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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 4, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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this is business alive. back to jail. ex—renault nissan boss carlos ghosn is re—arrested at his home in tokyo over new financial misconduct allegations. live from london, that's our top story on thursday the 4th of april. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: mps agree a law to further delay brexit. the ayes to the right, 313. the noes to the left, 312. the rock star of the global car the ayes have it, the ayes have it. industry says the new charges are they agree by a single vote to force theresa may to ask the eu outrageous and arbitrary as he is for an extension to brexit taken away in an early morning raid. and avoid no deal. and german manufacturing data has avoid inflaming the febrile come in at its slowest pace in two atmosphere around brexit — senior police officers issue a warning to politicians and campaigners. yea rs be measured, think about what you are saying and the impact about what it might lead to before it is said.
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good morning, firms have been stockpiling supplies ahead of brexit. they are counting the cost in time and money. was any of it worth it? it is home sweet home for spurs. they're off to a winning start at their new stadium after a spectacular opening ceremony. a successor to petra, shep and meg — the new blue peter dog will make his first tv appearence here, later. good morning. once again today we have got more rain and snow in the south—western quarter of the uk. snow in the far north of scotland. in between, sunshine but heavy showers which will be thundery with hail. more in 15 minutes. good morning. it's thursday april the 4th. our top story: mps have voted to change the law, to force the prime minister to seek an extension to brexit and avoid leaving the eu without a deal in eight days‘ time. it comes as talks between
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the government and labour continue throughout today, in an attempt to agree a way forward to break the deadlock. our political correspondent, iain watson, reports. another late night at westminster and, yes, another knife edge vote, but you are about to watch history in the making. the ayes to the right, 313. the noes to the left, 312. by the narrowest of margins, mps voted to seize control from the government. so long as the house of lords agrees, then parliament will have the power to instruct the prime minister to ask for a further delay to brexit. supporters of the move say this is the best way to avoid no deal. the house has tonight voted again to make clear the real concern that there would be about a chaotic and damaging no deal. but this long—standing leave campaigner was outraged. the public won't be impressed by this. forgive them, father,
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for they know not what they do. in a statement, the government was just a little bit more diplomatic. it said... but how significant was the vote? if theresa may can do a deal with labour's leader, then perhaps there could be just a short delay to our departure from the eu. if talks between the teams continue today, butjeremy corbyn wasn't exactly predicting a breakthrough. the chancellor didn't rule out another referendum. the confirmatory referendum idea, many people will disagree with it. i'm not sure there isa disagree with it. i'm not sure there is a majority in parliament for it but it is a credible proposition that deserves to be tested in parliament. another dramatic day at westminster is still no closer to
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agreeing a dealfor the uk departure. we can get more on these latest developments from our political correspondent alex forsyth, who's in westminster for us this morning. there have been a lot of votes going through the house of commons lately. why is this one more significant? through the house of commons lately. why is this one more significant7m is significant. there have been a whole number of votes that have happened. this one matters for two reasons. this is parliament taking control of the process, away from the prime minister and away from the government. it gives them quite a lot of clout. the prime minister had said she was going to ask for an extension anyway but she wanted it to be quite short if possible to give her time to get a deal through. now, mps can vote —— might force her to ask for an extension and crucially, they can have a say over how long that might be. the government said that could severely constrain its negotiating position but its options were pretty constrained anyway. we now theresa
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may metjeremy corbyn yesterday trying to find a compromise. there was no big breakthrough. their teams will get a get together again today. labour were unhappy with jeremy corbyn for not pushing for a public vote. the conservatives are unhappy with the prime minister for even talking to labour in the first place. there is a whole lot of unhappiness here and no clear route forward. a delay to this whole process looks even more likely and it could be a pretty long one. thank you. we'll be speaking to health secretary matt hancock, this morning at ten past seven. senior police officers have called for politicians and others with a public platform to use "temperate language", and not inflame the "febrile atmosphere" around brexit. police forces say, as part their preparations for a no—deal brexit, they have more than 10,000 officers ready to be deployed anywhere in the country at 2a hours' notice if there's unrest. daniel sandford reports.
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as the brexit debate has raged in parliament, around parliament and across the uk, passions have been inflamed. so much so that senior police officers are asking everyone in what they call the febrile atmosphere to think carefully about how they express their views and to make sure their words don't incite to violence. we would urge people, be measured, think about what you are saying and the impact and what it might lead to. and be confident that what you are saying is something you would want to be heard and won't be misconstrued and acted on in and won't be misconstrued and acted onina and won't be misconstrued and acted on in a different way. with well under way now for a possible no deal eu exit, chief constables have been keen to stress they are not expecting major problems in any brexit scenario, but they have making contingency plans to deploy 1000 officers and well over 10,000 officers within 2a hours. these police support offices would be
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drawn from forces across england and wales that would be used to do with anything that arises, from problems on the roads to major protests and even rioting. officers say they have warned those in charge of supply chains to make their own arrangements and not to rely on police forces who want as much as possible to stick to their core job of keeping communities safe. the hpv vaccine has nearly wiped out cases of cervical pre—cancer in young women since it was introduced in scotland 10 years ago, a new study suggests. scientists have published theirfindings in the british medicaljournal today. all teenage girls in the united kingdom are offered the free vaccine. lorna gordon reports. lauren mcadam discovered she had cervical cancer in her early 30s. doctors had noticed changes in the cells in her cervix when she went for a routine smear. the hpv vaccine fights the infection linked to most cervical cancer cases. laura says
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she wishes it had been available to her. definitely i would have taken it in their heart beat if it is going to stop anybody going through what i went through it is worth doing it. the hpv vaccine is routinely offered to all school—age girls in scotland. the uptake has been high. about 90%. researchers looking at the first smear tests of those receiving the vaccine found a 90% reduction in precancerous abnormalities and say this confirms the vaccination programme is translating into the prevention of cervical cancer. this vaccine has exceeded expectations. in 20, 30 yea rs' exceeded expectations. in 20, 30 years' time, we will look back and see, if the uptake stays high, we are potentially limit catered —— eliminated cervical cancer. later this year the vaccine will be routinely offered, notjust this year the vaccine will be routinely offered, not just two girls, but to all school—age boys in scotland, too.
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the former vice—president of the united states, joe biden, has promised to respect women's personal space, following allegations that he had been overly tactile. the potential democrat presidential contender has faced accusations of unwelcome touching from four women in recent days. he said he had only ever intended to build a "human connection", rather than make anyone uncomfortable. i always believe life is about connecting, but connecting with people. that won't change but i will be more mindful and respectful of people because my personal space. and that's a good thing. that's a good thing. a poor diet is responsible for one in four premature deaths. the global burden of disease study found that too much salt and too few whole grains and fruit are the main risk factors. eating unhealthily claims more lives than smoking because of its links to heart disease, cancer and diabetes, say researchers.
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young people living in british seaside towns are being let down and left behind by limited access to education and employment, according toa education and employment, according to a new parliamentary report. a house of lords select committee says many coastal areas are in desperate need of improvements to transport, housing and broadband. the government say they recognise the challenges facing seaside towns and are investing money in coastal communities. there is a big education divide, worryingly, over the last seven yea rs worryingly, over the last seven years there has been a fall of somerset —— 27% of people going to hire and further education in coastal communities. we think that needs to be looked at. we need to improve the quality of road and rail links. we need to ensure we have digital connectivity, high—speed broadband. those things can begin to mitigate some of the disadvantages that seaside towns and communities have got. there was a time when it was believed we'd all be flying around on jet—packs by now. have a look at this.
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well, that moment may be closer than you think. the world's first 3d printed jet—suit has taken its first public flight in new york. i feel like we have seen one of these before. maybe it has not been 3d printed. it was designed by a british company called gravity industries. it's made out of nylon and aluminium, has five turbo engines, and was created entirely using a 3d printer. if you fancy one, it will set you back more than £300,000. the thing is, does it look like you can go very far with that? there are so many details that i am missing. how far so many details that i am missing. howfarcan so many details that i am missing. how far can you travel? how high can you go? and what are going to be the new laws of air travel as well? do you give way to the right? is it like the road, do you drive on the right or left? does it change in different countries? and also, do you catch fire?! that is quite a
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considerable worry. i want one. it is like being a human drum. and also, printers so often go wrong. what if you get a paperjam? i have got the most spectacular stadium in this country out the moment. the new spurs stadium. we have talked about ita spurs stadium. we have talked about it a lot. they had their official opening ceremony and opening match there last night. last night was the big spectacular. fireworks, singing and everything. it has been a long time coming. it is six months later. it has cost more money than planned. finally they played in their new stadium last night. look at that. and they celebrated in style at the tottenham hotspur stadium before kick—off against crystal palace. all they had to do
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was win, and they did. son heung—min wrote his name into the club's history, scoring the first competitive goal there in a 2—0 win. manchester city meanwhile beat cardiff to go back top of the premier league, overtaking liverpool again. it's so tight at the top, liverpool will leapfrog city again if they beat southampton tomorrow. celtic are still firmly on course for the scottish premiership after beating st mirren. they could retain their title this weekend. and a scottish couple will make golfing history later. scott and kylie henry will become the first husband and wife to compete against each other in a professional tournament at the inauguraljordan mixed open. fa ncy fancy that? a mixed open micro. we are trying to get hold of them to talk to them. yeah. absolutely. i think there is a format where you ta ke think there is a format where you take alternative shots. it can get
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really antagonistic. you know the stadium? has it got a name yet? yeah, the tottenham hotspur stadium. yeah, the tottenham hotspur stadium. yeah, but like the magpie, the archer, or whatever? it yeah, but like the magpie, the archer, orwhatever? it is yeah, but like the magpie, the archer, or whatever? it is early days. if we are going to call it anything it has got to be the champions league stadium because one thing is for certain, that stadium needs to host champions league football. that is why spurs are under a significant amount of pressure to finish in the top four. if there was ever a location to have big european games, then it is there. it does look great. someone in my ear is telling me that they are going to sell the naming rights. they need to have a competition like when they named the boat. it makes me diea when they named the boat. it makes me die a little bit inside. it would be fun! i can think of loads of names. yeah. i don't think that's what's going to happen. you mean the
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highest bidder will get to name it? yeah. let's take a look at today's papers. the front page of the telegraph suggests thatjeremy corbyn is in the brexit driving seat. he's pictured giving photographers the thumbs up as he arrives for talks with the prime minister. the times reports that both mr corbyn and theresa may are facing a "furious backlash" from their parties. the main picture is of dame helen mirren, who has criticised netflix during an impassioned defence of cinema. moving away from brexit, the mirror says prince harry has slammed online gaming for the effect it has on children. he singles out fortnite as one that "shouldn't be allowed". and the main story in the daily mail claims unhealthy eating is responsible for one in six deaths in the uk. sally? there speaks a man who isn't
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yet a parent! is it worth seeing those things anyway? it throws it out there. it does. it makes us all think about restricting and time limits. i don't know if it is useful picking out one game though. honestly, it is. the scale of it amongst kids at the minute but you get into trouble either way because if you don't say something specific everybody says, what are you talking about? if you do, you get criticised for picking one. kids are not socialised now. they will talk to each other online. are you going to say, you can't play with your mates? really tricky. i am taking you to aintree. first day of the grand national festival today. saturday is the grand national. racing starts today. the times have got a really great interview today with lizzie kelly, who says her childhood dream was to be the first woman to win the
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grand national. you and me both. didn't we all dream that a bit? no xxx -- didn't we all dream that a bit? no xxx —— no! ithink didn't we all dream that a bit? no xxx —— no! i think it is an amazing occasion. jockeys are amazing personalities. a great interview with lizzie kelly. this is what i wa nt to with lizzie kelly. this is what i want to share with you. we love a bit of marble. this is from the jockey club. this is basically, they have made marvel heroes out of all the best racehorses of all time. my favourite is here. that's mine. red rum. the liverpool legend. it tells the story of red rum, the grand national, training on southworth beach. i have got you one, don't worry. it is a great idea. it ends at the back with the most famous racing fan of all, her majesty the queen. and a very handy kind of list of things you need to know. jockey, a person who rides in horse races.
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mary, a female horse. jump racing, racing over fences or hurdles. mary, a female horse. jump racing, racing overfences or hurdles. i bring you education at this time of the morning. this is for your old parker, who spent hundreds of hours clearing his neighbourhood after learning her discarded plastic can harm wildlife. he gets himself kitted out. he has got a thing he picks things up with. he has got a special suit. look at his pile of rubbish here that he has collected. he has been very busy. you are talking about kids, this is how they socialise? this is how this one socialises. it puts us in our place. what a lovely thing. interesting weather. i had some friends in scotla nd weather. i had some friends in scotland saying to me it was snowing yesterday. i was in london and it was so sunny. the contrast. the
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picture here is of snow dusted daffodils in livingston in scotland. spring vanishing from some parts of the country. four inches of snow. plunging temperatures. a thick blanket of snow in cumbria. lots of racing fans really interested to know what the weather is going to be like for the next few days for the racing. how is the going? the going today i think is soft. they were debating whether to water the course last night. i am going to stop talking now because i don't know about the weather. not too soft for the grand national. you don't want it hard. you don't want it crazy slippy either. carroll will now. good morning. for the grand national it is not looking too bad. for the boat race on sunday the risk of showers, possibly thundery. what we have today first of all is a chilly start. snow in the forecast once again. that will ease through the
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day. it will become drier in the east. low pressure is still very much dominating the weather. it has slipped down towards the south—west. we have fronts rotating around it, producing rain or snow. most of the snow is on higher ground. not exclusively. some at lower levels. this morning we are talking about parts of wales, shropshire, herefordshire and the south—west. snow also falling in northern scotland. this band will move northwards, taking rain with it. snow eases off through the course of the day in the south—west. you can see how this rain starts to push eastwards and also northwards. brightening up with sunshine in eastern areas. as we head on through the evening and overnight, are microcirculation still with us. still pushing north. then another pulse into the south—west of england and also ways, moving through hampshire, dorset, for example. another bank in the north continues
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to edge steadily northwards in the direction of the northern isles. there may be some mist around tonight but it will be too breezy for issues with fog or frost. not as cold as the night of that has just gone. tomorrow, we start with a lot of dry weather. we still have a weather front to the north. we also have some showery outbreaks of rain across parts of the south—west. tomorrow, a brighter day across much of scotland. temperatures picking up. the winds change direction. northern ireland, cloudy for you, cloudy and wales, cloudy in the south—west. rain stretching across the channel islands. from the midlands into the south—east, east anglia, eastern england, some brightness. temperatures up. highs between nine and 13 quite widely. as we move on into saturday, the wind changes direction to more of an easterly. they will be a lot of dry weather around on saturday. they will also be quite a bit of clout
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around as well. if you are close to this east coast, what you find is with the breeze it will feel quite chilly. some showers in the north—east of scotland. we have some showers in the channel islands into the south—west of england, possibly clipping south—west wales as well. temperatures away from the east that little bit higher in cardiff. sunday, once again, fairly cloudy with the breeze coming in from the east. we will see quite a lot of showers with it. these are the ones that might expect the boat race. they could be heavy and thundery. something to keep an eye on. you can see across parts of wales, a similar story. temperatures by then up. 16 degrees. it is a while since we said that. it feels like that. thank you. it sounds like something from a science fiction film, but medical researchers have found a way to grow tiny human organs on a microchip,
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to measure how disease attacks the human body. the scientists at the university of cambridge say it could help fight against diseases such as cancer, and reduce the need for animal testing. richard westcott reports. this is how you grow tiny 3—dimensional human organs in laboratory. first you freeze dry especially developed sponge for 18 hours. it acts like a skeleton. cells from human organ are put onto the sponge, which then sits inside this electronic chip. then they are fed with nutrients. what you end up with, if you can get your head around this, is a human organ growing inside a sponge, on an electronic chip. so this is a human gut, and they put it on the chip so that they can see exactly what is going on inside. so the reason i really like this
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image is because it shows me evidence that the mucus that is being produced by the epithelial cells is on the lumen lining. this green here is the edge of the lining and we can see here the blue nucleus of the cell, this is really key here, this red colour shows us the nucleus. this new technique means they can watch in real time how cancer changes or kills ourselves and then observe how new drugs might fight the cancer off. i think the real potential for this is personalised medicine. imagine i go into the hospital and i have a disease, i can take cells from my body, grow them in the lab in this beautiful 3—dimensional environment that is mimicking nobody, then we can test drugs on my body without effecting me at all, and develop the best possible therapy for me. they have made a gut, next they want to grow a rain so they can connect the two organs up.
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— grow —— growa —— grow a brain. now, we know that there are certain diseases like alzheimer's disease, parkinson's disease, which are affected by bacteria in our gut but how are they doing that, we do not know. and if we had this simple way to study that, it would really advance understanding in that field tremendously. in theory, they could go a whole body of organs, so the new technique could be used to find treatments for a range of human problems, from cancer to crohn's disease to allergies, the city, asthma or depression. —— micro—obesity. animal testing you do like this, the less you have to do on animals. richard westcott, bbc news, cambridge. that is interesting. extraordinary innovation. personalised medicine. we have sent ben out. we have had enough of him. we sent him to a factory, but he is getting chocolate, so it is not all too bad. where are you? i am in preston. good
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morning. it is a double—edged sword. i get to come to a chocolate factory but i get to where all this garb. we are talking about brexit because a lot of firms have been worried about the looming deadlines, but making sure they don't suffer disruption and get everything they need to give production running. here at this factory in preston they made chocolates. here are the brazil nuts. they have imported many more of those than they would need to. they have spent £100,000 on getting all that stuff from bolivia. they have spent £40,000 buying extra ginger from have spent £40,000 buying extra gingerfrom china. all the packaging for this place comes from china. it has cost them a lot to make sure they are ready. there is some frustration that all that swagger that continues at westminster means it is pretty tough for them. take a look at this. this gives you an indication of how much they are having to stockpile. this is the stuff they have made and are waiting to ship out. it would take them a lot longer. they have built their supplies to make sure they are ready
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for brexit. it means there is a lot of money sitting in here and they are not making that money back. we will talk to the boss later about their preparations and we will hear what business is doing to make sure they can avoid disruption. let's get they can avoid disruption. let's get the news, travel and weather where you are watching breakfast. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. families from enfield in north london who have been housed in former office blocks in harlow say they feel isolated and abandoned. enfield council says it wants to house residents locally but has no option but to secure temporary housing to meet the urgent needs of those who are homeless. residents say it has a huge impact on day to day — family life. the only thing that is around us is houses and business centres. —— micro—warehouses. like, there is not a shop.
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the closest shop to us is a 40—minute walk. even to commute to back to where your family live and things like that, that's what makes you feel isolated as well, because you have to walk an hourjust before you can even try and travel anywhere else. so that's quite bad as well. a man has been arrested following what has been described as an unexplained death in harrow. the man, aged in his 405, was found on northolt road yesterday afternoon. another person, who was allegedly seen running from the scene with a machete, has been arrested on suspicion of murder. a number of short story stations have been installed overnight in ca nary wharf. it have been installed overnight in canary wharf. it will dispense stories at no charge lasting between one and five minutes. it's hoped that they'll encourage people to take a break from their mobile and fall back in love with short stories. now the travel. southern trains are suspended between redhill and tonbridge because a broken down train.there are delays on heathrow express and there's a reduced service on tfl rail between the heathrow terminals.
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now the weather. good morning. some dramatic showers yesterday. today a rather different a day. feeling rather chilly. there would be some wet weather towards western home counties in particular. further east it is mostly dry. it is a cold start to the day. temperatures close to freezing. some early showers. they will clear away. wet weather towards parts of surrey, berkshire and buckinghamshire. towards the central and eastern areas, some sunny spells. mostly dry, clouding over in the afternoon.
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temperatures generally quite low underneath the ring. six to seven celsius. higherfurther east. underneath the ring. six to seven celsius. higher further east. quite a bit of wind—chill. overnight tonight, showers mostly towards the west. clearing skies into tomorrow morning. temperature is between four and 6 degrees. that southerly wind is going to put some warmer air are away on friday. temperatures will go up. it should be dry with sunny spells. warmer that the weekend. watch out for showers on sunday. i am back in half an hour. bye—bye. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it's 6:30. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning... there have been quite a few blue peter pets through the years, becoming almost as well—known as the presenters, and today we have the honour of meeting
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the show‘s brand—new dog — henry will be here later. kevin mccloud will be here to tell us about his latest show, following couples attempting the uk's largest ever self—build project. june and leon won the hearts of the nation on gogglebox with their wit and warmth, but since the death of her beloved husband, june's been writing a book about their life together. she'll be here to share her memories with us. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news... mps have passed a bill which will force the prime minister to seek an extension to brexit, to avoid leaving the eu without a deal in just eight days. it comes as talks between the government and labour continue throughout today in an attempt to agree a way forward to break the deadlock. the bill will now need approval
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from the house of lords to become law and it would still be up to the eu to decide whether to grant any extension. senior police officers have called for politicians and others with a public platform, to use "temperate language" and not inflame the "febrile atmosphere" around brexit. police forces say, as part of their preparations for a "no—deal" brexit, they have more than 10,000 officers ready to be deployed anywhere in the country at 24 hour's notice if there's unrest. they say measured language is required, to avoid tensions overspilling. be measured, think about what you are seeing and the impact as to what it mightily to do before it is said. be confident that what you are seeing something that you would want to be heard and will not be misconstrued and acted on any different way. there's been a significant drop in signs of cervical cancer among women in scotland who were given the hpv vaccine when they were at school. scientists have published new findings in the "british
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medicaljournal" today. they found the vaccine had led to a 90% cut in cervical abnormalities. all teenage girls in the united kingdom are offered the free vaccine. 50 people were killed in the shootings last month, and another 50 were injured. 28—year—old brenton tarrant is due to appear in court tomorrow. the former vice—president of the united states, joe biden, has promised to respect women's personal space, following allegations that he had been overly tactile. the potential democrat presidential contender has faced accusations of unwelcome touching from four women in recent days. he said he had only ever intended to build a "human connection", rather than make anyone uncomfortable. the global burden of disease study found that too much salt and too few whole grains in fruit are the main risk factors. eating unhealthily claims more lives than smoking
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because of its links to heart disease, cancer and diabetes, say researchers. a house of lords select committee says many coastal areas are in desperate need of improvements to transport, housing and broadband. the government says it recognises the challenges facing seaside towns and are investing money in coastal communities. there was a time when it was believed we'd all be flying around on jet—packs by now. well, that moment may be closer than you think. the world's first 3d printed jet—suit has taken its first public flight in new york. it was designed by a british company called gravity industries. it's made out of nylon and aluminium, has five turbo engines, and was created entirely using a 3d printer. if you fancy one, it will set you back more than £300,000.
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ido i do not know how far it goes. he did not go that far but presumably that was just a little up and down. you needed to be a properform of transport, don't you? it's the iron man suit or nothing, isn't it? you andi man suit or nothing, isn't it? you and i are loving the comic chat this morning. totally! the marvel films, another new one to look forward too soon. you could set a superhero film in the stadium i am about to show you. look at this. it has taken them a lot of time and a lot of money. but finally tottenham hotspur moved into their new home. let us have a look. fireworks, lights. . .and even opera singers. see if you can recognise him... that's wynne evans, the star
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of a well— known advert. when you put things aside to decide? yes. —— side to side. on the field, spurs made the most of the occasion, beating crystal palace 2—0. son heung—min the man to scored the first ever competitive goal at the stadium. you got there in the end. yes, eventually. manchester city meanwhile went back to the top of the premier league thanks to a comfortable win over cardiff. adam wild was watching. in premier league terms, this appeared a mismatch. indeed, the pre—match handshakes were about as close as cardiff got to manchester city in the first hour. knowing a win would take them back to the top of the table, city could have been ahead almost from the start. still, they did not have to wait too much longer. kevin de bruyne finding a gap he perhaps should not have been allowed to. city ahead within six minutes.
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cardiff might have fallen further behind had gabrieljesus not put this effort over from close range. but the second did eventually arrive before half—time. jesus with the lay—off to find leroy sane. it was no more than the reigning champions deserve. champions deserved. city's teenage star phil foden has had to wait patiently for his first premier league start. this was it and he almost got himself a hat—trick. had it not been for a string of fine saves and the post. city go back to the top. cardiff remain in a perilous position. for both sides, bigger battles lie ahead. adam wild, bbc news. one more game last night, and teenager callum hudson—odoi shined on his first start in the premier league as chelsea beat brighton 3—0. ruben loftus—cheek also scored on what was a good night for young english talent. that win moves chelsea above manchester united into fifth. things are much more straightforward
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in celtic —— in scotland. timothy weah and ryan christie both scored last night, and celtic are well on their way to an eighth straight premiership title. they could win it this weekend, after beating st mirren last night. now, more on that biting incident with kash ali. the 27—year—old has had his boxing license suspended, and he lost his fight purse too after what was a pretty bizarre incident. ali says his behaviour was "not a true reflection" of who he is. is that really a bite mark? yes. i do not think he was planning it, it was up one of those in the moment things. it is the first day of entry today. —— aintree. the 40 runners for what is one of the biggest races on the calendar will be announced at 10
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o'clock this morning. last year's winner tiger roll is going for it again and is the favourite. today's big race is the aintree hurdle. scott and kylie henry will become the first husband and wife to compete against each other in a professional tournament at the inauguraljordan mixed open. there we are. we have a photo of them at the end for you! more news now about couples. i like this one about leicester city defender harry maguire. you know about this, don't you? his fiancee fern has given birth to their first child...a little girl, who was both exactly nine months after he was involved in england's penalty shoot out win against columbia at the world cup in russia last summer. congratulations to them both. she has had a baby. we send our congratulations for this wonderful thing. that is what we do. very nice
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indeed. the time is 6:39am. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. fourinches four inches of snow i understand in scotla nd four inches of snow i understand in scotland yesterday. yes, we have had snow in parts of wales, shropshire, the south—west, there is a lot going on with the weather. if you do not like what you have at the moment, wait 50 minutes on the likelihood is that you will have something else. what we have this morning is some snow around but that will ease during the course of the day. it will become drier in the east but we have some showers. some of those will be heavy and thundery with some hail. low pressure dominates over whether as you can see there is a great big weather front wrapped all around it. that is what is producing the rain and also the snow. a lot of the rain and also the snow. a lot of the snow is over higher ground but it is not exclusively so. you can see we snow parts “— it is not exclusively so. you can see we snow parts —— above parts of northern england, scotland, through
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wales and we also see some for shropshire, hertfordshire and in the south—west as well. this morning, if you are travelling might bear this in mind, some nasty travelling conditions that could be slippery as well. northern ireland, if you shove us well. northern ireland, if you shove us first thing. for the north of england drier but you can see the circulation around the centre of low pressure producing rain and the snow. and as i mentioned, wales, herefordshire, parts of shropshire and the south—west, not immune to that snow and do not be surprised if you see some of it at low levels with heavy bursts. through the day that wind is further north, mostly as rain. getting into hampshire, the midlands, north wales and edging into northern ireland. the other band of rain across scotland continues to push northwards. eventually, brightening up on the east with some sunshine. no heatwave if you are stepping out. looking at ties and 80 degrees. through this evening and overnight, we still have this showery rain pushing north and then we have another post coming up
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from the south—west of england. again, dorset, hampshire, wales. at the same time, our band at the other end of this with a front will push on the other direction of the northern isles. so it will be quite busy tonight, we're not anticipating any problems with fog, neither with frost. it will not be quite as cold asa frost. it will not be quite as cold as a nightjust gone. this is how we start tomorrow. again we have a band of rain and cloud across the far north—west of scotland. we also have ever rain coming in across the south—western parts of wales and northern ireland. it could get further east. temperatures, well, we are starting to see things pick up. the wind will have changed direction to more of a south—easterly, that is a milder direction for us than the northerly or the north—westerly than we have been experiencing. for saturday, the wind changes again to more of an easterly and that means it will drag in more cloud from the north sea across much of the uk, and that will be thick enough here and there to produce some drizzle, or some patchy light rain and it will feel cooler right the way along the north sea coastline. showers coming
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in across the south—west. talking of showers, on sunday, again, we are looking at quite a cloudy day. some brighter spells but we are looking ata brighter spells but we are looking at a lot of showers across england and also wales. some of them could be heavy and possibly thundery. so something we are keeping a close eye on. but check out the 16, temperatures going up. thank you very much, carol. the time is 6:43am. let's bring you up—to—date with what happened in the house of commons last night. we've been hearing this morning, how mps reached a majority in the house of commons last night, passing a bill which forces the prime minster to ask for an extension to brexit to avoid leaving the eu with a no deal. here is how it happened. order! the ayes to the right, 313. the noes to the left, 312. so the ayes have it, the ayes have it.
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the house has tonight voted again to make it clear the real concern there would be about a chaotic and damaging no deal and also to support the prime minister's commitment to ensure that we don't end up with no deal on april the 12th. i have heard what the right honourable lady has said, but it is difficult to argue that you've had an extremely considered debate when you've rammed a bill through the house of commons in barely four hours! that is not considered a debate, sir, that is a constitutional outrage. and it went through in the end, mrspeaker... it went through in the end by one vote. some cheering. our political correspondent alex forsyth is at westminster for us. we we re forsyth is at westminster for us. we were just hearing the frustration of some obviously. four hours is enough. lots of people waking up this morning thinking, well, at
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least they have agreed on something. yes, even if it is by the smallest of margins, but it does not mean that everyone is happy about it. what they have effectively agreed is this. mps have the power to force theresa may to delay this process and crucially, they have a say over how long she should delay it by. the prime minister had already said that she would go to brussels and seek an extension because she has not got a gale in place yet. but she was hoping to keep that really short, just to give her enough time to try and get a gale over the line. now mps will have a say in that process, and if it looks like there could be no deal in the offing, it is quite possible that mps could say to the prime minister, look, we want a really long extension and push the idea of another general election or referendum. it gives parliament more say over this, the government is not happy about this and they have said it constrains their position over negotiations. lots of brexiteers are not happy about this. again, it means that parliament is dictating the terms of this and could push for ano
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the terms of this and could push for a no brexit or a soft brexit or a long delay to brexit. so something has gone through, but there are still a lot of anger and frustration. also lots of frustration. also lots of frustration i suppose about that it now seems appeasement between jeremy corbyn and threes in may, that they are actually talking, although so far we know that nothing inclusive has been agreed. yes, they met yesterday because theresa may said she wanted to reach out to the labour leader to try to find something you could agree on, you do that they could put forward in both of their names to parliament in the hope that mps could get around it. but yes, there is a lot of unhappiness about that. conservative mps are furious that theresa may is turning to labour party to try to get a brexit deal through. and some labour mps get a brexit deal through. and some labourmps are get a brexit deal through. and some labour mps are furious thatjeremy corbyn is not pushing for a public vote now that he has this opportunity to sit down with the prime minister and a say what he wa nts. prime minister and a say what he wants. there is a lot of pressure on both leaders. it is worth saying that despite the anger and frustration some have said that this could have happened if it sooner, but it is the right approach to try
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to find some consensus between the two parties to break this brexit deadlock somehow. but despite the fa ct deadlock somehow. but despite the fact that they sat down and talked yesterday, we were told they were just —— constructive discussions but there has been no breakthrough yet and officials will carry on conversations today, but i think finding something that the labour party and the conservative party can agree on at this point is tricky. alex, what do you make of phillip hammond post match comments about a conformity referendum ? hammond post match comments about a conformity referendum? he said this before that basically it is a viable option, he is not supporting or calling for it but he has said that it is something that should be considered as mps look at a way out. philip hammond voted for remain and we know he has pushed for remaining and keeping close ties with the eu but the brexiteers in his party again and see the prospect of brexit slipping out of their grasp. the question is whether that gets them on board to packy due to get it through. the picture is still very uncertain, but what does look likely to happen as some sort of delay to the process and possibly if the eu
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agrees, quite a long one. good luck with all of that, alex! thanks for explaining it. thanks! the confusion around brexit is continuing to have an impact on businesses and today we're looking at food companies which have spent money stockpiling ingredients to avoid brexit—related problems. but with the current deadlock, might that be wasted money? ben is at a chocolate maker in preston... they are trying to work out how it will unfold, ben. good morning to you. iam impressed in this will unfold, ben. good morning to you. i am impressed in this morning and we are looking at what companies have been doing to make sure that they can prepare for brexit, to make sure that they are able to have enough stuff and stop to get them through some of that uncertainty. this place, look, it makes posh chocolates but they have been having to buy any lot of stuff. they have £100,000 worth of brazil nuts, they have had to buy £40,000 worth of ginger to make sure that they have enough to get them through any disruption that might be because at the ports, because even if that stuff does come from the eu, there is an expectation that there could be delays at the border. let us
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speak to andrew, the boss. good morning. you have had to buy a lot of stuff early to make sure you have what you need to go about your everyday business. yes, we have, indeed. we have bought quite a lot of extra raw material stock and packaging has come in from the far east. that is to satisfy customers. they are extremely concerned about the continuity of their supplier because of brexit. now it has been moved forward, we have brought the stuff in and got it here, we now need to do it. it is an expensive thing for us to do in order to manage the whole situation. how frustrating is that uncertainty that ongoing drama at westminster, when you look at it from here? what does it mean for you from monday to do next? it is very frustrating. things are taking too long, billy, and the country said two years ago that we wanted to leave. that was a clear instruction to parliament, i do not know why it has taken so long to get out of the party political mode and ta ke out of the party political mode and
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take action together. because if they come back with an agreement together then there is no need for votes to ratify anything in the parliament afterwards. and things like that. it could save an awful lot of time. the rest of us, the whole country is reacting in exactly the same way as parliament is by running around with not knowing what to do, basically. we are alljust reacting on an hour by hour, day to day basis. very frustrating. for now, andrew, thank you. you have promised to show us the production line later and we will have a look at that. thank you. let me introduce you to nimisha raja and elsa fairbanks. nimisha raja is the owner of nim's fruit crisps and elsa fairbanks comes from the food and drinks export so —— food and drinks exporters association. how concerned are you? exporters association. how concerned are you ? there exporters association. how concerned are you? there is a lot of uncertainty but i have to think about the fresh produce that is coming in. oranges, lemons, kiwis,
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pineapples, they either come through europe or are grown in the eu. we have to worry about just—in—time products being delayed at customs, that means a whole day of production, perhaps not happening at our production factory in kent. but also be explored which has been a big problem to plan for that and we have decided to concentrate on exporting outside of the eu and growing the domestic market for the time being until we know what is happening with brexit. because i cannot set prices at the moment, not knowing how sterling will fluctuate and what targets will be imposed if any, so! and what targets will be imposed if any, so i do not want to commit to something that perhaps we cannot deal with. elsa fairbanks, something that perhaps we cannot dealwith. elsa fairbanks, that is theissue, dealwith. elsa fairbanks, that is the issue, we think of this is an important problem about getting raw materials but it is also about selling these things overseas. absolutely, with the uncertainty that businesses are facing, it is unheard of. people cannot plan, our members were a membership organisation of some of the most
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best food and drink brands in the uk, and companies of all sizes are saying the same thing. we have no new business in the pipeline because we cannot form up on prices, we do not even know which packaging requirements that they have to comply with. so everything is in limbo and it is a very dangerous position because this could mean that this will impact the way into next year, because new business takes months to develop. yes, one for us to talk about a little bit later on. thank you both. that is the view from here in preston from businesses that are struggling with all of that uncertainty. yes, if you a nswer all of that uncertainty. yes, if you answer is that perhaps no deal is potentially off the table again, but there are big questions about supplies and getting things through the ports to make sure that they have what they need. we will talk more about that after 7am. when are you getting the chocolate? after seven o'clock. why, is there an inappropriate time in which to each
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chocolate? no, this is all chocolate but they have told me that all of the stuff, the production line is not up and running until 7am because they have to warm up the chocolate. i wish you could smell displays, it smells incredible, and that is even before we have got to the production line. we will show you around. have you got any orders? just a couple of those boxes would be absolutely fine! nota problem. steel one, sneak one out! see you later. the time is 6:53am. more than 400 people a year, on average, drown in lakes, reservoirs in the uk. now bereaved families in the north of england are working with water companies and emergency services to install simple life—saving measures around dangerous reservoirs. tim muffett is in rochdale...
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yes, it is a chilly morning this morning. many people might be tempted to come to reservoirs, a place that they should not go to. they are very dangerous and often much colder than people realise. there are hidden currents beneath the surface and also they are very difficult to get out of because of the steep banks. today, at 20 locations and 80 reservoirs across the greater manchester area, throw lines will be introduced to help people if they are in difficulty and kelly, you are from united utilities, can you demonstrate how this will work? yes, you get the throw line from the board, you open up throw line from the board, you open up the court, keep hold of the site with your hand, the person over there, you throw it to them and then you drag them back. so you would rather people did not get into the water in the first place but this is to help them get back! yes, to help them get back to the edge before the fire services can take over. thank you. we are joined this fire services can take over. thank you. we arejoined this morning by two women who know how dangerous
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these places can be. i want to thank you both very much, becky and natalie, forjoining us. this must be difficult because you have both lost sons to drowning incidents. becky, your son dylan 13 died in a quarry nearby. and naturally, your sons was 16, paul. natalie, firstly, can you tell us more? as far as i am aware, he had arranged to come up here with his friends not knowing that it would be really warm and stuff. he was having fun. they decided to give it one more go and he got into difficulty swimming across the reservoir where we are now and sadly he drowned and lost the tie. how important is it that things are done to highlight the dangers and that there are safety mechanisms put in place? extremely important, to be honest. i said without any of this equipment that is going to get installed at the moment or is going to get installed,
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people arejust going moment or is going to get installed, people are just going through what i have been through, what other people have been through, what other people have been through, what other people have been through and, you know, it isa have been through and, you know, it is a good thing that they are doing. thank you for talking to us. becky, your son dylan, he drowned when he was 13, didn't he? and you have campaigned for some time about this. as enough being done? we are nowhere near doing enough but we are taking huge steps. these throw lines are an amazing initiative and could prevent people from feeling the pain that we feel, had these boards been in place whenever sons passed away. perhaps would not be living the life we're living now, because both of our sons died close to the edge the water. he was a strong swimmer as well. yes, he was and he had no alcohol or drugs in his system. it was simply the coldness of the water. apologies, we lost those images. really interesting to hear from those bereaved parents and the
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warnings are out there about these beautiful places and we will return later and hear more about the associated risks. we will be back with you at 7am with the headlines. let's find out what's happening where you are. good morning. families from enfield in north london who have been housed in former offices blocks in harlow have said they feel isolated and abandoned. enfield council has said they want to find homes for residents locally, but a national housing crisis means it has no options but to secure temporary accommodation to meet the urgent need. residents have said it has a huge impact on day—to—day family life. the only thing that is around us life. the only thing that is around us as warehouses and business centres, like, there is no shop, the closest one is a 40 minute walk. even commute to back to where your family live and things like that,
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that makes you feel isolated. because you have to walk one hour just before you can even try to get somewhere to travel elsewhere. a man has been arrested following what has been described as unexplained death in harrow. a man in his 40s was found yesterday afternoon with an injury which was initially thought to be or slash wound. another person who was allegedly seen running from the scene with a machete has been arrested on suspicion of murder. a number of short story stations have been installed in canary wharf. the vending machines will dispense stories at no charge lasting between one and five minutes long. it is so they will encourage people to take a breakfrom they will encourage people to take a break from their mobile phones and fall back in love with short stories. let us take a look at the travel situation. the district line is partly suspended westbound from whitechapel to embankment. there is a party suspension on the circle line. southern trains are suspended between redhill and tonbridge because of a broken down train.
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there is a reduced service between heathrow terminals because of a fa u lty heathrow terminals because of a faulty track. on the roads northbound traffic is slow on the tunnel approach from the flyover. very slow indeed. finally, in central london, baker street is closed between dorset street and blancher street. the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. some rather dramatic showers around yesterday. let us ta ke showers around yesterday. let us take a look at the bbc weather watchers website to look at some of your images from across the capital. today, it is a rather different day. still feeling rather chilly and there will be some wet weather out towards western home counties in particular but further east it is mostly dry. let us look at this. a cold start to the day, if you early showers around but they were clear. the wet weather is the surrey, berkshire and buckinghamshire, particularly as we head through the afternoon. toward central and eastern areas, some sunny spells around at times. mostly dry, clouding overfor around at times. mostly dry,
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clouding over for the afternoon and temperatures generally quite low underneath that rain, only six or seven celsius, slightly higher further east, but still quite a bit of wind chill around. overnight tonight, again, if you showers, mostly towards the west but clearing skies towards more morning. temperatures down to between four and 6 degrees. a bit of a breeze going on. the southerly wind will put some warmer air our way on friday, so temperatures will go up. it should be dry with sunny spells, one at the weekend but watch out for showers on sunday. iam back showers on sunday. i am back with the latest from bbc london in 30 minutes. plenty more on our website. until then, goodbye london in 30 minutes. plenty more on ourwebsite. untilthen, goodbye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: mps agree a law to further delay brexit. the ayes to the right, 313. the noes to the left, 312. the ayes have it, the ayes have it.
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they agree by a single vote to force theresa may to ask the eu for an extension and prevent a no deal exit from the eu. how a routine vaccination for teenage girls is leading to a dramatic reduction in the signs of cervical cancer. good morning. firms have been stockpiling ahead of brexit to avoid disruption in getting supplies. as the saga in westminster drags on, firms are growing increasingly frustrated at the time and money it has cost them. home sweet home for spurs. they're off to a winning start at their new stadium after a spectacular opening ceremony. a successor to petra, shep and meg — the new blue peter dog will make his first tv appearance here, later. good morning. the weather is very
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messy to describe today but essentially we have got rain and hail snow across the north of scotland, the south—west of the uk, rain and mostly hail snow. in between, drier and brighter with heavy showers. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. it's thursday, april the 4th. our top story: mps have voted to change the law, to force the prime minister to seek an extension to brexit and avoid leaving the eu without a deal in eight days. it comes as talks between the government and labour continue throughout today, in an attempt to agree a way forward to break the deadlock. our political correspondent, iain watson, reports. another late night at westminster and, yes, another knife edge vote, but you are about to watch history in the making. the ayes to the right, 313. the noes to the left, 312. by the narrowest of margins, mps voted to seize control from the government.
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so long as the house of lords agrees, then parliament will have the power to instruct the prime minister to ask for a further delay to brexit. supporters of the move say this is the best way to avoid no deal. the house has tonight voted again to make clear the real concern that there would be about a chaotic and damaging no deal. but this long—standing leave campaigner was outraged. the public won't be impressed by this. forgive them, father, for they know not what they do. in a statement, the government was just a little bit more diplomatic. it said... but how significant was the vote? if theresa may can do a deal with labour's leader, then perhaps there could be just a short delay to our departure from the eu.
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if talks between government and opposition fail, mps are likely to vote on alternative proposals last night. —— next week. the chancellor didn't rule out another referendum. the confirmatory referendum idea, many people will disagree with it. i'm not sure there is a majority in parliament for it but it is a credible proposition that deserves to be tested in parliament. another dramatic day but westminster is still no closer to agreeing a deal for the uk departure. we'll be speaking to the health secretary, matt hancock, in ten minutes. senior police officers have called for politicians, and others with a public platform, to use "temperate language" and not inflame the "febrile atmosphere" around brexit. police forces say, as part of their preparations for a no—deal brexit, they have more than 10,000 officers ready to be deployed anywhere in the country at 24 hours' notice if there's unrest. daniel sandford reports. as the brexit debate has
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raged in parliament, around parliament and across the uk, passions have been inflamed. so much so that senior police officers are asking everyone in what they call the febrile atmosphere, to think carefully about how they express their views and to make sure their words don't incite to violence. we would urge people, be measured, think about what you are saying and the impact and what it might lead to. and be confident that what you are saying is something you would want to be heard and won't be misconstrued and acted on in a different way. with preparations well under way now for a possible no deal eu exit, chief constables have been keen to stress they are not expecting major problems in any brexit scenario, but they have making contingency plans to deploy 1000 officers within an hour, and well over 10,000 officers within 24 hours.
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these police support officers would be drawn from forces across england and wales that would be used to do with anything that arises, from problems on the roads to major protests and even rioting. officers say they have warned those in charge of supply chains to make their own arrangements, and not to rely on police forces who want as much as possible to stick to their core job of keeping communities safe. there's been a significant drop in signs of cervical cancer among women in scotland, who were given the hpv vaccine when they were at school. scientists have published new findings in the british medicaljournal today. all teenage girls in the united kingdom are offered the free vaccine. lorna gordon reports. laura mcadam discovered she had cervical cancer in her early 30s. doctors had noticed changes in the cells in her cervix when she went for a routine smear. the hpv vaccine fights the infection linked to most cervical cancer cases. laura says she wishes it had
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been available to her. definitely i would have taken it in a heart beat. if it is going to stop anybody going through what i went through, it is worth doing it. the hpv vaccine is routinely offered to all school—age girls in scotland. the uptake has been high, about 90%. researchers looking at the first smear tests of those receiving the vaccine found a 90% reduction in precancerous cervical abnormalities, and say this confirms the vaccination programme is translating into the prevention of cervical cancer. this vaccine has exceeded expectations. in 20,30 years' time, we will look back and see, if the uptake stays high, we will have potentially eliminated cervical cancer. hpv is linked to other cancers, including those of the head and neck. later this year the vaccine will be routinely offered, not just to girls, but to all school—age boys in scotland, too.
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the man accused of the christchurch mask terror attack will faced 50 charges of murder, 39 charges of attempted murder. 50 people were killed in the shootings last month, and another 50 were injured. 28—year—old brenton tarrant is due to appear in court tomorrow. the former vice—president of the united states, joe biden, has promised to respect women's personal space, following allegations that he had been overly tactile. the potential democrat presidential contender has faced accusations of unwelcome touching from four women in recent days. he said he had only ever intended to build a "human connection", rather than make anyone uncomfortable. i have always believed life is about connecting, about connecting with people. that won't change but i will be more mindful and respectful of people's personal space. and that's a good thing. that's a good thing. a poor diet is responsible for one
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in four premature deaths. the global burden of disease study found that too much salt and too few whole grains and fruit are the main risk factors. eating unhealthily claims more lives than smoking because of its links to heart disease, cancer and diabetes, say researchers. prince harry has warned that social media has become "even more addictive than alcohol or drugs". he made the comments during a visit to a ymca in west london. the event was organised by heads together, a mental health initiative headed by the young royals. the duke of sussex met with representatives from charities including stonewall and young minds. young people living in british seaside towns are being let down and left behind by limited access to education and employment, according to a new parliamentary report. a house of lords select committee says many coastal areas are in desperate need of improvements to transport, housing and broadband. the government says it recognises the challenges facing seaside towns and is investing money in coastal communities.
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there is a big education divide, worryingly, over the last seven years there has been a fall of some 27% of people going to higher and further education in coastal communities. we think that needs to be looked at. we need to improve the quality of road and rail links. we need to ensure we have digital connectivity, high—speed broadband. those things can begin to mitigate some of the disadvantages that seaside towns and communities have got. there was a time when it was believed we'd all be flying around on jet—packs by now. well, that moment may be closer than you think. the world's first 3d printed jet—suit has taken its first public flight in new york. it was designed by a british company called gravity industries. do you know much about this, charlie? yes! it's made out of nylon and aluminium, has five turbo engines, and was created entirely using a 3d printer.
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the guy doing the experiment taking offa the guy doing the experiment taking off a little bit. about four foot off a little bit. about four foot off the ground. you might be hoping by now they have made slightly more progress. the fact is this is expensive. if you fancy one, it will set you back more than £300,000. i don't think that is that expensive. if you think about what ca rs expensive. if you think about what cars go for now, i don't how far is this thing can take you. that is what he wanted for. it's very spooky. back to our top story and the dramatic moment in the house of commons last night, when mps agreed by a majority of one to force the prime minster to ask for an extension to brexit and avoid leaving the eu with a no deal. talks between the government and labour are set to continue today, leading some conservative mps to question, who is really in control? we can put that question to the health secretary, matt hancock, who joins us now from westminster. do you welcome last night a's vote,
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which forces the prime minister to ask for an extension and rules out a no deal? i voted against it. i wa nted no deal? i voted against it. i wanted to deliver brexit as soon as possible. i think in doing that, in trying to do that, seeking to do it, we have to look to what is in the national interest. the national interest is served by being really clear about what the actual options are. the house of commons has now been clear that it won't accept a no—deal brexit. so, we need to find a deal that can command a majority of mps. that is one of the prime minister is working on right now. help us with some things you know that we don't. within cabinet, where you one of those who thought talking tojeremy you one of those who thought talking to jeremy corbyn you one of those who thought talking tojeremy corbyn in a formal sense as happened yesterday, where you one of those who thought that was a good
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idea? i am not going to go into the private discussions within cabinet. what i profoundly believe is that of the best thing for this country to resolve this issue, is to deliver brexit and deliver it as soon as possible. and to do that we have to look for where we can get votes that will command a majority of the house of commons in order to deliver brexit. we tried, by god we tried, to do that with votes on the conservative side and with the dup. that clearly didn't work after three attem pts that clearly didn't work after three attempts and months of work to try to persuade people. and so, the only way that the prime minister could go was then to talk tojeremy corbyn, to look for it labour votes to support a deal that can get us to leave the european union. so the
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simple answer is you think it is a goodidea simple answer is you think it is a good idea to talk tojeremy corbyn, yes? i think that it is important sometimes in life to compromise. we all do that in our normal lives. and in politics you've got to start with what is in the national interest. the national interest is to find a deal that can command a majority in the house of commons to leave. the labour party stood on a manifest at the last election, as we did, to deliver brexit. —— manifesto. the talks between the prime minister and the leader of the opposition are intended to find a way to do that. i think the best way to do that is the prime minister's deal. i have been on this programme many times in the past few months to describe that. but that hasn't commanded a majority in the house of commons, as we all known, and so the prime minister is looking to find how we can deliver brexit soon as possible that can
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command a majority in the house of commons. one of the things that people are slightly perplexed about in relation to these talks, a quote from you aboutjeremy corbyn very recently, in fact, at a time when there weren't talks happening, you said that given thejeremy corbyn will talk to her mass, his brother and the ira, it is astonishing he won't talk to our prime minister about brexit. he is not fit to lead. the impression given now, certainly byjeremy corbyn and following those talks, is he is very much in the driving seat now because theresa may has gone to him in desperation seeking his help. do you trust jeremy corbyn? well, we have to work with him because all the alternatives have failed. the prime minister has been trying to talk to him fora minister has been trying to talk to him for a long time now as you said. his initial reaction was, i am going to refuse to talk to the prime minister. then he agreed to talks, turned up at the talks and walked
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out because there were other mps there. finally he has decided to engage. i disagree profoundly with jeremy corbyn on a whole series of issues, on security matters. he is dangerous. on economics, he is a marxist and he would undermine the prosperity of this country. but he leads a party that has a manifesto commitment to deliver brexit micro. so on this subject, his manifesto says we need to do a brexit. our ma nifesto says we need to do a brexit. our manifesto says we need to deliver brexit. i think it is in the national interest to deliver on the result of the referendum because we area result of the referendum because we are a democracy. and finally, he has agreed to talks with the prime minister. and i hope that we can find a way to deliver brexit before the european elections that are scheduled for the 23rd of may, because the overriding sense of the country is, can we please just get on with it? talking to anybody who
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will help us to do that, i think is the right approach. you are a member of the cabinet. it is interesting to hear your take on some of the areas. we are all in the business of compromise. things have shifted dramatically. everything has changed. so for you, which of the areas of compromise are you prepared to look at? for example, are you prepared to be in a government that would bring forward some kind of a deal with the customs union attached to it? is that a possibility for you? i prefer the prime minister's deal. it is better than the customs union and! deal. it is better than the customs union and i have spoken before about the problems i have with it.|j union and i have spoken before about the problems i have with it. i don't wa nt to the problems i have with it. i don't want to be rude but can you try to address the question? we have moved on. this is a reality. the customs union is very much on the table. what about you ? union is very much on the table. what about you? is it something you
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are ok with? could you go with that? my are ok with? could you go with that? my overriding priority is to deliver brexit by the 22nd of may so we don't have to fight european elections. and we just get on with it. i don't want to prejudge these talks that are happening that the prime minister is engaged with. i think that it is in the national interest to deliver the prime minister's deal rather than a customs union. and i have talked in public about the problems with the customs union. but i do want to see an outcome to these talks so that we can deliver brexit. i am really trying, and you are being very nuanced in your answers. we are at the end game here and people want to see clarity. i am trying to read into this that you come although you don't like it, customs union, it could be a possibility in matt hancock's mind. the other one i would like some clarity on is the
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second referendum. some of your cabinet colleagues have suggested that they are more open—minded than they were previously. what is your position? is it changing? a second referendum doesn't deliver on brexit my gran would require a longer extension to organise a second referendum. the purpose of these talks is defined a solution that would command the majority that delivers brexit. a second referendum is not about delivering brexit. it is not about delivering brexit. it is about having another go and asking the people for another go. again, i have spoken about my very deep concerns with the second referendum because it would be divisive but it wouldn't be decisive. and it doesn't help us with the objective of these talks, which is to find a way which can command the majority in the house of commons that delivers brexit and thatis commons that delivers brexit and that is the overriding priority. can i ask you a question specifically to
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prime minister, theresa may? as it stands this morning, mps are in control of parliament. jeremy corbyn is in the driving seat on negotiations. what is theresa may in charge of? well, she is clearly, obviously in charge of the government. and the government is driving this process but it has to do it in driving this process but it has to do itina driving this process but it has to do it in a way that commands a majority. can you give me some evidence of her being in charge of government? mps have taken control of parliament. jeremy corbyn has been invited in. and clearly now he has a major role in what will happen next. i mean, you say she is in control of government. i don't see the evidence. of course she is. the challenge is, when there isn't a majority for the government in parliament, naturally then there is a lot more effort needed to keep a
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majority and to get a majority behind any course of action. in this country we have both the government and parliament. they are different things. usually the government commands a decent majority in parliament and so parliament does what the government wants, sort of second nature. not always, but usually. the unusual but difficult thing about now is that we don't have a majority in parliament. so every time you want something to command a majority, you have to construct that majority. she has been trying, the prime minister has been trying, the prime minister has been trying, the prime minister has been trying to do that on the conservative side with the dup over many months, talking to other labour backbenchers and a few other labour backbenchers and a few other labour backbenchers have backed us on the brexit deal but not enough. and so she has taken the decision that the only way to get brexit done is to go to the labour front bench instead. despite how profoundly we disagree with jeremy corbyn
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despite how profoundly we disagree withjeremy corbyn on other areas, he is committed to delivering brexit in the same way as we are. now the challenge is to find out what deal can then command that majority in the house of commons. matt hancock, thank you very much. we look forward toa time thank you very much. we look forward to a time when we will talk about things to do with health. today we are launching nhs x, which is about bringing modern technology into the nhs, which is incredibly exciting. i would love to spend even longer talking about that. we will do that ata talking about that. we will do that at a future date, i am sure. thank you. once brexit is sorted. i will tell you who can sort out stuff, carol. you can tell us what is happening with the weather. snow for many around the uk? there is certainly snow in the forecast for some of us today. snow
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in the south—west easing through the day. snow as far north as scotland. then it will become drier for many. there are also showers in the forecast. a bit of everything. that is because low pressure is driving our weather. this weather front comes from the mediterranean all the way around the british isles and ends up across wales and the south—west. this is where we have the rain, snow, showers in southern scotland. and northern scotland. a lot of those are at height but some getting down to lower levels. showers first thing for northern ireland. a few showers in northern england. but a lot of sunshine. rain and predominantly hills now. through the course of the day this system moves a little bit further north and east. this one moves further north. in between it dries up and brightens
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up. we are looking at highs between eight and 10 degrees. some showers will be heavy and thundery with some help. this evening and overnight we still have the rain moving north. another pulse coming off it. this is one great big weather front and it is going to be producing this rain in the far north of scotland. breezy tonight. we start tomorrow morning with a lot of dry weather. still rain and cloud across the northern isles. showery outbreaks of rain in wales, the south—west, the channel islands and northern ireland. as we get further east, temperatures higher. the wind changes direction toa higher. the wind changes direction to a south easterly. a little bit milder. changes again on saturday. we pull in more of an easterly wind. a cloudier date. a cooler day than the north sea coastline. light rain or drizzle. showers towards the
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south—west. a better day for northern ireland on saturday. the grand national is set fair in terms of the weather. as we head into sunday, a fair bit of cloud. some showers. some of those could be heavy. potentially thundery. keep a close eye on that for the boat race. the temperature of 16 degrees. thank you. it sounds like something from a science fiction film, but medical researchers have found a way to grow tiny human organs on a microchip, to measure how disease attacks the human body. the scientists at the university of cambridge say it could help fight against diseases such as cancer, and reduce the need for animal testing. richard westcott reports. this is how you grow tiny 3—dimensional human organs in laboratory. first you freeze dry a specially developed sponge for 18 hours. it acts like a skeleton.
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cells from a human organ are put onto the sponge, which then sits inside this electronic chip. then they are fed with nutrients. what you end up with, if you can get your head around this, is a human organ growing inside a sponge, on an electronic chip. so this is a human gut, and they put it on the chip so that they can see exactly what is going on inside. so the reason i really like this image is because it shows me evidence that the mucus that is being produced by the epithelial cells is on the lumen lining. this green here is the edge of the cell and we can see here the blue nucleus of the cell, this is really key here, this red colour shows us the mucus. this new technique means they can watch in real time how cancer changes or kills our cells, and then observe how new drugs might fight the cancer off. i think the real potential for this
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is personalised medicine. imagine i go into the hospital and i have a disease, i can take cells from my body, grow them in the lab in this beautiful 3—dimensional environment that is mimicking my body, then we can test drugs on my body without affecting me at all, and develop the best possible therapy for me. they have made a gut — next they want to grow a brain so they can connect the two organs up. now, we know that there are certain diseases like alzheimer's disease, parkinson's disease, which are affected by bacteria in our gut, but how are they doing that, we do not know. and if we had this simple way to study that, it would really advance understanding in that field tremendously. in theory, they could grow a whole body of organs, so the new technique could be used to find treatments for a range of human problems, from cancer to crohn's disease to allergies, obesity, asthma or depression.
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and the more testing you do like this, the less you have to do on animals. richard westcott, bbc news, cambridge. personalised medicine. just for you. imagine that. go in, something is wrong, get it built on a microchip and it is done. it's amazing. time for the news, weather and travel where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. families from enfield in north london who have been housed in former office blocks in harlow say they feel isolated and abandoned. enfield council says it wants to find homes for residents locally, but a national housing crisis means it has no option but to secure temporary housing to meet the urgent needs. residents say it has a huge impact on day to day family life. the only thing that is around us is warehouses and business centres. like, there is not a shop.
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the closest shop to us is a 40—minute walk. even to commute to back to where your family live and things like that, that's what makes you feel isolated as well, because you have to walk an hourjust before you can even try and travel anywhere else. a man has been arrested following what has been described as an unexplained death in harrow. a man in his forties was found yesterday afternoon with an injury which was initially thought to be a stab or slash wound. another person, who was allegedly seen running from the scene with a machete, has been arrested on suspicion of murder. a number of short story stations have been installed overnight in canary wharf. the vending machines will dispense stories, at no charge, lasting between one and five minutes long. it's hoped that they'll encourage people to take a break from their mobile and fall back in love with short stories. let's look at the travel situation.
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now the weather. good morning. some dramatic showers yesterday. take a look at the bbc weather watchers website to see some of your images. today a rather different a day. feeling rather chilly. there will be some wet weather towards western home counties in particular. further east it is mostly dry. it is a cold start to the day. temperatures close to freezing. some early showers. they will clear away. wet weather towards parts of surrey,
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berkshire and buckinghamshire. towards the central and eastern areas, some sunny spells. mostly dry, clouding over in the afternoon. temperatures generally quite low underneath the rain. six to seven celsius. higher further east. quite a bit of wind—chill. overnight tonight, showers mostly towards the west. clearing skies into tomorrow morning. temperatures between four and 6 degrees. that southerly wind is going to put some warmer air are away on friday. temperatures will go up. it should be dry with sunny spells. warmer that the weekend. watch out for showers on sunday. i'm back in half an hour. bye bye. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news... mps have passed a bill which will force the prime minister
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to seek an extension to brexit to avoid leaving the eu without a deal in just eight days. it comes as talks between the government and labour continue throughout today in an attempt to agree a way forward to break the deadlock. the bill will now need approval from the house of lords to become law. it will still be up to the eu to decide whether to grant any extension. the health secretary matt hancock said in the last few minutes that the government had done everything it could to get the prime minister's deal to make brexit work. we have to look for where we can get votes that will command a majority of the house of commons in order to deliver brexit. we tried, by god we tried, to do that with votes on the conservative side and with the dup, and that clearly didn't work after three attempts and months of work to try to persuade people. and so the only way that the prime minister can
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go was down to talk to jeremy corbyn to look for labour votes. senior police officers have called for politicians and others with a public platform, to use "temperate language" and not inflame the "febrile atmosphere" around brexit. police forces say, as part of their preparations for a no—deal brexit, they have more than 10,000 officers ready to be deployed anywhere in the country at 24 hour's notice if there's unrest. they say measured language is required to avoid tensions overspilling. there's been a significant drop in signs of cervical cancer among women in scotland who were given the hpv vaccine when they were at school. scientists have published new findings in the british medicaljournal today. they found the vaccine had led to a 90% cut in cervical abnormalities. all teenage girls in the united kingdom are offered the free vaccine. the man accused of the christchurch mosque terror attack will face 50 charges of murder and 39 charges of attempted murder. 50 people were killed in the shootings last month, and another 50 were injured.
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28—year—old brenton tarrant is due to appear in court tomorrow. a poor diet is responsible for one in five premature deaths worldwide, according to a study. the global burden of disease study found that too much salt and too few whole grains and fruit are the main risk factors. eating unhealthily claims more lives than smoking because of its links to heart disease, cancer and diabetes, say researchers. those are the main stories. 7:34am is the time. sally has the sport. we all know that i like shiny, new things and a new football stadium can be very impressive, he says, looking at the picture behind him. if that was on your wish list... it isa if that was on your wish list... it is a whopper, isn't it? it is a dream come true for that club. it has been a vision of theirs for many, many years, it is late, ridiculously expensive, but last night tottenham moved into their new home. it is gorgeous. look at this opening ceremony...
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and with a new stadium comes a big old opening ceremony. fireworks, lights. . .and even opera singers. see if you can recognise him... shall we give people a clue? that's wynne evans, the star of a well— known advert. on the field, spurs made the most of the occasion beating crystal palace 2—0. son heung—min the man to scored the first—ever competitive goal at the stadium. is there evidence that having a wonderful new stadium impacts positively on a teams performance? it could pile on the pressure, couldn't it? we have given you this fantastic new place... it could work both ways. yes, it could work either way. they had to win last night on the pressure sometime goes against you. i remember when liverpool change the kop end of the anfield stadium, all of the liverpool players went out and wanted to win, they were playing in front of the old—fashioned cop for the last time and were beaten. that could have
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happened last night, but it didn't. manchester city, meanwhile, went back to the top of the premier league thanks to a comfortable win over cardiff. adam wild was watching. in premier league terms, this appeared a mismatch. indeed, the pre—match handshakes were about as close as cardiff got to manchester city in the first hour. knowing a win would take them back to the top of the table, city could have been ahead almost from the start. still, they did not have to wait too much longer. kevin de bruyne finding a gap he perhaps should not have been allowed to. city ahead within six minutes. cardiff might have fallen further behind had gabrieljesus not put this effort over from close range. but the second did eventually arrive before half—time. jesus with the lay—off to find leroy sane. it was no more than the reigning champions deserved. city's teenage star phil foden has had to wait patiently for his first premier league start. this was it and he almost got himself a hat—trick. had it not been for a string of fine saves and the post. city go back to the top.
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cardiff remain in a perilous position. for both sides, bigger battles lie ahead. adam wild, bbc news. one more game last night, and teenager callum hudson—odoi shined on his first start in the premier league as chelsea beat brighton 3—0. ruben loftus—cheek also scored on what was a good night for young english talent. that win moves chelsea above manchester united into fifth. celtic are running away with it in scotland. they are well on their way to an eighth straight premiership title. they could win it this weekend, after beating st mirren 2—0 last night. but there was an unsavoury incident after the second goal as celtic fans threw a firecracker onto the pitch. celtic boss neill lennon called it "totally uncalled for" there has been an apology from kash ali, the man who put david price during the heavyweight fight on the weekend. the 27—year—old has had his boxing license suspended, and he lost his fight purse too,
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after what was a pretty bizarre incident. ali says his behaviour was "not a true reflection" of who he is. ——who bit david price. can you imagine the force of trying to grip onto something that is not flesh light? he has said he did not mean to do that and has been punished. ——flesh—like. onto horse racing. the 40 runners for what is one of the biggest races on the calendar will be announced at 10 o'clock this morning. last year's winner tiger roll is going for it again and is the favourite.
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today's big race is the aintree hurdle. the all—time winner is? red rum. well done. we so... we shall see you later, sally, thank you very much. carroll will have the weather in about five minutes. after a ten week trial and 29 hours of deliberations, jurors failed to reach a verdict in the case of the hillsborough match commander, david duckenfield, yesterday. the former chief superintendent had denied the manslaughter by gross negligence of 95 liverpool fans at the fa cup semifinal in 1989. the bbc‘s north of england correspondent, judith moritz, has been following the case and is with us now. good morning. please remind us what this case was about. well, the manslaughter prosecution against the david duckenfield manslaughter prosecution against the david ducke nfield is manslaughter prosecution against the david duckenfield is based on the case that he is ultimately responsible for what happened. the prosecution said that his failings we re prosecution said that his failings were extraordinarily bad, that they
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contributed to the deaths and that he had broken his duty of care to the fans who were there that day. they said that his feelings included things like monitoring the crowd numbers outside the ground and inside the ground, failing to close off the tunnel to the fence pens area and then to monitor the numbers of fans going through that tunnel because the pens were already full. that was a prosecution case. the defence on the other hand had said he had been singled out unfairly by the prosecution committee said it was breathtakingly unfair, that there were other factors at play, including things like the design of the stadium, poor signage, low police numbers, that sort of thing. the jury couldn't decide, they spent 29 hours in the jury room and yesterday they were discharged after failing to reach a verdict. what happens next? the crown prosecution service who brought this prosecution have said they intend to seek a retrial. david ducke nfield's
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have said they intend to seek a retrial. david duckenfield's team have said they will take legal steps to try to stop that. we will not know for some months, the laws will thrash this out in court before a ruling is made. there was one conviction yesterday, wasn't there? the exchequer wednesday club secretary, graham mark roe, what we see found guilty of? he was the club safety officer. the club secretary and safety officer back in 1989. he was the only person ever to be convicted in connection on a lesser safety offence. he basically was found guilty of failing to ensure there were enough turnstiles to let there were enough turnstiles to let the fans in there were seven tonnes for more than 10,000 people that this what that offence relates to and he will be sentenced next month. please tell us about the reaction from families. it will be the 30th anniversary of the hillsborough disaster and if you each time and they have been through the highs and lows. it has been emotional for them. many have been in court watching these proceedings and they
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have mixed feelings, they have told me that they want closure but many of them still want answers. these are very upset yesterday at the prospect of the legal process continuing. there were various fears about a retrial i think we can hear from two of them. firstly from steve kelly, whose brother michael died at hillsborough and then from barry devonside whose son christopher was killed. detention was unbelievable andl killed. detention was unbelievable and i do not think people should be put under the strain once again. i beg the families to look the fact that we take our families back. there is something fundamentally wrong in our society in my opinion that it takes 30 years to get to the stage of where we are now and it looks at this moment in time as though retrial will be the order of the day. you can see there are a range of views but emotions they are running high. ithink range of views but emotions they are running high. i think it still has some time to run. the next thing that will happen is that next month
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the 13th of may, graham mark roe will be sentenced. we expect a fine rather than any time in prison and after that injune, rather than any time in prison and after that in june, the rather than any time in prison and after that injune, the beginnings of hearing stealing on whether or not there will be a retrial. -- graham mackrell. thank you for going through the with us this morning, judith. you will continue to monitor it, i know. thank you. let's take a look at today's papers... i think the vote was quite late on last night and possibly too late for many of the paper is to react to that. it got through by one single vote, the exit date for brexit will then be extended. the times is looking at the angry revolt over leader's' brexit talks. there were hopes that theresa may and jeremy corbyn would meet, come to some sort of compromise. we spoke to matt
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hancock earlier today who suggested the government is doing everything it can to get it through but so far no breakthrough. and the daily telegraph, we were shortly speaking to matt hancock as we have said, he was suggesting why it is they are talking tojeremy corbyn now and views on him in the past. the daily telegraph is suggesting thatjeremy corbyn is in the driving seat. quite a few of the other papers this morning maybe our acknowledging the fa ct morning maybe our acknowledging the fact that people are confused, picking up on other stories instead. the daily mail is talking about the number of deaths due to bad diets. it is coming up to 7:45am. i promised you carol with the weather. good morning, carol. good morning, carol. good morning, carol. good morning, i can give you any whether you want today because we more or less have the lot. we start off with snow across the south—western quarter of the uk, including wales. that will ease through the day. we have snow for
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the far north of scotland and it will become drier in the east. low pressure is driving our weather. look at this where the front. it extends from the mediterranean all the way round the uk and then curls and towards wales. that is what is bringing us these unsettled conditions. this morning some snow around, snow conditions. this morning some snow around , snow across conditions. this morning some snow around, snow across parts of the southern uplands, and the problems. bright spills in northern ireland, shivers for the north—east of england. they will clear but if dry weather comes down to the south—east with the chipper. through the channel islands, into the south—west of wales. we have the rain and the hill snow but in some of these heavier bursts it gets down to low levels as well. one day and some nasty conditions. this is going to be pushing south north eastwards as we go through the course of the day, getting on across the southern counties in the midlands and through the north of wales, fringing into northern ireland. this ban will continue to move north into the northern isles and it will brighten up
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northern isles and it will brighten up in the east with some sunshine. temperatures today getting up to ten or 11 temperatures today getting up to ten or11 in temperatures today getting up to ten or 11 in the sunshine, but it will not feel particularly clever if you are stuck in the wind and rain. this evening and overnight you can see how this pushes up through northern ireland, gets into the south—west of scotla nd ireland, gets into the south—west of scotland and north—west of england and then another pulse comes up from the south—west channel islands and again through wales. we have all of this going on and it will not be as cold a night as they one just gone. it will also be quite breezy and we are not anticipating any problems with frost or fog. tomorrow morning we have remnants of the front across the far north—east of scotland, producing some cloud, and at times rain. still some rain pumping up across parts of the south—west, wales, and through northern ireland. this could edge further east and a lot of dry weather in the east itself, but one thing you will notice is that the temperatures are starting to pick up because the wind is changing direction, away from the north and north—west which we have had for the last few days, and coming up from the south—east, from
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a warmer continent. saturday sees the wind changed direction again to more of an easterly. we start to pull in these cloud from the north sea, thick enough for some patchy light rain and drizzle and it will feel cooler on the north sea coastline. through the channel islands, south—west england we have got some more showers coming our way but brighter skies in northern ireland. temperatures up to 13 or 14. as we head into sunday, still a fair bit of cloud around and we will see further showers develop across england and wales. some will be heavy and particularly thundery, so we will keep an eye on this forecast. we have the boat race, of course, amongst other things during the course of sunday, but temperatures up to 16 degrees. carol, you are bringing a 16 degrees even though it is wet. i quite like it when it is warm and wet. and ben is bringing as chocolate this morning. so i think that bennett wins this morning. i think so. i am coming up, i will come up tojoin
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ben. when the map, thank you. let us go to the chocolate factory now. good morning, ben. we are talking brexit. good morning. sorry, we were chatting about chocolate and i was wondering whether i could finish one in town. the answer is no. good morning. we are talking about businesses that are stockpiling all sorts of things ahead of the brexit deadline and you will know that a lot of companies have been trying to work out whether they have enough stock. just enough to go about their everyday business. this company has been stockpiling all sorts of things. they have imported £100,000 worth of brazil nuts from bolivia and they have been importing £40,000 worth of ginger from china. and they have been importing £40,000 worth of gingerfrom china. they have got extra to make sure they do not get caught up in any problems. let us speak to andrew who is the boss. good morning. you have had to make sure you have a lot of stuff ahead of schedule. you have got to
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make sure that you have it in here. how frustrating has it all been? really frustrating, there would have been plenty of time to give us some idea of when to be ready for but the trouble is that this information that has been going around, the misinformation, it has caused our customers to panic. people in the north and south, by customers, big supermarkets. they all want to make sure that they get continental supplies, so we have had to bring in extra stock from bolivia, china, packaging from the far east. it has cost us about 200,000 altogether. you essentially have that money sat in this warehouse and factory, not really doing much until you know where it is going. that is correct. the cash is tied up in stock at the moment and that will be converted at the normal rate. the normal rate that we sell it out. but we have had to bring it in early and that means to bring it in early and that means to afford that cash flow right now, it is like three months in advance of what we would normally have paid
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for these goods. so there has been a costly business. i am sure that our businesses have had to do the same as we have. funny you should mention that, we are meeting window. thank you, andrew. let me introduce you to the owner of nim's fruit crisps, nimisha raja. good morning. and also elsa fairbanks. you are particularly vulnerable because what you import our perishables, fruit and vegetables, and that will go off if it is stuck in the port. exactly, we are facing importing problems as well as exporting, so we export a lot of our crisps into eu and outside of the eu, and we have made a conscious decision not to carry out any new contracts within the eu. so we are concentrating on the outside of the eu, within the eu we are limiting the number of contracts we take on, simply because we do not know what is going to happen with sterling, we do not know what it will mean for us to be able to export into the eu in terms of cost.
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and i do not want to get into a contract where we are stuck with a price that we cannot honour. bringing in fresh fruit from the eu, we bring in kiwis, pineapples, all sorts of things, lemons, if there is a delay, what will we do? and elsa, that is the same issue that you are facing. that is what your members are telling you, that they have no certainty and they do not know what to do? they cannot plan. yes, people cannot plan for monday to the next which is not the way that the food industry works. what happens next and what do you want to see from westminster? certainty, people to know... the food industry is used to deal with complex regulations and it isa deal with complex regulations and it is a complicated business. they will be able to respond when they know what they're doing but the are uncertain and so people are in limbo. for now, thank you very much, elsa and nimisha raja. thank you. i
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will leave you with these guys who are very busy this morning making sure that the stuff that they have in stock gets filled and gets out to the people who need it. we will show you more later. thank you so much, ben. i do not think he will be able to resist. sorry, i was distracted. let us officially introduce you to henry. henry is the new blue peter dog and tell us, lindsey, is this the first time he has been on tv? this is the first live tv he has done. he does the statue very well, doesn't he? he has gone very quiet. he is a professional, a natural. tell us about henry. he is a brand-new blue peter pet and the other live performance today will be on blue peter. say hello to charlie, go on. he is not sure. there we go. he is
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our brand—new pet and they have been such a big part of blue peter and we re ce ntly such a big part of blue peter and we recently had our 60th anniversary and we just felt like it went really well, there was a lot of love for blue peter and it felt like... are you going to take him, charlie? he is so sweet. go on. how do you know when a dog is going to be good for television? because they have become pa rt television? because they have become part of the team, haven't they? yes, he has been to the studio a few times, he has met the camera crew and the sound guys and girls... he is sniffing the script! we think he is sniffing the script! we think he is two years old, he went to the dogs trust as a stray. there is only so much we know about him. you think he isa so much we know about him. you think he is a beagle basset hound? perhaps. he is amazing with children, he is really gentle as you can see. very inquisitive as well. he makes the perfect blue peter dog, we think. we all quite like it when
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animals misbehave on blue peter. that is the truth, if we are honest about it. have you had incidents over the years? yes, because the dog before this, again, he was a guide dog. in fact, she was a baby when she started on blue peter. if she got off the lead, she like to go and sniff the cameras and there was an episode where we gave her a bath live on tv and that was... we all got pretty wet, that was a bit of a disaster. we will not do that again! henry is going to be out on location, more than just in the studio, things like that? yes, i can't wait. whenever we do filming in manchester or where it is not too faron in manchester or where it is not too far on the train, henry will hopefully be there. so if we are doing a gardening film or perhaps a challenge, he can be on the side cheering me on hopefully. it is nice because it makes everyone feel chilled out and happy. yes, it a lwa ys chilled out and happy. yes, it always works when we have dogs in the studio as well. matt baker, formerly a blue peepers presenter ——
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blue peter presenter, he said the dog knew when it was going live? yes, his dog said that. yes, when he came in here he was really calm. henry here, he had been knocking over coffees behind the set. henry here, he had been knocking over coffees behind the setm henry here, he had been knocking over coffees behind the set. it is an interesting environment, it is not a comfortable environment, the studio. what kind of training has henry had to get used to the studio and a light sandy camera operators? it isa and a light sandy camera operators? it is a lot and it can be overwhelming. he has been the studio for the last two or three weeks, not live or on tv butjust kind of sniffing around and seeing how it all works, going in the gallery and saying hello to the director. he has met all of the cameramen and we wanted to ease him in really gently and on the show tonight at 5:30pm on cbbc, it is all about him, so we will have a vet in the studio to give him a check up, just checking that everything is ok.
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give him a check up, just checking that everything is 0k.|j give him a check up, just checking that everything is ok. i have noticed that his nails are very clea nly noticed that his nails are very cleanly clipped. sorry, charlie, he has ruined your suit. yes, i am covered in hair. he looks very wise and thoughtful for his age, don't you think? yes, he is a perfect face for the show. i think he will fit in well. charlie and i often bicker about who will get the pet and i never win because the shots are better on the site of the sofa. we should have ta ken better on the site of the sofa. we should have taken him around the other side! you can take, go on. he is not interested. we have a lovely lady and the office called michelle and he is looking at her. she has got lots of treats in her pocket. that is why he is looking in that direction. yes, i never get that out. he is adorable. he could be the breakfast dog. i willjust leave him
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here. that is great. thank you so much. we need him back for the live show at 5:30pm. perhaps you can throw us to the regional news now. can you do that for us? ma. he has looked away. camera six over there. can we go to that? henry? there we go. he is really looking. he is seeing it. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. we will see you soon. good morning from bbc london news. the family is from enfield in north london who have been housed in former office blocks in harlow have said that they feel isolated and abandoned. info council has said it was to find homes for residents locally, but a national housing crisis means it has no option but to secure temporary accommodation to meet the urgent need. residents have said it has a huge impact on day—to—day family life.
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said it has a huge impact on day-to-day family life. the only thing that is around us as warehouses and business centres. there is not a shot, the closest one isa40 there is not a shot, the closest one is a 40 minute walk. even to commute, to get back to your family live and things like that, that makes you feel isolated because you have to walk one hour before you can even try to travel elsewhere. a man has been arrested following what has been described as an unexplained death in harrow. a man in his 40s was found yesterday afternoon with an injury which was initially thought to be a stab or slash one. another person, who was allegedly seen running from the scene with a machete has been arrested on suspicion of murder. a number of short story stations have been installed in canary wharf. the vending machines well to spend stories at no charge lasting between one and five minutes long. it is hoped it will encourage people to ta ke hoped it will encourage people to take a break from their mobile phones and fall back in love with short stories. let us take a look at the travel situation...
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severe delays on the district circle and the hammersmith and city lines. on the railways... southern trains have delays of up to 40 minutes between redhill and tonbridge because of a broken down train. there are delays on the heathrow express and reduce services on tf rail because of a faulty track. on the roads... traffic is still on the highway westbound up to tower hill. the m23 is partly blocked southbound approaching junction nine following approaching junction nine following a collision. delays are half way back to the m25 atjunction eight. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. some rather dramatic showers yesterday. let us look at the bbc weather watchers website to see your images from across the capital. todayit images from across the capital. today it is a different sort of day. feeling chilly and there will be some wet weather out towards western home counties in particular. further east it is a mostly dry story. it is a cold start to the day.
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temperatures close to freezing. if you are early showers around but they will clear. the wet weather is for parts of surrey, berkshire and buckinghamshire, particularly for the afternoon. toward central and eastern mirror sunny spells at times, mostly dry, clouding over through the afternoon and temperatures generally quite low underneath that rain, only six or seven celsius, slightly higher further east, but still quite a bit of wind around. overnight, if you showers, mostly towards the west, but clearing skies into tomorrow morning and temperatures down to between four and six celsius. bit babyis between four and six celsius. bit baby is going on. that southerly wind will put some warmer air our way on friday. so temperatures will go up. it should be dry with sunny spells, a bit warmer at the weekend but watch out for some showers on sunday. iam back sunday. i am back with the latest in 30 minutes. goodbye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt.
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our headlines today: mps agree a law to further delay brexit. the ayes to the right, 313. the noes to the left, 312. so the ayes have it, the ayes have it. they agree by a single vote to force theresa may to ask the eu for an extension and prevent a no deal exit from the eu. how a routine vaccination for teenage girls is leading to a dramatic reduction in the signs of cervical cancer. good morning. there must have been stockpiling ahead of brexit to make sure they avoid any disruption at the ports, but as the saga in westminster drags on, many are asking whether it is really worth the time and effort. it is home sweet home for spares. a winning start at their new stadium after a spectacular opening ceremony last
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night. —— spurs. we have rain and snow in scotland and showers which will sometimes be wintry elsewhere along with hail and thunder. it is all going on and i will have more in 15 minutes. it's thursday 4th april. our top story: mps have voted to change the law to force the prime minister to seek an extension to brexit and avoid leaving the eu without a deal in 8 days. it comes as talks between the government and labour continue throughout today in an attempt to agree a way forward to break the deadlock. our political correspondent iain watson reports. another late night at westminster and, yes, another knife edge vote, but you are about to watch history in the making. the ayes to the right, 313. the noes to the left, 312. by the narrowest of margins, mps voted to seize control
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from the government. so long as the house of lords agrees, then parliament will have the power to instruct the prime minister to ask for a further delay to brexit. supporters of the move say this is the best way to avoid no deal. the house has tonight voted again to make clear the real concern that there would be about a chaotic and damaging no deal. but this long—standing leave campaigner was outraged. the public won't be impressed by this. forgive them, father, for they know not what they do. in a statement, the government was just a little bit more diplomatic. it said: but how significant was the vote? if theresa may can do a deal with labour's leader, then perhaps there could be just a short delay to our departure from the eu.
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if talks between government and opposition fail, mps are likely to vote on alternative proposals next week. last night the chancellor didn't rule out another referendum. the confirmatory referendum idea, many people will disagree with it. i'm not sure there is a majority in parliament for it but it is a credible proposition that deserves to be tested in parliament. another dramatic day but westminster is still no closer to agreeing a dealfor the uk's departure. iain watson, bbc news. let's get straight to westminster and alex forsyth. a lot of people will frankly have been asleep when this boat happened last night, so it will be brand—new to them this morning. why is this different from some of the other folks that have come and gone? i hate to confess that i was asleep when the vote happened but i am all caught up on
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what it means, don't worry. theresa may was going to ask for an extension anyway because she wants to buy some time to get the deal through the house of commons. what mps have done is to make sure that they can force her to do that, and crucially they can have a say on how long that extension might be. it could be that we are looking at something a bit longer than the short one that theresa may was after. the government says this has tied their hands when it comes to negotiating with the eu about any potential delay but the truth is the government was running out of options anyway over brexit. we know that theresa may met with jeremy corbyn yesterday to see if they could find a compromise. no breakthrough. the talks will carry on today but that has caused a lot of anger, particularly in the conservative party, to say the prime minister should not have to enter the labour leader to try and get a brexit deal through. matt hancock was on bbc breakfast this morning and he explained why the government had done this. we have to look at where we can get votes that will command a majority in the house of
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commons in order to deliver brexit. by commons in order to deliver brexit. by god, we tried to do that with votes on the conservative side and with the dup. that clearly didn't work after three attempts and months of work to try to persuade people. and so the only way that the prime minister could go was to talk to jeremy corbyn to look for labour votes. jeremy corbyn is under some pressure from people who want him to force a public vote on the brexit deal. unhappiness on all sides. talks carrying on. no breakthrough player. and the uncertainty continuing. alex, thank you. senior police officers have called for politicians, and others with a public platform, to use temperate language and not inflame the febrile atmosphere around brexit.
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police forces say as part of their preparations for a no—deal brexit, they have more than 10,000 officers ready to be deployed anywhere in the country at 24 hours' notice if there's unrest. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. as the brexit debate has raged in parliament, around parliament and across the uk, passions have been inflamed. so much so that senior police officers are asking everyone in what they call the febrile atmosphere, to think carefully about how they express their views and to make sure their words don't incite others to violence. we would urge people, be measured, think about what you are saying and the impact and what it might lead to before it's said. and be confident that what you are saying is something you would want to be heard and won't be misconstrued and acted on in a different way. with preparations well under way now for a possible no deal exit, chief constables have been keen to stress they are not expecting major problems in any brexit scenario, but they have making contingency plans to deploy 1000 officers within an hour, and well over 10,000
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officers within 24 hours. these police support units would be drawn from forces across england and wales and would be used to deal with anything that arises, from problems on the roads to major protests and even rioting. officers say they have warned those in charge of supply chains such as food and fuel to make their own arrangements, and not to rely on police forces who want as much as possible to stick to their core job of keeping communities safe. daniel sandford, bbc news. there's been a significant drop in signs of cervical cancer among women in scotland who were given the hpv vaccine when they were at school. scientists have published new findings in the british medicaljournal today. they found the vaccine had led to a 90 per cent cut in cervical abnormalities. all teenage girls in the united kingdom are offered the free vaccine.
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50 people were killed in the shootings last month, and another 50 were injured. 28—year—old brenton tarrant is due to appear in court tomorrow. the former vice—president of the united states, joe biden, has promised to respect women's personal space, following allegations that he had been overly tactile. the potential democrat presidential contender has faced accusations of unwelcome touching from four women in recent days. he said he had only ever intended to build a human connection, rather than make anyone uncomfortable. i have always believed life is about connecting, about connecting with people. that won't change but i will be more mindful and respectful of people's personal space. and that's a good thing. that's a good thing. a poor diet has been found to be responsible for one in five premature deaths worldwide. the global burden of disease study found that too much salt,
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and too few wholegrains and fruit are the main risk factors. researchers say that eating unhealthily claims more lives than smoking because of its links to heart disease, cancer and diabetes. prince harry has warned that social media has become even more addictive than alcohol or drugs. he made the comments during a visit to a ymca in west london. the event was organised by heads together, a mental health initiative led by the young royals. the duke of sussex met with representatives from charities including stonewall and young minds. young people living in british seaside towns are being let down and left behind by limited access to education and employment, according toa education and employment, according to a new parliamentary report. a house of lords select committee says many coastal areas are in desperate need of improvements to transport, housing and broadband. the government says it recognises the challenges facing seaside towns and is investing money in coastal communities. there is a big education divide. worryingly, over the last seven years, there's been a fall of some
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27% of young people going off to higher and further education in coastal communities. we think that needs to be looked at. we need to improve the quality of rail and road links. we certainly need to ensure that we've got digital connectivity, high—speed broadband. those things can begin to mitigate some of the disadvantages that seaside towns and communities have got. periodically, in fact quite often, we do those pieces where we say this is the future of travel. a flying car, jetpack, whatever, and then it doesn't really happen. maybe it is one step closer. we can show you the first 3d printed jetsuit. it has taken its first public flight in new york. it was designed by a british company called gravity industries. it's made out of nylon and aluminium, has five turbo engines, and was created entirely using a 3d printer.
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ididn't i didn't realise it was part of the suit. i thought you just strapped on the turbo engines. that would be more convenient. you could go to work in your normal outfit, have it ina case, work in your normal outfit, have it in a case, put it on your arms and a nkles in a case, put it on your arms and ankles and go. judging from that experimental left off, it is a work in progress. i think that is what we say! not yet for general use and very expensive. it will set you back £300,000. so now you know! 8:12am. when the hpv vaccine was introduced in the uk more than ten years ago, the hope was it would reduce cervical cancer rates. now scientists in scotland, who tracked more than 140,000 girls, say the jab has almost wiped out all cases of cervical abnormalities in young women. we'rejoined by sophia lowes, health information manager at cancer research and from london,
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dr philippa kaye who's a gp specialising in women's health. that is hpv? it is a human papilloma virus, and it is incredibly common and eight in ten people will be affected with it at some point in their lives. most people will not know they have had it and it can cause no problems at all, but in some people and in some women, it can cause cervical cancer. that is why by having a vaccine to protect against the virus, we can see a reduction in the cases of cervical cancer. girls aged 11 to 13 across the uk are offered the vaccine depending on their school year. what have we discovered about this great success story, according to the figures? the figures are really reassuring and they are showing that the vaccine is doing exactly what it is supposed to do. we are seeing a huge reduction in scotland in the percentage of cervical abnormalities, which other precancerous changes that you detect through cervical screening. girls have received the vaccine are showing much lower rates of these cervical abnormalities than girls who have not been vaccinated.
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doctor, there is a reluctance among some sections of the community and some sections of the community and some parents, because of what they perceive hpv to protect young girls against? absolutely. there is a stigma about hpv. there is the incorrect idea that it is a sexually committed disease. it isn't. it is passed through sexual contact. the thought of your 12—year—old being sexually active is quite apparent to lots of pa rents. sexually active is quite apparent to lots of parents. but the whole point of it is that we want the vaccine before their first sexual contact, but also at the point where their immune systems are working the best. this study was really interesting, because we were involved with children who had it between 11 and 13 but also children who had it in a catch up period, between 14 and 17. it worked better, the younger that they had it. it is definitely important to get it. it is notjust
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a one—off vaccine, is it? there is a lag between the two injections. a one—off vaccine, is it? there is a lag between the two injectionsm you're having it before the age of 15, you have two and if it is after the age of 15, you have three and thatis the age of 15, you have three and that is because the response is not so good. it is done through the schools but if for some reason you don't get it at school or your pa rents don't get it at school or your parents didn't give consent, then you can get it free of charge from the nhs from your gp up until the age of 18. given the success of this and the take—up rate as well, where do we go from here? the study has shown that we are seeing a reduction in the prevalence of cervical abnormalities, but the next step is seeing that huge drop off in the numberof seeing that huge drop off in the number of cervical cancer cases. as this cohort of vaccinated women get older, we should start to see a reduction in the cervical cancer rates themselves. the cohort you are talking about, that is a scientific term. what age have they reached as
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we speak now? the vaccine was introduced around a decade ago, so these girls are probably in their early to mid 20s. the rate of cervical cancer increases as you get to around 25. that is when we should really start to see the impact of the vaccine on cervical cancer. this is probably a stupid question with an easy answer. why can't you have the vaccine when you are older? the vaccine is most effective, as the doctor said, when it is done before you have had any sexual activity whatsoever, any chance to be exposed to the virus. you can request it if you didn't get it at school up until the age of 18 on the nhs. thank you very much forjoining us. so fear from cancer research uk. and doctor, thank you for your time as well. —— sophia. and now let's catch up with the weather. there is a real mixture, isn't there? that is a nice
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way of putting it. we have got a bit of everything. let's have a look at this picture from a weather watcher. this was sent in from wales, carefully, and there is definitely snow in the forecast today. some in the south—western quarter, including in wales of course, and also further north in the north of scotland and some snow showers but they tend to ease through the course of the day with some of us even seeing some sunshine. low pressure is driving the weather. look at this weather front wrapped around, going right the way from the mediterranean and across our shores. that is why it is so unsettled. you can see where we have had the snow already this morning and also some rain as well. a lot of it is over the hills but some of it is getting down to lower levels. if you are travelling, do ta ke levels. if you are travelling, do take extra care. as we go through the course of the morning, we have not just got snow across wales, but in the southern uplands, the highlands and northern scotland. and
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here there is also persistent rain. in northern ireland, bright spells and sunshine and showers, and showers across northern england and the sun will come out, and brighter spells in the south—east. look at the scale of rain and hail is no getting down to lower levels for a time. this circulation moves north and east and there is a lot of rain associated with that so a lot of surface water and spray. behind it, sunshine and showers. some will be heavy and thundery with hail. the rain pushes north across the north of scotland, heading towards the northern isles. some sunshine in the east mean that we will have temperatures even up to 11 but it will not feel so clever if you are stuck under the rain and the wind. through the evening and overnight, the weather front pushes up, with cloud and rain, and you will see the circulation bringing showery rain across north west england, south—west scotland and northern ireland. at the same time, another
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pulse of rain comes up from the south. we are not anticipating any problems of frost, to wendy, or any fog. tomorrow morning we still have that pesky weather front. the cloud as well. it kills them through the south of england and wales, producing more rain. —— it curls round. the further east you are, the drier you will be, with temperatures up drier you will be, with temperatures up and we lose that whence macro and pull in and pull in the smile that south—easterly. —— that wind and pull ina south—easterly. —— that wind and pull in a milder south—easterly. it will feel cooler on the east coast as well. further west, some showers and not too bad for the grand national at the moment. on sunday, more showers around, more developing across england, and showers in wales which could be heavy and thundery.
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something to watch out for for the boat race on sunday. high temperatures up to 16 on sunday. yes, isaid temperatures up to 16 on sunday. yes, i said 16! aren't you supposed to be impartial about the weather? this is the bbc, don't you know? but don't you get sick of having the heating on, then off again? you don't know what to wear these days. she is ranting now! she is absolutely right and we were just talking about which coat to wear earlier. i have been going through loads. is it anorak weather? is it warm enough? first world problems! nothing to complain about really. it looks great. thank you. sally will have the sport a bit later. it is 8:20am. 400 people a year,
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on average, drown in lakes, and reservoirs in the uk. now bereaved families in the north of england are working with water companies and emergency services to install simple life—saving measures around dangerous reservoirs. tim muffett is in rochdale. that is a beautiful location but it isa that is a beautiful location but it is a warning to anyone who uses those areas. this is from the people who know first hand. that is right. we arejust outside who know first hand. that is right. we are just outside rochdale and this reservoir is a lovely site. it is very cold this morning, but it is fairto is very cold this morning, but it is fair to assume that the temperatures will go up over the next few months and people will be tempted to swim in places where they shouldn't, quite frankly. resin wires are especially dangerous and much colder than people realise with hidden currents beneath the surfaces because of the pipes, and the banks are very because of the pipes, and the banks are very steep and difficult to get out of. in eight reservoirs across lancashire, throw lines are going to
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be installed to help people if something happens. can you demonstrate how these work? yes, you get the throw line, you keep hold tight, and you throw it to the person in danger. you wouldn't want people to be in a wart in the first place but if they are, it is at least something that can be done. you can pull them to the side until the emergency services get there. we are alsojoined by the emergency services get there. we are also joined by two mothers who know full well the dangers of these places. thank you for talking to us because it must be very difficult. but they can actually, you both lost your sons to drowning incidents. paul was 16 when he drowned in 2017 in this very reservoir. as far as you know, what happened? they were having a good day and they were swimming and he got into difficulties towards the end and his friends tried their hardest to save him but with no success. how
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important is it to highlight the dangers of reservoirs? highly important. they look calm and inviting but really they are not. they are not. these throw lines, presumably you welcome them? oh, yes. they will be there and they will help to save lives. thank you for talking to us, we appreciate it. rebecca, your son was 13 when he drowned in a quarry nearby and you have campaigned for this over the last few years. what needs to be done as far as you are concerned? we need more education, raising awareness, and having more of these boards in place. as you have said, these are not places to swim, but if somebody is swimming in it and they get into danger, these throw lines are potentially life—saving. get into danger, these throw lines are potentially life-saving. your son was a strong swimmer, wasn't he? an amazing summer. he was a fleet of fiscal two years in a row. he had
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been swimming since he was eight and it wasn't his swimming that let him down, it was the cold water. what do you say to people who might be tempted to do outdoor swimming?” say that 20 minutes of fun in the sun is not worth your family's lifetime of pain which is ultimately what is left behind. i have a broken family. i have children who grieve their brother every second of every day. i miss my son and i wish that something like throw lines had been in place where dylan died because had they been in place, maybe i wouldn't be living the life that i am living. thank you for talking to us. we really appreciate it. mark, you are from lancashire fire and rescue services. why do people misunderstand how deadly that place can be? i think because it looked so inviting but the danger with reservoirs is that the sides are so steep, so once they have entered the water, it is difficult to climb out, especially once cold shock sets in.
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the circulation moves away from the exterior of the body and mussels don't work. then very fit and able people becky's son find their strength is gone and they can't leave it. and there are often currents and machinery under the surface, so they are really not places to enjoy a leisure activity. they are functional and they are not swimming location. thank you for explaining that so well. the throw lines are here and the idea is for them to be positioned around the reservoir. the preference would be for people not to go into the water in the first place. that is the key message is being put out here this morning. thank you. wise words from those people at those beautiful surroundings. it is 8:25am. we have been talking a lot about brexit, obviously, and lots of companies are trying to figure out how to prepare, and you might have heard about stockpiling. then is at a chocolate factory this morning. you have been
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talking about that and get involved, i see! welcome to preston. we are looking at what different firms are doing. and those are lemon cream is, believe it or not. they do go a bit gooey with the chocolate. down the production line is where it really gets interesting. this firm has had to stockpile all sorts of stuff. it has spent £100,000 on extra brazil nuts, which it has had to get to avoid disruption at the port. £50,000 on gingerfrom china. they have been making sure that they have got enough, but that means a lot of money is held in places like this. all of the stock and the supplies that they have had to get in. we have been looking at what that means for them and whether it was money well spent. we will talk about that later but first the news, travel and weather where you are watching brea kfast weather where you are watching breakfast this morning.
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low pressure is in charge at the moment that is keeping things u nsettled. moment that is keeping things unsettled. you can see it from the satellite imagery with us that —— a spiral of cloud rotating around the centre of the low position towards the south—west of wales and the south—west of england. you can see the weather front bringing outbreaks of rain and also snow this morning across central and southern parts of wales and there could be snow for a time over the hills of herefordshire and shropshire and the south—west of england as well but the rain will clear away from the south—west and sunny spells will develop later on. the rain will edge north and east but for most of eastern england and northern england there will be sunny spells and the rain clears from
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northern scotland to give sunshine here and there will be sunny spells and showers for northern ireland today. maximum temperature is between seven and 11 degrees but when you are stuck beneath a cloud and the snow he could be lower than that. tonight we will continue with a spiralling area of cloud and showers which will feed in which could be heavy through the night and further north and east largely dry although temperatures could drop down to two or three celsius. not quite as cold further south and west. the area of low pressure will still be with us on friday but it gradually moves away and it makes things a little bit more settled for many of us. showers and unsettled weather confined to southern and western areas of england and wales and northern ireland seeing some showers. for much of the midlands, eastern and northern england and scotla nd eastern and northern england and scotland on friday, dry, sunshine and turning less cold with temperatures up to 12 or 14 degrees
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with a southerly wind bringing in milder air. it will stay unsettled in the next few days but a bit more settled into the weekend.
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