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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 5, 2019 7:00pm-7:45pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines at 7pm: the prime minister requests another brexit extension until the end of june. shadow brexit secretary sir keir starmer says it's disappointing that the government has proposed no changes to its brexit deal after two days of talks. downing street has said it would be willing to make changes to secure an agreement. compromise requires change. we want the talks to continue and we have written in those terms to the government but we do need change if we are going to compromise. an inquest finds a botched ira warning call contributed to or caused 21 deaths in the 1974 birmingham pub bombings. free after almost a decade in jail,
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sally channel who killed her husband with a hammer attack has been released ahead of a retrial. and coming up — footballer danny rose criticses the lack of action in tackling racism in the sport. earlier today, the prime minister has asked the european union and meet the television channel that has been enjoying record audiences for politics. good evening and welcome to the programme. after several days of discussions between the government and labour to break the brexit deadlock, labour has denied said it is disappointed at what they said was a lack of real change or
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compromise. sir keir starmer has said the government is not offering changes to the withdrawal agreement 01’ changes to the withdrawal agreement or the political declaration. however this evening downing street has insisted it would be willing to make changes to secure a cross—party agreement and they were prepared to continue talks over the weekend. earlier today, the prime minister has asked the european union for a further delay to brexit untiljune the 30th. but she said preparations to take part in elections for the european parliament at the end of may would continue in case there was no agreement. some european leaders say they're reluctant to approve the request and say britain needs to clarify its intentions ahead of an emergency eu summit next wednesday. our deputy political editor, john pienaar, looks backs on the days events. on the day's events. it isa it is a race against time. brexit. just not enough time. some tories hate even talking to labour, though ministers say they have no choice. if we cannot find a way through with parliament, we have
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no choice but it is not our first choice. ourfirst choices no choice but it is not our first choice. our first choices to leave quickly, cleanly, deliver the referendum result, and allow britain to move forward. what could break the brexit deadlock? if we receive something from the governance which we are looking at now. what was that? a piece of paper. you know i can't say anything and i cannot speculate. this could drag on. today the prime minister has had to a cce pt on. today the prime minister has had to accept that. she wrote a letter to accept that. she wrote a letter to donald tusk, requesting a leave date extension to june to donald tusk, requesting a leave date extension tojune the 30th, if needed. it also requests an option to leave earlier if a deal is agreed in parliament but the letter accepts no agreement means the uk prepares for the european parliament elections on may the 23rd, something theresa may has been desperately trying to avoid. at westminster, brexit is a work in progress and not much progress. mps could vote to set
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their own limit on any extension, potentially to for the prime minister commented she will have to hammer outan minister commented she will have to hammer out an agreement in brussels next week. even before today's letter, the government was fiercely lawyer in cabinet was warning of a potentially long delay if talks failed. we have to re-evaluate where we were. an extension would be likely to be a long one. after three rounds of talks this week, negotiations betweenjeremy corbyn and theresa may were barely alive tonight, with no sign of a breakthrough. labour blaming the tories for offering no change in the brexit deal and much the same plan for the future. obviously that is disappointing. compromise requires change. we want the talks to continue and we have written in those terms to the government but we do need change if we are going to compromise. some brexiteers say leave with no deal and may change
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prime minister. the prime minister herself has made it clear she will not be leader for much longer. we will have a new leader and a new prime minister and that new prime minister will not want to be tied into the withdrawal agreement with the option of extension, he or she will be in a much stronger negotiating position to get the right deal for the united kingdom and that seems to be in the national interest. even if theresa may strikes a deal withjeremy corbyn, mps on both sides could mutiny. some tories hate the idea of delaying brexit or staying close to the eu or even talking tojeremy corbyn. many labour mps want even talking tojeremy corbyn. many labourmps wanta even talking tojeremy corbyn. many labour mps want a new referendum whatever deal is struck. and jeremy corbyn has never much liked that idea. both leaders might be privately relieved if their talks come to nothing and it is left to mps to choose their ideal outcome, if they can. theresa may now travels to brussels, where a 12 month delay has been suggested maybe with enough
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flexibility to allow an earlier exit. but some eu leaders may want to make the journey tougher, not easier. there seems to be a war of words emerging this evening between labour and the government over whether any changes are possible to either the withdrawal agreement or the blue to go declaration. what is going on? as it stands, the talks do not appear to be making much progress at all. it is about what the end result will be. labour sources telling us, although there was an exchange earlier, it seems the government is keen on creating an extra document, rather than making changes to the political declaration itself and labour wants the talks to make detailed changes to the wording of the political declaration, which as a reminder, sets out the uk's future
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relationship with the eu. that is why you were hearing in that report, labour came forward with a statement saying they were disappointed that the government had made no change or attempt at compromise but a little while later, downing street came back with its own statement saying it had made serious proposals during the talks this week and that it was ready to hold further detailed discussions and to make changes to the blue to go declaration. make of that what you will. it seems the government has not given enough for labour so far but they are now saying they will go further and make changes to that political declaration. as yet there are no talks scheduled as we understand it for tomorrow and across the weekend but downing street has said tonight it is ready to hold further discussions. no real progress yet but potential to make some in the coming days. and how much of an extension the uk might need could be rather elastic. yes, theresa may has made her request to donald tusk, the
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chairman of the european council. she has asked for it to be taken until the end ofjune but the eu has to agree to that and as we have been hearing from various quarters and different capitals around the european union since theresa may said that letter, it looks like a longer extension could be on the cards, maybe up to a year or more, but with a get out clause for the uk that if it signs of a deal on something get through parliament, it would be able to leave sooner. it will all be decided in brussels next wednesday. jonathan, thank you very much. the departure date has changed frequently over the last frantic weeks of negotiations. initially, the uk was due to leave on the 29th of march. this was then put back to the 12th of april, next friday. but if the uk parliament could vote through a deal, there was the
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opportunity for the uk to stay until the 22nd of may. this morning, theresa may wrote to the european council president, asking for an extension to the 30th ofjune. she also said the uk would make preparations to field parliaments in the european elections taking place on the 23rd of may. there have been indications the european union might wa nt to indications the european union might want to offer a longer extension of up want to offer a longer extension of up to want to offer a longer extension of uptoa want to offer a longer extension of up to a year but if that agreement was reached by the uk parliament, they could leave earlier. let's speak to the uk bleeder. —— you kept leader. how likely is it that you will want to field candidates for you kept in the european elections? we have been preparing for months. i had predicted every stage of this for the last couple of years, of what we we re
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the last couple of years, of what we were going to be, and reluctantly we knew it was going to be betrayed and we have had to prepare for european elections. we have gone through 190 candidates in a selection process and we have selected our candidates. they have to be positioned on the list and we will be doing that within the next few days. we are ready to go and we are raising the money. we have had our campaign plan. we intend to fight that election on a platform of unilateral unconditional withdrawal, no compromise, no surrender, and we are going to represent the 17 point formally in people who voted to leave and a lot more, now, i think, have come round to that point of view. some polls have suggested the opposite but polls can suggest all kinds of things. the prime minister has said she is doing all she can to get the uk out of the eu with a deal as fast as possible. it might not be necessary to stand in these elections. why would you bother if we are likely to come out sooner rather than later? it is my
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responsibility because we cannot find ourselves in the elections with no preparations. we are ready to go. it is difficult to see how anything will happen now because parliament has consistently voted against any deal. i did not like the deals anyway. they voted against no deal and now theresa may in her inimitable style has gone and handed the ball back to the european union and said basically if there is no further agreement reached in parliament then we will have to go forward into the european elections and of course, what the european union want, although it does not wa nt union want, although it does not want a lot of ukip meps, it would rather have them back than have the uk out of the european union. that is just uk out of the european union. that isjust something uk out of the european union. that is just something they are prepared to live with. what should voters make of your choice to share a platform with stephen yaxley—lennon, who likes to be known as tommy robinson, for a lot of people his views on race, immigration and islam
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are repellent? tommy robinson, if you... why don't you ask him his real points of view. we had a rally last week, which was basically sponsored by tommy robinson and his news service. we would not have been able to hold that otherwise because we could not have spent the money to pay for it. you make these accusations, which i am rather tired. have you not read his tweets? it is not causing —— calling him names, it is describing some of the things he says on the platforms that he had times as shared with you and also looking at the way he uses social media. he is offensive. he has never said anything racist. i would not be with him on a platform if he had. he talks about islamic ideology and that is fair enough to have a critique of an ideology. that does not make somebody a bad person or justify the names does not make somebody a bad person orjustify the names he gets called.
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all these people who keep asking me about tommy robinson, why don't you have him on the show? it is legitimate to ask you about stephen yaxley—lennon, as his real name is, because you choose to appear in public with him and i havejust... before i decided... before this interview took place, i went back and look at some of the reports about him and i look at some of his tweets. they are so offensive, that i would not read them out on television. i have been on platforms with labour mps, conservative mps, people of all kinds over the years andi people of all kinds over the years and i don't go into every detail of what they may or may not have set in the past. but labour mps and conservative mps, the people that your name, have not got his track record, have they? and the kind of language that he uses about people from pakistan, about people who are muslim, is not the kind of language you get from those other people you
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are talking about. it is not a fair comparison. you are now saying things but you are not prepared to read the tweets out. i don't know what they are saying because i have not seen them. isn't that worrying? a reader of a party who wants to have people elected to the european parliament of the elections go ahead is prepared to share a platform with someone is prepared to share a platform with someone who is widely reported to hold these views and yet you don't bother looking at them yourself? widely reported by people like you who won't interview him yourself. because he has extreme views that have to be handled with care. people have to be handled with care. people have views that you do not approve of, so you do not have to interview them. i get this on every programme igo them. i get this on every programme i go on. basically you represent a remainer organisation of the media and easiest way to have a go at what i represent is to bring him in and talk about him when you will talk about... talk to him personally yourself. many people the bbc have
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been more on the leave side of the campaign, we seem been more on the leave side of the campaign, we seem to upset people on both sides. our head of editorial policy makes the decision about whether we interview people like tommy robinson, not me. how many seats do you think you will get if these elections go ahead? we came top of the poll last time with 24 seats. we are the authentic party of brexit and we will be standing for an absolutely clean exit from the european union, i would expect to do very well. i never make predictions. i have been leaderfor 13 months and ianda i have been leaderfor 13 months and i and a promise and over deliver on thatis i and a promise and over deliver on that is the way i intend to go on. thank you very much. you have been talking to people about their views on these elections, possibly needing to take place. you would expect, as with so many things around brexit, that the
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country is divided but it is not as divided in the ways that you might also expect. in our latest poll, we have 37% of people saying that if the european elections took place with britain taking part it would be a bad thing, 31% saying it was a good thing. it was not the case that levers overwhelmingly thought it would be a bad thing and remainers thought it would be overwhelmingly a good thing. in actual fact, thought it would be overwhelmingly a good thing. in actualfact, both sides, half of their supporters think it is either a good or bad thing and then a quarter of ukip think it would be a good thing that it took place. lots of confusion. that is in keeping with what you expect. the cost is the same, whether we... if they have to run, and then there is a deal, the uk comes out of the eu, and then those people who have been elected as meps
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don't actually set for very long. all these numbers i am throwing out you are in the abstract. they are talking about some thing that has not happened yet. it could be the case that we have a series of elections in this country which are estimated to be costing around about £100 million and then i feel weeks later, after those meps have been elected, we then leave the european union and they never get to sit in the parliament. and so, this new deadline of the end ofjune could mean that elected meps never actually make it to brussels, which would be a really negative way of an outcome to happen. if you are a political journalist, outcome to happen. if you are a politicaljournalist, it is fascinating, but a lot of people have fatigue with politics, so how many people are likely to turn out and vote? geeks like me call these actions second order elections and by that we mean people do not view them in the same way as they view a
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general election. they use them quite often as a protest vote. it may be that parties like ukip but also parties like change uk and nigel farage's brexit party may benefit from this and people may be spurred on turnout at these elections as an opportunity to show their displeasure with the entire date —— process. it may be that people are so disappointed in general, theyjust sit on their hands and say, ijust can't be bothered. i have had enough of it. long live the geeks! the jury at the inquests into the birmingham pub bombings 44 years ago, has found that a botched ira warning led to the deaths of 21 people. the jury heard that a coded warning call was made less than 10 minutes before the explosions because ira members struggled to find a working phone box. two massive explosions tore apart two pubs in the city centre in november 1974. the jury also found that there were no failings, errors or omissions in the police's response to the call. 0ur midlands correspondent,
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sima kotecha, reports. the one thing that will always stick with me is the smell — flesh, hair — that will never go from me. kevin burgess, more than 200 people injured. two explosions killing 21 people. the city was in shock. these men, who were known as the birmingham six were falsely imprisoned for the crime. some of the families of those killed campaigned for fresh inquests. today the jury concluded a botched warning call from the ira led to the death of twenty one people and meant the police were not able to evacuate the pubs in time. is isjust, as i said,
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isjust the beginning of beginning. the inquest has assisted us in bringing new evidence to the fore. and to the public domain. which means that that will. .. aid police to actively engage in an investigation. the jury deliberated for almost five hours and concluded that there was not sufficient evidence of any failings or errors by the police in their response to the bomb warning. well this used to be the tavern in the town, one of the pubs that was bombed. a significant moment during the inquests was when an ira bomber, witness 0, told the jury who he suspected of being behind the bombings.
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there are calls for the police to investigate. there are huge challenges, but there are active lines of inquiry and we will take those forward. as we say to any family when we investigate a death or a murder, we can't promise that we will result in a prosecution orjustice. we can promise we will to our best and we will do our best. nobody has been clearly convicted of the atrocity at the time. that has led to a lot of frustration in me personally. we know it was the ira, who were the actual people? and it's really a case of closure and i don't think we are ever going to find closure. the coroner said:. 44 years ago and its horror remains etched in the minds of generations in this city. it has been a long fight
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for the families to get to this stage, years of campaigning and a long—drawn—out court battle, but what they can say today officially, which they have not been able to say before, is that their loved ones were murdered by the ira in november 1974. a woman who has spent almost 10 years injail after killing her husband in a hammer attack has been released on bail tonight after her conviction was quashed. sally challen, who was found guilty of murdering 61 year old richard in 2011, now faces a retrial injuly. charlotte gallagher reports. the family of sally challen say she was released from this prison today. just hours after a judge granted her bail. her supporters were thrilled. the family are all supporting sally, we have done from day one and our strength builds and we will build further. this is a fantastic day for us. sally and richard challen were married for 30 years, but in august 2010 sally killed her husband at the family home in surrey, hitting him more than 20 times over the head with a hammer. she had never denied killing him,
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but said it wasn't murder. in february, the court of appeal over turned her original murder conviction, after hearing evidence that she was suffering from two undiagnosed psychiatric conditions at the time and they heard claims she had been subjected to coercive control and emotionally abused and bullied by her husband. sallen challen appeared in court from prison by video link. she confirmed she would plead not guilty to murder at her retrial. her sons were here to support her. we are overjoyed that bail has been granted for her mother and she will be released back us to. she rejoins our family. david challen added his mother couldn't believe what was happening. the judge said her new trial would begin in july, adding, if necessary.
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england and tottenham footballer danny rose says the way the authorities are dealing with racism in the game is a ‘farce' and he can't wait to see the back of football after recent incidents of racism. he and other england players were victims of racist chanting during the recent euro 2020 qualifier in montenegro. it's been seen as a damning indictment of the modern game. danny rose has the footballing world at his feet, but has now revealed racism has made him want to turn his back on the sport. the spurs defender has been the victim of abuse including during his match in montenegro last week. he says the game is failing to tackle the issue. a country can only get fined a little bit of money to be racist. it is a farce. i have had enough. i think that... i have got five or six more years left in football and i can't wait to you know see the back of it.
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rose's comments have saddened many in the game. daniel rose has not to do that. next tuesday if i see him, i will tell him. the best way to fight, combat this kind of... terrible situation is fighting, being there. rose's england team mate, raheem sterling, has been credited with inspiring renewed debate about the problem. the abuse suffered this week byjuventus's forward is the late est in a series of incidents. i hope i would have the courage to take a team off. we can no longer keep sweeping things under the carpet with a fine. i'm not sure we are getting to to bottom of the issue. rose's comments reinforce the sense that racism is the biggest issue affecting the sport, including at the grass roots.
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this season is said to be the worst ever. in leicestershire, a cup final was abandoned after alleged racist remarks from the crowd. they were doing monkey chants and gesture. i feel sorry for other people for me to witness them. it is kids there. it is horrible. the government's held talks with the fa and the premier league in a bid to get a grip of a crisis that is harming the game's image. but with more players losing faith with the authorities, the decisive action may come from them. rescue operations continue across iran after severe flooding kills more than sixty people. there are new warnings that dams in some areas could overflow, causing more devastation. tens of thousands of people have already been displaced, and many are in urgent need of food,
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water, tents and blankets. leigh millner reports. panic in iran, as roads are washed away, some even destroyed. these are the rooftops of houses on a local river bank, just inches away from being fully submerged between the murky floodwaters. almost 2000 cities and villages have been affected, leaving tens of thousands of people desperate for food, water and blankets. as many wait for days on rooftops to be rescued, on the ground, more than 4500 sheep and cows have died. this is what is left of a chicken farm which was hit by severe flash floods. rescue operations continue, but for some, it is already too
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late. as the death toll reaches more than 60, families across the country have started burying victims. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. temperatures a little higherfor many of us over the weekend but it is mixed fortunes when it comes to sunshine or cloud. it will be a reverse of what we have had today. a lot of the cloud and rain has been across the western side of the uk. that was slower —— slowly pull away and that will leave clearing skies for many others. and temperatures a little lower than this in rural spots. not out of the question, there could be a touch of spot —— touch of frost. cloud increasing across the eastern side of england as well and that leaves the best of the sunshine through northern ireland, wales, the western side of england, a glorious day at aintree for the grand national. the easterly
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breeze will be noticeable in places. temperatures heading a little higher, particularly where you get to see some sunshine compared to today. the uk will make preparations for european parliament elections just in case. the government has proposed no changes to expect a deal though brown downing street has said it would be prepared to make changes to reach cross—party agreements. would be prepared to make changes to reach cross-party agreements. even though that is disappointing, compromises required. we want talks continue and we have written to the government, but we do need change if we are going to compromise. an inquest
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finds that a botched ira warning, because a death in the birmingham bombings. for after because a death in the birmingham bombings. forafteralmost because a death in the birmingham bombings. for after almost more than a decade injail sally challen bombings. for after almost more than a decade in jail sally challen who killed her husband with a hammer, has been released ahead of a retrial. the england and spurs star danny rose says that he cannot wait to turn his back on football after racism. the farmer planning to harvest seaweed from the yorkshire coast. the eu is growing increasingly concerned about the potential of a no—deal brexit. 0ur europe editor, katya adler, has been speaking to annegret krampkarrenbauer. known almost universally as akk, she's the new head of the cdu party in germany — and could become the next chancellor when angela
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merkel stands down. translation: we the eu negotiated in afair translation: we the eu negotiated in a fair way. is it fair to stay on these lines, like keeping the irish backs up, would it be more fair to say ok, we will put an end date, we'll put it so finely future that we'll put it so finely future that we will not get that? i've heard that germany may have been open to that germany may have been open to that idea but there was a pushback from other member states, including ireland. translation: it was clear from the start that all eu countries wanted to work together, particularly listening to the point of view ireland and the irish government. to try to avoid a no deal. but if the uk now came to us and said spent five days negotiating nonstop on how to avoid the backs up, ican't nonstop on how to avoid the backs up, i can't imagine anyone in europe
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say no. if there are newer to take proposals for the border, i don't think anyone in the eu would say we don't want to talk about it. do you think it is still possible that the uk will stay in the eu after all? as you wish? translation: know that it is clear what the consequences of brexit will be with or without a deal, i would like to think that a second referendum might be possible. perhaps it could be one of the results of the current talks between theresa may and jeremy corbyn. anything that keeps in the uk close to the eu, and best of all in the eu, would make me, personally, very happy. but it is something that has to be acceptable to the people of the uk. uk living, does that not leave germany quite naked inside the european union? the uk has been quite useful. germany are supposed to be the motor of the year, but actually disagrees with france over
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many things, like protectionism, germany is more competitive minded when it comes to the single market and has been quite happy to... you could say, hide behind the uk. does at the uk leading men that there will be more tension with france? translation: i think there will be even more expectation on germany after brexit. it is true that germany and the uk work closer when it comes to competition rules than germany and france, on the other hand, the franco german axis is very important. it has never been free of tension. the eu dynamic comes from is forging a current position from a different standpoint. is that whatever happens with brexit you wa nt to whatever happens with brexit you want to keep the uk close? does that mean that you want a soft brexit? translation: if there has to be a brexit, it should be with a deal and the closer the relationship, the better. but above all, it needs to better. but above all, it needs to bea better. but above all, it needs to be a brexit that is acceptable to the uk and allows the country to
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karma, to settle and turn over a new page. brexit has been a strain on all of us. in some way that has paralysed us. we have all invested anya paralysed us. we have all invested any a lot of energy and patience into this process. if we need a bit more patient and a bit more energy to come to a good conclusion that i hope will manage that. on both sides of the channel. a hospital trust in cheshire has told many of its patients who live in wales that it can no longer treat them — because their government isn't fully paying its bills. the countess of chester hospital says it's becoming unsafe to carry on — and patient safety has to come first. gill dummigan reports. this quiet road on the outskirts of chester has become the front lines in an unlikely battle in health care. it is called a boundary line for a losing, because on the side you live in chester and on the other side you lived in wales. unless it
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is in side you lived in wales. unless it isina side you lived in wales. unless it is in a charity case or an emergency, your local hospital will no longer be treating you. they have been complaining about funding from the welsh covenant and now they say they're going to stop treating many of their patients, a worrying prospect for people at this time. of their patients, a worrying prospect for people at this timem is going to be harderfor a lot of people, especially for me because i do not dry. my nearest hospital is wrexham. it is just the people do not dry. my nearest hospital is wrexham. it isjust the people in the middle that's a fairly most. it is very sad. for the other people who cannot drive, it could be inconvenient for them as well. do you think the the countess of chester have a point? yes, if they are finding it. it is less than ten miles from here and it is dead easy on the buses. wrexham is 20 miles and could miss than that. if i have referred people to wrexham, i refer them to chester because it is a lot easier to go and all that is going
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to change. it is a shame. the hospital trust is currently £6.59 in the red and it would be dangerous to carry on. is chief executive said her first concern was patient safety and the trust had to remain financially sustainable. —— six 5p in the red. £6.5 million in the red. if you don't make that is all funding will be stopping. if it choose not to provide the services and then they will have to face up to the fact that their income stream that they rely on, that comes from wales, is not going to float on them in future. nhs england has now got involved, both sides and their patients, hoping for some sort of resolution.
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every school pupil in scotland is to be taught vital life—saving skills in a bid to cut the death toll among people who suffer a cardiac arrest. fifty thousand young people will receive the training each year, which it's hoped could save thousands of lives. andrew anderson reports. hi, douglas. she is meeting the man who helped save her life three years ago. doreen suffered a cardiac arrest at her is carried, her mechanic knew he had to act quest —— act quickly. i saw that she was not breathing at all and her face was turning blue. i started performing cpr and chess compressions and at that point i told the receptionist to phone a 999. although he has not use the term and save my life, that is definitely true. it has increased
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my survival rate. it meant that i... my my survival rate. it meant that i... my brain was not starved of oxygen for very long. away from hospital, around three point —— 3500 people suffer a cardiac arrest each year. the survival rate is low. 0ne suffer a cardiac arrest each year. the survival rate is low. one in 12 of those lives is saved. immediate cpr could save more. these youngsters at a high school in glasgow are learning how to get cpr. would they be confident to step in if somebody dropped down in front of them? i would not be put off doing this and learning how to do it before i actually need to do it on someone. before i actually need to do it on someone. aye, if nobody else was doing something. i would need to step in. all of scotland's councils have signed up. we should spec to see 50,000 pupils each year trained in scotland and if we add that year on year then it willjust be a scenario where it is the norm to be trained in cpr and there is no
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mystery around it. survival rates in scotla nd mystery around it. survival rates in scotland will increase because of that. and other countries, where young people have been trained to deliver cpr, the survival rate from cardiac arrests has greatly increased. it is hoped the same will happen here. it's used for everything from food to pharmaceuticals— now seaweed is to be grown commercially for the first time in england off the east yorkshire coast. it's already harvested by hand in the waters north of filey, but soon it'll be grown on a larger scale. it's hoped the farm's first harvest will be within a year. our environment correspondent paul murphy reports. it's a plant that grows in abundance of the yorkshire coast and seaweed farmer here plays in the north sea to harvest the crop —— the crop. farmer here plays in the north sea to harvest the crop -- the crop. is still abiding and vitamins and minerals. it is being gathered by hand at the moment, but large—scale
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farming will start at sea here. hand at the moment, but large—scale farming will start at sea harem can go into biotech tales —— biotech sales and bio plastics and we can use any chemicals extracted from the sea use any chemicals extracted from the sea with two produce a biodegradable plastic products so that when it ends up inherently back and there it will dissolve. scientists at the university of hull identifying the best types to farm commercially. we are looking for strong, fast species. seaweed farming is really at the beginning. we have wild crops, but which one can be selected and improved on. can we choose with the kind of instruments that be happier? quite like we have a sea lettuce, and sequins. there is also the man to get yorkshire seaweed on the man to get yorkshire seaweed on the menu. we try to get anything on the menu. we try to get anything on the menu, including fish. as is the chefs are learning about this all the time to trying to integrate it into the menus. that should be the
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same effort is made more widely available for the customers at home, from there is any supermarket and things like that. nearly £500,000 has been awarded to get the firm started in government money. in terms of industrial point of view, davies is by this project has been taken fiercely. the first commercial crop could be harvested from the seas as early as the spring of next year. it is a tough working environment, but the scientists believe that the strong tides and cold waters of yorkshire's east coast could provide ideal growing conditions. a pair of sea otter pups who were rescued in california have been rehomed at the georgia aquarium in the us. the otters avoided euthanasia and an unusual journey but are now settling in well to their new surroundings. tom webb reports. making a splash in their new home,
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sea making a splash in their new home, sea otters. discovered on the california coastline, both pups were pa rt california coastline, both pups were part of a special rescue after being separated from their mothers during a storm. with efforts to be anathema to families and successful, they we re to families and successful, they were taken to be cared for at a local sanctuary. requiring round the clock care they were viewed as nonreleasable by well—paid authorities. and they faced been put to sleep. as the search faded for a new permanent home, an aquarium willing to take on the pair was discovered over 3000 kilometres away in atla nta. discovered over 3000 kilometres away in atlanta. to get the pub there as quickly as possible with as little stress as quotable —— to get the pup there as quickly as possible with as little stress as possible... it was cold but has plenty of ice to keep the cold weather man school. never
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in atla nta, the cold weather man school. never in atlanta, d remain behind the scenes under 24—hour watch and care. she is currently things all and swimming on her own, but the younger of the two is being bottle—fed. both pups of the two is being bottle—fed. both pups are believed to be settling in well to their new home and will soon be ambassadors for their endangered species, providing millions of guests species, providing millions of gu ests to species, providing millions of guests to georgia aquarium the chance to learn more about them. the headlines on bbc news. the prime minister requests and other brexit extension until the end ofjune and says that the uk will make preparations for european parliament elections just in case. shadow brexit secretary sir keir starmer has proposed no changes to
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expect. and ira warning that a botched ira warning contributed to deaths in the 1974 birmingham pub bombings. now on bbc news, it's time for newswatch, presented this week by shaun ley. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, shaun ley. coming up on this edition. not everyone is bored by brexit, meet the television channel which is enjoying record audiences for politics. should last week's question time have included a question from the audience asking if it is morally right for five—year—olds to be taught about lgbt issues in school? the costs of the last few months of political turmoil in the uk are debated, but there has been at least one big winner. the television channel of which many
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viewers have previously, perhaps, been unaware. 0rder, order. bbc parliament has made an international star of mr speaker, john bercow, thanks to its live coverage on all the twists and turns of brexit. the channel attracted a record 3.5 million viewers injanuary, as well as its five biggest daily audiences of the past decade. bbc parliament broadcasts live all the proceedings of the house of commons, as well as providing coverage of the house of lords, committee meetings, the scottish parliament and the welsh and northern ireland assemblies. it also makes some programmes of its own from the archive. the bbc parliamentary correspondent, mark darcy and ruth fox from the society have been providing expert commentary on the some of the big debate. it is an addition much appreciated by viewers like michael mcdonald. while television cameras didn't arrive in the house of commons until 1989. it took a lot of lobbying by the bbc and other broadcasters

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