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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  April 4, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the pilots of the boeing jet that the headlines: crashed in ethiopia last month followed all the right emergency procedures but couldn't save the plane, that's according the ethiopian government says the to a report into the disaster. pilots of the boeing 737 that you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's 11 am, and these are the main crashed last month couldn't control it says the aircraft repeatedly nosedived before it hit the ground, the aircraft despite following killing all 157 people on board. stories this morning: proper cockpit guidance. all 157 people on board died. the government authorities in ethiopia have said is continuing to hold talks with the the pilots flying the boeing 73 in labour party today and theresa may the crew performed helps you find a consensus for her all of the procedures repeatedly provided passenger plane that crashed killing by the manufacturer but was not able 157 people followed proper cockpit to control the aircraft. brexit deal. it's after mps voted by the findings will put more pressure guidance but was still not able to a majority of one vote to try to on boeing, which is already control the aircraft. mps vote by a prevent no deal. it means the prime being sued over the disaster. minister will need to seek a further also this lunchtime... extension from the eu for the brexit majority of one to force theresa may to seek a further extension to the more talks today process. the routine vaccination of between labour and the government to try to find a brexit compromise. brexit process. the bill is an girls to protect against hpv in attempt to stop a no—deal brexit. scotla nd how the routine girls to protect against hpv in scotland has led to a dramatic drop vaccination of schoolgirls in scotland is saving lives. and talks continue this morning in cervical disease. england manager between the labour party and the the dangers of a bad diet — conservatives as the government tries to salvage a brexit deal gareth southgate received his 0be scientists say it's a bigger risk despite differences. talks yesterday from prince charles at buckingham palace and it was awarded to him after he led england to the world we re cup semifinals last summer. despite differences. talks yesterday were described as constructive between jeremy corbyn were described as constructive betweenjeremy corbyn and theresa
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may. his manifesto says we need to deliver brexit, our manifesto says we need to deliver brexit. more now on brexit, i think it is in the national interest to deliver as negotiating teams on the results of the referendum because we are a democracy. from the government iamat and labour are meeting today. it comes after mps voted to force i am at westminster as those talks continue. we will bring you the the prime minister to seek updates as they happen as the brexit an extension to brexit, deadlock continues. to try to prevent the uk leaving the eu without a deal in eight days. the routine vaccination of girls to in a knife—edge decision, they passed a bill proposed prevent against hpv in scotland has by labour mp yvette cooper byjust led to a dramatic drop in cervical one vote last night. disease. now we head to westminster to join and in sport, tottenham hotspur play joanna for more reaction from there. their first and in sport, tottenham hotspur play thank you. theirfirst game and in sport, tottenham hotspur play their first game at their brand—new we have had reaction from the vice £1 billion stadium. they beat crystal palace 2—0. president of the european commission saying that no deal is highly likely in spite of the commons passing that bill yesterday to stop a no—deal brexit. remember we are on course for a good morning and welcome to bbc no—deal brexit potentially if there newsroom life. i'm annita mcvey. —— is no alternative one week on friday, the 12th of april. and although the mps here might have bbc newsroom alive. legislated to block a no till departure, but they cannot do was force to 27 eu countries to agree to
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—— bbc newsroom live. the sort of extent that theresa may might seek. —— the sort of the report found that the aircraft extension. we must keep in mind that possessed a valid certificate of airworthiness. the crew obtained the it does not completely rule out a no—deal brexit. those talks can hit license and qualifications to to new today as i need to mention, conduct the flight, take off this time notjeremy corbyn in appeared very normal. dagmawit moges theresa may but discussing is the ethiopian transport minister. face—to—face, but david lidington deputising for theresa may and keir the following facts have been determined. starmer deputising forjeremy corbyn number one, the aircraft possessed a and keir starmer said before they went into the talks earlier that valid certificate of airworthiness. they will be discussing the issue of the second one, the crew obtained a second referendum. it is something the licence and qualifications that many in both of the parties to conduct the flight. wa nt that many in both of the parties want theresa may remaining —— people in both parties want a second and third, the take—off run referendum and theresa may does not. but are the red lines on either side going to be completely moved and how appeared very normal. strong is the appetite for compromise? we will talk about one and the fourth one is, aspect of a potential compromise the crew performed all deal, the customs union. our reality the procedures repeatedly, provided by the manufacturer, but was not able to check correspondent explains exactly what this means.
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control the aircraft. one term that keeps cropping up in the brexit negotiations is the customs union. the uk is in it because at the moment it's still an eu member. but what does it actually do? dagmawit moges there. correspondent theo leggett is following developments on the story for us. a basically, the customs union makes number offindings, trade between the 28 developments on the story for us. a eu countries easier. number of findings, preliminary findings, but undoubtedly the most when goods move between them, there are no customs significant is the fourth one, that checks or charges imposed. the crew performed all of the when goods enter the customs union procedures provided by the from the rest of the world, manufacturers but were not able to there is a common charge known as a tariff. control the aircraft. yes, there are take cars — two significant things that we can that charge is 10% of their value. it's a way of protecting eu goods ta ke two significant things that we can take out of this. firstly, the fact from cheaper foreign imports. that the plane repeatedly tried to once the common tariff is paid, nosedive when it was supposed to be goods can move freely around the eu without any more checks or charges. getting to altitude and the pilots that's one of the main reasons why wa nted getting to altitude and the pilots wanted the noes of the aircraft to big japanese car firms like nissan come up. that suggest that a controversial flight control system set up car plants in the uk — guaranteed smooth access to the whole eu market. known as mcas, already implicated in this accident and another one involving an identical aircraft, may well have been responsible. that is obviously, though, if you're one pot —— .2 door. the second is in the customs union, you've got to play by its rules. that the balance that everything that the balance that everything that they were supposed to and still most importantly, one country, failed to retain control of the uk for example, can't strike its own trade deals
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aircraft. that is particularly with other countries significant because after the of the around the world. two accidents, off indonesia five the eu negotiates trade deals months ago, boeing insisted its for all its members. why? aircraft were safe, there was no reason to stop flying it and at well, because of the uk every problem emerged with that was able to set tariffs for imported cars of, system, if pilots used a routine say, 5% rather than 10%, safety check list to disable the then all those cars would be sent flight safety check list to disable the flight control system, then they to the uk more cheaply and get free access to the rest of the eu, would be able to fly the aircraft manually and would not be a problem. giving the uk an unfair advantage. if the pilots did exactly what boeing told them to do and they were now, the government would like to keep most of the benefits still unable to control the aircraft, then boeing clearly has of the customs union would still be able to do its own trade some questions to answer. that is in deals with everyone else. clear contradiction to what boeing the eu are saying that's said. have to be near response to not really on offer. so is there any alternative? well, a free trade agreement can what boeing have said on this also remove tariffs and allow kissed—macro not yet, i would expect you to do other deals elsewhere, them to go through the report very but companies importing goods into the eu under a free trade agreement still need to provide carefully. boeing will argue that detailed proof of how this has already taken action to ensure the safety of the 737. and where those goods are made. remember, the system is not unlike a customs union, that can create bureaucracy, considered safety critical when the checks and considerable costs, plane was first brought to market. all of which the uk is keen to avoid. it is facing a lot of questions however over how the safety
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certificate, the safety testing was carried out. particularly the relationship between the regulator in the us, the federal aviation administration and boeing who did the analysis themselves. what is chris morris. let me give you a boeing already doing to fit with flavour of what is happening in the house of lords behind me because the bill passed in the commons yesterday recommendations from the ethiopian must be passed by the lords in order transport authorities today. they have said firstly that the aircraft to proceed and labour is threatening to proceed and labour is threatening to keep the house of lords are was ‘s flight control systems should sitting all night if they have to do be reviewed by the manufacturer and to get that through because there secondly, that review should be adequate before this type of plane are some moves from brexiteer tories is permitted to fly again. boeing is in the house of lords trying to talk doing the first of those and has out the bill so it does not get already developed new software or is through. one baroness, are labour in the process of finalising new softwa re in the process of finalising new software which should rectify this peen through. one baroness, are labour peer, has accused those doing that flight software which should rectify this of trying to thwart the will of the flight control system. it is doing that. that new software then has to elected commons. she has said, be tested to make sure it eliminates unconventional times call for the floors that were perceptible in unconventional times call for unconventional measures, and she has said that, we will be here all night these two accidents. the second point is simply a flagging up a if that is what it takes us to do what the elected commons has asked warning, really, that although system should be thoroughly tested us to do. so we are keeping an eye before the planes are allowed back on what is happening in there. into the air. remember that the 77 senior police
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officers have called for politicians, and others max is grounded worldwide at the moment. how long could it be before with a public platform, it gets back in the air? well that to use "temperate language" and not inflame the "febrile atmosphere" is difficult to answer. boeing is around brexit. testing solutions it has developed police forces say, as part of their preparations for the aircraft but it appears no for a "no—deal" brexit, they have more than 10—thousand solutions will take longer than officers ready to be deployed first thought before they can be rolled out to air fleets around the anywhere in the country at 2a hour's notice if there's unrest. world. we are talking weeks and stop brexit! our home affairs correspondent months already. the question then daniel sandford reports. as the brexit debate has becomes whether or not aviation administrations around the world are raged in parliament, around parliament and across the uk, willing to say, yes, this aircraft passions have been inflamed. so much so that senior police is safe. firstly, the us officers are asking everyone administrator will have to say we in what they call the febrile certify this as say. then other administrations around the world atmosphere, to think carefully about will have to do the same. that could how they express their views and to make sure their words don't incite ta ke will have to do the same. that could take time because one thing we can be sure of is that they will go over others to violence. the safety systems of this aircraft with a fine tooth comb. people will we would urge people, be measured, think about what you not want to fly this aircraft until are saying and the impact they can be reassured that it is and what it might lead to before it's said. fundamentally safe. theo leggett, and be confident that what you're saying is thank you very much. and we will something you would want to be heard and won't be misconstrued and acted on in a different way. talk to an aviation expert shortly.
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with preparations well under way now negotiating teams from for a possible no—deal eu exit, the government and labour are meeting this morning, chief constables have been after mps voted to force keen to stress they are not the prime minister to seek expecting major problems in any an extension to brexit, brexit scenario, but they have to try to prevent the uk leaving been making contingency plans to deploy 1000 officers the eu without a deal in 8 days. at an hour's notice, in a knife—edge decision, and well over 10,000 they passed a bill proposed officers within 2a hours. these police support units would be by labour mp yvette cooper byjust one vote last night. drawn from forces across england and wales and would be used to deal let us find out more from my with anything that arises, colleaguejoanna gosling who is in from problems on the roads to major westminster this morning. protests and even rioting. good morning. it is david lidington and keir starmer who are holding the talks today. not theresa may or officers say they have warned those in charge of supply chains jeremy corbyn. yesterday, that bill for things like food and fuel approved by the commons late last to make their own arrangements, and not to rely on police forces night, a total of 313 mps voted in who want as much as possible to stick to their core job favour of the bill. 312 voted of keeping communities safe. daniel sandford, bbc news. against it. it was an extremely tight majority, just one vote. what does the bill actually propose? the d raft does the bill actually propose? the draft legislation would force the we will of course keep you updated prime minister to ask the eu for an extension to the article 50 process with all of the latest developments as there is that attempt under way beyond the 12th of april, and would to broker a compromise deal between give parliament the power to decide the length of the delay. but the the labour party and the tories on what might happen next with brexit
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bill must still be approved by the house of lords before it becomes in terms of a deal that might be law, and the ultimate power as to a cce pta ble in terms of a deal that might be acceptable for in terms of a deal that might be acce pta ble for cross— party whether to decide article 50 lies of in terms of a deal that might be acceptable for cross—party support. so you can stay up—to—date as well course with the eu, and it remains on the news website but for now i unclear what they might say. it hand you back to the studio. comes as talks between the there's been a dramatic drop government and labour continue today in the early signs of cervical in an attempt to find a way forward cancer among women in scotland who were given the vaccine to break the deadlock. let us get for human papilloma virus when they were at school. the thoughts of our assistant political editor, norman smith. research published in norman, parliament has spoken, but the british medicaljournal shows a 90% reduction in ultimately, it's down to the eu. cervical abnormalities since the hpv immunisation where are we headed do you think?|j programme began a decade ago. all teenage girls in the united kingdom are think where are we headed do you think?” offered the free vaccine. think probably towards a lengthy delay because although parliament lorna gordon reports. has got control of the brexit timetable and can tell the prime laura mcadam discovered she had minister the sort of length of delay cervical cancer in her early 30s. they would like. at the end of the doctors had noticed changes in the cells in her cervix day, we still have to go cap in hand when she went for a routine smear. to the eu, who will firstly decide the hpv vaccine fights the infection whether we can have any extension, which is linked to most not a given, but likely. and if we cervical cancer cases. laura says she wishes it had are going to ask them for a delay and mrs may has not secured her been available to her. deal, and i think it is incredibly unlikely now that she will secure definitely i would take
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her deal before the eu summit, such it in a heartbeat. if it is going to stop anybody as the level of anger and antipathy going through what i went through, towards her in the tory party, then it is worth doing it. the hpv vaccine is routinely offered i think the indications are that the eu will say, you guys have got to all school—age girls in scotland. nowhere near to resolving this, you the uptake has been high, about 90%. need to go away for some considerable amount of time and sort researchers looking at the first smear tests of those receiving yourself out. and interestingly, in the vaccine found a 90% reduction the commons today, the brexit secretary steve barclay conceded in precancerous cervical that it was never far from certain abnormalities, and say this confirms the vaccination programme that it was never far from certain is translating into the prevention that we would not have to take part in the eu elections in the month of of cervical cancer. may. if we are a member of the european union, this vaccine has exceeded our expectations in that respect. then under treaty law, in 20—30 years' time, we will be required to have european parliamentary elections. we will look back and see, and i think, again, there has been if the uptake stays high, some confusion in the house we will have potentially eliminated cervical cancer. previously with ideas around rolling over the existing members of the european parliament or having it on a ratio similar hpv is linked to other to the composition of the house. cancers, including those of the head and neck. later this year the vaccine will be if we were to still be a member routinely offered, notjust of the european union, to girls, but to all school—age boys which is not our government's in scotland, too. intention, but if we were, lorna gordon, bbc news. we would need to have european parliamentary elections. the only way around that is either
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if mrs may got a deal through or jeremy corbyn and theresa may the man managed to put together a brexit accused of the christchurch mosque deal. that i think is unlikely. and terror attacks will face 50 charges of murder and 39 charges of attempted murder. therefore, we are seeing real fury amongst the sort of tory brexiteers 50 people were killed in the shootings last month, at the prospect of a lengthy delay. and another 50 were injured. never mind the sort of ongoing 28—year—old brenton tarrant is due to appear in court tomorrow. attem pts never mind the sort of ongoing atte m pts to never mind the sort of ongoing attempts to reach an agreement with our correspondent hywel griffith has more details on the charges. initially, the 28—year—old mr corbyn. and we saw a bit of that australian brenton tarra nt was charged with one murder, again in the commons when mr backley essentially so that the police could keep him in custody was on his feet and he was challenged by philip hollobone, one while they carried out a vast of the brexiteers. investigation, the biggest criminal investigation in new zealand history, the conservative party and that means they believe they now national convention, the meeting of all local party have the evidence they need chairman, made it clear in february to charge him with a total that were brexit to be delayed of 50 murders. so that we take part in the european elections, that would be a betrayal and as you said, another of the referendum result and inflict 39 attempted murders. untold damage on the reputation of the conservative party. there was actually an additional 50 isn't that right, people injured during the attack, 16 of which remain in different and doesn't he agree? hospitals across new zealand. and what about the position on the and further to the charges announced by the police today, other side of the house forjeremy they say they are still considering other charges. corbyn and the labour party in terms that may well be terrorism charges. of what they might be prepared to accept? it is almost a mirror image, it's not been decided yet not quite as furious on the tory whether or not that would be helpful
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side but there is nervousness on the in terms of the prosecution, to add to the charges of murder labour party side thatjeremy corbyn and attempted murder. might not lock in the idea of a confirmatory referendum. we have seen the likes of emily thornberry a study has shown that the type of food we eat is putting one and tom watson publicly suggesting that he must put that down as a in five of us into an early grave. resarchers found that poor diet is the world's condition. interestingly, we now deadliest health risk, understand that ian livery, the and accounts for nearly 11 million deaths. party chairman, he offered to resign the report says low intake of wholegrains and fruits, twice after he defied party policy and high consumption of salt, accounted for more than half in the inductive loads that we have of diet—related deaths. the —— had the other day in the a little earlier i spoke to bridget benelam of commons by not backing a the british nutrition foundation, confirmatory referendum and it who described the link between diet points to the fact that yes, there and serious diseases. are profound divisions in the tory party, but there are serious we know diet has a big impact on these major killers, divisions on the labour party side, like cardiovascular disease, particularly over this idea of a type two diabetes and some cancers. but the results from this study second referendum. thank you, today really are striking in terms norman. well, it is supposed to be of the scale of the impact it is having, the case that mps are heading off on even more than smoking. and it tells us... their easter break but that has been well, we may know, and most of us should know, ithink, kibosh to because of what is going about the right sorts of foods on. so the house will be sitting to put in our bodies and others which we should next week because... and we are perhaps eat in moderation. but on a daily basis, hearing from andrea leadsom telling i guess, we do not think whether we are having our five a day
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us hearing from andrea leadsom telling us that what happens in the commons or seven a day, or whether in terms of process and votes and we are having too much debates, it depends on the progress processed meat, for example. of those talks between the labour yes, we do not think party and the conservative party. so about single foods in that way, that will be determining the agenda but what was interesting of parliament but andrea leadsom about the study was that it was suggesting it may be the case that the things that we are not eating parliament might need to sit next enough of, like the fruit friday. parliament does not normally and vegetables and whole grains, sit on friday's because that is when which had a bigger impact than the things that we know mps go back to their constituencies we should eat less of. and hold their surgeries, but, so perhaps we should all be thinking mps go back to their constituencies and hold theirsurgeries, but, of course, we are in very unusual times the things we should eat more of, whereas a lot of our health messages and next friday is the 12th of are about eating less and cutting back, cutting out. april, the new brexit deadline. let if we perhaps have more positive us messages about eating more fruit april, the new brexit deadline. let us get the thoughts of the and veg and more whole grains, conservative mp dominic grieve who perhaps that could be voted for the bill last night. more effective. welcome. good morning. what do you think should happen in terms of the sort of delay that you would like to see? the first thing is to see what comes out of the discussions between now the headlines. authorities in ethiopia investigating last month's government and the opposition. clearly, if we can come to some view crash involving a boeing 737 say the pilots were not to blame and a astoa clearly, if we can come to some view as to a form of brexit that might be report shows they followed proper a cce pta ble as to a form of brexit that might be acceptable to parliament, then that flying guidance but were unable to
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control the aircraft. is the first step. the second step, talks between the government and the labour party to continue today after they agreed to try to find a way we will have to determine whether we put that to a referendum, and there forward for brexit. it is after mps are strong indications that the labour party is moving to a position agreed to extend the brexit process after a vote in the comments passed where it says that this deal should bya go back to the public. i happen to after a vote in the comments passed by a majority ofjust one vote. —— a agree about that. it does not matter if it is the prime minister deal or vote in the house of commons. turkey's government has ordered a deal negotiated to get through a recount of votes after local parliament. i would a deal negotiated to get through parliament. iwould be elections that showed it losing parliament. i would be prepared to acce pt parliament. i would be prepared to accept any of these deals but i the two biggest cities, ankara and istanbul. happen to strongly believe that the public should have a chance to vote the opposition chp party on it. because it bears no candidate, ekrem imamoglu, has claimed victory in istanbul after preliminary results put him relationship to what happened in around 25,000 votes ahead. 2016. and then we need an extension long enough to enable us to do that. the reality is that if we are but the governing ak parti has challenged it, heading for that, then we are going saying ballots were wrongly counted. our turkey correspondent mark lowen to need an extension of quite a few months in order to achieve it. quite spoke to ekrem imamoglu in istanbul. a few months? potentially a year or longer? one year since two long, but istanbul's parallel realities — i certainly think we are talking of ekrem imamoglu from the opposition chp, who says he's won between six and nine months. the the election to be the new mayor. alternative is that we come to a deal and we take the uk out of the eu on that deal, in which case it is still going to have to be negotiated but across the city,
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with the eu. i do think that even in victory posters by the governing ak parti, thanking istanbul those circumstances the 22nd of may, for their local election victory. which is the other deadline date president erdogan won't let go of turkey's economic that has been floated, it looks to powerhouse that he once ran. be rather optimistic. you have said you would be prepared to accept any of the compromises put forward, the election results show things regarding the customs union the opposition won istanbul and the single market? yes, i have by 25,000 votes, but the government has challenged been clear, i would have accepted that, ordering recounts. the deal of prime minister if it to the man who says would have gone back to the public, he is the new mayor, i put the ak parti claim i would have voted it through the that the election is parliament on the proviso it the biggest stain in turkey's received a referendum on it. one or two things i never have accepted, democratic history. but these are a range of possible translation: of course, i don't agree with that. and credible options that i happen just recently the government to think that none of them have was praising the fact that they had the most secure voting system and there was no problem with turkey's elections. serious downsides, but they are 1 million people were on duty in the polling stations that day, credible options to put to the public, which could take us out of so the only explanation i have is that they are making the eu if that is what the public excuses for their failure. want. obviously, the issue for those unwilling to compromise, whether it but, i mean, you yourself admit is those that are fundamentally that there are invalid votes and irregularities at the ballot remaining are those who want to box, so they have the right leave with no deal, it is a to challenge this, don't they? compromise is good for no one, even we have official procedures in turkey. there are people who
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run polling stations. if they have any concerns some brexiteers have said the compromise is not as good as what we there, the person on duty writes that in a report. have at the moment. the difficulty going through those reports or doing individual recounts is fine, is this, i have a group of but saying let's count colleagues in the conservative party all of the invalid votes in istanbul is a bottomless pit. in parliament who, because the negotiations have not led to a deal that we can approve, they say that we should leave with no deal. i have to say that this is totally u na cce pta ble to say that this is totally unacceptable to me and i believe it would be so damaging to the country that the government shares this you, if i had lost, it would not be my character to hide it. that the government shares this you, that under no circumstances and i i am so sure of myself prepared to contemplate it and the because i know i have won. consequences is that they get angry, but there is no point in doing that is this the beginning of the end because they will not get it. i for president erdogan? realised that there are sincerely and deeply held beliefs, but my judgment is that it will not be everything comes to an end — passed through parliament and parliament will not allow this to parties, governments, life itself. happen. so, in the circumstances, we mr erdogan has finished have to be reasonable. there are his 17th year in power. there are problems and things we don't like, forms of brexit, i do not like brexit, i think it is in historic but it's a political success. mistake and i think the country will of course there will be pay a heavy price and gain nothing an end to it one day. will you be the next from it, but i do recognise that president of turkey? there is an issue on the 2016 god knows.
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referendum result that must be respected. but then we have to go and so, turkey's biggest city and the election's biggest prize isn't yet sure who back and put back the deliverable will be steering it. there's no clearer sign ofjust how options to the public. and if my polarised this country is. colleagues in the erg want to feed mark lowen, bbc news, istanbul. into that process, then they can do that, they may have ideas of their owfi that, they may have ideas of their own that may be viable to put to the public as well, but they must be negotiated and they need to be the potential democrat presidential deliverable if they were to be contender has faced accusations approved. and a quick thought on of unwelcome touching from four women in recent days. your own politicalfuture. you lost a vote of no confidence in your the former vice president of the constituency. theresa may has said united states joe biden she will support your remaining a the former vice president of the member of the tory party. united statesjoe biden has promised to respect women's personal space potentially, what does that mean for you in the future, perhaps you following complaints he has been overly tactile. cannot stand for your constituency he said he had only ever intended to build in the future? and secondly, to that a "human connection", rather than make anyone uncomfortable. potential happen to other tories? i have always believed life is about connecting, about connecting with people. firstly, this was not a vote of no confidence. my office has tabled a vote of confidence in me which did that won't change but i will be more not gaina vote of confidence in me which did not gain a majority. it provided an mindful and respectful of people's personal space. opportunity which had deliberate and that's a good thing. intention behind it to enable that's a good thing. members of my association to express their views. i delivered a long it sounds like something from a science—fiction film,
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question and answer session and but medical researchers have found explain where i was in relation to a way to grow tiny human organs on a microchip, brexit. my association, like many in to measure how disease attacks the human body. the country, is deeply divided on this issue. and those who turned up, the majority, said they did not have the scientists at the university confidence in me and were not prepared to express confidence in of cambridge say it could help fight against diseases such as cancer, what i was doing. that is some way and reduce the need for animal testing. richard westcott reports. from me being deselected as a member this is how you grow tiny of parliament. i am grateful to the three—dimensional human organs people who turned up. i have in a laboratory. expressed some anxiety that there was evidence, which undoubtedly was, first you freeze—dry a specially developed sponge for 18 hours. that some of the evening was it acts like a skeleton. orchestrated, particularly the destructive aspects of it, buy it cells from a human organ are put onto the sponge, which then sits seems to be individuals who do not inside this electronic chip. share conservative values at all. and there is a lot of evidence that then they are fed with nutrients. mps are being targeted nationally from outside the party through party what you end up with, if you can get your head around this, is a human organ growing members and also through a degree of inside a sponge, on an electronic chip. entry is of people who are actually coming in to pursue a single issue so this is a human gut, in the way that the conservative and they put it on the chip party has not done traditionally and so that they can see exactly with a great deal of intolerance. i am determined to fight that as and what is going on inside.
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when i see it. but as for my future, so the reason i really like this image is because it shows me my future does not matter in one evidence that the mucus that is being produced way. i my future does not matter in one way. lam here my future does not matter in one way. i am here to do myjob and to by the epithelial cells act on the national interest. but is on the lumen lining. this is such a big crisis, i am not this green here is the edge going to be deflected from doing of the cell and we can see here the blue nucleus of the cell, that. however difficult it might be this is really key here, for my future career. and i will not this red colour shows us the mucus. allow that to happen. as for the future of the conservative party, if this new technique means they can we do not remain a broader church watch in real time how cancer capable of tolerating different changes or kills our cells, views, even on important issues, and then observe how new drugs might fight the cancer off. which is something we have managed to do very well in the past, then we face a very bleak future and we may not survive as a party in its current form. dominic greene, thank i think the real potential for this is personalised medicine. you very much. i will be here for imagine i go into the hospital the next two hours keeping you and i have a disease, up—to—date with the latest of i can take cells from my body, elements. for now, i will hand you grow them in the lab in this back to the studio. ryan gosling, beautiful three—dimensional environment that is mimicking my body, thank you very much. the time is then we can test drugs on my body without affecting me at all, 11:18am. a recap of the head lice. and develop the best possible —— joanna gosling. therapy for me.
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they have made a gut — next they want to grow a brain so they can connect the two organs up. now, we know that there are certain mps have agreed to extend the brexit diseases like alzheimer's disease, process after a vote of one. talks parkinson's disease, which are affected by bacteria in our gut, between theresa may and jeremy but how are they doing that, we do not know. corbyn, i beg your pardon, between and if we had this simple way to study that, it would really labour and conservative, but not the advance understanding two leaders, will continue today after they try to find a way forward in that field tremendously. in theory, they could grow for brexit. in sport, six months a whole body of organs, so the new technique could be used to find treatments for a range later than planned and costing much of human problems, from cancer more, but tottenham played in the to crohn's disease to allergies, new statement —— stadium last night. obesity, asthma or depression. and the more testing son scored the first goal and a 2—0 you do like this, the less you have to do on animals. richard westcott, victory over crystal palace. celtic captain scott brown has been charged with improper conduct after bbc news, cambridge. their victory over rangers last week. the 2018 scottish national england manager gareth southgate has winner, joe farrell, is the last received an 0be from prince charles at buckingham palace for services to horse to make the line—up for saturday pars grand national after a football. the a8—year—old, who last year guided england to their first world cup semi—final since 1990,
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pairof saturday pars grand national after a pair of brown eyes was pulled out. a is among about 100 people full list will be announced later of to be handed honours today by prince charles. he collected the honourjust one the runners. join you laterfor a week after england captain and world cup top goalscorer full round—up. harry kane, 25, was awarded an mbe. there's been a dramatic drop this sunday it's the boat race — in the early signs of cervical the annual four—mile contest between rowing crews from oxford cancer among women in scotland who were given the vaccine and cambridge universities. for human papilloma—virus and this year two—time olympic when they were at school. championjames cracknell is set research published in to become the oldest person the british medicaljournal shows to compete, at a6 years old. to find out what it takes to compete a 90% reduction in cervical in the gruelling contest, abnormalities since the hpv immunisation programme former nfl starjason bell and former gb hockey player sam quek began a decade ago. all teenage girls in put themselves to the test. the united kingdom are offered the free vaccine. lorna gordon reports. laura mcadam discovered she had cervical cancer in her early 30s. doctors had noticed changes in the cells in her cervix when she went for a routine smear. have you done rowing before? in the gymnasium for fun. i did it on water once. the hpv vaccine fights the infection which is linked to most cervical cancer cases. intense and i am not sure i am laura says she wishes it had been available to her. ready but we will win it. let's go. definitely i would take hello. it in a heartbeat. if it is going to stop anybody
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going through what i went through, it is worth doing it. how are you? nice to meet you. how are you doing? the hpv vaccine is routinely offered we will put you through tests to all school—age girls in scotland. the uptake has been high, about 90%. to find out what potential you have tojoin the boat race in some years in the future. i like this and i am into this. researchers looking at the first smear tests of those receiving there is the word test. the vaccine found a 90% reduction in precancerous cervical we are coming to the aerobic abnormalities, and say this confirms capacity test, the single best the vaccination programme indicator of somebody's potential is translating into the prevention as a rower. of cervical cancer. we can't speak after, but good luck. this is frightening. this vaccine has exceeded our three, two, one, go. expectations in that respect. in 20—30 years' time, we will look back and see, nice and gentle... if the uptake stays high, we will have potentially eliminated cervical cancer. watching the heart hpv is linked to other rate climbing nicely. cancers, including those well done. of the head and neck. sam, you're up to 150. hitting the minute... later this year the vaccine will be routinely offered, notjust very nice. to girls, but to all school—age boys in scotland, too. lorna gordon, bbc news. we are getting a nice high heart rate. let's return now to our main story. authorities in ethiopia have delivered their first very strong and that's us.
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report into the crash well done. superb. well done, folks. leg burn. of ethiopian airlines flight 302. the capacity test results... sam, your score came all 157 people on board in at 2.8 litres per minute. were killed last month jason, you are 3.4 per minute. and boeing 737 max planes around the world have been grounded. ethiopia's transport ministry has found that pilots "repeatedly" followed procedures recommended by boeing but were unable to regain the boat races would have control of the plane. around four and more. forthe men, six and more. they have almost double i'm joined now by an aviation ally the aerobic capacity you have. you have been good sports, but no test is complete without a proper race. —— analyst, sally gethin. thank you for joining —— analyst, sally gethin. thank you forjoining us this morning. that is the key finding that i mentioned in the key finding that i mentioned in the introduction, pilots could not are you ready? stop this aircraft from nosediving, attention... go! despite them doing everything that settle in, guys. a nice race. boeing should tell them to do in such a scenario. yes, so, they were 700... you might have this. repeatedly trying to gain control of don't overcook it. well done. the plane. they were bringing the nose up to regain the correct pitch and altitude. and this preliminary fantastic, fantastic. well done, excellent! report seems to completely exonerate
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the airline in this instance. and well done, jason. last few strokes. they have been keen to point that well done and brilliant and super. out. obviously, they need to wow! move around and i hope preserve their reputation and their nobody throws up. brand and they finger now will be if you do, i will get you a bucket. pointing more firmly at boeing. how worrying is it that after the crash boeing were saying, look, there jason, you got 1,000 metres in 3.43. shouldn't have happened, this would not have happened if the pilots had sam, 3.57. been following the procedures that you did what boat races do, to go off hard. we set out. yet, as this preliminary for some, your heart rate rises up investigation has shown, they were to the first couple of minutes, actually doing that, but it did not and jason, the same thing, work? there is still a lot yet to fast start in heart rate rises quickly to peek out. come. it may seem at the moment that all of the answers are very clear. but it is still a long pathway ahead to finalising and pinpointing all so all we need is another two years' worth of practice and we will have the different factors. there are many, the different factors. there are any you on a boat race team. the different factors. there are many, many different factors that go i can't stand up into a particular scenario like so you know how weak i am. this. having said that, yes, it does look very concerning that boeing was and that was one sixth of the vote race? distancing itself in the beginning yes.
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well done. and the united states didn't want to in a moment it's time for 1.00 news, but first it's time ground the aircraft. there are other for a look at the weather. factors that will go into this investigation. but we know that the manufacturer is already looking at hello there. it's been another day the aircraft flight control system, which indeed is one of the with temperatures really struggling recommendations of these early across parts of the uk. earlier this findings. yes, so there are a number morning it was cold enough for some of technical issues that are really fresh snowfall across wales and the going to come under the spotlight. midlands, with the scene in ludlow so, we have the stabilisers under trim. we have this mcas the system in shropshire. low pressure in charge today and some weather fronts which is designed to avoid storming affecting south—west england and when the aircraft is in a high pitch wales. another one affecting northern scotland with showers in between these areas as well. on the radar picture you see some snow. mode. so, basically, what you have that was the area of snow we had got with this aircraft is to across parts of the west midlands extremely powerful engines that were and wales earlier on today. those cited forward in order to be able to temperatures have really been struggling here. going through this maintain that sort of gravity and evening, that cloud and rain spirals balance, both on the ground and then when it got into cruise mode. and across the irish sea into northern ireland. band of rain in scotland slowly clears but could continue to
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the underlying aerodynamics are that affect northernmost areas from time action was was very high and a to time. some clear spells system that boeing had implemented, elsewhere. a chilly night with a this mcas system, it was designed to breeze and cloud keeping many of us just above freezing. 0n into friday keep the nose down. but, obviously, it overcompensated and that is why morning, the high rate of low the pilot was struggling to bring the pilot was struggling to bring the nose up. now, they were not pressure m oves morning, the high rate of low pressure moves westwards and we draw manually able to do that because up pressure moves westwards and we draw up ourwinds they were battling against all of pressure moves westwards and we draw up our winds from europe. it will be turning a little bit less cold over these software systems on the the next few days and that is the question about this entire incident general trend in the forecast. now, really is, is there too much we will see rain around on friday automation, or was there enough and the wettest weather across northern ireland with rain at times automation, or was there enough automation and there were some disconnect, or the wrong for wales and south—west england. communications going on between the further northward and eastward those different software elements you go, the drier the weather becomes on the brighter it gets, with the best of sunshine in within the actual avionics of the scotland. temperatures climbing and aircraft combined with the hardware looking at how of 1a celsius towards itself? what does this all mean for the south—east england in 1a as well in the sunshine in edinburgh. clock confidence in this particular ticks on into the weekend at the aircraft, and for the possibility of weekend will seek cloud round but it being allowed to fly again? well, bright spells and the best in many in industry are suggesting that western areas. expecting rain but turning milder as well. here is the it will not damage boeing's future weather picture for the start of the weekend and on saturday. the best of brighter weather across
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with the 77 max, but as we are north—western areas of the uk and we could see showers in the south—west sitting today, it is fully grounded and there is no prospect of it and perhaps rain affecting eastern areas of the uk as we go on through taking to the sky. and could it be that boeing will have to go back to the afternoon. away from the cloudy the drawing board. —— 373. boeing east, we see temperatures climb to typically ta kes 14 east, we see temperatures climb to 1a celsius with bright spells coming the drawing board. —— 373. boeing typically takes about five come up and going. heading into sunday, a to seven years to develop a new airframe are like the triple seven x risk we will see some fairly heavy showers moving in at times from which is due to enter service next eastern parts. they could be heavy year. that first came onto the and thundery in nature. some dry and drawing boards in 2012. but with the bright weather further northwards and temperatures range, 12 celsius in edinburgh and not far off normal 373 max, which boeing brought out in but on the wild side in london with response to airbus having its rival highs of 16 celsius on sunday. goodbye. aeroplane, the a320 neo, which was coming onto the market, the d 77 max, some people in the industry believe that that was rushed out. it was a bit too quick, too soon. —— be 737 max. it was a new effort for boeing. the downside is that they named it anyway that was through their brand, that lineage and that lineage has always stood them in good stead, but now, of course, it
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is slightly tainted by this. and it has damaged limitations in terms of the brand for boeing as well. obviously, they would want to fully cooperate with the authorities and they put safety at the front, first and foremost of everything. as does the entire aviation industry. that is the whole proviso, but equally they will need to be aware of their own brand and how they manage that going forward and also their aircraft production. they have about 40,700 of aircraft production. they have about 110,700 of these max planes on order and they are still in production. so, although the max has been suspended and rounded, in terms of the airline's operating it in service, and what we call in revenue service, and what we call in revenue service, in actualfact, those aeroplanes are still being built. and not all of the airlines have cancelled their orders. they still wa nt cancelled their orders. they still want that aeroplane. so there is a lot yet to run on this, and there is a lot at stake. sadly, thank you for
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your thoughts on this story today. sally gethin, aviation analyst, thank you very much. —— sally. now to the mosque attack in christchurch, new zealand. 50 people were killed in the shootings last month, and another 50 were injured. 28—year—old brenton tarrant is due to appear in court tomorrow. our correspondent hywel griffith has more details on the charges. initially, the 28—year—old australian brenton tarra nt was charged with one murder, essentially so the police could keep him in custody while they carried out a vast investigation, the biggest criminal investigation in new zealand history, and that means they believe they now have the evidence they need to charge him with a total of 50 murders, and as you said, another 39 attempted murders. there was actually an additional 50 people injured during the attack, 16 of which remain in different hospitals across new zealand, and further to the charges announced
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by the police today, they say they are still considering other charges. that may well be terrorism charges. it's not been decided yet whether or not that would be helpful in terms of the prosecution to add to the charges of murder and attempted murder. the time is almost 11:30am. a study has shown that the type of food we eat is putting 1 in 5 of us into an early grave. resarchers found that poor diet is the world's deadliest health risk and accounts for nearly 11 million deaths. the report says low intake of wholegrains and fruits, and high consumption of salt, accounted for more than half of diet—related deaths. we can speak to a member of the british nutrition foundation, bridget. thank you forjoining us. this is a wake—up call to all of us to think about what we are putting in our bodies. yes, it is no
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surprise that diet has a big impact on these major killers. like diabetes and cancers. it is the scale of the impact it is having thatis scale of the impact it is having that is surprising is today, even more than smoking. most of us should know, i think, more than smoking. most of us should know, ithink, about more than smoking. most of us should know, i think, about the right sorts of foods to put in our bodies and others which we should perhaps eat in moderation. but on a daily basis, i guess, we do not think whether we are having our five i guess, we do not think whether we are having ourfive a day, whether we are having too much processed meat, for example? yes, we do not think about single foods in that way but what was interesting about the study was that the things that we are not eating enough of, like the fruit and vegetables and whole grains which had a bigger impact than the things that we know we should eat less. if perhaps we should eat less. if perhaps we should think about what we should eat more of whereas our health m essa 9 es eat more of whereas our health messages are about eating less and cutting back, cutting out. if we perhaps have more positive messages about to eat more fruit and veg and more whole grains, perhaps that
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could be more effective. we will come back to that. firstly, that i show you on our screens, this is from the lancet journal figures show you on our screens, this is from the lancetjournal figures on the bbc news app. i am hoping we can bring this on our screen. it is showing us the global dietary targets and are we eating enough. i am not sure, i think we could be having some technical issues. if you go onto the bbc news app and have a look at that story, you will see different types of foods, nuts and seeds, red meat, processed meat, salt and so on, and they give you a column for the recommended amount. and they show how much generally we are eating compared to those recommended amounts. so not enough of the good stuff and too much of the bad stuff basically, if i can put it like that any some plastic fashion. of course, no food is particularly bad if you eat it in moderation. do you think this really needs to come from us as individuals to change these habits or is more that can be done on a public policy
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level? it needs to be across the board and not all doom and gloom, the uk is 23rd out of 105 which is not bad and we have done a lot of work to reduce trans fats and reduce salts and we need to build on that. explain what you mean. two of 100 and... explain. you limit the amount which countries had most diseases as a result of poor diet, and countries like israel and france and japan did well. the uk was 23rd in the list, above sweden and the us which was a3rd. not all bad news although there is some way to go. what are the countries who do best doing differently to what we are doing differently to what we are doing at rank 23? we know countries like france and japan have strong food culture is based around healthy diet, be that a mediterranean diet patent like in mediterranean diet patent like in mediterranean countries or the japanese dietary pattern with a lot
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of fish and vegetables and relatively low in foods we know we should eat less. we could do well to look at those countries but we don't have to eat like someone in france orjapan. we can have the diet we wa nt orjapan. we can have the diet we want but we must base it on a healthy dietary pattern we know is good for reducing long—term risk of disease. might i interrupt you again because we can show you those images i was talking about. global dietary targets, are we can show you those images i was talking about. global dietary targets, awaiting enough? there we are. we have got them. looking on the left—hand side of each of those types, the green bar, nuts and seeds is the top left. that is the recommended amount to eat... 25 grams per day but the grey coloured column, we are only eating 1296 coloured column, we are only eating 12% of the recommended amount. go to the diagonally opposite image on the bottom right, processed meat... the recommended amount, the green column, we should be eating no more than 2.1 grams per day but actually
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we are consuming around four grams a day of processed meat and as you can see that is way above the recommended amount. that is a useful tool, isn't it? just to visualise what we are doing or not doing. what are your key recommendations to anyone, looking at this story today and saying, i have really got to improve and shake up my diet? but we are all busy and with full into habits and cook the same things and eat typically the same things. what do you recommend? focus on the good stuff and it is depressing to say you can't eat things but focus on what you should eat more and that is particularly whole grains and fruit and vegetables. if you can find easy, quick, simple ways to get them into the diet, like frozen vegetables and canned vegetables, they are fine to have a spot of a healthy diet and perhaps swapping bread for wholegrain bread and pasta for brown pasta. make simple swaps to improve dietand pasta. make simple swaps to improve diet and include foods we should eat more of to have a significant impact
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on your diet. thank you very much for your time. 0k, thank you very much for your time. ok, now let's look at the weather forecast. snow in places, i know... absolutely, yesterday snow was falling across a good part of northern united kingdom, northern parts of england and scotland and northern ireland. this morning snow down towards mid and south wales and the west midlands. the satellite shows were an area of low pressure swirls around the southwest. it's still giving us a hill snow across mid and north wales but generally speaking we have rain down that low levels, spreading north and east gradually. for many northern, eastern areas of england come up into scotland and northern ireland and the south—west of england, there are sunny spells and some showers. maximum temperatures seven up to 11 celsius. this swirl of cloud and showery rain will continue tonight, western parts mainly, the further east you are it will be clearer.
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temperatures down to two celsius or for celsius, a touch of frost perhaps on friday first thing but northern and eastern areas on friday, write all fine with sunshine. showers confined to western areas. it will be less cold with temperatures about ten up to 1a celsius. goodbye for now. hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: authorities in ethiopian say the pilots flying the boeing 737 passenger plane which crashed last month followed proper flying guidance and were still not able to control the aircraft. the crash killed 157 people. mps vote by a majority of one vote to force theresa may to seek a further extension to the brexit process and the bill is attempting to stop a no—deal brexit. the routine vaccination of girls to protect
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against hpv in scotland led to a dramatic drop in cervical disease. now the sports news. hello. good morning. the fallout from a feisty old firm continues. celtic captain scott brown's been charged for improper conduct — he was involved in a couple of incidents including alfredo morelos' red card. rangers boss steven gerrard has also been offered a one—match ban, apparently for comments he made to refere bobby madden. both clubs have been served notices of complaint after a mass confrontation at the end of the game. it has taken a long time and a lot of money to get there but last night totte n ha m of money to get there but last night tottenham finally moved into their new home. and with a new stadium comes a big old opening ceremony. fireworks, lights...and they even drafted in the opera singer from the well known adverts for a price—comparison website. 0n the field spurs made the most of the occasion beating crystal palace 2—0, son heung—min the man to scored
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the first ever competitive goal at the stadium. manchester city, meanwhile, went back to the top of the premier league thanks to a comfortable win over cardiff. adam wild was watching. pep guardiola praised a teenager making the first start for this. city were moved back to the top of the table. it was one player who caught the eye last night with pep guardiola saying the 18—year—old could start for the club for the next years. another teenager shined on his first start in the premier league as chelsea beat brighton 3—0. they scored on a good night for young english talent... another teenager — callum hudson—odoi — shined on his first start in the premier league as chelsea beat brighton 3—0. ruben loftus—cheek scored on what was a good night for young english talent. that win moves chelsea above manchester united into fifth. mcgregor hinted he may not be retiring after all after an exchange of insults with rival
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khabib nurmagomedov. the ufc have condemned what it calls "islamaphobic comments". mcgregor wrote on twitter, i want to move forward, with my fans of all faiths and all backgrounds. it is one world and one for all. now, see you in the octagon. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. more now on brexit, as negotiating teams from the government and labour are meeting this morning. it comes after mps voted to force the prime minister to seek an extension to brexit, to try to prevent the uk leaving the eu without a deal in eight days. in a knife—edge decision, they passed a bill proposed by labour mp yvette cooper byjust one vote last night. we will get more from westminster. thank you very much. the process going forward now as a result of that vote on the bill in the commons yesterday is that the house of lords
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are discussing it today and there are discussing it today and there are various manoeuvres under are discussing it today and there are various manoeuvres under way are discussing it today and there are various manoeuvres under way in the house of lords to toke out the debate and try to prevent it being passed in the lords today at least. —— talking it out. also there is the question of how the eu will respond. in the end, if mps are put through a bill to say theresa may must ask for an extension if the eu does not want to grant the extension being requested, it is in the hands of the eu and emmanuel macron in france is assuming he similarly has the view he does not want a long extension. we will see how those events play out. now we focus more on the talks happening not today between theresa may and jeremy corbyn but between keir starmer and david lidington. we talk to the labour mp ian murray. welcome. thank you. do you hold out hope for the talks? it is right for the opposition party to speak to the prime minister and
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the should have happened two and a half years ago. when the new prime minister came in, theresa may should have sat around the table with eve ryo ne have sat around the table with everyone to thrash out what parliament might accept as a negotiating stance with the eu and what parliament might pass. it is right forjeremy corbyn and keir starmer to meet with the prime minister and her team but the red lines for the labour party are clear. our conference motion is clear. our conference motion is clear we would back the prime minister's deal and allow to pass parliament if we have a confirmatory public vote. all other options have been examined and the only way to break the impasse is to have the confirmatory public vote and let people back in. when you talk about red lines on the labour side, can either side be going into talks today with red lines because theresa may's red lines because theresa may's red lines have been the customs union and single market and the issues flow from that would go against what the public voted for in terms of what the implications are on british sovereignty and freedom of movement? the prime minister's red lines got us the prime minister's red lines got us into this mess in the first place and she has been negotiating with
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her own hardline brexiteers in her own party rather than find a consensus across parliament. your question highlights why we should go back to the public because what was promised on the 2016 referendum has not come to pass. all the promises have been broken and the prime minister has a deal to get with the european union that bears no resemblance for leavers or remainders so it is right to say the government should be given instruction by the public to leave the european union. this is what the government negotiated and that is what the parliament can pass and therefore any deal now must go back to the people to say, is this what you expected when you voted to leave the eu? and if it is not, you should vote accordingly. an extension is obviously having the backing of the commons. how long would you want an extension to be? an extension must be long enough or two things in my view. long enough for parliament to come to a decision ona for parliament to come to a decision on a deal and get a majority in parliament for the deal and it must be long enough to put the deal back to the people. that extension, then, must take into account the fact of
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the european elections and it is very important indeed that we have a process that gets the right ring through parliament and let the public back in —— gets the right thing through parliament. the only way to break the impasse. unison the largest trade union in the uk came out to back the vote and the chancellor has warned. we have indicative votes in the house of commons on monday or tuesday next week like the prime minister promised and it must be on the table and we must find a majority around it. you say philip hammond has said he thinks it is a workable idea and matt hancock talking this morning said that he is very strongly against a public vote. theresa may remains of that view herself. when it comes down to it, those who are on polar opposites of this debate, remaining or leaving without a deal, look at the compromise you are talking about and say, it is just not as good as what we have got. it has to be one extreme or the other... so when you talk about
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there being a referendum, if it were to go back to the public for a confirmatory vote, don't those two options have to be back on the table? the two answers to that question are that you either leave the european union with absolutely nothing and it's incredibly painful and there is not a credible analysis out there which says it would not be incredibly painful for our economy, or you stay very close to european institutions in terms of the norway plus model with the single market and customs union, and leaving becomes pointless. so it is time we had the argument to the public about instructions have gone to the government to leave the eu and they have negotiated something between those two painful and pointless ideas on the spectrum and then what we do about it? the public should get their say on that. liber‘s company position then becomes remain? the compromise must be that parliament must coalesce around the compromise. —— does the labour position become romain? let's not forget she has been clear
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with the 585 legal document the compromise parliament might come up with is pointless? iam with is pointless? i am saying if you come up with a single market model in terms of staying in the single market and customs union, the least painful, it becomes pointless because what's the point in leaving the european union? we should find a compromise that the parliament can come around and get majority for in the parliament and then put it back to the people and say, you must make choices. you either have a painful choice or a pointless choice... we are going around in circles. stay in the european union, the best deal at the moment. asa deal at the moment. as a political party must take a view when you say one option is pointless, does liber‘s campaigning position have to be we believe remain is the main option —— the labour party? exiting the european union shadow secretary keir starmer said the options should be for a public vote
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with the option to remain at the party conference and got a standing ovation. we are a remain party and an internationalist party and we must say to the country in the national interest there is no deal better than the one we have at the moment, staying in the eu. we must get something through parliament to get something through parliament to get that compromise. any deal now comes through parliament and there would be a compromise deal or the prime minister's deal on the table, incidentally which won't change. this is a trap the prime minister is setting because she said the legal agreement on the table cannot change and therefore all that is really going to be negotiated as the future framework, which is not a legally binding framework, and she won't be prime minister to agree that or negotiate it. she is asking for parliament to coalesce around something that she has no power to deliver in the future if she decides to step down as pm and someone else comes in and could rip that agreement up. it is only the withdrawal agreement that will not change and that is why i have a suspicion about the whole process,
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so we should let the public back into it with a public vote with the option to remain. we will have more reaction from here later and i now hand you back to the studio. thank you, our reporter at westminster. the business news but first the headlines... authorities of ethiopia investigating last month's crash of a boeing 737 says the pilots were not to blame and the report shows the follow guidance but were unable to control the aircraft. mps agreed to control the aircraft. mps agreed to extend the brexit process a free vote in the comments passed by a majority of just one vote in the comments passed by a majority ofjust one vote. and talks between the government and the labour party continue after they agreed to try to find a way forward for brexit. i'm victoria fritz. in the business news... the crisis for boeing deepens. ethiopia calls for a review of flight controls, as investigators find that pilots
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were not to blame for crash near addis ababa. hundreds of boeing 737—maxs have been grounded and thousands of orders now on ice. carlos ghosn is rearrested, this time over allegations that he paid an omani businessman $31 million from company funds. mr ghosn denies all charges and vows not to be broken. thousands of firms look set to miss tonight's legal deadline for publishing their gender pay gap. the deadline for companies in the public sector was march 31st. britain's equality and human rights commission says it will take enforcement action against all businesses that miss the deadline. now, how likely are you to buy a new car? the answer to that question by the looks of today's new car sales figures is less likely than in the past. march is normally a good month because of the number plate change lowering more customers into showrooms but demand continues to
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fall. the bulk of that fall is due to a rapid decline in the sale of diesel cars. down by more than 20%. we speak now to emma butcher from the society of motor manufacturers and traders. how concerned is the industry by the continued decline of car sales? absolutely it is concerning and as you say particularly in march, at such an important month for the industry. important to remember the market is still at a relatively high level and we are still on the fifth biggest march on record but yes it is of concern and what we see as consumers increasingly uncertain about what to buy and what fuel type to buy and also whether to buy at all at the moment, pending some kind of positive resolution on brexit. and the demand for diesel, the reason behind the rise in the sale of petrol fuel vehicles and alternatively fuelled vehicles
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because those who went up? yes, we see some movement into petrol and the alternatively fuelled segments, absolutely, but not enough to correct the balance so we are seeing real evidence of people sitting on their hands and they don't know what to buy next. that is a real shame because the latest diesels are relieved the crane lea nest diesels are relieved the crane leanest in history, on a par with petrol pretty much, so should be looking —— latest diesel cars are the cleanest in history, almost on a par with petrol, but electric are better. you say on a par with petrol but is it cleaner to buy a diesel or not? it is cleaner to buy a diesel these days than it ever was. the latest diesel cars are light years away from the cars that people talk about now, and only trace levels of pollutants, and really incredibly efficient and better performing on
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c02 the car industry has been vocal about the impact of continued political uncertainty on the industry. but is it not right that consumers are being held back from purchasing not necessarily because of brexit or anything as grand as that but actually around issues like taxation and incentives. nobody knows what the future of diesel is in the uk. correct and there is a great deal of uncertainty amongst consumers. in fa ct, uncertainty amongst consumers. in fact, if you buy a diesel car today, it is the cleanest you will have ever bought before and you can drive it anywhere in the uk. there are no bounds are restrictions on diesel, new diesels come at all anywhere in the uk. thank you, emma. now we look at other business stories... saga may be excited by the launch of its three—year fixed insurance deals, but the market has taken a dim view of its trading update. shares in saga have crashed by nearly 40% after the over—50s travel and insurance specialist wrote down the value of its business by almost a third of a billion,
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and cut its dividend. that is the income shareholders would receive. amazon studios has said it was "justified" in terminating its film deal with woody allen. the movie/tv distributor has alleged the us film director's comments about the #metoo movement "sabotaged" its attempts to promote his movies. allen is suing the company, claiming it abandoned a four—film deal amid resurfaced allegations he molested his adopted daughter. and a0 world, the online electronics retailer, has stockpiled around £15 million of its most popular products in the latest move by a uk company to brace for a potentially chaotic brexit. potentially somewhat troublesome... who knows when that might be if it happens at all? a lot of money coming of the table today... investors moving money out of the stock markets across europe and asia.
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combination of factors at play. slowing global growth. uncertainty around the outcome of trade talks between china and the us. it's all playing out in real numbers on the real economy — just take a look at the german factory numbers, the weakest since the european debt crisis in 2012. so all of that leaving the ftse100 down about a0 points. more after the lunchtime news. see you soon. this sunday it's the boat race — the annual four—mile contest between rowing crews from oxford and cambridge universities. and this year two—time olympic championjames cracknell is set to become the oldest person to compete at a6 years old. to find out what it takes to compete in the gruelling context, former nfl starjason bell and former gb hockey player sam quek put themselves to the test.
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have you done rowing before? in the gymnasium for fun. idid it in the gymnasium for fun. i did it on water once. intends that i am not sure i am ready but we will win it. let's go. hello. how are you? nice to meet you. how are you doing with my will put you through tests to find out what potential you have to join the vote race in years in the future. i like this and i am into this. there is the word test. we are coming to the aerobic capacity test, the single best indicator of somebody's potential as a rower. we can't speak after about good luck. this is frightening. 321 oh. nice and gentle... watching the heart rate climbing nicely. well done. sam, you're up to 150. hitting
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the minute... very nice. we are getting nice high heart rate. you go, done. very strong and that's us. well done. superb. well done, folks. my well done. superb. well done, folks. my legs are burning. the capacity test results... sam, your score came in at 2.8 metres per minute. jason, you are 3.4 per minute. jason, you are 3.4 per minute. the vote races would have around four and more. minute. the vote races would have around fourand more. forthe men, sex and more. they have almost double the aerobic capacity you have. —— for the double the aerobic capacity you have. —— forthe men double the aerobic capacity you have. —— for the men it would be numbersix and more. have. —— for the men it would be number six and more. you have been good sports but no test is complete without a proper race. are you ready? attention... go! settle in, guys. a nice race. 700 document you
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might have this. don't over cook it. well done. fantastic, fantastic. well done, excellent! well done, jason. last few strokes. well done and brilliant and super. wow! move around and i hope nobody throws up. if you do, i will get you a bucket. jason, you got 1000 metres in 3.43. sam, 3.57. you did what vote races do, to go off ha rd. you did what vote races do, to go off hard. for some, your heart rate rises up to the first couple of minutes, and jason, the same thing, fa st start minutes, and jason, the same thing, fast start in heart rate rises quickly to peek out. so all we need is another two years' worth of
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practice and we will have you on a boat race team. i can't stand up so you know how weak i am. well done. no thank you. that gives you a tiny glimpse of the cruise this sunday. i don't know what the weather will be like for that far ahead but let's begin with today. i have, there could be showers around the london area on sunday so keep an eye out. as for today, it is hard to believe it is spring. snow falling this morning and this is not the alps or a winter wonderland but actually in herefordshire only a few hours ago. we have had this area of low pressure moving its way gradually south and westward. it is positioned towards the south—west of wales and south—western parts of england. you can see from the satellite imagery the spiral of cloud around that area of low pressure. that is what is
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brewing, unsettled weather towards the south—west. you can see the white to hear, the snow following this morning. the midlands and south wales through parts of the west midlands and hills here, rained down to lower levels. gradually spreading north and east woods, so more midlands into southern parts of northern england, getting rain during the afternoon. still hill snow across wales. the far east of england, up into northern england, scotland, northern ireland, a few showers here and there but looking largely dry and bright with sunny spells. maximum temperatures six up to 11 celsius. underneath the cloud in helston, across wales and the midlands not much above five or six celsius. continuing with a spiral of showers and rain across western areas and further east with clear spells, it could turn chilly with temperatures down to about two or four celsius. perhaps lower than that in the countryside. friday's forecast, the area of low pressure
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is still influenced conditions. moving further south and westwards. still with this weather front wrapped around it and that brings us more showers across northern ireland and wales and the south—west of england during friday. still some rain affecting the far north of scotla nd rain affecting the far north of scotland and otherwise there will be sunny spells and the wind is coming in from the south—east. that will bring us less cold weather. temperatures up to about 12 up to 1a celsius. pleasant with sunshine but chilly in the south—west with the cloud and rain. going into the weekend, still south—easterly or easterly wind, drawing in that warmerair easterly wind, drawing in that warmer air from easterly wind, drawing in that warmer airfrom the near easterly wind, drawing in that warmer air from the near continent. so many of us over the weekend will feel warmer. plenty dry weather around with some showers likely at times in the south—east as mentioned. temperatures at 16 celsius. goodbye.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live. these are today's main stories: authorities in ethiopia say the pilots flying the boeing 737 max passenger plane that crashed killing 157 people followed proper cockpit guidance, but were still not able to control the aircraft. and talks continue this morning between labour and the conservatives as the government tries to salvage a brexit deal. despite differences, discussions yesterday between the party leaders were described as constructive. mps vote by a majority of one to force theresa may to seek a further extension to the brexit process. the bill is an attempt to stop a no—deal brexit. if we were to still be a member of the european union, which is not our government's intention, but if we were, we would need to have
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european parliamentary elections. i'm at westminster, as those talks continue. we will bring you updates as and when they happen, as that brexit deadlock continues. the routine vaccination of girls to protect against hpv in scotland has led to a dramatic drop in cervical disease. and in sport, gareth southgate receives an 0be. the england manager was at buckingham palace and received it from prince charles. he was awarded it after getting england to the semifinals of the world cup last summer. good afternoon, welcome to bbc newsroom live. an investigation has found that pilots followed the protocol but were unable to prevent the crash in ethiopia.
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pilots "repeatedly" followed the procedures recommended by boeing, but they "were not able to control the aircraft", and the plane repeatedly nose—dived before crashing. dagmawit moges is the ethopian transport minister... the following facts have been determined. number one, the aircraft possessed a valid certificate of airworthiness. the second one, the crew obtained the licence and qualifications to conduct the flight. and third, the take—off run appeared very normal. and the fourth one is, the crew performed all the procedures repeatedly, provided by the manufacturer, but was not able to control the aircraft.
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boeing 737 max aircraft have been grounded following the ethiopian airlines crash, a move affecting more than 300 planes. this preliminary report doesn't attribute blame for the crash but it does suggest that boeing should review the aircraft control system. earlier i spoke to our correspondent, theo leggett, about the report's findings... yes, there are two significant things that we can take out of this. firstly, the fact that the plane repeatedly tried to nosedive when it was supposed to be gaining altitude and the pilots wanted the nose of the aircraft to come up. that suggest that a controversial flight control system known as mcas, already implicated in this accident and another one involving an identical aircraft, may well have been responsible. that is one point.
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the second is that the pilots did everything that they were supposed to and still failed to retain control of aircraft. that is particularly significant because after one of the two accidents, off indonesia five months ago, boeing insisted its aircraft were safe, there was no reason to stop flying it and at every problem emerged with that system, if pilots used a routine safety check list to disable the flight control system, then they would be able to fly the aircraft manually and would not be a problem. if the pilots did exactly what boeing told them to do and they were still unable to control the aircraft, then boeing clearly has some questions to answer. that is in clear contradiction to what boeing said. has there been any response to what boeing have said on this? not yet, i would expect them to go through the report very carefully. boeing will argue that it has already taken action to ensure the safety of the 737. remember, the system is not considered safety critical when the plane was first brought to market. it is facing a lot of questions
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however over how the safety certificate, the safety testing was carried out. particularly the relationship between the regulator in the us, the federal aviation administration and boeing who did the analysis themselves. what is boeing already doing to fit with recommendations from the ethiopian transport authorities today? they have said firstly that the aircraft's flight control system should be reviewed by the manufacturer and secondly, that review should be adequate before this type of plane is permitted to fly again. boeing is doing the first of those and has already developed new software or is in the process of finalising new software which should rectify this flight control system. it is doing that. that new software then has to be tested to make sure it eliminates the flaws that were perceptible in these two accidents. the second point is simply flagging up a warning, really, that the system should be thoroughly tested before the planes are allowed back into the air.
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remember that the 737 max is grounded worldwide at the moment. how long could it be before it gets back in the air? well, that is difficult to answer. boeing is testing solutions it has developed for the aircraft but it appears now solutions will take longer than first thought before they can be rolled out to air fleets around the world. we are talking weeks and months already. the question then becomes whether or not aviation administrations around the world are willing to say, yes, this aircraft is safe. firstly, the us administrator will have to say — we certify this as safe. then other administrations around the world will have to do the same. that could take time because one thing we can be sure of is that they will go over the safety systems of this aircraft with a fine tooth comb. people will not want to fly this aircraft until they can be reassured that it is fundamentally safe. theo leggett. negotiating teams from the government and labour are meeting this morning, after mps voted to force the prime minister to seek an extension to brexit, to try to prevent the uk leaving the eu without a deal in 8 days.
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in a knife—edge decision, they passed a bill proposed by labour mp yvette cooper byjust one vote last night. let us find out more now at westminster from my colleague, joanna gosling. hello, thank you. what happens behind as in this building is that it will go to the house of lords for debate. there is a bit ofa house of lords for debate. there is a bit of a process underwear in there with those who want to thwart that dibell actually getting past, so we are keeping an eye on what happens inside the house of lords. and it is down to the eu to ultimately decide what happens in terms of any extension. let's bring you right up to date with the thoughts of our assistant political editor, norman smith. and focusing firstly on the talks between the labour party and the tories, i spoke to ian murray shortly ago who said that any compromise it is pointless when you compare it to what we have at the moment and therefore, he thinks his party, the labour party, should be a remain party. yes, that
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flatly contradicts what barry gardiner said last week when he said we are not a remain party and that points to the fact that we know that there are huge buts on the tory side, but there are profound splits on the labour party site over this issue of a referendum, and that is why it is hard for mr corbyn to do a deal with theresa may because there are those who are desperate for him to include in that some sort of referendum. others you do not want to touch with a barge pole. interestingly, we learnt this morning that the party chairman of the labour party offered to resign twice after he denied the party whip and those indicative votes by abstaining on the idea of a confirmatory referendum. and yet, when sir keir starmer, the shadow sector, arrived around about 11 o'clock for the start of talks, he was pretty clear that the idea of a confirmatory referendum would be on the table from the labour party's site. we have been discussing labour's alternative plan and issues such as confirmatory votes. we had discussions yesterday and we will continue them today. thank you very much.
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will you be looking for a confirmatory vote in all circumstances? we are discussing a plan and we are discussing a confirmatory vote, and we are building on the discussions from yesterday. so that is going on on one side. on the other is this tussle over the timeline after parliament, just before midnight, effectively grabbed control. and are now forcing theresa may to accept their demands over the sort of delay that we have. the trouble is that it is really the eu who are calling the shots because they will decide the length of any delay and interestingly, we heard from the brexit secretary, stephen barclay, acknowledging that it is quite possible that we may have to hold those european elections. if we are a member of the european union, then under treaty law, we will be required to have european parliamentary elections. and i think, again, there has been some confusion in the house previously with ideas around rolling over the existing members of the european parliament or having it on a ratio similar to the composition of the house. if we were to still be a member of the european union, which is not our government's intention, but if we were,
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we would need to have european parliamentary elections. normally, we are hearing that the vice president of the eu commission has said that a no—deal brexit is highly likely, despite that vote in the commons. he is saying, you only know what britain doesn't want, but taking into account the limited days available, it is logic to think we are heading towards a hard brexit. hopefully i am wrong. but in terms ofa hopefully i am wrong. but in terms of a hard brexit, potentially for next friday, we are assuming it won't happen, might that be the case? from the westminster rent i don't think so, because parliament will have to be consulted. but if the eu was to decide when mrs may goes back next wednesday, actually, there is no point in continuing with this process, we are nowhere near a green anything, rather than telling her you can have a long delay, and bearing in mind it needs the agreement of all the leaders to get an extension, some might say, forget
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it, you have no clue, you need to leave. the idea of a no deal is absolutely possible. if the eu are not prepared to give us more time, thenit not prepared to give us more time, then it remains the legal default. normally, thank you very much, and on that, emmanuel macron in france has been saying that he is veering towards not having any sort of delay and suggesting that we have had this process and he is on the harder line of refusing a delay. but what happens in the end we just have to wait and see. let's get the thoughts now of the labour mp rupa huq who is with me. thank you. i spoke to one of your colleagues, ian murray, a short time ago, and he said the sort of compromise being looked at between the tories and labour party at the moment is pointless because it is not as good as the current position we are in at the moment to stop these indicative votes, the multiple choice that we have twice done though, any other form of brexit, whether it be theresa may's
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deal or no deal, it will be worse than what we have at the moment, and every government analysis has shown that, the economy shrinks, jobs are lost. every region and every sector of the economy suffers. he is correct. so why is the labour party getting involved? correct. so why is the labour party getting involved ? why correct. so why is the labour party getting involved? why not become a remain party? it is only right and proper that after three years when the government does not seem to have sorted anything out that we look at other options. it is a minority government. in those kind of circumstances when there is no parliamentary majority, it makes sense to reach out rather than keeping your arms folded. a lot of the people behind or she has relied on, the erg and dup have tried to knife or in the back. it is right that we do this. if you are at home and watching this process and we are hearing that the mps are suggesting the compromise is not as good as the status quo, and on the other side of course you have those who suggest the only way to get the people what they want us to have a no—deal
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brexit. mps like you then say the sort of compromise we are looking for will not be anywhere near enough, it is like, why bother?” will put this to theresa may who i am going to see myself at 2:30pm, because she did a dear colleague letter to all mp5. i took her up on her invitation to the chamber and saidl her invitation to the chamber and said i will meet you. if she gets do through, the liberal party could agree to it if she attaches a confirmatory referendum on the end of it. some of these things are not achievable, the no deal and things like that, for the function of our country, they are not a good idea. we do not like it on the labour benches. if it is the only one that our government has negotiated that would work that is sanctioned by the eu, why not put it to the people with the alternative of remaining, because we certainly know that that works? hold on, please, because we need to say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. those talks today are not
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between jeremy corbyn bbc two. those talks today are not betweenjeremy corbyn and theresa may, they are at a lower level than that, but the talks continue and we welcome of course, keep you updated with all of the latest details here on the bbc news channel. we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. and rupa huq, picking up on the referendum and keir starmer suggesting it is something they will continue today. when you go down that path, even though there were to be an agreement in the commons, ultimately, or as part of the steel that there should be a referendum, those of you who want one say that it should be a choice between whatever the commons majority is and remain, they will be many who say well, that is absolutely not fair at all, and if you want to really alienate people out there, you know, don't give them the no deal option. why not have that? that's a problem of having a binary choice. it would bea of having a binary choice. it would be a three—way choice, wouldn't it? but we know that work needs to be
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done and they are not workable. we done and they are not workable. we do not have the luxury of time, businesses want certainty. we have a deal in place that allows us to leave the european union. sorry to interrupt but your view is that the compromise, the deal is not as good as remaining. so you would go for remain. but surely you have to give people who voted as a majority at the last referendum, you must give them the alternative which is to be without it you? the thing is, it was an instruction without a specification. it was a binary choice in these big thing should not simplicity be thrown out. in the republic of ireland, they recently had a vote on abortion reform, it we nt had a vote on abortion reform, it went through 70—30 because the wording was on the ballot paper and thatis wording was on the ballot paper and that is what we need, something workable versus remain, the status quo and in trade union agreements that normal way of doing it. when you sign any contract, you should read the terms of conditions. for something of this magnitude, you should look before you be. i think a
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little checking mechanism, do you still want it and do you want it in this form, do you want it as it is at the moment, what you've got? that is what i would suggest to the prime minister today at 2:30pm. thank you very much forjoining us. we will have more reaction later, now back to the studio. joanna gosling, thank you very much. a quick look at the headlines. authorities in ethiopia investigating last month's crash involving a boeing 737 max have said that the pilots were not to blame. the report shows that the followed proper slight guidance but were not able to control the aircraft. talks between the government under labour party continue today after the agreed to find a way forward for brexit. it is after mps agreed to extend the brexit process after a vote in the commons passed by a majority just one. time for the sports news. thank you.
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after a feisty old form, the fallout continues. celtic captain scott brown has been charged with improper conduct, he was involved in a couple of incidents involving alfredo morrell is‘ red card. stephen gerard, the rangers boss, he has been given a one match touchline ban a p pa re ntly been given a one match touchline ban apparently for comments made to referee bobby madden. both clubs have been served notices of complaint after a mass confrontation at the end of that game. it has taken a long time and a lot of money but finally talked and moved into their new home and with the new stadium comes a big old opening ceremony. fireworks, lights and even opera singers at one point last night. on the field, however, spurs made the most of the occasion, beating crystal palace 2—0. son was the man to score the first competitive goal there. manchester city went top of the premier league thanks to a 2—0 victory over cardiff. it was more co mforta ble victory over cardiff. it was more comfortable than the scoreline suggested. kevin de bruyne and leroy
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sane with the goals. and last night's other game, teenager callum hudson—odoi shined on his first start for chelsea in the premier league. they beat brighton 3—0. loftus—cheek scored what was a good night for english talent. the win moves chelsea above manchester united into fifth position. at aintree the festival begins and there are a0 runners which have been announced, amongst them as the favourite tiger roll, looking for back—to—back wins. and if he does that he will be in elite company as our reporter explains. tiger role is this amazing horse that has won four times at the cheltenham festival and it was the smallest horse and last yea r‘s race it was the smallest horse and last year's race with the oldestjockey. and they have said he has the heart ofa and they have said he has the heart of a lion and it has been a5 years since red run won the grand national, he won it three times and this is considered in racing circles to bea this is considered in racing circles to be a horse that has a genuine chance of doing it again, one at the
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cheltenham festival. he was cheered all the way from the town into the home straight, up the street, because he won by 22 lengths. that is all the sport for the moment, you can find more of those stories on our website. —— red rum. —— red rum. let's go back tojoanna gosling and more on brexit now. thank you. yes, those talks happened yesterday between theresa may and jeremy corbyn. today they are by the deputy speaking on their behalf, and they are currently discussing, we understand, from the keir starmer on the labour party side in those conversations, about what would happen with a referendum with many labour mps pushing to suggest that it absolutely has to be a red line for the labour party in those negotiations. in terms of any deal, any compromise that might come up,
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it is interesting, i have been speaking to two labour mps who have said that actually, any compromise is not as good as the status quo and they are echoing the thoughts of many mps who ultimately think that if we end up with the sort of compromise that involves the customs union or the single market, it is not as good as remain, and that is why a lot of mps want to go back to the country. let's talk about what might happen in the days ahead. the director for the institute of government is with me now. as a sam coates of the times. welcome to you both. thank you, so much to talk about. that's speak about what is happening as a result of the comments —— comments passing that bill to force theresa may to go to europe for an extension. 0n bill to force theresa may to go to europe for an extension. on that front, we have had the vice president of the eu commission suggesting a no—deal brexit is highly likely and meanwhile it has to get through the house of lords and then kind of played around with ita and then kind of played around with it a bit, aren't they? the key point
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is that all it does is tell the prime minister to ask for an extension, it does not suggest that the eu has to give it to stop the eu is nervous about giving an extension without any conditions attached. it goes to the lords after getting through the commons extreme the quicker yesterday, that in itself controversial. and it is interesting as to how quickly it can get through the house of lords. it has been talk ofa the house of lords. it has been talk of a filibuster to use up all of the time for discussion on this. in practice, that is unlikely to work, there are methods of stopping that happening, the lords can ask for the noble lord not to be heard, for example. perhaps some of these archaic sounding tools might be brought out. there could be some attempt to play around with the process. even if the vote goes through, it has to get royal assent and that propels the prime minister to ask for an extension. she might try to beat parliament to it and bring her own request for an
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extension forward and try and get that ahead, but she needs to know what is coming out of the jeremy corbyn talks. sam coates, we heard from the vice president of the eu commission seeing a no—deal brexit is highly likely despite these moves. we are kind of assuming that the 12th of april, next friday, we will not leave with an no deal, but how possible do you think it is @bbcnewsline legally, it is complete the possible. we do not know the parameters of what theresa may will ask for and how the eu will react to it. no deal are ask for and how the eu will react to it. no dealare planning is ask for and how the eu will react to it. no deal are planning is going on inside government at pace and those 24 hour control rooms that have been set up in parts of whitehall are up and running. clearly it is a possibility despite there being a political will at the top of number ten, at the top of the civil service, for it's not happen, because accidents do happen, and when we come to next wednesday and there is that summit at six o'clock in brussels, and theresa goes after, we do not know what britain needs,
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wants and asked for can be delivered by the european side, and if it isn't, and i think it is more likely that it isn't, and i think it is more likely thatitis isn't, and i think it is more likely that it is delivered, but if not, we could be crashing out. we are seeing a lot of activity, the stuff inside the house of lords today. that, to me, is of lower priority, it will have less significance as to whether we go to a no—deal brexit, regardless of whether this bill passes, which i do not think we'll have ultimately a great impact on where we go next. it is all down to theresa may with talks with jeremy corbyn, the discussion between her and her own side and jeremy corbyn and her own side and jeremy corbyn and his own side. so what do you expect in terms of how much movement there is on both sides and whether ultimately the labour party will fight to ensure that a referendum is attached whatever compromise there is? there is a great bike irony that personally jeremy corbyn and is? there is a great bike irony that personallyjeremy corbyn and theresa may are incredibly close when it comes to the counter brexit that they would both like to see. they both want to leave the single market and want something around a customs
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union, one side linguistically in favour, the other against. what they wa nt favour, the other against. what they want to end free movement and neither wants a second referendum. the problem is that the forces operating on both sides for a harder brexit on the tory side and to have that referendum on the labour side. there is that dynamic relationship to coina there is that dynamic relationship to coin a phrase that it is the hardest thing to read at the moment and whether both sides can do it. one observation, the whip, the instruction from party leaders to their troops on how to vote has proved incredibly resilient as the institute has shown over and over again. so if they did decide on a real —— if they did decide on the deal, i think they could get it through. what do you think about that? since this has been unfolding it has been suggesting that the tribes of different, but it is not about tory versus the liberal party anymore. so would the whips hold in anymore. so would the whips hold in any event, you think? what is
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interesting to me is that the labour party has held together better than the tories in all of this and theresa may has been battling in the past few weeks to hold together these completely opposed wings of her party. the labour party so far has managed to move on and lose fewer mps. if you are voted in favour of her deal than she expected. butjeremy favour of her deal than she expected. but jeremy corbyn favour of her deal than she expected. butjeremy corbyn has not been tested like she has. as sam has said, jeremy corbyn has got to find out what are they prepared to sign up out what are they prepared to sign up to in terms of coming out of the single market and what that means, are they prepared to accept freedom of movement or not? what do they do about the second referendum? above all, what would it look like to him and his party, what would it feel like to do a deal with theresa may's and serve eugh i have only spoken to two labour mps this morning out of the many but both believe that
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single market and customs union, the compromise looked at, is not as good as the status quo, and ian murray said it was pointless. you have to look at the polling of labour party members published in january. something like nine out of ten people who signed up to the labour party pay their subs and vote in leadership elections think that there should be a second referendum. jeremy corbyn has looked to be a leader that listens to his members. that is the nub of the incredible pressure that he is under. whether he can face them down, eyes i suspect he would be inclined to do, but many, many people will not want him to do that and whether he goes into that pressure is one of the big questions for the next ten days. beyond that, whether there were to bea beyond that, whether there were to be a referendum, there will be pressure from many within the labour party for them to campaign for remain, do you see that happening? we saw in 2016 and unenthusiastic remain vote from jeremy corbyn. that is what he says. i do not see any
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reason why that would not be the case now. we have had barry gardiner suggesting that they are a leaf party. it is a question of what the labour party manifesto would be, it will be fascinating if we were going toa will be fascinating if we were going to a referendum and, you know, what do you labour position on this would be. as! do you labour position on this would be. as i have said already, this is to testjeremy be. as i have said already, this is to test jeremy corbyn and his ability to hold his team together and what he wants out of this relationship with europe in a way that he has yet to be tested so far. thank you both so much. it stays interesting, doesn't it? and we will continue to monitor developments here and keep you updated. now back to the studio. joanna gosling, thank you very much. the outgoing president of algeria — abdelaziz bouteflika — has asked for "forgiveness" in an open letter to the country's citizens. the president, who has been in powerfor 20 years, has stepped down following weeks of anti—government protests
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let's cross to our correspondence selling appeal who is in algiers. how is the mood there? —— sally nabil. it isa nabil. it is a very cheerful mood. the people are very happy that the president has finally left. but they still feel that they have not achieved all of their goals yet, because, to them, it is not about the man any more, it is about the system. it is about the ruling elite, which includes powerful businessmen, powerful politicians. they hold this ruling elite accountable for what they say is corruption and depression and high unemployment and they have said that it is not just unemployment and they have said that it is notjust abdelaziz bouteflika that he needs to go, it is also his ruling elite, the regime that have dominated this country for 21 years. imean, i dominated this country for 21 years. i mean, i have been talking to some people here since i arrived and i asked them, why were you so unhappy under abdelaziz bouteflika's rule?
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they said, because we could not speak. because we had so very high unemployment. the thing is, the dilemma and algiers at the moment is that if put to the constitution, the interim government appointed by abdelaziz bouteflika before he resigned, it should stay in power for three months until fresh elections are held. and also the speaker of the upper house of the parliament should be the caretaker president, but the people in the street, they totally refuse government members. the speaker of the upper house, they say we need a new face with new faces. this is why they are very much determined to go out in huge numbers tomorrow because they say, yes, we have succeeded partly in unseating the country's longest serving president, but we also need his resume to go. sally, thank you very much for that update. sally nabil in algiers. it is time for a look at the weather forecast.
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over to chris fawkes. hello there. thank you. it was cold enough for some snow across the west midlands and wales earlier today. temperatures are beginning to slowly rise a little bit to stop so we are seeing that transition slowly back to rain. across mousse—mac and into northern ireland, some rain still affecting the north of scotland as well. there will be some bright weather for the east. tonight overnight, a main bout of rain works into northern ireland, another post comes into the south—west of england and wales during the night. given the cloud around with rain at times, not particularly cold across the west. clear spells further east and that coldest weather will be, there could be the odd patch of frost were the cloud breaks for any length of time. into friday and moment whether into northern ireland. wales and the south of england also likely to see rain as well. the further south and east were due go, the drier the weather is. sunshine in scotland and
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temperatures, turning milder, 1a degrees in london, 1a is the high in edinburgh. that is your weather.
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