publicity may deter them from acting but it could have the opposite effect of course, and with a focus on their country they may want to show this is what we are doing. we hope very much that is not the case. brunei has a relatively positive record on the death penalty for example, it hasn't executed anyone since 1957, we think that's a record that needs to be preserved. it should follow the reactions, not just a preserved. it should follow the reactions, notjust a western reaction, malaysia is actually moving away from the death penalty, it has pros and executions, so there are it has pros and executions, so there a re lots of it has pros and executions, so there are lots of good examples within the region as well of the brunei to take inspiration from.
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there is a storm gathering. nothing to do with that meeting but that is getting under way right about now just a at dark cloud appeared. 0ne minute it was cold. now it is quite one. what have you done? i haven't done anything. i think it is you. i tell you what, it is very changeable out there today. westminster, i guess find anywhere else. sleet, snow and these are the sort of crowd over london right now and some of the other part of the country. very deep. from here to here, we are talking about a couple of miles. they are tall enough to give some downpours. if you look at the
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satellite, you can seek little blobs. they are the clouds i am talking about. sometimes these clouds clustered together to form bigger areas and there is one here thatis bigger areas and there is one here that is across the north—west of the uk into northern ireland. that is we often call longer spells of rain. elsewhere across the country, showers will come and go. there is a bit of sunshine around. it is certainly not all bad. tonight, one of these clusters, these longer spells of rain, and even some wintering us, sleet and snow, will be affecting south—western part of the country first thing tomorrow morning. it is the centre of the low pressure. devon, somerset, herefordshire, shropshire could get a little bit of snow first thing in the morning. you can see low pressure spinning around here. showers will be cycling and cycling in the same place. elsewhere, fewer showers. northern england, southern scotland, the lowlands will be
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absolutely fine with sunshine. we are starting to see a shift in the weather. this low pressure is going to be moving not completely away but sort of changing orientation. that means the wind will start to come out of the south, southeast tomorrow. the yellow you can see here is slightly milder air heading in our direction here is slightly milder air heading in ourdirection and here is slightly milder air heading in our direction and it is going to push the cold air away. it is as simple as that. yes, we are still close to the close. there will be showers. the temperatures are starting to cut. 11 to 13 degrees. 0n starting to cut. 11 to 13 degrees. on friday, giving a bit of sunshine, it is going to feel a lot better. that same process continues into the weekend as well. the temperatures will continue to rise. they are picking up to around 17 degrees. whether that happens or not, we will see. but temperatures are rising in the south. today hopefully a couple
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of these. rainbows. goodbye. this is bbc news. our latest headlines. theresa may is meeting jeremy corbyn right now in trying to get his help in breaking the brexit deadlock. the jewellery and trial fails to reach a verdict on the manslaughter charge. compensation for which victims of the windrush scandal is an ounce. the ministry of defence investigate after footage of the ministry of defence investigate afterfootage of emerges the ministry of defence investigate after footage of emerges of soldiers shooting atjeremy corbyn for practice. john watson, another racism bleep instance of racism in football. it is the latest in what has been a number of high—profile, well documented incidents in
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football. another presented itself in italy last night. thejuventus forward racially abused. a team—mate suggested that he was partly to blame for his own abuse he received on the field. he scored the second goal and stood in front of the home fa ns goal and stood in front of the home fans who directed monkey chants towards him for much of the game. play was halted and a warning was broadcast to the cloud. afterwards... sterling, who has become a well spoken critic of racism in football having received a lot himself on the field of play, playing for his country and for manchester city, he
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said this on instagram... uefa do have rules which permit referees to remove players from the field if chanting continues. thejuventus manager also said his player shouldn't have celebrated in that manner. he said more technology is needed to catch those responsible. asi needed to catch those responsible. as i said before, and i will say again tonight, there is only one solution. there are tools that can be used for this and these tools are the cameras. when these people are caught, then they need to take them out of the stadium and never be allowed back in. it doesn't take much, we just need strict rules so after a while these strict rules will be observed, period. it is very easy when you do something wrong
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like this, then you can't walk into a stadium anymore, notjust for a month or a year but for good. when summary does something wrong they shouldn't be allowed into stadium any more. as you can imagine, a lot of shock, not just about what happened on the field but the weight juventus have handled the fallout. tonight the long—awaited opening of tottenham's new stadium. yes, we have seen a lot of test events at the newly built stadium in north london. spurs finally getting to play at their new home tonight six months after it was due to open. the £1 billion tottenham hotspur stadium as it is known will open its doors at they play crystal palace. there it is in all its glory. 62,000 seater capacity, almost double that of the old stadium and the second largest ground in england now behind 0ld largest ground in england now behind old trafford. they say the new home will benefit the surrounding area in
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north london as well. as far as a community is concerned it is a massive lift for tottenham and for london and it couldn't come at a better time in view of all the political situation we have at the moment. we are definitely open for business. as far as the players are concerned, we are all excited. i have every confidence they will finish the season very strongly. 100 days to go until the netball world cup that is being held in liverpool, england, scotland and northern ireland all taking part. they visited the bbc this morning very special event was staged. 100 days, 100 goals, 100 goals. they won commonwealth gold last year. the coach feels her squad will be ready. we have had everything thrown at us over this international calendar to prepare us for this world cup and it isa prepare us for this world cup and it is a tough tournament. we have to
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keep all our players fit, healthy and we have to do is select the best squad. the pressure is on from one point of view but our protocol has been maintained throughout. we have been maintained throughout. we have been following the process. the countdown is on. they are hoping to topple australia, the current holders of that title. that is all from the bbc sport centre now. back to you. thank you very much. i'm live in westminster as the prime minister begins talks withjeremy corbyn on how to find common ground on brexit. they will be talking for nine minutes. her decision to reach out to the labour leader angered conservative brexiteers with one announcing his resignation. what is announcing his resignation. what is a timetable for the prime minister over the next few days and what will the eu demand? chris morris knows and is with me now. i hope you know. talk us through what are we facing. we know we have got this very short
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extension until april the 12th which looks highly unlikely to be enough time to decide anything so the prime minister's new strategy is to try and agreea minister's new strategy is to try and agree a new deal with labour that can get pushed through a pretty high speed before the 22nd of may. but there is a bit ofjeopardy in that because it is by april the 12 that because it is by april the 12 that the government has to decide whether it is going to hold european elections. if it is decided not to do that because it thinks it can do a deal with labour but then that deal went into the sand in parliament before may the 22nd, you are kind of out of options and you are kind of out of options and you are faced with that cliff edge of no deal or revoke article 50 and no brexit altogether. there is also the real problem on the european union side. jean—claude juncker said today that an extension isn't on the books. the key thing is that you have to take part in the european elections if you are going to move beyond the 22nd of may. with the
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prime minister accept that? she may not have that much choice even though we have seen the tory backbenchers are incandescent today. they will be even more angry because a longer extension won'tjust be a few more weeks or months. it is probably at least nine months, maybe a year or longer. i heard two to four years this morning. don't forget that if we had left on the 29th of march we would have been moving into a transition period of at least 21 months with possibly one or two years on top of that. there is an element of progress. it is worth remembering, the point you lead is not the end of negotiations because a whole future relationship is kind of still up for grabs when you leave. there is a huge time pressure on both sides. here in westminster and brussels. yes, we have seen the anger here but there is also a lot of concern in brussels about the idea of a longer extension. most of them do not want ano extension. most of them do not want a no deal. they think it would be a
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failure of statecraft from their perspective and they still believe that it would be damaging to the economy on both sides.” that it would be damaging to the economy on both sides. i am just hearing that the labour delegation is walking into theresa may's office now. they are running late. there are risks here for both sides. there are. from the european union perspective, the problem are having a longer extension is you have got the destruction of brexit still inside the union. don't forget during the course of this year they have got to bed that you parliament in. they have to elect a new president of the european commission. they need tough negotiations about the budget period. if you have the uk slightly grumpily inside the tent, that is not a particularly good luck. if there is the long term extension offered it would come with terms and conditions, one of which would be, don't be obstructive. don't, perhaps, take part in some key votes. agreed to step aside on certain occasions if you are still
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determined to leave in a relatively short period of time. of course, that can't be legally guaranteed. it would have to be some sort of political arrangement and there are people in brussels who say, we could be setting ourselves up for something that we don't want to get into here, with a grumpy britain still inside, trying to leave, a mess in westminster and we want to get on with the rest of our agenda. the nature of this whole brexit process , the nature of this whole brexit process, what is huge news one day is nothing the next. what is happening there? you might be seeing them again next monday. 0ne amendment to today's motion has been the ability to bring back indicative votes again. so if the talks between theresa may and jeremy corbyn don't really get anywhere in the next day or two, really get anywhere in the next day ortwo, and we really get anywhere in the next day or two, and we are... we will see more indicative votes and different options will come back on monday.- ever, thank you very much, chris
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morris. no significance to this at all, butjust as the labour delegation walks into theresa may's office the hail started coming down here at westminster. a storm has been brewing. there is a picture. i don't need to describe it. it says everything. anyway, we're hearing that nicola sturgeon is having a meeting with theresa may at 4:30pm. she will also be meeting members of the lib dems, the greens and the independent group. they are having a meeting at 4p pm this afternoon in the lobby here at parliament. before nicola sturgeon has had meetings the prime minister. let's pick up more on where we are. thank you both for coming. i suspect neither of you is particularly happy at the prospect of what is in store because we are looking... is it a soft brexit that is most likely outcome? it absolutely looks like it. if she is having a conversation withjeremy
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corbyn. he has put his head above the parapet saying he wants a second referendum. from my side of things it looks pretty dodgy. and from yours? from my side of things it looks slightly promising. i think it is good final that we are having a conversation about careful scrutiny of the various options in front of us of the various options in front of us and! of the various options in front of us and i do think we will have to look at a longer extension to sort this out but there has to be a purpose. i am worried that my generation will be faced with a last—minute deal that is stitched up by parliamentarians to try and find a majority. the only way to move on with some semblance of legitimacy will be to... you want him to say nothing happens unless there is another boat. yes, i want him to stand behind the opinion of the vast majority of his supporters. i think it isa majority of his supporters. i think it is a tremendous opportunity. 7096 of actual tory membership want a no—deal brexit. we have seen 44% from a poll say they would be ok with that. you can see it online.
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there are many polls out there that say a vast majority of tory members wa nt say a vast majority of tory members want to see that happen and i feel that theresa may is turning our back on tory members. i am a tory member myself. i feel like our voice is being taken myself. i feel like our voice is being ta ken away. myself. i feel like our voice is being taken away. becoming disenfranchised. we are seeing again and again this anger that their voices and being heard. what this was always about and what it always should be about is about who governs his country. right now we're seeing that it his country. right now we're seeing thatitis his country. right now we're seeing that it is ungovernable with theresa may installed. so who governs it? it should be the people. those who have had their say on the first referendum that is the default. no deal. you don't agree that the a nswer deal. you don't agree that the answer is to go back to the people. we went to the people the first time round then they said that they wanted to have a brexit and leave the eu and all of its institutions. if we were to start reconsidering the customs union which is an eu
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institution, therefore brexit doesn't exist. it is brexit in name only. the assumption of those who call for another referendum is up it will result something but there is a risk it doesn't. i think it absolutely will because it is the only democratic way to sort out... hang ona only democratic way to sort out... hang on a minute. i thought i had dealt with everything. you can of shouting, everything, but now we have a thunderstorm right over westminster. the timing of that is perfect actually. having a second referendum would bring about such thunder and referendum would bring about such thunderand anger in referendum would bring about such thunder and anger in this country. very good, yeah. the only way to bring back country is to have the peoples vote. we have given politicians the chance. they are incapable. brexit would have happened had these conservative mps actually backed the deal. we are now looking at a very long extension and theresa may having to go tojeremy
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corbyn. we just haven't had a brexiteer in charge from the very beginning. there was never going to beginning. there was never going to bea beginning. there was never going to be a deal which delivered. there was never going to be a deal... there is a fundamental change to how we govern this country, how people have a say in their communities, the laws they have made. it is a fundamental change and there are people in the establishment, remainer is a the board that want to see brexit thwarted and they want to see people not have their say. they want to see the same old establishment in power. they don't want them to have their say. people on your side have tried to thwart brexit. we are now looking into the abyss. there is a concerted effort by those in parliament. let's remember that the majority of parliament i don't want brexit, the people don't want brexit. we are seeing it. but a brexiteer in charge
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and let see what happens. this is what happens when brexit goes from a bstra ct to what happens when brexit goes from abstract to reality. any form of brexit is likely to wither under scrutiny. there isn't a brexit deal which doesn't leave us with significant economic harm. what is happening here is that they are not listening to the initial result of the referendum ? listening to the initial result of the referendum? we are ultimately at gridlock because it is an unworkable project. this idea that brexit cannot happen is completely flawed because you haven't got people there that actually want brexit to happen. we have seen again and again politicians who don't want brexit to happen trying to make the rules and i want to see politicians like boris johnson in charge of making those rules, bring it back to the people and actually listen to people for once. boris johnson is the answer? unfortunately i don't think boris johnson is the answer and i think you would have seen brexit happen if enough conservative mps had voted
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for it. people can't agree on what brexit means. it goes back to 2016. brexit means. it goes back to 2016. brexit means. it goes back to 2016. brexit means to leave the eu and all of its institutions. and that is what we have got to see. you would like to see a no deal? i think that stage... it is not about what we wanted. no one has even tried to negotiate that. that is what i want to see happen going forward. i want to see happen going forward. i want to see happen going forward. i want to see greater working with european partners to make that happen but thatis partners to make that happen but that is never going to happen because people in parliament fundamentally don't want brexit to happen. that is a truth of it. crashing out without a deal would be an absolute crashing out. you are looking at a hit to the gdp of about 60%. looking at a hit to the gdp of about 6096. in terms of people having a say, for the first time in 14 years... we are talking about
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peoplesjobs and years... we are talking about peoples jobs and livelihoods. theresa may is said that she can make no deal work. theresa may is said that she can make no dealwork. she theresa may is said that she can make no deal work. she said that yesterday. you can we just keep going for another minute or so? keep going for another minute or so? keep going because this is the most interesting discussion i have heard for a long time. i think it is a really important situation that we actually log... 17.4 million people voted for brexit and you are saying it is not possible. it fundamentally is. we put the right people in place, we can make this work. this isa place, we can make this work. this is a vision for the country. we can put the right people in place in the next couple of weeks. the situation we are in, it is not about what would happen if someone else had been there... i was in bury st edmunds only last weekend i had a
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ban come up to me with his ten—year—old child and he said to me that i should be lobotomised for being pro—brexit. that i should be lobotomised for being pro-brexit. i have also had lots of abuse. it is a divisive campaign because it is an issue that is fundamentally divisive. in order to move on we are going to have to put this back to the people. what question would you put to them?m is not up to me. ultimately you want to put remain in their... we'll leave them to it. marion is here. she has a business news. she is in the studio. here on
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afternoon a jury fails to face a verdict on the police officer facing a manslaughter charge. compensation is announced for victims of the windrush scandal. most of the fight are within the uk. the airlines hated city sincerely apologise for inconvenience. boots has warned that it could close stores as it takes decisive steps to cut costs. it employs around 56,000 staff. it says it has suffered its most difficult quarter since it
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found formation. like-for-like sales are down by 2.3%. britain's dominant services sector has shrunk for the first time in three years. the index came in much weaker than forecast. it isa came in much weaker than forecast. it is a first time the sector has shrunk since july 2016, it is a first time the sector has shrunk sincejuly 2016, immediately after the uk voted to leave the european union. we got cut short because of that discussion. that is the first time i have heard... it was a great discussion, simon. let's talk quickly about flybe. there is bad news. some flybe customers have been hit hard. the regional airline has cancelled dozens of wednesday morning fight as it enters discussions over a potentialjob losses. the company blamed an industrywide shortage of pilots for delays as well as its own pilots taking holidays. flight from belfast and birmingham are amongst those affected. most of the flights are
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within the uk. earlier we spoke to flybe's chief executive. we are facing challenges, mainly pilot shortages but also seasonality. we just launched the summer season this week. we have just launched this week the summer season and that is the main challenge we have to face. we've been working with the team very early, starting very early this morning, and starting late yesterday. so it is coming at a very difficult storm and it has been a surprise for us. we would like to apologise. today is not the level of service we would like to provide to customers. all customers impacted have been informed we have also briefed all the people on the ground and the handlers that are working with us. again, it is concerning 5% of our flight.
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we did cancel too many flights today. 95% of our operations are running normal so we are managing the situation as much as we can. and we are doing that right now. i'll have more business with you in one hour's time. you are watching afternoon light. four of the world's largest amphibians — chinese giant salamanders — have been given a new home at london zoo after customs officers foiled an attempt to smuggle them into the country in a cereal box. the salamanders, which are critically endangered, can grow up to six feet in length. one of the zoo's new residents has gone on display to the public. 0ur science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. a bizarre—looking beast. meet london zoo's latest resident, a chinese giant salamander which can reach nearly six feet long, making it the biggest amphibian on the planet.
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today, it's being moved to a new enclosure. the salamander‘s very young, far from fully grown, so a quick weigh—in and then it's swabbed to check its health. this animal has already been on quite a journey. it was discovered after an attempt to smuggle it into the uk. i was amazed when i got the call from uk border force, and actually seeing these critically endangered amphibians being smuggled illegally really hit us hard, because they are a species that we've dedicated so much effort to conserve in the wild. it's such a rare chance to see a creature like this up close. these animals were once widespread across china, but they were taken from the streams that they live in and bred in farms for their meat. a recent survey found that there are now barely any of them left in the wild. chinese giant salamanders are living fossils, virtually unchanged since the time of the dinosaurs.
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they are unlike any other animal on the planet, but it's this uniqueness that's making them so highly sought after. the trade of wildlife is rife throughout the world, and i think, as species like the chinese giant salamander become rarer, that can actually place more demands on the trade of the species, so anything that creates more pressure on amphibians in the wild is going to be detrimental to their future survival. at london zoo, it's time to move the salamander. the hope is to eventually create a breeding population — but, highly territorial, for now it's in the tank alone. they don't have scales, they have soft skin... it's a chance for the public to learn about one of nature's giants, even if it is a little shy while it gets used to its new home. rebecca morelle, bbc news.
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if you've been watching, you will know that we have had thunder and lightning and i was looking for a broomstick. what is going on? time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. it really feels chilly in the north—west of the uk with strong winds and all the cloud and occasional rain. sweets, showers, snow. for most of us it is rain and sunny spells. tonight, really chilly. and look at all this weather in the south—west of the country. southern wales, the mowers, into the south west midlands. during the rush hour there could be wet snow falling, mostly across the hills though. tomorrow, another changeable day with sunshine and passenger was but there will be a gradual improvement in the weather, particularly across northern areas. however, in the south—west tomorrow
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ta ke however, in the south—west tomorrow take a brolly but steady on, it will be quite gusty. the weather is set to improve, set to turn warmer across the south—east of the country with temperatures into the mid—teens. hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3pm... theresa may is helping meeting jeremy corbyn right now. david duckenfield fails to reach a verdict on the manslaughter charge against him. compensation worth about £200 million is announced for victims of the windrush scandal. the ministry of defence investigates after footage of soldiers shooting at a picture ofjeremy corbyn for target practice. the video shows totally unacceptable behaviour and a serious error ofjudgment that unacceptable behaviour and a serious error of judgment that falls far below the behaviour we expect of our soldiers in the brigade. coming up, all of the sport with john watson. criticism ofjuventus
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for their handling of another incidents of racism in football. and we are also getting a weather update from tomasz schafernaker. we've had a little bit of snow, not unusual for april, another cold day tomorrow and then from friday it is looking a bit warmer. thanks, tomasz. also coming up, a salamander smuggled in a cereal box finds a new home at london zoo. this is afternoon live, i am live in westminster. talks between theresa may and labour leader jeremy westminster. talks between theresa may and labour leaderjeremy corbyn are underway may and labour leaderjeremy corbyn are under way now to try to find common ground to break the brexit deadlock. later this afternoon the prime minister will also hold talks
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with snp leader nicola sturgeon and wales first minister mark trayfoot. mrs may has defended the move telling mps they have a responsibility to deliver the uk's departure from the eu. she was responding to criticism from pro—brexit conservatives who claim she has had it control of brexit to labour and made it more likely the country will stay in a customs union with the eu. 0ne minister nigel adams resigned this morning, calling the move a grave error. nick eardley has this report. prime minister, will it be a labour brexit? can you fix the cracks in your cabinet this way? this is not where the prime minister wants to be, but after failing three times to get her deal through parliament, she is now looking to labour. so could an unlikely compromise between these two get brexit through? the prime minister say she can't change the withdrawal agreement, the way we leave, but she will explore what our future deal looks like. i think there are a number of areas we agree on in relation to brexit. we both want to deliver leaving the eu with the deal,
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we both want to protectjobs, i think we both want to ensure that we end free movement, i think we both recognise the importance of the withdrawal agreement. what we want to do now is to find a way forward that can command the support of this house and deliver a brexit. labour wants a close—knit relationship following eu trade rules through a customs union and that could be the price of his leader's support. mr speaker, i welcome the prime minister's offer for talks following the meetings i have held with members across this house and look forward to meeting her later today, and i welcome her willingness to compromise to resolve the brexit deadlock. there are big differences, but the prime minister is hoping there could be a deal withjeremy corbyn as soon as today. if not, proposals would be put to parliament and the government would accept the verdict. if not, theresa may is promising
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to respect any vote in parliament if labour does as well. she wants it all done by may to 20 seconds to avoid the uk taking part in european elections. scotland's first minister will meet the prime minister as well, she is warning any agreement now could be a trap because promises on the future won't be legally binding. it may be unpicked by hard—line prime minister, because, remember, whatever theresa may might agree with us right now, by her own admission, she is not going to be prime minister so she can't deliver on anything. so, take a pause, get rid of this ticking clock, and do this properly and sensibly. and none of this is as simple as just getting a deal through parliament, winning the votes to get it through the commons. theresa may knows that her party is deeply divided, and if she pivots towards labour to try and win some of their votes, many of her own brexiteers will be absolutely furious. welsh 0ffice minister nigel adams resigned this morning, angry mrs may has offered to work with the opposition. he wrote... this is a major moment, and i would simply counsel my
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government and my party and my prime minister, stop, think very carefully what you are doing. if you give legitimacy to a man that i think is genuinely not fit to run britain and will do it damage, you will damage the very prospects of your own party, and, most importantly, for people like me, the prospects for our country. jeremy corbyn could face the wrath of some of his party, too, if he agrees to a deal that doesn't lead to a referendum. every shred of evidence available says that it's what most labour party voters and party members want to see, so i am sure he will be very mindful of that. talks this afternoon could change what brexit looks like, but westminster is still very divided. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. in the last few minutes, nicola sturgeon, leader of course in scotland, has just tweeted that she has had a meeting withjeremy corbyn in the last half hour or so. she is
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responding, jason groves, whose treat she is responding to, the political editor of the daily mail, and she has said there is a shape of the corbyn deal with theresa may is becoming clear, customs union, permanent alignment of workers' rights, tory immigration plan is watered—down but free movement ends, no second referendum come out before the euro elections. nicola sturgeon says she would be surprised and very disappointed if labour sold out for such a bad deal. nicola sturgeon meeting other opposition leaders at 4pm, and then scheduled to be meeting theresa may at about 4:30pm, but that is a tweet of the last few minutes. 0ur chief political correspondent vicki young is in the houses of parliament. do we know how that meeting betweenjeremy corbyn and theresa may went? no, and i think it is still going on, i think he arrived a bit late so they have only been in there about half an hour. i saw nicola sturgeon and her
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entourage going past hurriedlyjust now. what is interesting about the snp, they backed the nick boles proposal because it was about partly staying in the single market, so thatis staying in the single market, so that is the view of the snp, it would not be enough just to be that is the view of the snp, it would not be enoughjust to be in a customs union, they have always said single market as well and they are very pro freedom of movement, so i think that is where they would be a difference between the snp and labour. jeremy corbyn's issue will be about another referendum and interestingly his spokesman this lunchtime saying another referendum is only needed to prevent what they call a tory harmful brexit, or a no deal scenario, so you can seejeremy corbyn may not making that one of his red lines. intriguing to think how that meeting is going. i am joined by former conservative cabinet ministerjohn whittingdale who was with me now. first of all, how do you feel about the prime minister right now having a meeting with jeremy corbyn minister right now having a meeting withjeremy corbyn to sort out brexit policy? i have to say, i was profoundly surprised and unhappy when i heard the prime minister's
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announcement yesterday. by talking to the labour party, she has plainly decided that the way best to get her deal is to try and win the support of labourmps, deal is to try and win the support of labour mps, which means that the deal will become less acceptable to people like me who want to achieve a proper brexit. it is obvious from everything the labour party has said that they would only accept it if we moved into a permanent customs union, possibly even a second referendum. those are things which until now the prime minister has been absolutely clear do not represent our policy, and breach the commitments we have given to the electorate. so i think this is a great mistake. lots of your collea g u es great mistake. lots of your colleagues are furious about it but there are others and brexiteers who say look, people were warned this would happen, if you don't back her deal, i know you did last time round, but if you don't, this was the only way it would go. if the prime minister is determined to deliver on a referendum result as she says she is she has to get the
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votes from somewhere, she can't get them from her own side, so they have put this on themselves, some would say full stop it was with great reluctance, but i did decide to support the vote on the third occasion that we had last week, precisely because it seemed to me we we re precisely because it seemed to me we were reaching this position. i personally would be happy, not happy, but willing to leave the european union without a deal. a lot of work has been put in place and necessary measures to ensure it is not as damaging as some have tried to portray, and even the prime minister herself has said she thought we could do very well if we left without a deal. but what became apparent was that that was not a possibility and what is now happening in the house of commons this afternoon, with this attempt to pass a bill against the will of the government by taking control of the order paperjust government by taking control of the order paper just proves government by taking control of the order paperjust proves that the house of commons is not willing to let that happen, so when i was faced with a choice of either the prime minister's deal was something which was like lead to be even less
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acceptable, it was on that basis that i voted for the prime minister's deal and i'm afraid what has happened since that time has rather borne that out. there has been a lot of anger around this place in the last few months. yesterday it had reached fever pitch really. in the labour party as well, there them arguing with each other about a second referendum but in the conservative party particularly, it is vitriolic. can the party get back together once this is done? where there is an awful lot of anger, not just amongst conservative mps but particularly in the country. people who voted to leave were assured repeatedly by the prime minister that we would be living on the 29th of march, with or without a deal. then there were certain things which we could possibly not accept, such as permanent membership of the customs union, all of those commitments appear to have been torn up, and! commitments appear to have been torn up, and i think if it turned out we are willing to sign up to permanent ship of the customs union, i would absolutely understand the anger that i think that will cause in the
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country and i have to say i would share it. thank you very much indeed, john whittingdale. a lot of anger and people not sure how this whole process will quite pan out. we will have to see if a deal is done between jeremy corbyn will have to see if a deal is done betweenjeremy corbyn and theresa may, if not the government is promising to abide by another series of votes in the house of commons full stop vicki young, thank you very much inside the houses of parliament. damian grammaticas has been engaging reaction in brussels. we have heard from jean—claude juncker but watching what is happening herejust juncker but watching what is happening here just as closely as we are, obviously. yes, they are, we are, obviously. yes, they are, we are inside the european parliament here in brussels, who have been holding a session here this afternoon. jean—claude juncker address that, the first clarity, really, from the eu since that statement by theresa may last night, and mrjuncker statement by theresa may last night, and mr juncker saying the statement by theresa may last night, and mrjuncker saying the offer of a short extension, which had been there only until the end of march,
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is possible for the uk to achieve, he said, provided the uk passes a withdrawal, or agrees to pass the withdrawal, or agrees to pass the withdrawal agreement in the next few days. after the 12th of april we ran the risk ofjeopardising the correct running of the european elections and the correct functioning of the european union. so what mrjuncker was saying was a very clear timetable there the uk has about a
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week up to the end of next week to agree or for parliament to approve that withdrawal agreement. then it can have a short extension. otherwise, what he did not mention was what would happen in the alternative case, if nothing is passed, the implication that a long extinction might well be possible. we heard from other speakers in the parliament who were saying that they believed a long extension would only believed a long extension would only be possible if the uk commits to holding those european elections, but concerns that the uk would continue to be a member of the eu, andl continue to be a member of the eu, and i have stacked —— guy have lost —— guy verhofstadt talked of a nightmare scenario, the uk half in, half out, led by a new prime minister, possiblyjohnson or gove, and talked about that as a nightmare for the and talked about that as a nightmare forthe eu, uk stillable and talked about that as a nightmare for the eu, uk still able to take decisions but on way out. damian, thank you very much for the latest in brussels. you are watching afternoon live.
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a jury has failed to reach a verdict in the trial of david duckenfield — the police officer who was the match commander on the day of the hillsborough disaster. the former chief superintendent denies the manslaughter by gross negligence of 95 liverpool fans. prosecutors say they will now seek a retrial. our north of england correspondent fiona trott has been outside preston crown court. we have had relatives coming out of court, hugging each other, telling us that the news is still sinking m, us that the news is still sinking in, but they say there is some disappointment that there has been no outcome on the gross negligence manslaughter charge because for them this has been a very long journey already, over the past 30 years there have been two inquests, a private prosecution, an independent enquiry, and now this court case here too. as for 74—year—old david duckenfield himself, he has been told now that the crown prosecution service is seeking a retrial. it is from sue hemming, she says i
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recognised this develop and will be difficult for the families affected by the hillsborough disaster. we spoke with those present in preston and liverpool before, and they say they have been talking with relatives this afternoon, answering any questions they have. meanwhile in parliament, christopher chope, mp, raised a point of order, suggesting it was unfair for his constituent david duckenfield to face another trial. let's quickly made ourselves what we have heard in this trial over the past 11 weeks. thejury this trial over the past 11 weeks. the jury heard david this trial over the past 11 weeks. thejury heard david duckenfield twice refused requests to open a gate, to relieve the crushing at the hillsborough stadium that day. he agreed after a final appeal but didn't consider the consequences of his actions, the court heard. 2000 people flooded through a gate, through a tunnel, it depends which we re through a tunnel, it depends which were already packed. the jury also heard david duckenfield himself told the new inquest in 2015, probably i
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wasn't the best man for the job on the day. he did not give evidence in this trial, but his lawyer, benjamin myers qc says, had not been treated asa myers qc says, had not been treated as a normal person, but as a target of blame, and he said the hillsborough stadium was potentially lethal. he said it is like giving a captaina ship lethal. he said it is like giving a captain a ship that is already thinking and judging him on how well he sails it. a guilty verdict today, as you say, for the charge relating to 69—year—old graham mackrell, who was the grand safety officer, effectively the jury saying to him you failed to provide enough turnstiles for the fans that day, just seven, for some 10,000 fans in the area where the fatal crushing occurred. he will be sentenced at a later date. you are watching afternoon live. our headlines. the prime minister meetsjeremy our headlines. the prime minister meets jeremy corbyn for talks about a solution to the deadlock over
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brexit. ajury fails a solution to the deadlock over brexit. a jury fails to reach a verdict on david duckenfield, former police officer facing a manslaughter charge over his handling of the hillsborough disaster. and compensation worth about £200 million announced for victims of windrush scandal. in sport, teenage aventis striker moise kean was racially abused in italy's top flight racially abused in italy's top flight last night. team—mate leonardo bonucci suggested the player was partly to blame for the abuse he has received, which has been heavily criticised by raheem sterling. tottenham host theirfirst match in the new stadium tonight, they play crystal palace. 100 days to go until the start of the netball world cup. england head coach tracey neville admits the form of her players dipped after commonwealth games success. more to come in all of those tories at around 3:30pm. about £200 million is to be paid in compensation to those affected by the windrush scandal. the home secretary sajid javid said the compensation would help people
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who arrived in the uk before 1973, many from caribbean countries, who were then wrongly detained, denied legal rights, threatened with deportation or wrongly deported from the uk by the home office. i am confident that the proposals for this scheme are closely aligned with what affected communities wanted to see. namely, that it is simple, it is accessible and above all, it is fair. full information is now available online and via a free telephone hotline number. guidance is being provided to help people understand what compensation they might be entitled to and how to submit a claim, and the application process itself is as simple and as clear as possible. the ministry of defence has launched an investigation after a video was shared on social media showing soldiers shooting at an image of jeremy corbyn.
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the footage, filmed in kabul, appears to show personnel using the image of the labour leader as a target on a practice range. the ministry of defence said such behaviour was totally unacceptable. labour described it as "alarming" — and the prisons minister, rory stewart — who served in the army — called it "outrageous". the video shows totally unacceptable behaviour and a serious error of judgment that falls far below the behaviour that we expect of our soldiers in the brigade. so what now, what have you established and what is the next step? so the army is conducting a full investigation and taking this extremely seriously and we want to get to the bottom of what happened. can you tell us any more about the individuals in the video, why they are in afghanistan, what their role has been? we have about 400 soldiers from the brigade conducting force
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protection in afghanistan, and working closely with both nato and afghan partners, and these soldiers are doing an outstanding job in theatre, but this serious error ofjudgment is being fully investigated by the army. the target is the leader of the opposition, jeremy corbyn. it is a central pillar to the british armed forces, notjust the army, but the armed forces as a wider body, that they are apolitical, and this would seem to fall short of that, would you agree? so, let me be clear, the army is and always will be a totally apolitical organisation, and this is a serious error ofjudgment. you are watching afternoon live. crossrail — the new trainline linking east and west london — may not be completed by next year and could run even further over budget, mps have warned. the line was supposed to open last december and has already cost almost three billion pounds more than planned. our transport correspondent, tom burridge, reports. not a single new crossrail station is complete.
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electrics for cctv and tannoy systems are still being sorted. this is farringdon. other stations are further behind. on the surface, this station is pretty much good to go, but look more closely and there is plenty of work still to be done. under the original plan, passengers would have streamed through here down onto trains last december. as things stand, the new line won't be ready this year — but, in today's report, mps are sceptical about whether it can be finished next year. the mps on the public accounts committee are highly critical of the management of the project before the delay and a significant overspend became public last summer. they argue local and central government were fixated on the original finish date. if they hadn't ignored warning signs, say the mp5, the project might not have veered so drastically of course.
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the fact that crossrail wasn't delivered in december last year, as was promised, is obviously a big problem, and it's going to be an extra £2.8 billion already injected into it, and we are not sure when it's going to be opened or how much more money it's going to cost, so at this point we are still blind as to what the outcome will be. this is the first train that will run on the eastern overground branch of the new route... featured in a bbc documentary, the testing of the trains. marrying them up with digital signalling is still ongoing. it's why there is so much uncertainty. new management at crossrail will announce a new target finish date later this month. the tunnel, the trains and the platforms are much bigger than on other lines on london's underground. in purely engineering terms, a new high—capacity rail line underneath central london is an impressive feat. the government rejects today's report from mps, saying it acted swiftly to strengthen governance and oversight after crossrail admitted the delay. tom burridge, bbc news.
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mps on thejustice select committee say some crimes should be punished with community sentences instead, to reduce the number of inmates. they've warned prisons are in the ‘depths' of a continuing ‘crisis'. the south—east asian country of brunei has introduced strict islamic laws to make suddenly and adultery punishable by stoning to death. —— sodomy.the move has sparked international condemnation, including from high—profile stars such as george clooney, and the country's gay community has expressed shock and fear. our lgbt correspondent ben hunte reports. the sultan of brunei, one of the richest men in the world, ruling over a small south—east asian nation. and it's in this country where strict new islamic laws are being introduced, making gay sex between men and adultery offences punishable by stoning to death.
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translation: anyone visiting the country will attain good memories, and are able to experience our peaceful and harmonious environment, and the best hospitality. homosexuality was already illegal in brunei, and those caught could face up to ten years in prison. but the sultan, who is the world's second longest reigning monarch is calling for stronger islamic teachings. he wants brunei to become more aligned with the islamic faith and sharia law. if this law is actually enforced, it will be a real setback for the human rights of the people of brunei. and we are talking about a country which has maintained a moratorium on the death penalty since 1957, so they have not executed anyone since 1957. because of its oil wealth, brunei has an investment agency, which owns some of the world's top hotels, including this one, the dorchester in london. it's these properties that some campaigners are calling for people to boycott. campaigners with huge public
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platforms, eltonjohn tweeting that he's already refusing to stay at these hotels, as well as other big celebrities asking their followers to rise up and do something now. george clooney has said we are putting money in the pockets of those who choose to stone and whip their citizens. brunei's lgbt community has expressed shock, whilst there is a small hope that the new laws may not actually be widely enforced, people still say they are powerless. before, lg bt people were living in secret. now, they are living in fear. ben hunte, bbc news. services out of belfast, birmingham and edinburgh were among those affected. the company blamed an industry—wide shortage of pilots for the problems, as well as its own staff taking holidays. let's speak to rosie bannerman, who has flown from japan. i think you are attending a family wedding in northern ireland. now, you're going
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to get to that, aren't you? yes, just some of the wedding is on saturday and we are due to fly out in belfast on sunday, but we had to make other arrangements to make our connection to japan. at what point were you aware your original plans were going somewhere else? as we were boarding ourflight in somewhere else? as we were boarding our flight in tokyo, somewhere else? as we were boarding ourflight in tokyo, we got an e—mail, the third e—mailfrom flybe, changing flights for the third time, to say that the times had changed so we would miss our connections to get back to japan on saturday.” we would miss our connections to get back to japan on saturday. i think you work injapan, how much of a problem is this causing you? we are already having to take some holiday to attend the wedding, so the connections if we had missed them, we miss even more holiday, even more school time, which would cause more stress and difficulties when we got back. and, rosie, i am guessing this
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is costing you money? yes, around £600 for us to change our flights, plus travel from belfast to dublin, whether new flights are flying from. ami whether new flights are flying from. am i right that flybe, they are compensating you for the local flight compensating you for the local flight but compensating you for the local flight but it compensating you for the local flight but it is the flight to tokyo that will cost you? yes, we paid £50 each, the two of us, they will refu nd each, the two of us, they will refund us that, but it is nothing compared to what we are having to fork out to go back to japan. and you would rather like flybe to cover that, i guess? yes, we would. any chance? i don't think so, they said they couldn't do anything, there are no other flights out of belfast that morning, so, yes, they arejust going to refund us but that is nothing really. do you know what, rosie, it is your boyfriend's brother's wedding on saturday, just have a great time. thank you very much. thank you forjoining us. growing resistance to
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antibiotics has been called "the greatest threat to human health" in the 21st century. public health england say the problem is primarily down to the drugs being over prescribed, meaning they become less effective at fighting dangerous bacteria. now a team of researchers believe there may be hope, in the form of honey. i was gravely ill, gravely ill. when debbie contracted a derisory tract infection, she assumed antibiotics would take care of it but things went downhill fast. i had developed sepsis, where your body sort of goes into overdrive and attacks itself. they started pumping antibiotics into me, and then as each day passed, they found that antibiotic wasn't working. i was deteriorating, day on day four stop why won't those antibiotics working? they found out i had antimicrobial resistance, is becoming more and more common, which is what the alarming thing is and why we have to do something. antimicrobial resistance happens when microorganisms, such as these bacteria, evolve, and drugs, such as
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antibiotics, can no longer kill them. antimicrobial resistance is predicted to kill more people than cancer by 2050, and if we get to a stage where we have no working antibiotics, it would essentially mean the end of modern medicine. the research really started with a curious question around why can bacteria not survive in a beehive? one of the main reasons for that is the natural antimicrobial properties of honey. honey has been used as a treatment for infection for centuries for it contains natural antibiotics, can kill bacteria. the problem is, it's sticky, which means it is very difficult to use in surgery, or on a wound. we are taking it from something that is thick and sticky and turning it into sprays, creams, and powders that can be easily applied to lots of different parts of the body. honey —based medical gel has already been developed. the team here want to ta ke developed. the team here want to take that idea further. this is our
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simulated wound. it is healing the bacteria. here we have our emotion that has the droplets of the honey, and this could be used preventatively as well, so before a surgeon makes an incision. would that work potentially as well as an antibiotic prescribed by a doctor? yes, so this is an alternative to using an antibiotic, and what is really promising about this honey is that it has already been shown to kill bacteria that are resistant to conventional antibiotics, such as the superbug mrsa. the sixth antibiotic doctors tried on debbie did work on but she very nearly died and welcomes a different approach to fighting infection. part of the double—edged sword of being a survivor is the fact that so many people don't make it. we have to support research so that we find other methods of treating infections. it is hoped that if funding is found, these products will be brought to medical trial in the next few years will stop tim
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muffett, bbc news. right now there is a glimmer of blue up right now there is a glimmer of blue up there somewhere. a glimmer of something, somewhere... there it is. there is a bit of blue there. we'll have more on brexit negotiations later on. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. today and tomorrow it really feels chilly in the north—west of the uk with strong winds and all of the cloud and occasional rain. sleet, showers, showers and snow, but for most of us it is rain and sunny spells. tonight, really chilly. look at all this weather in the south—west of the country. southern wales, into the south west midlands during the rush hour there could be
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a bit of wet snow falling. mostly across the hills though. for many of us tomorrow, another changeable day with sunshine and passing showers but there will be a gradual improvement in the weather, particularly across northern areas. however, in the south—west tomorrow, ta ke however, in the south—west tomorrow, take a brolly. it will be quite gusty from time to time. it is said to improve and turn warmer across the south—east of the country, with temperatures into the mid—teens. this is bbc news — our latest headlines.
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theresa may meet jeremy theresa may meetjeremy corbyn to try to get his help in breaking the brexit deadlock. the jury in the trial of the hillsborough commander david duckenfield fails to reach a verdict. competition worth about £200 million is announced for victims of the windrush scandal. the minister of defence investigate after footage minister of defence investigate afterfootage emerges of minister of defence investigate after footage emerges of soldiers shooting at a picture ofjeremy corbyn for target practice. over to the bbc sport centre. john watson has a spot. another instance of racism in football. it was a juventus forward moise kean he was racially abused. sterling, very critical of his team—mate, who suggested that he was partly to blame for the abuse he received. the striker scored a second goal and stood in front of the home fans who
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directed monkey chants towards him throughout much of the game. play was halted and a warning was broadcast to the crowd but afterwards... sterling, who has spoken out on this issue of racism in football having been subjected to abuse playing recently for club and country confronting montenegro fans while playing for england last month redacted to the comments on instagram... uefa redacted to the comments on instagram. .. uefa do redacted to the comments on instagram... uefa do have rules which permit referees to remove players from the field if chanting continues. former manchester city was speaking at an event today and was speaking at an event today and was critical, for showing a lack of support to his team—mate.”
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was critical, for showing a lack of support to his team-mate. i don't know what he was saying because for me it was totally disrespectful to his team—mate and you can see that by tweeting. i don't want to say any worse things and i don't want to be harsh with him but if you are my team—mate... harsh with him but if you are my team-mate. .. feeling that. harsh with him but if you are my team-mate... feeling that. he has left his team—mate down. a lot of criticism coming in from all quarters for the weight juventus have handled the fallout. on a brighter note, we see the long awaited opening of tottenham's new stadium. it has been a long time coming for the tottenham fans. they finally get to play, they finally get to visit their new home tonight for a premier league match. lots of test events in the lead up to this game. six months after it was due to open the £1 billion tottenham hotspur stadium, as it is called this moment. that will change. they ta ke this moment. that will change. they take on crystal palace. the 62,000
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seater capacity, almost double that of white hart lane and the second—largest club ground in england behind old trafford. let's hear from the's chairman. as far as a community is concerned i think it isa a community is concerned i think it is a massive lift for tournament for london and it couldn't come at a better time in view of all the political situation we have now with brexit so we are definitely open for business. as far as players are concerned, we are all excited and i have every confidence they will finish the season very strongly. another big date to mark your card. 100 days until the netball world cup begins in liverpool. england, scotla nd begins in liverpool. england, scotland and northern ireland are all taking part. representatives from all three nations visited the bbc this morning. this isjust outside our studios here. 100 days, 100 goals and 100 girls to mark the run up. england won commonwealth gold last year. results have been
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patchy since but they head coach feels the squad will be ready. we have had everything thrown at us over this international calendar to prepare us for this world cup and it isa prepare us for this world cup and it is a tough tournament and we have to keep all our players fit, healthy and we have to do is select the best squad for it. the pressure is on from an external point of view but our protocols have been maintained throughout and it is about following the process and that is what we have been doing. hugely exciting tournament to come. that is all from the bbc sport centre for now. back to you, simon. i'm live in westminster with talks between theresa may and jeremy corbyn are under way. her decision to reach out to the labour leader has angered conservative brexiteers with one announcing his resignation. let's talk more. i'd love to be a fly on the wall in these meetings because
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they both have issues, both have risks in these talks. there are big risks in these talks. there are big risks for both of them. for theresa may they are pretty obvious. she has to embrace something like the customs union which has been the co re customs union which has been the core of the labour proposal and we know from that very stormy cabinet meeting yesterday that a lot of cabinet and meeting yesterday that a lot of cabinetand mps meeting yesterday that a lot of cabinet and mps really don't want that. she'd have to move a long way that. she'd have to move a long way that way. she also has a risk that jeremy corbyn might ask for things that the eu will never deliver. he has always been rather vague about what kind of relationship labour would like to see with the single market. he has been accused of cherry picking himself. she can't sign onto that. for his part, he doesn't want to own the outcome of brexit in any way. he could be justified in saying i have been here for two years and here you are wanting to talk to me and in the last two minutes. he has indeed. excuse me. he has indeed said exactly that and... there are trees
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round here that do that to your throat. it's a common complaint. he said, why has it taken you so long to come to me and ask for this kind of compromise. surely you should have reached across the aisle when you lost your majority. and whilst this is going on, parliament is not sitting around doing nothing. there are plants there, further talk of indicative votes. what might we see happening in the next 48 hours? parliament is trying quite a lot itself. we are having an emergency debate today over a business motion to pave the way for a micro bit of legislation, the eu withdrawal number five bill. this legislation, the eu withdrawal numberfive bill. this is an attempt to shut off no deal. even if this moved at top speed through the comments and then the lords, the earliest it really could be done is
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early next week. yet she might not know what plant she will be put into the eu but the eu has said they would like to put whatever kind of plan she wants for an extension to them by monday. the timing for them is really working against all the players. could it work that this is sorted out by friday? it could just about work that that comment on the lords have managed to get the micro bill through telling her to ask for an extension. she could decide on the back of this medium what kind of... she might try to bring her round vote back again and say look, you vote on this. she could try to get this through by friday to pre—empt the mps having their own indicative votes on monday. we know that she is racing to that kind of timetable but the deadlines are clustering around monday and tuesday next week and people are trying to
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beat those. yes, it is just possible that she couldn't get that through. i have recovered. you mention deadlines. the eu has a deadline of its own and that there is pressure coming from brussels. yes, as it stands we are due to crash out without a deal on april the 12th. the eu has an emergency summit on this in the middle of next week and they said to theresa may, you have got to tell us what you want and a plan for any kind of extension by early next week. what they really don't want to see uk to be staying in is don't want to see uk to be staying inisa don't want to see uk to be staying in is a member beyond may the 22nd because they have their elections in may the 23rd and they can't have a member without. .. may the 23rd and they can't have a member without... looking at the politics of this, we have already heard how very angry tory brexiteers are that this meeting is happening at all and obviously particularly
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angry given thatjeremy corbyn has said often that a customs union is something he is quite keen on end. and then there is the issue of another referendum. the timing of this means that there has to be an a nswer to this means that there has to be an answer to something. yes, the brexiteers are absolutely furious at what the prime minister has done because for so long she has been tacking their way and trying to accommodate what they want and she has pivoted really this week and said, ok, i am has pivoted really this week and said, ok, iam going has pivoted really this week and said, ok, i am going to reach across online and try to do a deal with the people who want a much softer brexit, something like the customs union that labour has been saying. jeremy corbyn is pushing that one. he can offend a lot of his own party who were pushing very hard for a second referendum and say look, we are committed to this at the party conference. you said if we can get a general election then we will get back a second referendum. why haven't you done that? that has a big, loud constituency in the labour party and they will be very angry if
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he does a deal with her. yesterday the talk was of yvette cooper push for a no—deal brexit. that is still bubbling. mainly what mps are concentrating on today is trying to produce this micro piece of legislation to force the prime minister to shut off... by 10pm tonight, they reckon. it would still then have to go to the house of lords so it is not a completely done deal and some of the critics are saying it doesn't have any date attached or tell the prime minister what kind of extension to ask for, but it does try to put another roadblock in the way of no deal. always good to see you. you handled that brilliantly. thank you very much. there are trees here a p pa re ntly much. there are trees here apparently they give out something that get in the back of your throat. any broadcaster will tell you that after a few days here you can hardly talk. it is an issue. i'll be back a
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little later on. let's send you back to the studio. simon, thank you very much indeed. a look at the headlines. the prime minister to meetjeremy corbyn for talks about a solution to the deadlock over brexit. ajury fails solution to the deadlock over brexit. a jury fails to reach a verdict on david duckenfield, the former police officer facing a manslaughter charge over his handling of the hillsborough disaster. compensation worth about £200 million is an ounce for victims of the windrush scandal. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. regional airline flybe has cancelled dozens of flights today, for what it describes as "operational reasons" including a shortage of pilots, and holiday allowances. most of the flights
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are within the uk. the airline says it "sincerely apologises for any inconvenience caused". pharmacy chain boots has warned that it could close stores as it takes ‘decisive steps' to cut costs. the move comes after the chain, which has 2,485 stores across the uk and employs about 56,000 staff, said it had suffered its "most difficult quarter" since the firm's formation. like—for—like sales in the uk are down 2.3%. the uk's dominant services sector has shrunk for the first time in nearly three years, according to the latest figures. the index came in much weaker than forecast. it is the first time the sector has shrunk since july 2016, immediately after the uk voted to leave the european union. great to have you here. not a hugely happy day for some flybe customers.
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the regional airline has cancelled dozens of wednesday morning flights as it enters discussions over potential job losses. the company blamed an industry—wide shortage of pilots for the delays, as well as its own pilots taking holidays. flights from belfast city airport and birmingham are among those affected. a lot of passengers are very unhappy. a little bit earlier we spoke to flybe's chief executive. we are facing some challenges. many pilot shortages but also seasonally. we have just launched this week the summer season and that is the main challenge we have to face. we've been working with the team very early, starting very early this morning, and starting late yesterday. so it is coming at a very difficult storm and it has been a surprise for us. we would like to apologise. today is not the level of service we would like to provide to customers.
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all customers impacted have been informed and we have also briefed all the people on the ground and the handlers that are working with us. again, it is concerning that it is 5% of our flights. we did cancel too many flights today. still, 95% of our operations are running normal so we are managing the situation as much as we can. and we are doing that right now. this is a report from the debt charity. it is published latest figures on the number of people who contacted regarding the levels of debt. it shows a record number of people calling the charity, in particular it is honing in on the number of single parents. that number of single parents. that number has risen and is a lot higher thanit number has risen and is a lot higher than it was before, considering that single parents make up a smaller
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amount of the population, it is a very worrying statistic indeed. let's talk to the head of policy. thanks forjoining us. explain to me how exactly you came about with these figures? all the people you contact us who we put through our advice process, we are able to gather information from them. these figures are based on real experience and details from around 350,000 of our clients who contacted us in the la st our clients who contacted us in the last year. when they contact you, whatever their worries? people are generally contacting us because some particular things happen to them which has brought their financial difficulties to a crisis point. there may be problems with a number of different debt and also council tax, fuel debt, rent arrears where four out of ten are struggling to
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pay basic bills. the worrying price of single parents, why do you think that is? it is a barometer of the levels of financial difficulty and the low level of financial resilience. if you look at lone parents, record numbers are in work but it may be low paid, it may be insecure. we have the benefit freeze. they will pick up the cost of relationship breakdown. there are a lot of reasons combining together which means that they can be particularly financially vulnerable to cope with shock and to deal with debt problems. we have had to date you set hundreds of thousands of people who were mis—sold pay day loa ns people who were mis—sold pay day loans by one particular company and going to get compared compensation. this is further evidence of the damage done to many people's finances by these kinds of companies. that's right, we know that debt causes all type of damage
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to people's health as well as finances. with payday loans, the numbers were going down after intervention. it is now going back up intervention. it is now going back up again. the fact they are announcing more people with these debt and with multiple debt reinforces that miss selling which causes the kind of claims which we talked about this morning, that is still going on. they need to look at that and look at white loans are still being sold to people who can pay them back and also look to make sure that firms are robust and not likely to go bankrupt and leave people without their compensation. 0k, peter, so good to talk to you. thank you. before we let you go, let's do our magic. it's been a pretty good day for the markets. the ftse100 is up. it has been rising because of progress made between talks between
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china and the us. investors are hoping there is some kind of progress. super dry is still in trouble. four of the world's largest amphibians — chinese giant salamanders — have been given a new home at london zoo after customs officers foiled an attempt to smuggle them into the country in a cereal box. the salamanders, which are critically endangered, can grow up to six feet in length. one of the zoo's new residents has gone on display to the public. our science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. a bizarre—looking beast. meet london zoo's latest resident, a chinese giant salamander which can reach nearly six feet long, making it the biggest amphibian on the planet. today, it's being moved to a new enclosure. the salamander‘s very young, far from fully grown, so a quick weigh—in and then it's
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swabbed to check its health. this animal has already been on quite a journey. it was discovered after an attempt to smuggle it into the uk. i was amazed when i got the call from uk border force, and actually seeing these critically endangered amphibians being smuggled illegally really hit us hard, because they are a species that we've dedicated so much effort to conserve in the wild. it's such a rare chance to see a creature like this up close. these animals were once widespread across china, but they were taken from the streams that they live in and bred in farms for their meat. a recent survey found that there are now barely any of them left in the wild. chinese giant salamanders are living fossils, virtually unchanged since the time of the dinosaurs. they are unlike any other animal on the planet, but it's this uniqueness that's making them so highly sought after.
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the trade of wildlife is rife throughout the world, and i think, as species like the chinese giant salamander become rarer, that can actually place more demands on the trade of the species, so anything that creates more pressure on amphibians in the wild is going to be detrimental to their future survival. at london zoo, it's time to move the salamander. the hope is to eventually create a breeding population — but, highly territorial, for now it's in the tank alone. they don't have scales, they have soft skin... it's a chance for the public to learn about one of nature's giants, even if it is a little shy while it gets used to its new home. rebecca morelle, bbc news. strange creatures. "sussexroyal" is the official account for harry and meghan, and it will be used for "important
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announcements" and to share pictures of their work. it already has nearly two million followers, and the first post included images of the royal couple watching a sailing competition at the invictus games, meghan embracing women at a charity event for those affected by the grenfell tower fire, and meeting fans in australia. before we go, i want to show you pictures of this budding artist. she is just two years old and she has already had two successful exhibits atan art already had two successful exhibits at an art gallery in new york. her first show was so popular — people were snapping up four pictures at a time. the artist who discovered her says some of her paintings have sold for more than 1,000 dollars. her approach to work is fairly simple, when she wants to start, she says "painting?" when she's done, she says "done." we are all sitting there wondering
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why we can get our two—year—old to do that. time for the weather now. sorry, we are going to go back to parliament and to the lobby because eric has been a cross—party meeting and we are expecting a press conference now to report on how that went. let me thank colleagues from the other opposition parties. we have a position of compromise we have a position of compromise we have all developed and i think it is really important they send a clear message today that whatever happens over the coming days, there has to bea over the coming days, there has to be a public vote, there has to be a peoples vote. there is real concern, given the fact that the prime minister and the leader of the opposition are meeting, that there could be an attempt to carve out a peoples vote from this process. it is absolutely essential that whatever is done, that we have that opportunity to go back to the people and that is on behalf of all of us gathered here. ithink, secondly and that is on behalf of all of us gathered here. i think, secondly to that, when we have the bill coming in front of the house of commons
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this afternoon to extend article 50, we are seeking to give us protection and move an amendment that will give that option in the bill to have a peoples vote. i would say, if the talks between the conservative and labour party breakdown, if the prime minister does as she has said today, bring back indicative votes, and just sat on the basis of an agreement between the conservative party and the labour party, that will not be acceptable. it has to be the case at all mps have got to have that opportunity to put together compromised motions that could unite the house of commons. there is a clear determination that all of us have that we do not want to crash out of the european union with no deal. we have that option to vote. we must have that debate and come to a consensus in the house of commons before the european council meeting then all eventualities. .. people
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have said that the problem with her approach is that she had laid down the deadline... at the end of the day, given what has happened over the course of the last three years, there is no such thing as a good brexit. the house of commons has voted on various occasions now on the prime minister's deal three time. it is only right and proper that they people have the right to a say. one thing we all want to do is seek to find compromise in the house and we will play all of us collectively a constructive part in that over the coming days. we understand our responsibilities. the fa ct we understand our responsibilities. the fact we are all standing here, five parties in the house of commons that are buried our differences and working together, we are asking about colleagues to do the same. we wa nt about colleagues to do the same. we want a solution that saves us from a no till brexit. no deal must be taken off the table. we will work
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constructively to get that we best solution. isn't it true that you simply don't have the numbers? we don't know until we actually have any votes. just to underline this point that ian makes, there is compromise to be made here and a numberof us has compromise to be made here and a number of us has said that we will not stand in the way of the deal if she wants to keep pushing it. as long as it is put to a confirmatory vote. we could have recognition... we could bring the two together and put the concept of us leaving the european union, you could have that to juxtapose against keeping the deal we have a member of the european union to a confirmatory vote. there is definitely compromise to be had here. you don't have an
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open process by excluding a very major part of the argument from the discussion which is what it seems is happening today. we in common all have been promoting a peoples vote but had been excluded from a discussion that we were included in only last week. what we are saying is that people had the opportunity to have another shot at it, to change their mind here. if that is how democracy works here, democracy should go back to the people and people should have their say. we are prepared to compromise for the sake of seeing democracy operating outside, notjust in this place. there are not just outside, notjust in this place. there are notjust five parties. there are notjust five parties. there are notjust five parties. there are 280 mp5, notjust us, a lot of conservatives and labour people, who want to see a referendum and it has been excluded from the discussion despite the fact that we made it very clear we could work with the government to get a settlement. caroline lucas, a second
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referendum maintains long extension. the two main parties are not going to agree with that you are endangering... i disagree with that. i think we shouldn't be afraid of the european elections and i think there is all to play times of persuading the other parties that they shouldn't be afraid of a democratic process. why would we try denied the british people a voice, evenif denied the british people a voice, even if it was only the transitional period. why would we deny the british people a democratic voice in the european parliament. i take comfort from the fact that david liddington has already made contact with the electoral commission to put in place the arrangements that would be needed for us to contest those european elections. we should have beat shying away from them. we do need to recognise, as others have said, that we are already compromising. i don't want to see a customs union. we have already compromised to come to this point. we are saying it should go back to
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the people on one of those two options and given that so has changed since the referendum almost three years ago, so much has changed, it would be undemocratic not thank you very much, everybody. so there, the leaders of the lib dems, of course vince cable, checker owner and other party leaders expressing their wish for another vote, underlining, of course, the problem is that theresa may and indeed jeremy corbyn face, even if there is an agreement reached between the two of them are in talks that have been going on today here in westminster. but time is against them. it might be worth just mentioning the german chancellor angela merkel has been speaking in the last few minutes about brexit, speaking after a meeting with the regional prime minister. she said i still regret the brexit decision but still regret the brexit decision but
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still we have to deal with the desire of the british people. i have a lwa ys desire of the british people. i have always said i will fight until the last hour of the date in question foran last hour of the date in question for an orderly brexit, that is in the british interest, but she says also in our interest. on the one hand, we have the integrity of the single market, which would end on the british islands, but it is also just as much about the peace between the republic of ireland and northern ireland. of course, in the end of the solutions have to be found in great britain, in london. that is the german chancellor. let's go back to the houses of parliament because our chief political correspondent vicki young is there, and consensus from at least a few people within that building? what they are very worried about is being carved out of this argument. you could hear that very clearly there, where their position of calling for another referendum, even if it is attached toa referendum, even if it is attached to a deal, so there has to be confirmation through a referendum of a deal, they are fearing that is not even going to be really discussed between theresa may and jeremy corbyn, because we know the prime
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minister has put a match against a referendum and we knowjeremy corbyn is definitely lukewarm about it. very clear today from his spokesman that actually the idea of a referendum was only to avoid what they call a harmful tory brexit, or ano they call a harmful tory brexit, or a no deal scenario. now, they call a harmful tory brexit, or a no dealscenario. now, presumably, if they were to be a deal between mr corbyn and mrs may, labour wouldn't view that as a harmful tory brexit, so it does feel that once again that idea of another referendum is very much at the bottom of the list of preferences forjeremy corbyn, and without him getting full behind it, it is very difficult to see where the numbers come from. there are certainly lots of labour mps who do wa nt certainly lots of labour mps who do want another referendum but there is not enough to get it over the line. that is something we are hearing, the frustration there from those five different groups in parliament about all of that, because they think they are not included any more in all of this. so, vicki, tell us what happens in the next couple of hours, when we will hear what
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happened at that meeting? where we don't know. we are just hoping that we get some kind of sense from the people in the room about how it has gone. we know the timetable as far as the government is concerned, they wa nt to as the government is concerned, they want to get this done very quickly, if there is a deal to be done and it is fascinating to look at where there might be some overlap between there might be some overlap between the prime minister and mr corbyn. they have both gone in there saying they are willing to compromise, that they are willing to compromise, that they are willing to compromise, that they are going on with the right attitude, they say. downing street has not been totally clear about what red lines or not the prime minister might ditch. they have talked about freedom of movement as being something she really has a very strong view about, then again labour say freedom of movement must end when we leave the eu so that is not necessarily a point of disagreement but you can see there could be some kind of move around a customs union, and workers' rights for example, something the government has already said it will be prepared to look at. so it is not
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beyond the realm of possibility this might happen, but of course there are some labour mps who think this isa are some labour mps who think this is a trap jeremy are some labour mps who think this is a trapjeremy corbyn is falling into, but he will be blamed for brexit by some. others say actually it is the right thing to do to compromise, and of course there is absolute fury among some in the conservative party, those who have not backed theresa may's deal up to now, they feel they are being circumvented, and they hate the idea ofa circumvented, and they hate the idea of a deal going through with the backing of labour mps but not all of the conservatives, and of course there is a huge problem for the prime minister because the dup, who haven't backed her deal, who are opposed to it, had previously said that if it goes through, then as far as they are concerned, the agreement with the government to prop up the tory government, that will be over, so that is long—term a huge problem for the conservative party. don't go away, because in the last few moments you are talking about the opposition within the tory party. just hearing that chris heaton—harris has resigned. this is how he has announced this. we will show you the comment on twitter, he says after much contemplation i have
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decided to leave theresa may's government, grateful to the prime minister for giving government, grateful to the prime ministerfor giving me government, grateful to the prime minister for giving me the opportunity to serve. he goes on, the standard resignation letter, but just remind us who he is, and this is the second resignation today. just remind us who he is, and this is the second resignation todaym is, he is a brexit minister, i have lost cou nt is, he is a brexit minister, i have lost count of how many ministers the brexit department has lost, but he has been unhappy for a while about the direction things are going. now i think it is very interesting about the resignations. there was a lot of talk yesterday, saying if there is in the cabinet are so unhappy about this move towards a may softer brexit, and speaking tojeremy corbyn, why haven't they walked out? it is worth ripping last time it did ta ke it is worth ripping last time it did take a few hours, a couple of days, for people to actually go and i would say some are also biding their time because of course this deal with jeremy corbyn time because of course this deal withjeremy corbyn is not done yet, we still don't know what nature that might be, how the that might frame up might be, how the that might frame up in the end, will it be a softer brexit, will we get to the actual point of indicative votes, where they will be these votes in
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parliament? i think some are biding their time but clearly there are others, as you say, the second one today, who have just others, as you say, the second one today, who havejust had enough, they cannot countenance the idea that theresa may is talking to jeremy corbyn, and they would say really cutting off those in their own party. the focus will be on the erg and how they respond, they are very, very, very angry. i would say they have been very, very angry for quite a long time, but they are even more angry today. there are some in this conservative party obviously who turn to them, and their brexiteers is well, and say, we warned you, this is what was going to happen, but the hardest brexit available was theresa may's deal because of the make—up of parliament. now, they dispute that and they say what she could have done was to stick by her words before, that no deal is better than a bad deal, they think her deal is bad and she should be pursuing a no—deal brexit, but what some in her party have said to them is we are not going to get that through the house of commons. look at what is
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happening today. benches have literally taken control of what is going on in there and they will probably be able to get a law through this place to force the prime minister to ask for a delay to brexit, and they say the writing has been on the wall for some time that parliament would not allow a no deal scenario. so they have been trying to encourage their colleagues in the erg to get behind a deal, they haven't done so and theresa may would argue that is why she is now looking at a compromise. thank you very much indeed, vicki young, our chief political correspondent. to show you some pictures of the labour to before they went into those talks with theresa may, jeremy corbyn of course leading that team, there he is with keir starmer, the brexit spokesman. with sienna rogers, who is the editor of the political blog labour list, which describes itself of supportive but independent of the labour party. just looking at the
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tea m labour party. just looking at the team going in with talks for theresa may, what will the mood have been, how much a mood of compromise will they actually have? of course the labour party is divided on what kind of mood they should have going into those talks. there has been a lot of pressure from labour mps who support another referendum and of course from the grassroots, that members are overwhelmingly in favour, not all, but in favour of another referendum, and they want that to be put down as a condition of supporting any deal. but it doesn't look like that was a condition going on. and whatever it is a grade of course has to be sold to the parliamentary party. yes. but if a customs union, it looks likely went in with those five demands that he set out to the prime minister a few weeks ago in his letters. if customs union, close relationship with the single market, all of those things, those other conditions he went in with, will support your deal if you meet those conditions. now if then an amendment is laid, may be
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something like the kyle wilson plan, and the condition it is put to the people, may be on top of that an amendment could be laid and labour would wait for it. but labour could also work for a deal that is a customs union deal. that is what i think it happen. and of course the labour whip think it happen. and of course the labourwhip in the think it happen. and of course the labour whip in the meeting today, he has to know what has been discussed and the mood surrounding it. and to be able to sell it mps, as well. jeremy corbyn could equally turn round and say look, i have been here for two years, you have not approached me, here we are in the last minutes of this whole process. because he runs some risks by talking to her, as far as some in his own party are concerned. there are some downsides, he could say you are some downsides, he could say you are coming to get my help. because you have handled this whole process so badly, and she raised expectations for brexiteers, heart
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brexiteers in her party so much that now they are resigning today, they are taken aback by this, and actually a softer brexit was was going to have to happen since the 2017 election. customs union and another referendum is what many within his own party would like jeremy corbyn to come out and say, right, this is what we have negotiated, but it's unlikely. right, this is what we have negotiated, but it's unlikelym seems unlikely. theresa may did not ta ke seems unlikely. theresa may did not take anything off the table, in pmqs today she was very careful. where they were both very nice to each other and didn't really talk about brexit, some would say it was a change they welcome, and that rather set the mood for what is clearly a serious meeting today. definitely, i do thinkjeremy has gone into this meeting in good faith, willing to compromise, and if she meets those five demands i don't see any reason why a compromise agreement couldn't be found, couldn't be reached. you are convinced he will push for those five? yes, that is absolutely message coming out of the leaders office, those five demands. and then
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there is the process, sojust office, those five demands. and then there is the process, so just talk me through, in order to meet the various deadlines, notjust here but obviously in brussels, how you could see that panning forward?” obviously in brussels, how you could see that panning forward? i don't think either main leader wants to see a long extension. the people have questioned this, journalists have questioned this, journalists have questions how exactly do they see a deal getting through before may 22. they do want to do this all as quickly as possible to avoid holding european elections, because even keir starmer, who favours another referendum more than the leaders office, more than corbyn, acknowledges to hold european elections and then drop out of them is all quite messy so they do want to get this over as quickly as possible. a lot will be made between the personal relationship of theresa may and jeremy corbyn, is there one? doesn't seem to be, but does she have a good personal relationship with anyone at the moment? she is not very personable, really, is she? where you work for labour list,
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plenty of people what you might say you probably have a view. in terms of the labour party, jeremy corbyn will at some point have to address his own team. are there those who will just say as a matter of principle, do you know what, you are dealing with the devil, we would never back this? there are absolutely mps in the party who are going to say that. there are mps who didn't vote for a customs union earlier this week, any of the soft brexit options because all they want is another referendum to stop brexit but that has never been the leader's position. they have never said we wa nt to position. they have never said we want to overturn the 2016 result, that has just not happen. there is a shadow cabinet meeting this evening, and they will have more sympathetic voices to where corbyn is coming from. people like angela rayner, jon trickett, iain lee pre—, the party chair, two of them have rebelled earlier this week and last week on another referendum, who are going to be much more empathetic to try to
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find a compromise deal. sienna rogers, thank you forjoining us. you are watching afternoon live, we will keep an eye on what is happening at westminster if there is any announcement following those talks between jeremy any announcement following those talks betweenjeremy corbyn and theresa may of course we will bring them to you at 4:30pm, so in about ten minutes' time, nicola sturgeon is holding talks with theresa may and again we may have to go over if they speak after that, one of them. prosecutors say they will now seek a retrial. fiona trott is outside preston crown court. throughout this process , preston crown court. throughout this process, relatives of those who died at hillsborough have been monitoring this by the minute. they have indeed and some of them have come out of
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court today after this 11 week trial and said we are disappointed there has been no outcome on that charge of gross negligence, manslaughter, because this has already been a very long journey, 30 years where they have been through two inquest, a private prosecution, an independent enquiry and now this trial here at preston crown court, too. a short time ago we spoke to louise brooks, his brother andrew died in the hillsborough stadium disaster. it is notjust the physical toll, it is the mental toll. travelling 300 miles a day is not easy. i am travelling 300 miles a day is not easy. lam no spring travelling 300 miles a day is not easy. i am no spring chicken now. i was 17 when andrew died, and i will be 48 ina was 17 when andrew died, and i will be 48 in a few weeks' time. i can't do what i could have done even five years ago during the hillsborough inquests. so no complete closure for
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the families today, no complete closure for david duckenfield either, the 74—year—old is being told that the crown prosecution service are seeking a retrial. his legal team says it will apply for a stay of proceedings to prevent a retrial. let me read you the statement. i recognise this development will be difficult for the families, we spoke with those present here at preston and liverpool before informing the court of our decision and the cps says it has been speaking to relatives and answering any questions they have. meanwhile in parliament, christopher chope mp raised a point of order suggesting it was unfair for his constituent david duckenfield to face another trial. we have also received a joint statement from steve rotherham, the mayor of liverpool's city region and andy burnham, the mayor of greater manchester. they say, after 30 years of fighting for the truth through the hillsborough independent panel, the hillsborough independent panel, the inquest and now this trial, the
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families have waited long enough, they say. we welcome the decision of they say. we welcome the decision of the crown prosecution service, and they also say at least today, at long last, someone has been held to account for what happened, and that's because 69—year—old graeme has been found guilty of breaching the health and safety act, effectively the jury here at preston crown court have said you didn't provide enough turnstiles for the fa ns provide enough turnstiles for the fans that day, just seven. for some 10,000 fans will stop we also heard from the former environmental health officer, david moore, during this trial. he told the jury he asked graham mackrell if he was prepared to carry out the activities for the safety officer, particularly on match days. i was quite surprised by his response, he said full stop he told me very directly he would be too busy entertaining corporate clients. graham mackrell is due to be sentenced on the 13th of may. fiona trott interesting, thank you.
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are watching afternoon live is. the prime minister meetjeremy corbyn for talks about the solution to the deadlock over brexit. the jury fails to reach a verdict on david duckenfield, a former police officer facing a manslaughter charge over his handling of the hillsborough disaster. commendation worth about £200 million announced for the victims of the windrush scandal. more on that in a moment. —— compensation. teenage juventus striker moise kean was racially abused in italy's top flight last night. team—mate leonardo bonucci suggesting the player was partly to blame for the abuse, which has been heavily criticised by raheem sterling. tottenham staged their first premier league game in their new stadium tonight at a cost of £1 billion. the stadium ready eight months later than planned, they take on crystal palace. it is 100 days to go until the start of the netball world cup. england head coach tracey neville admitting that the form of her players dipped after their commonwealth games success. i will be back with
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more on all of those stories in around ten minutes' time. hundreds of millions of pounds are to be paid in compensation to those affected by the windrush scandal. the home secretary sajid javid said the compensation would help people who arrived in the uk before 1973, many from caribbean countries, who were then wrongly detained, denied legal rights, threatened with deportation or wrongly deported from the uk by the home office. he set out details of the scheme to the house of commons. i am confident that the proposals for this scheme are closely aligned with what affected communities wanted to see. namely, that it is simple, it is accessible and above all, it is fair. full information is now available online and via a free telephone hotline number. guidance is being provided to help people understand what compensation they might be entitled to and how to submit a claim, and the application process itself is as simple
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and as clear as possible. here with me now from the joint council for the welfare of immigrants, a charity supporting windrush victims. he wants it to be accessible and fair. and i think thatis accessible and fair. and i think that is quite right, it should be, and we do welcome the news that the home office, the government will be compensating victims of this scandal, it is only right that they should be compensated for the awful treatment they have received, but ultimately the fear is that this could still happen again, we are not necessarily learning the right lessons. that will only happen when we get rid of some of these policies that rid of these crises. what about the money? will that make enough of a difference to those who have been affected, some of them really badly affected, some of them really badly affected by this? that money is never going to bring back the years of peoples lives that were stolen from them, nor will it bring back people who actually lost their lives asa people who actually lost their lives as a result of this crisis. it is a start, people who have been left
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homeless do need some support to get their lives back up and running. what i want to see is the compensation being paid out very fairly but also very quickly because many people have been waiting a very long time to restart lives, which have been on hold. you are expressing a concern this could happen again, sajid javid making it quite clear he does not want to see anything like this happen again, so this is a one—off? anything like this happen again, so this is a one-off? you just have to look at the language the government employee, it something they are very sorry the experience, this wasn't an accident, this was something done to people, policies they were warned about, they were told this would happen, they ignored it when it was happening, they claimed it wasn't really happening, then it did hit them all of a sudden. this can't happen again and the only way for that to happen is for the hostile environment to go you have had a home secretary resigned, the entirety of the right to rent scheme found unlawful by the high court, and now the taxpayer has been left with a £200 million bill to pay for
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the problems the government wilfully created. they have to think about getting rid of these policies and that should be plainly obvious to anyone apart from it seems this when government. you say the government of this time time wilfully created, it was theresa may. she was the prime minster now, so if there is anyone hoping to get rid of their policy would hope it to be their architect but unfortunately we have government, we see this in all areas of policy, that is held hostage by a right that ultimately is an obstacle to making those kinds of decisions. but for this to not happen again, for the taxpayer to not be left again and again with this kind of bill, these policies have to go full stop are you now satisfied we know everything there is to know in terms of who has been affected, or are there still people who have been wronged by this government?” there still people who have been wronged by this government? i do worry there are still people out there who don't realise what they have been affected by is the windrush crisis. there are people who may not be from the caribbean who may not be from the caribbean who don't think it affects them and
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i will encourage them and their family member is to seek help, to go online, look at the government website, find out more if it is something that is affecting them. we will also unfortunately never really know and that is the sad truth, never really know how many people we re never really know how many people were deported or removed from the country illegally because once gone it is very difficult to track them down, and the government didn't really do a very thorough job of looking at that, they looked at only a handful of cases rather than the whole gamut of cases they removed from the country. there are u nfortu nately very from the country. there are unfortunately very likely to be people who are affected butjust don't realise it. thank you for joining us. the ministry of defence has launched an investigation, after a video was shared on social media, showing soldiers shooting at an image ofjeremy corbyn. the footage, filmed in kabul, appears to show personnel using the image of the labour leader as a target on a practice range. the ministry of defence said such behaviour was totally unacceptable. labour described it as "alarming" — and the prisons minister, rory stewart — who served in the army — called it "outrageous". in the past few minutes,
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defence secretary gavin williamson has tweeted, "i commend the prompt and clear leadership shown by the army in investigating this troubling video." speaking to sky news, the commander of 16 air assault brigade, nick perry, said that the video showed a serious error ofjudgement. the video shows totally unacceptable behaviour and a serious error of judgment that falls far below the behaviour that we expect of our soldiers in the brigade. so what now, what have you established, and what is the next step? so the army is conducting a full investigation and taking this extremely seriously and we want to get to the bottom of what happened. can you tell us any more about the individuals in the video, why they are in afghanistan, what their role has been? we have about 400 soldiers from the brigade conducting force protection in afghanistan, and working closely with both nato and afghan partners, and these soldiers are doing an outstanding job in theatre, but this serious error ofjudgment is being fully investigated by the army. the target is the leader of the opposition, jeremy corbyn.
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it is a central pillar to the british armed forces, not just the army, but the armed forces as a wider body, that they are apolitical, and this would seem to fall short of that, would you agree? so, let me be clear, the army is and always will be a totally apolitical organisation, and this is a serious error ofjudgment. the south—east asian country of brunei has introduced strict islamic laws to make sodomy and adultery punishable by stoning to death. the move has sparked international condemnation, including from high—profile stars such as george clooney, and the country's gay community has expressed shock and fear. our lgbt correspondent ben hunte reports.
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the sultan of brunei, one of the richest men in the world, ruling over a small south—east asian nation. and it's in this country where strict new islamic laws are being introduced, making gay sex between men and adultery offences punishable by stoning to death. translation: anyone visiting the country will attain good memories, and are able to experience our peaceful and harmonious environment. and the best hospitality. homosexuality was already illegal in brunei, and those caught could face up to ten years in prison. but the sultan, who is the world's second longest reigning monarch is calling for stronger islamic teachings. he wants brunei to become more aligned with the islamic faith and sharia law. if this law is actually enforced it will be a real setback for the human rights of the people of brunei. and we are talking about a country which has maintained a moratorium on the death penalty since 1957, so they have not executed anyone since 1957. because of its oil wealth, brunei has an investment agency, which owns some of the world's top hotels, including this one, the dorchester in london. it's these properties that some campaigners are calling for people to boycott.
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campaigners with huge public platforms, eltonjohn tweeting that he's already refusing to stay at these hotels, as well as other big celebrities asking their followers to rise up and do something now. george clooney has said we are putting money in the pockets of those who choose to stone their citizens. brunei's lgbt community has expressed shock, whilst there is a small hope that the new laws may not actually be widely enforced, people still say they are powerless. before, lg bt people were living in secret. now, they are living in fear. ben hunte, bbc news. the regional airline flybe has cancelled dozens of flights because of what are called operational issues. services at a belfast, birmingham and edinburgh were affected. the company blamed an industry—wide shortage of pilots for the problems, as well as its own staff taking holidays.
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now the weather, the skies over westminster, if you have been watching, you have seen everything, we had centre, lightning, now blue sky has appeared over the victoria tower here in westminster. let's find out what is happening with tomasz schafernaker, what is going on? we are going round in circles, aren't we? round and round and round. all sorts of fronts coming together today in london, and it is going to remain very changeable for the next 24, 48 hours, of more showers, more thunder and lightning to come in some areas. this is what it looks like right now in the north—west of the country, it is particularly windy here and cold, we have cloud, wind and rain, snow in places, we have had hailfalling across a number of areas in the uk, giving a real covering, it almost looks like snow, more of the same for some of us. particularly in the south—west. some of us will be waking up to some wintry weather, a
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bit icy out there as well, parts of the west country, certainly the hills around the cotswolds, parts of brecon beacon, the south west country, certainly the hills around the cotswolds, parts of brecon beacon, the south—west midlands, some wintry weather particularly around the rush hour but others will have sunshine across eastern areas, hull to edinburgh, a mostly fine day tomorrow. on friday, still some showers around but slowly the weather will be coming down and over the weekend we could be getting temperatures in the maid, maybe even the high teens. —— middle, maybe even high teens.
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