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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  April 4, 2019 10:00am-11:01am BST

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that patchy rain will move northwards. for the eastern north of england, scotland and northern ireland, while there will be someone in the far north, it is looking dry, there will be some sunny spells and a maximum temperature of 11 to 12 hello. it's thursday. it's ten o'clock. degrees. chow there across wales in i'm chloe tilley. the mountains. tonight we will continue with some showers, sparring around that era of low pressure. the mps have voted byjust one vote to force theresa may to ask the eu to state will be dry and clear. extend the brexit process and avoid temperatures could drop to two or three celsius. a frosty start on and no—deal brexit. the prime friday morning in the east. for minister's team is meeting labour's many, it should be dry, but there will be showers across mainly bracelet spokesman for a second day of talks between the two parties to western areas, northern ireland, try and find a way forward. we have wales on the south—west of england, sunny spells elsewhere and attempt brought together some labour mps and was a little bit higher than today tony blair's former spokesman, at 11 up to 1a. goodbye for now. alistair campbell, it is now campaigning fora alistair campbell, it is now campaigning for a second referendum, to find out what chance the two parties have of finding a compromise. a pioneering project working with women having multiple
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births has resulted in women needing you're watching bbc newsroom live. fewer emergency cesarean sections. it's 11 am, and these are the main she taught you to hunt, yes? yes, sir. stories this morning: then show me what you know. authorities in ethiopia have said and it is the gaming baftas tonight the pilots flying the boeing 73 in so we and it is the gaming baftas tonight so we will look ahead at one of the games in the running for one of the passenger plane that crashed killing biggest prizes. hello and welcome to 157 people followed proper cockpit guidance but was still not able to control the aircraft. mps vote by a the programme. we are alive until 11 majority of one to force theresa may o'clock this morning. we are also to seek a further extension to the going to be talking about shared brexit process. the bill is an pa rental leave, going to be talking about shared parental leave, where mothers and attempt to stop a no—deal brexit. their partners can have a shared time off when their baby is born. and talks continue this morning between the labour party and the the lib dem mpjo swinson became the conservatives as the government first to take her baby into a house tries to salvage a brexit deal despite differences. talks yesterday of commons debate. she is asking for backing for her bill which aims to make sure that everybody can access we re the scheme, run the first day of a despite differences. talks yesterday were described as constructive between jeremy corbyn were described as constructive betweenjeremy corbyn and theresa newjob or even if they are may. self—employed. are you part of a couple who has done it or is it something you wanted to do but couldn't? please get in touch with
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us on couldn't? please get in touch with us on that story and on everything we are talking about this morning. if you are emailing us and you're happy to be contacted to come on the programme, please include your phone number in your message. and remember that if you text you will be charged at the standard network rate. but there is the news with annita mcveigh. good morning. the first initial report into a boeing crash last month says that pilots responded properly but couldn't control the airport but it macro aeroplane. everybody on board died shortly after take—off. boeing should now review its flight control system. should now review its flight control syste m. m ps should now review its flight control system. mps have voted by a majority of one to force the prime minister to ask for an extension to the brexit process. last night's bill was intended to prevent the uk from leaving the eu without a deal in eight days' time and will require the approval of the house of lords
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to become law. the final decision to granta to become law. the final decision to grant a brexit extension lies with the eu. talks continue today between labour's brexit spokesman and the prime minister's team in an attempt to break the deadlock. the hpv vaccine has nearly wiped out cases of cervical precancer in young women since it was introduced in scotland ten yea rs since it was introduced in scotland ten years ago, according to a new study. scientists have published their findings study. scientists have published theirfindings in the british medicaljournal today. they found the vaccine resulted in a 90% cut of precancerous cells. all teenage girls in the uk are offered the free vaccine. the man accused of the new zealand mask shootings will face 50 charges of murder and 39 charges of attempted murder. 50 people were killed in the attack in christchurch last month and another 50 were injured. 28—year—old brenton tarrant is due to appear in court tomorrow. a poor diet is responsible for one in five premature deaths worldwide according to a new study. the global
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burden of disease study found that too much salt and too few whole grains and fruit are the main risk factors. researchers say eating unhealthily claims more lives than smoking because of its links to heart disease, cancer and diabetes. seaside towns have been neglected too long and they are in desperate need of reinvention according to a report by the house of lords. it says young people in coastal communities are being let down and left behind by issues like transport, housing and post—16 education. the world's first 3d printed jetsuit has taken its first public flight in new york. it was designed by a british company called gravity industries. it is made from nylon and aluminium, has five turbo engines, and was created entirely using a 3d printer. but if you fancy one it will set you back £300,000. that is a summary of the news this morning. back to you. thank you.
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shortly before midnight last night, a bill forcing the prime minister to ask the prime —— eu for another extension to the brexit process was passed by mps byjust one vote. but now, the lords need to confirm that decision and then, of course, the eu has got to agree to it too to make it happen. today the prime minister's top team is meeting labour's brexit spokesman, keir starmer, to try to thrash out a compromise brexit deal that theresa may can get a majority of mps to agree to. talks yesterday between mrs may and labour leaderjeremy corbyn were described as constructive but many of the prime minister's own mps are angry at the move and two ministers have resigned. 0ur political guru norman smith is here. what is the feeling among conservative mps today? they are furious, incandescent with rage at mrs may, and if we had a
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rage—ometer, i imagine it would be at max with the lid blown off. it is not just that they think that mrs may is betraying brexit by possibly doing some deal with mystical bent over a customs union, but because they think she is betraying their party by even contemplating an agreement with mr corbyn. it is almost a visceral uprising of anger about mrs may. some of them now are talking about getting out the basildon bond and writing a whole load of letters to the head of the backbench committee, said brian grady —— graham brady, but they can't fall steadily because they had their chance to falter out and they blew it, but i think there are enough letters, then the party elders might tell mrs may that she has really got to move along. 0thers are suggesting they could get the party rules changed and they could have another crack at a formal
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leadership contest. 0thers have another crack at a formal leadership contest. others are suggesting there could be more ministerial resignations which would increase the pressure on mrs may. my senseis increase the pressure on mrs may. my sense is that they are literally thrashing around wondering what on earth they can do to get shot of mrs may and i am not sure there is a clear a nswer may and i am not sure there is a clear answer because by and large they have blown it in december. added to which, mrs may, because she had said that she is going anyway, it doesn't matter. they can say what they like. they have no control over her because she has pretty much said she will try and deliver brexit and thatis she will try and deliver brexit and that is it, i'm out of here, this is my last task. their ability to determine what she does or even to get shot of her seems to me decidedly limited. the one thing that does flow from this explosion of anger is mrs may's deal, already dead, i think, of anger is mrs may's deal, already dead, ithink, now of anger is mrs may's deal, already dead, i think, now six feet under. where she to bring it back, i think the chances are that there would be an even bigger tory vote against it,
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suchis an even bigger tory vote against it, such is the level of hostility among the brexiteers towards the prime minister. norman, you talk about the possibility of more resignations, some speculation there could be cabinet resignations. what are you hearing? i am sceptical about that, to be honest, because i feel we have been up and down this hill so many times and people having and puffing about how they will walk out of the door and nobody ever does. i don't really think that will happen, certainly not in the immediate future. i think the likelihood, the next step, if you like, is not going to be ministerial resignations. it is probably going to be a long delay to brexit. the prospect of anything being agreed before this critical eu summit on wednesday is pretty much zero. that means mrs may will have to go cap in hand to the eu and it will be up to them, not parliament, not mrs may, to decide whether we can have an extension to brexit, and it seems to me quite possible that
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they may well say this is hopeless and you haven't got a clue. just leave and leave now. alternatively they might sate you need to go away for a couple of years and sort yourselves out. i think that is equally the most likely scenario, that the eu in a moment about exasperation will say the only other on the table is a lengthy delay, and i think that is becoming increasingly likely. norman, thank you. i know you will come back if there are any updates throughout the course of the programme. labour now has a much enhanced role in the brexit process but is the party behind its leadership and its brexit vision? let's talk now to some labour mps. dame louise ellman who supports another referendum, mp rachael maskell who is broadly supportive of mr corbyn and his route forward on brexit, and former advisor to tony blair alasatir campbell who campaigns for a so—called people's vote.
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i could see rachel maskell and alistair campbell nodding away when norman smith was talking about an extension and a long delay to brexit. is that what you see happening? it is absolutely inevitable now. the prime minister has completely failed to bring country together, parliament together and even her cabinet together. the only way to proceed now is to make sure that we can have a long period of reflection, of really understanding what the country is saying at this time, but also moving as now, if we are going to have any process to break this deadlock, it is clear it can't be donein deadlock, it is clear it can't be done in parliament. it is going to have to go back out to the country and that is where the resolution will be made. but we need time on that process to bring the country together first. but bringing the country together and another referendum are two and other very big spectrum. won't it be more divisive? the country is divided and any big debate is inevitably going
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to have some divisiveness about it, but i think the country is yearning for leadership and for resolution, and it can see that what this process is about, there reason these guys process is about, there reason these guys are process is about, there reason these guys are finding it so difficult to resolve is because the conflict between what we are, parliamentary democracy, and a plebiscite, which was won by promises which frankly have been exposed as totally undeliverable. these guys, if they vote now for any form of this, they know they will make their constituents poorer, which is a tough call for any mp to do. bear in mind that the last referendum was dismal on both sides. we can finally have an informed debate about where we go on this. what happens, if for example, there is another referendum, and let's say the numbers switch? remain wins by a marginal amount? then what? do we have another referendum because it
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isi-i? have another referendum because it is 1-1? no, we are in a crisis situation now and it is not about the parties but the future of our nation. three years ago people took a decision but it was closed and there was a decision, that people we re there was a decision, that people were given false expectations and i thought this was very simple. the more the government has tried to find a solution... isn't that patronising? people watching at home may have voted to leave and they know what it means, it means not being part of the customs union, which used we all support. that is not brexit, because brexit is walking away and not having that link to the european union. i want to give the actual explanation of the customs union because we fling words around and it is confusing. a customs union is an arrangement that makes trade is between members because there are no checks and charges, but it also means members can't strike their own trade deals with other countries around the world. when people voted, they didn't vote to make themselves poorer. that is very clear. people
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thought this was very simple. we have learned a lot in the nearly three years since that referendum was taken. the complexity of it is really showing itself in parliament's inability to come to a firm conclusion. even yesterday when there were talks between jeremy corbyn and the prime minister, and the attorney—general made comments about getting an agreement but we can always change it later, it really undermines confidence. i think we need a loan extension without pressure on people so that we can think much more clearly about what is happening and give people a choice about what they want to do but an informed choice. we haven't even left so we can't say that it will make people poorer because we don't know until it happens. will make people poorer because we don't know until it happenslj will make people poorer because we don't know until it happens. i think we do. every assessment shows that it will make people poorer. there are differences in degrees of poverty but they are all leading the same way. i want to make it clear to people watching at home that we invited lots of labour mps who are against another referendum to join the conversation this morning and nobody took up the invitation, just
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in case everybody is wondering why everybody here supports another referendum. you are very clear that is the compromise you want theresa may to make, another referendum. what compromises should jeremy corbyn be making in this discussion with the prime minister? it is very clear whenjeremy with the prime minister? it is very clear when jeremy meets with the prime minister? it is very clear whenjeremy meets with the prime minister and now keir starmer today that he sets out very clearly that we have got to have a deal to move forward to say to the country this is what brexit looks like and this is what brexit looks like and this is what brexit looks like and this is the deal that we have got at the moment. then the country can compare the advantages that we have of being in the eu compared to being outside. that is not compromised, is it? it is setting out a very clear agenda. the prime minister's deal has been rejected by parliament on three occasions now. i know she has a desire to bring it back for a fourth time but as norman smith said, there will be an even greater majority against it. we have got to move forward to say to the country this is brexit, this is remaining, now make your choice.|j
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this is brexit, this is remaining, now make your choice. i am not sure jeremy corbyn has got to compromise that much on this and i will tell you why. it is a signal of how desperately and the government are that they have got to reach out to them. ithink that they have got to reach out to them. i think he should be in there saying that i want an absolute commitment that no deal happens under no circumstances. i want you to go to the european now and ask for a long extension because you know that we are going to need it, andl know that we are going to need it, and i want any outcome that is agreed by us, between us, all the option to be put to parliament, every single one of them because the brexit on offer are so different to what was promised, has to be accompanied by a people's vote.l long extension? people at home will be tearing their hair out! leave and remain. if we go for a couple of yea rs, remain. if we go for a couple of years, that means we have got to ta ke years, that means we have got to take part in european elections at the end of may. this is madness three years after the referendum. that may be but this isjust recognising reality. yes, people are fed up with this and i hear this all
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the time but this is not something that will only apply for next week and next year, because we are talking about years ahead and our future and the future of generations, so it has got to be looked at carefully and calmly. we have already seen what happens when people try to take quick decisions. they don't stand up to examination. we have to recognise the impact that we are rent, something that reflects reality, —— the impasse that we are in. and we should find the best way forward. should the compromise from jeremy corbyn be that if there is a referendum then remain should not be on the ballot paper? definitely not. but this country voted to leave. but this country divided and that is the biggest weed in the prime minister should have taken from the referendum, to show the inequality across the nation. —— the biggest
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reading. if there is any failure of her leadership, the tenures austerity that people have been experiencing, which has really divided people. she has the incapability divided people. she has the inca pability of divided people. she has the incapability of bringing people together, and showing leadership. and chloe, can i make a point? any big decision that you make in your life, you get engaged to be married, and then in the year, the six months, whatever, you discover the person you are engaged to is making money out of your bank account and playing away, you're not going to get married. you are a football manager and you buy a player for 50 million euros and you discover in the medical that his knee has gone. you don't go ahead. you buy a house on the foundations are rotten. this is the biggest if these guys are going to make in our lifetime. but people who voted to leave will say it is just that you want to stay in and you are not happy with the result so you are going to keep on asking. some will say that but the vast majority in this country
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realise that this is going wrong and they wanted to get to the right place and they want to be involved in that process. the idea that millions of people are so angry that they are going to have another state isa they are going to have another state is a nonsense. lots of people disagree with you. gene on text: jeremy corbyn isn't fit to run this country. all mps are traitors planning to take away no—deal. we voted to leave so on of the vote. i have voted labour for 55 years. never again. many of the people who voted to leave are dissatisfied with the weather lives are now and have felt they had benefited from the european union. people will be worse if people leave and if they realise that, they might rethink. they need to think about why they have made for and alienate it. it is notjust about the eu but leaving the eu will make their problems worse and they should have the opportunity to think about that. steven on facebook: i know this might not be well received but perhaps there should be a long extension to the article 50 date,
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followed by a general election, then an informed referendum on whether or not to leave the eu. macon facebook: it what they are offering a vote on. we aren't leaving but i would like to vote on how we leave. when we voted i would never have given a thought to the irish border automatically that every medicine i ta ke automatically that every medicine i take is made in the eu. it takes yea rs take is made in the eu. it takes years to set up medical facilities and testing to be able to use these things for humans, so when really we might be shunted to the back of the trading key. people say they need us more than we need them but there are 27 of them and i would like to stay mates when we leave other that is where the customs union or a trade deal. he support the idea of a customs union and many people say thatis customs union and many people say that is not brexit. —— you support the idea. i don't, by the way. i don't see it as the outcome for this crisis. the outcome is staying in the european union. this idea of a marsh in the middle... there was an
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interesting piece on social media to date with the leader of a party in norway, and he has done work with our campaigners, norway, and he has done work with ourcampaigners, and he norway, and he has done work with our campaigners, and he is making the point that it is ok for norway but not right for the uk. lots of m essa g es but not right for the uk. lots of messages here. lynn on text: i am so furious with the members of your panel. how biased and how dare they? i knew precisely what i voted for andi i knew precisely what i voted for and i have been met down by them is and i have been met down by them is a parliament across the board. these mps are like spoiled children. we didn't win so we will vote until we do. as soon as mps, because that is where this is going, not the realities of the vote and what it means, the reality has become apparent and that is what you see. mps are trying and we can't reach a decision because we can see the competitiveness and that is why it is so important that we do have a long extension and give people the chance to reflect on where we are now. the point that your other
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communicative set before it is very true. they voted to leave and they didn't think about medicines, for example. that is something that people just didn't think about and now it has become more apparent and pa rt now it has become more apparent and part of the picture. chris on email: iam sick part of the picture. chris on email: i am sick and tired of people telling me what i did and didn't know. we voted to leave, and. it is mps and members of the house of have a vested interest in a sting in the eu and they are to stop us leaving. i respect the way that people chose to vote on the 23rd ofjune with information available to them but the reality is we have all learned much more sense that vote. every five years or so we have a general election and it was only two years la st election and it was only two years last time, where people vote for a party of choice and they have the opportunity to change their mind, which is how governments change. because the conservatives have a bigger majority, doesn't mean i support all their policies and i help them get through. of course not. i scrutinise that and i look into it and i put up the opposition,
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which is what our role is to do. but i would say to people is re—examined asa i would say to people is re—examined as a nation what brexit looks like and what remaining looks like, and then have an informed choice from this point as to how we move forward from here. people are incensed watching this conversation. we have hundreds of comments coming in and the last ten minutes that we are talking. do you get a sense of how angry people are? people accused mps of being in a westminster bubble and not understanding. do you understand how let down people feel? different people feel different things. my constituents are very angry at the prospect of leaving. there is intense anger in my constituency and the labour government, i fully agree! but in other places, people feel differently, which is why we need to reflect on this but without pressure. we now have a clearer picture of what it would mean so
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lets have the extension and let people think calmly about it. do you feel that it's macro understand that people feel let down and the anger? iam not people feel let down and the anger? i am not suggesting it is on one side. i am just saying there are a lot of angry people on both sides saying you are elected to sort this out and you haven't. we have got to break the myth of the westminster bubble. we are out in our communities continuously, having public meetings, talking to people on doorsteps, listening to what people on the ground are saying. we are not isolated in westminster. we are not isolated in westminster. we are part of the community and we have worked in normaljobs in our communities and we understand them and we are reflecting our voice back into westminster. people in york are saying that we want another vote. and on the labour party there is a lot of anger at the fact that the labour party are not really pushing forward on what is the party's policy. we will see in the coming days. thank you for your time. dem louise ellman and alistair campbell
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both advocate holding another referendum. 0ur reporter went to meet the group best for britain, who are encouraging people to lobby theirmp are encouraging people to lobby their mp for that. i'm eloise todd and i'm the ceo of best for britain. so, as you know, at best for britain, we've been fighting to give people the final say on brexit. tonight we're gathering with people from the tech community to try and help us use tech products and tech tools to help fight brexit and help connect ordinary people to their mps and give them information about the eu that might help them understand whether they think brexit is a good thing or not. you have eight minutes to come up with eight different ideas. we've had a brainstorm around two of our websites that we've developed. one of them is called hey—mp.co.uk, where you can write to your mp no matter where you are in the country.
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so they're talking about how to get that website out there more. right now, we just want anything that comes out. and the other website is called revoke. info, and this taps into the amazing six—million—person petition that's been going around the country and gone viral. this basically shows each constituency, how many people have signed, how that compares to the parliamentary majority of the mp there and how it compares to the local population. as a country, we did vote to leave. we did vote to leave, in 2016, and the government had a mandate to negotiate but the government did not have a mandate to sign off the deal. so we're saying, if parliament is in gridlock, why not put it back to the people, now that we know what brexit means? could you be seen as spamming or harassing mps? no, i don't think it's spam at all. i mean, different mps have
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different points of view about when they get emails, but most of them like to understand where their constituents and where their own voters are on these issues. so we're just trying to connect them to public opinion in their own backyard. it was very much the hope of our extremely dedicated professional staff. we are in a constitutional crisis, we're in deadlock. the lies that a lot of politicians have told are starting to catch up with the positions on brexit. we're saying, why not put it to the people? this is about coming together as a nation and having a conversation about what the different options really mean. we think the country deserves to have that debate and to have the final say. a pioneering project working with mothers expecting twins, triplets or more has reduced the number of emergency cesarean sections and admissions to hospital during pregnancy. working in 30 maternity
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units over a year, they sell 200 fewer neonatal admissions and 105 fewer neonatal admissions and 105 fewer emergency sections. the three—year project has been run by the twins and multiple births association and included doing things like improving the way twins' growth is charted so they're not delivered early unless it's absolutely necessary, and training midwives and sonographers to be multiple birth specialists. now we can speak to professor asma khalil, a consultant obstetrician at st george's hospital in south london and an expert on twins, who delivered these little ones, george and tommy watson, who are here with their mother michelle watson. her original hospital thought the twins weren't growing properly at 28 weeks and wanted them to be delivered early but under professor asma they had a healthy delivery at 36 weeks. and indre indrekute is speaking to us together with her partner andy
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from st george's hospital, where she's with her babies gabriele and abigaile, born the day before yesterday. she is in her bed! i can't believe that you are functioning in any way, shape orform, that you are functioning in any way, shape or form, let alone that you are functioning in any way, shape orform, let alone being on television, so thank you for being with us! michelle, i want to ask if first of all, you actually move hospitals, didn't you, because there was a thought that the boys would have to be delivered at 28 weeks and you were not massively keen on that idea? all of the scans had been fine up idea? all of the scans had been fine up until then and suddenly we got this scare at 28 weeks. i am a paediatric occupational therapist myself, so i have worked with children with difficulties as a result of prematurity. 0r from the experience within the neonatal intensive care unit. so i wanted to get a second opinion and i had
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already been on the website, the twins and multiple births website, and we had been seeing the work they had done with asma's lead, so we got her opinion and from day one she said there was nothing wrong with them. she said they were growing fine and everything turned around within those couple of days. prophetic, just explain the work that you are doing and the difference it is making to families like michelle's. we know that twins tend to be smaller than if you have single babies, and by having this chart, you take into account the fa ct chart, you take into account the fact that they are twins. it helps us fact that they are twins. it helps us to identify this then, which is that the twins are small because they are normal, and healthy, or they are normal, and healthy, or they are normal, and healthy, or they are small because they are not really developing properly and not growing properly. and then they are
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at risk unless you deliver them early. by doing this, you avoid unnecessary early delivery, which results in prematurity, and we know that many premature babies will have severe disability. i want to bring in indre at this point. i can't believe you go bed a couple of days ago because you are so calm! —— you gave birth. how have you been? the skype line has frozen and we will try and re—establish that. it is not just the physical care that you received at the hospital. emotionally, it must have made a huge difference to you being able to have that support from people who knew about multiple births. being around the people who have the knowledge and experience, from the midwives who were amazing and they
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we re midwives who were amazing and they were twin specialists themselves, deborah and joanne, we had confidence. everybody knew what they we re confidence. everybody knew what they were doing and had that knowledge and specialism and expertise and we re and specialism and expertise and were all working as a team and communicating really well as a team. india, we have re—established your skype line. what is it like being a mum? the whirlwind of the last few days. how has it been? it is the most amazing thing ever. it is such a feeling that i cannot express myself even. and explain to people watching at home the difference there has been for you, to be somewhere that has a specialist twin unit to support you notjust during your pregnancy, but the birth. sorry? what difference was there for you being at a specialist twin unit rather than just in a normal maternity unit? the difference is
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quite huge, they are professional, you feel secure, they are looking after you. and andy, did it put your mind at rest that it was specific ca re mind at rest that it was specific care tailored towards twins?|j care tailored towards twins?” cannot even remember some parts, there were so many specialist, many different ones. it's been a whirlwind couple of days. professor, it's interesting, the main objective was to make sure that followed the guidelines from nice and the government has sent a statement commending the twin and multiple births association work saying it demonstrates how many lives can be saved when the nhs follows the latest clinical guidelines. couldn't
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they always follow the latest clinical guidelines? is that surprising to you? it's not surprising. nice produces excellent guidelines backed up by high—quality evidence and they make sure it is tailored to fit the uk practice and targets in the nhs. the problem we know that the implementation of the guidelines is is not within the remit of nice to ensure the implementation. so if we are to successfully implement the guidelines we need a dedicated effort to overcome the barriers to implementation. for example, improving awareness and knowledge, training health care professionals. more importantly making sure you have enough resources for the level of high quality —— care across all maternity hospitals in the country. michelle, are you surprised to hear this? surprised to hear that the nice guidelines are not followed in
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every hospital? again, i am not surprised because there is short staffing and all of the hospitals, so staffing and all of the hospitals, sol staffing and all of the hospitals, so i can appreciate how difficult it can be, but the guidance is therefore a reason, and it is for excellence, so that would be the ideal for every hospital to be following those guidelines. and for you, indre, you had a natural birth, which is incredible, because most people would think you automatically have to have a cesarean section. and the twins are off in separate directions. we might need chaperones at this point. i am pleased to say that alison and nick are here to chaperone because we don't want anyone to get hurt. indre, explain to us, for you, were you surprised that you got to have a natural birth with your twins? no. i was expecting
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to do it. i wanted to do it. i didn't wanta to do it. i wanted to do it. i didn't want a cesarean section, so for me it was part of the whole experience and it made a big difference. so it's important for you, and important for many mums, to have that option to have a natural birth. how much of this kind of work comes down to nhs funding?” birth. how much of this kind of work comes down to nhs funding? i think there is a misconception that many twin pregnancies will have to have cesarean sections, which is not true. it is true that many of them will have a cesarean section for medical reasons, but we still can offer a vagina or delivery of the —— if it is not complicated and the
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baby has a head down position. so they are very happy with the outcomes, like indre, and often have very good outcomes. for the magenta —— maternity engagement, the effort involved, it's really important if we we re involved, it's really important if we were to achieve our target of reducing stillbirths by 50% by 2025. 2025 is not far, only five or six years away from now and if we were to implement any intervention it will take time to implement that and see the effect, because a pregnancy lasts for nine months. i think this is an important step that we can build on to try and improve the outcomes of twin pregnancies for all mums. we are a bit distracted because tommy and george are running around and being ultra cute. dad nick is here to help and alison. thank you both were coming in. and indre and andy, best of luck with
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your cute babies. 0h, tommy, do not hit your head. alison, please come in. thank you so much for coming in. it is the gaming baftas tonight and we look at the games in the running for one of the biggest prizes in the industry. and mps are being asked to back a bill today that would give everybody the chance to take shared pa rental leave everybody the chance to take shared parental leave when they have a baby. we will hear from the lib dem deputy leader, joe swinson, pictured here. you're married to someone for more than 20 years — you're in a loving relationship, yet you're told by a court that you're no longer allowed to have sex with them. that's the situation facing an anonymous married couple, who are due to have their case decided by a judge in london soon. the wife has learning difficulties and it's being argued by the local
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council that her needs mean she now longer has the mental capacity to make consent to have sex. the judge in the case has said, "i cannot think of any more obviously fundamental human right than the right of a man to have sex with his wife,". that comment in itself has caused controversy. but this whole area is legally difficult and this programme has learned of scores of similar cases across the country. victoria spoke to barrister sophy miles, who specialises in mental capacity cases and consultant psychologist kelly rayner, who has to assess whether people with learning difficulties have ‘mental capacity‘ she started by asking sophy miles what constitutes consent. consent is where somebody agrees by choice to sexual activity, and they have the freedom and capacity to make that choice and that applies to
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everybody, whether it is spouses or civil partners or virtual strangers. and when might capacity be reduced, ifi and when might capacity be reduced, if i can put it like that? and when might capacity be reduced, if! can put it like that? we and when might capacity be reduced, if i can put it like that? we take that from the mental capacity act and that starts from the presumption that all of us have capacity to make the decisions we need to make as we go through our daily lives and it also starts from the predominant —— presumption that although we make an unwise decision we should not be treated as having capacity, and it also makes it clear that you should not treat somebody as lacking capacity until you have tried every thing to help them make a decision. that is the starting point, and then the mental capacity act provides that you lack capacity if you are unable to make a decision and the reason is because of an impairment or disturbance in the function of the mind or brain and that could be long—term, such as a learning disability, or a short term, such as concussion. then the act looks at the decision making progress ——
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process and the information relevant to any decision and then we ask, can the person understand that information, can they retain it long enough to make the decision and can they use it, weigh it up, look at they use it, weigh it up, look at the pros and cons and communicate the pros and cons and communicate the decision. kelly, you are a co nsulta nt the decision. kelly, you are a consultant psychologist carrying out assessments in these types of cases. how do you decide if somebody can consent to having sex or not? the court of protection has been quite clear on the parameters that we use when someone is consenting to sexual relations, that they understand the body parts and that there are health risks involved and they understand they have a choice and can refuse. so the bar has been set by the court of protection deliberately low so we can promote peoples right to sexual expression, but we are looking at those three areas. do people understand the mechanics of the act,
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the consequences, and do they understand that they can refuse western mark and if somebody does not match those criteria, they are seen as not being able to consent to sex. at that time, yes, but we would do everything we could to make sure the person can get to a point where they can achieve the low bar. understood. why is this particular case different? for me? we are looking at a relationship here that predates the introduction of the mental capacity act and we have two people in a marital relationship, sexual relationship and they both wish to pursue a sexual relationship with each other, yet when we apply the low bar of sexual capacity, there is a failure to meet the standard and we have a clash of legislation of the human rights act which promotes our right to a private and family life and then the mental capacity act. with those two
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bits of conflicting legislation, the judge has to suck —— decide what has supremacy? the judge will have to look at capacity at the final hearing and it's obviously really important that he does that and gathers evidence and hears from all sides including representation from the legal team from the woman concerned, and if, in fact, she does lack capacity, so is there anything that can be done to help her? can she regain capacity? will psychological input help that. but fundamentally if she is absolutely unable to consent and there is no possibility of her regaining her capacity to consent, then the law is clear and the criminal law is clear, that she cannot give a valid consent and unfortunately that would place
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her husband at risk of prosecution. 0rof being her husband at risk of prosecution. or of being accused as a rapist. yes, as a sexual offender. do you understand the quote from the judge which has caused outrage, which was, there is no more fundamental right for a there is no more fundamental right fora man to there is no more fundamental right for a man to have sex with his wife. that is a snippet and i have not heard the rest of what was said. and just to say i saw it quoted again with another bit of the sentence and i wouldn't want to read anything into the way in which that was expressed. i am sure what he is intending to get at is the fundamental human right of both parties to have a consensual sexual relationship and the incredible importance of making sure you investigate whether the person can consent. and also do what you can to help them gain capacity for some reason they have lost it. and in the case that has hit the headlines, what will thejudge case that has hit the headlines, what will the judge have to decide? the rulings in the court of
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protection have made it clear that we need to be protecting people from the real risk of significant harm, so the real risk of significant harm, so the judge will be looking at what harm is going to come to the woman should the relationship continue. it's more complicated than whether she has or lacks capacity, it's the safeguards she did. a preliminary report into the crash of an ethiopian airlines plane last month says the aircraft nosedived several times before it crashed. pilots "repeatedly" followed procedures recommended by boeing before the crash, according to the first official report into the disaster. our international business correspondent, theo leggett, is here. we know that it was diving when it was trying to take off and that goes to reinforcing the suspicions that the aircraft problems by the same
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thing as the identical mac 737 of indonesia last october. the second point is that the pilots did everything did everything they were supposed to do to try and rectify the situation and that is absolutely key. because after the first accident, boeing said that the aircraft was basically safe if the pilots do everything they're supposed to do, even if the system malfunctions, it should not be a problem. the evidences says we have a second accident caused by a similarfailure, the pilots did what they were meant to do in the aircraft crashed with a severe loss of life. are the plane still grounded? they are grounded at the moment and the safety process is going through. boeing has come up with a software solution that it thinks will make the aircraft perfectly safe again. the federal
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aviation authority which regulates the aircraft has invited other international regulators in to help with the process. fundamentally, you can fix the aircraft, but until passengers are reassured it is safe, they won't want to fly it. thank you for updating us on that, theo. it's britain's biggest gaming red—carpet night tonight, the 15th time bafta has hosted its game awards. categories include — best mobile game, best family and social game and best evolving game — and historically, it's been a pretty successful event for some of the smaller software developers. let's speak to radio 1 newsbeat‘s gaming expert, steffan powell. you can see how important the gaming industry is. , big movie and film
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awards. and it's been 15 years since it was recognised. and that gives it the authenticity and it's not an industry only event, it's the outside coming in. there are people from overall —— all over the world. notjust in the uk but globally as well. tonight is to celebrate the six excess of the industry. the uk economy is up 10%. and it's also about looking at the issues going
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forward and that is online abuse and thatis forward and that is online abuse and that is tackling the issue shelley preston knows a bit more than i do. there is what she had to say. you have to have faith in people that if you give people the right motivation they will use them in a positive way. you could project your voice over a further distance. there is an element of risk to that. we believe it will bring players together and people were forming bonds between the cruise, and it was about having the cruise, and it was about having the right intent behind the features and hoping players will use them in the right way. there are other issues about representation of ethnic minorities and women in the games. there are lots of things that will be talked about tonight as well
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as celebrating who has done well in the past 12 months. as we said at the past 12 months. as we said at the beginning, the awards are against millions of pounds rather than the smaller developers. if you look at the best british game category, there is a game called red dead redemption two that made millions across the world, they are based in glasgow and they also made grand theft auto and people spent hundreds of thousands of hours making the game and there is a game called two—point hospital that was made ina called two—point hospital that was made in a small office in farnham, dozens making that game. and it does show there is a level playing field even though what has gone into the game is different to those who enjoy playing it. these are the guys who are against red dead redemption two for best british game tonight. we would love a bafta and we have stiff competition in the group, and all of
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the games are all of the amazing and we love all of them. and to be nominated is pretty fantastic, we are shortlisted for three and it's great to get a proper nomination for one, but fingers crossed and we are all going along and it should be a nice night. a bit of david and goliath there. a totally different sort of game to the big action adventures and they do throw up a surprise and there is a big mobile game called florence, a tale of love and loss you can play on your phone and loss you can play on your phone and that is up for five nominations. anything else you have got your eye on? god of war, a massive epic about greek and norse mythology, that is up greek and norse mythology, that is up forten greek and norse mythology, that is up for ten awards and it will be a bit of a shoot out between that, which did something really interesting, a major triple—a game, but also a tale between a father and
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son and that might resonate with the judges, but who knows, and that is up judges, but who knows, and that is up against red dead redemption two and we have talked about this big cowboy epic or it could be a game that people have not heard of, an independent title that might take home the gold and masks. i don't wa nt home the gold and masks. i don't want to predict and get it all wrong i will sit on the fence. i am firmly on the fence. thank you so much for coming down. mps are being asked to back a bill today that would give everybody the chance to take shared pa rental leave everybody the chance to take shared parental leave when they have a baby. four years ago, the government announced shared parental leave but it's not available to self—employed people, and even if you are employed, you have to have been in yourjob for six months. the deputy leader, the lib dems, jo swinson, who became the first mp to take a baby into a commons debate is pushing for it to be extended to all
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couples and we can talk tojo swinson and nick davies, a dad back at work after taking shared parental leave. thanks for both coming in today. nick, first of all, shared pa rental leave, today. nick, first of all, shared parental leave, how did that come about? how did this discussion at home go? since the policy came in my wife and i had the idea we would see me takea wife and i had the idea we would see me take a big chunk of time off and when she became pregnant we confirm she would do that and we thought we would overlap a bit and we did for months together and then i did two months together and then i did two months at the end and we had six months at the end and we had six months in total each. it was a wonderful experience, spending that much time with my son but also time with my wife as well. so you saw a huge benefit. it is a tricky time when the baby comes along as cute as it is.
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joe, you took shared parental leave. how did it work as an mp, juggling that? my second son was born at the end of last june and that? my second son was born at the end of lastjune and i felt as deputy leader of the lib dems. and i saw my husband take some leave and he took he took another two months at that point and we've enjoyed the ability to share that and split it ina way ability to share that and split it in a way that works for us. when our first son was born we weren't able
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to use parental leave, so it's been really positive to be able to do it. and thousands of people across the country are using it to. i wanted it to be available to more people and it was in the legislation that i put through in 2013, and it came into force in 2015, and it was always supposed to be reviewed and improved on after three years, and it is a year overdue. but you know, people haven't stopped having babies and couples are all having children all the time and we need to get on with doing the review. nick, did you find ita doing the review. nick, did you find it a difficult conversation with your employer? i was quite lucky. my organisation is not that large, only 50 people and i was only the third person to take six months through shared parental leave.
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and i know others have not been as lucky. freelancers have to make difficult decisions get no support if they want to take leave. if one of you is the major breadwinner, in financial terms, you have to make a strategic decision about paying the rent paying the mortgage. there is a really big financial element to this and traces been a great supporter. she has been promoting a bill to make sure parental leave has been extended and we have worked closely on that. and employers are taking it more seriously and we have great announcements this week. it is a pa re ntal announcements this week. it is a parental pay policy that applies equally to men and women and aviva have similar. there are lots of companies that are doing that. we
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push for transparency so large companies have to publish their pa re ntal companies have to publish their parental pay policies. they should have to justify that, because the difficult question ought to be asked of them, and for many of them they have not thought it through, and of course if they properly pay people to take leave, it makes it easier to ta ke to take leave, it makes it easier to take leave. matthew got in touch on e—mailand said take leave. matthew got in touch on e—mail and said six months before my baby was due i was often newjob and took it. after a week i went back to my old job, and after that the management had filed my p a5. and i was there not entitled to paternity leave and my wife struggled. it would be helpful if maternity and paternity leave was available to everybody from day one. laura said she went back to work at eight months and my husband took shared pa rental leave. months and my husband took shared parental leave. he loved it and he feels he has a wonderful bond with a two and a half year old daughter,
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but the request to take spl was not well received by his employers. it is difficult for some guys and there is difficult for some guys and there is the stigma to say for some guys to say i want to take time with my baby. some guys are not unreasonably worried about their career progression but that is a worry that women have had since day one. and that gave us more recognition of me being worried about my career, but her career. and they can do without theirfemale her career. and they can do without their female employees and that is not the reason, because it is not true. thank you both coming in.
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we are currently evaluating the shared parental leave and pay scheme and we anticipate being in a position to public findings in 2019. thank you for sharing your experiences here, and online. thanks for your company and have a great day.
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