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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 6, 2019 7:00am-8:00am BST

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good morning and welcome to breakfast with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today: brexit talks stall — labour says theresa may is refusing to compromise but the government insists it's made good morning. welcome to breakfast with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. our headlines today: brexit talks stall. labour says theresa may is refusing to compromise but the government insists it's made "serious proposals". millions of workers will have to pay higher pension contributions from today, but some will benefit from new tax changes. the housing dream turning into a nightmare — calls for more protection for people who buy new homes. good morning. catch us if you can.
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liverpool are back on top of the premier league after coming back to win at southampton. and target on a roll —— tiger role ona and target on a roll —— tiger role on a roll. aiming to become the first horse to win back—to—back grand national ‘s in decades. we have something drier in our weather to come this weekend. i cannot promise you unbroken sunshine. many eastern areas will get stuck with some fairly stubborn cloud. in an easterly breeze setting up cloud. in an easterly breeze setting up it will turn out quite chilly on the eastern coasts. more detail coming up. good morning. it's saturday, 8th april. thanks forjoining us. our top story: it's unclear whether the government and labour will hold further talks on brexit over the weekend,
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after three days of discussions ended without agreement yesterday. meetings have been taking place to try and find a proposal to put to another commons vote, before an emergency eu summit next week. labour's shadow brexit secretary sir keir starmer said the government has not proposed any changes to theresa may's brexit deal. at the moment, the government's not proposing any change to the deal, it's not countenancing any change to the actual wording of the political declaration. now, obviously, ithink we all want to break this deadlock. we want the talks to continue. but compromise does require change. downing street has insisted it's prepared to hold further discussions. foreign secretaryjeremy hunt said developments were being watched closely in brussels. we will give them an honest assessment as to whether we think that process will bear fruit. but what i think they will see from the actions that theresa may has taken over the last week is that she is leaving no stone unturned to do that. so britain is not dragging its feet in trying to solve this, but we are a democracy with a hung parliament so it's not easy. let's talk to our political correspondent matt cole. good morning to you. much was made
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in advance of these possible meetings and what might come out of them. where are we at? well, charlie, the talks look a little lifeless at the moment. we have had two or three days of negotiations between 18 from labour and their government counterparts. but labour seemed to be of the opinion that the government isjust not seemed to be of the opinion that the government is just not shifting. theresa may all the way along had key red lines as she described them over which she wouldn't cross. labour says, effectively, she needs to cross one of those, that of a customs union was of a much closer trade relationship with brussels and the eu than she had been willing to countenance. it looks as though labour haven't seen that offer. they are saying that the government isn't willing to compromise, is only willing to compromise, is only willing to, perhaps, provide a supplementary document to the existing withdrawal agreement and its political declaration. that bit looks ahead to future relations stop thatis looks ahead to future relations stop that is what they should be document. the government says it is willing to change that political declaration, but it is not looking
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like there is too much going on between the 22. which means we get to the start of the week and if there is no agreement between the sides then it will probably come down to mps voting on a series of options. theresa may said the government instead would back whatever comes out of that. of course, it all has to be decided in some way before wednesday when the emergency eu summit is on which the other 27 nations will have to unanimously agree to give britain an extension to its brakes at exit date. thank you very much. talk to you later —— brexit exit date. millions of workers will now see a bigger chunk of their wages automatically diverted into a pension, from today. the minimum contribution is going up from 3% to 5%. employers will also have to increase their contributions. here's our personal finance correspondent simon gompertz. this is a tale of two hairdressers. one, chloe, full—time and ready to have 5% clipped off her wage for her work pension after today's increase. i just think that a little bit
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of money that i don't see, you know, it goes straight out of my wages before i even see it, and ijust think, well, for the future you may need it. cause you won't be working. and you'll need to top up for your old age and enjoy doing things as you get older. and this is taneika, who's been blown out of the pension scheme after having a baby and coming back part—time. pensions are tricky for new parents to afford. i think once you've a baby you put kind of it to the side and that's how it is. you don't really have much say. it's like you've had a baby, you don;t want to do this, you want a lower wage, and that's it. and then there's a danger you get a lower pension. yes. it's notjust the cost. employers aren't obliged to sign up people like taneika, who earn less than £10,000 per year. to be fair, it's a challenge to the boss as well. the business has to contribute a top up, which has gone up to 3% of pay. for the majority of small businesses it is an onerous burden that's just
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going to get worse and worse and worse. and i think something like 70% of people work for a small business in this country, so it'll have an impact on the employment of whether people will actually take people on. right now the challenge for savers like chloe how to afford today's higher pension payments. the government says it's letting us earn more before income tax kicks in and raising minimum wages and that should help. simon gompertz, bbc news. the aircraft manufacturer boeing says it's temporarily cutting production of its 737 airliner, following two crashes. production will decrease from 52 to 42 planes a month, while the firm works on changes to its max model which was involved in crashes in ethiopia and indonesia. a soldier who walked towards a bomb left on an underground train is being awarded the queen's commendation for bravery. lieutenant colonel craig palmer was travelling to work when the device partially exploded a few carriages away at parsons green station.
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a fireball swept through the tube train injuring more than 50 people. colonel palmer took photographs of the smouldering bomb before contacting the police. and we'll be talking to colonel palmer after nine o'clock. hundreds of pupils from raheem sterling's old school are heading to wembley this afternoon, after he got them tickets to watch the fa cup semifinal. the england forward surprised students from ark elvin academy, by inviting them to watch manchester city's game against brighton. here's natalie pirks. it's pe as usualfor the pupils of ark elvin academy, but this has been no ordinary week. on thursday, ten of them met their school's most famous former student, and then 250 of them discovered that, thanks to raheem sterling's generosity, they were going home with a pair of tickets for today's semi. despite his success and the fact
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that he's moved out of london and he's playing for manchester now, he still remembers where he's from and he sticks close to his roots. for our children to have role model who thinks of them and has his heart in our community, that means a huge amount to us, is very special. this used to be copeland community school. every day for a young raheem sterling there was a very visual reminder of his dream to one day play at wembley stadium. his former coach still works you. he has always has been a very nice person. very generous. always willing to help where he could look out for people. i think it is great that he is doing that. it gives a lot of people in the area, from the school, the opportunity to go to wembley and see a game. a lot of them haven't been to wembley before. for those with the golden tickets, sterling is a role model. he is our inspiration. he is our reason to play football. he got found and it goes to show
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that with hard work, determination, passion, and focussing on your studies, anything is possible. by the school will now rename after the manchester city star and want him back to copy ribbon, they hope with the fa cup in tow. natalie pirks, bbc news, wembley. sirmick sir mickjagger says he sir mick jagger says he is sir mickjagger says he is on the mend after having a heart operation in the united states. in a tweet, the singer said he was feeling much better and thanked hospital staff for doing a superb job. the stones postponed their tour of the us and canada, after their frontman pulled out on doctors orders. the cheapest european resort for uk holiday makers has been revealed. analysis of 20 destinations was carried out by the post office. bulgaria's sunny beach came out on top, where you can get a glass of wine for £1.17, and a two course lunch for two for £8.42. sorrento in italy was the most expensive, where lunch costs more than £35. that is good. it gets you thinking
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about how cheap is cheap. looking through the figures, we said bulgaria, a bottle of wine in bulgaria, a bottle of wine in bulgaria, one of the resorts there, on for a bottle of wine. that is very good. i can't tell the difference between cheap and expensive wine. get the tickets now. bulgaria is the place for you. and by comparison, sorrento, £3.51 fora of wine there. you can make your pick. we're hearing this morning that brexit talks between the government and labour have ended without agreement so far. it comes at the end of one of westminster‘s more unusual weeks, let's take a look. we are not.
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anand menon, director of the independent research group uk in a changing europe joins us now from oxford. good morning. thanks forjoining us. it is funny. we were saying it was an unusual week but every week seems to get more surreal. what has your ta ke to get more surreal. what has your take been? it has been a bizarre week in politics. not least because water started pouring into the house of commons on thursday and they had to close the chamber. even before that you had the government bailing again at the end of the week, being forced to get as many full vote through, the commons having to take control. yvette cooper forcing through, the commons having to take control. yvette cooperforcing her own bill through that force of the government to go and ask for a delay. that bill should become law, we think, on monday. and the prime minister, of course, has risen to the european council asking for this delay untiljune which is odd because we are all pretty certain that the european council are going to give us the delay she is asking for. because there are so many
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unusual things happening, it's really ha rd to just unusual things happening, it's really hard to just pick through what is the most important, isn't it? what do you think is key to what we have seen this week? there are two things going on at the moment that i think are absolutely crucial. the government has been in talks with the labour party and those talks haven't broken up, but what we are hearing this morning implies they are not going brilliantly. keir starmer has said that the government is not actually offering anything. they are not offering to change the political declaration so we're not sure what we are negotiating. at the same time you have the european council coming up on wednesday. at that the prime minister has to convince the other heads of state and government that we need a longer delay. the sound around that is not encouraging either because we are hearing this morning that the french are saying we don't want a longer delay and up to this point they seem to have convinced the spanish and the belgians to take their side. it is farfrom a the belgians to take their side. it is far from a guaranteed thing that we are going to get this delay. the legal deadline for leaving us till next friday. and, of course, there
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are ongoing talks. there are more votes, more talks, it feels like the system isn't working. when not getting anywhere. no, absolutely full so we have to bear in mind this is mainly political than the constitutional system itself. the fa ct of constitutional system itself. the fact of the matter is you have a government without a majority and without that majority you will find there are not enough votes to get theresa may's many full vote over the line. it also as we saw last monday with the indicative votes there aren't enough votes to get the alternatives over the line. parliament is still not able to express parliament is still not able to ex press a parliament is still not able to express a preference for anything but having just enough votes to vote every alternative down. it is pretty impossible to predict these days, but how do we move on, how do we get somewhere, do you think are?” but how do we move on, how do we get somewhere, do you think are? i think what will find on wednesday is that the european council will say to theresa may, look, there's no point in giving you a deadline of the end ofjune in giving you a deadline of the end of june because we in giving you a deadline of the end ofjune because we don't want to have a summit every month where we discussed brexit. my guess is that they will give us a choice, which is
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either you get this done quickly, you get some deal over the line, in which case you can leave when you had originally said you wanted to with your first extension, which is on may 21, if you are still in the european union on may 22, you have to have european parliament elections on the 23rd. the only option we will give you will be to have a long delay, may be nine months, maybe 12 months, and hopefully that will give you time to sort yourself out, maybe have a referendum or a general election, come back, trigon, and we can a properly. the politics aside, what we have also seen, it is these unusual things that have happened. we have also seen in the house of lords this time wasting that has been going on. the so—called filibustering. can you explain a bit about that i might as important as well? filibustering is what happens when certain members of the house of lords tried to eat up time so that the house of lords doesn't have time to pass a measure. in general, there isa
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to pass a measure. in general, there is a pretty solid majority in the house of lords brexiteers are in a strong majority. in the —— even though they tried all sorts of tricks to stop this being debated and turned into law, even though they spent a boring day in the house of lords discussing the procedural amendments, what has happened as they have been seen off, so that come monday the house of lords will get this finished. but they had a very long session seeing of this series of procedural breaks that brexiteers and house of lords try to apply to the process. you have been working in this sector for a long, long time. politicians doing your head in? welcome i think... it is very complicated. it seems every day that a year's weather politics is compressed into 2a hours. to be fair to politicians they are under an enormous amount of strain themselves. this is very stressful. the post bags are full of often abusive but extremely shall see mail from both sides of the arguments and we have got to leave, why can't we
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stay in? all politicians are feeling the heat. i don't think we should suppose they have an easyjob because they haven't at the moment. thank you very much. lovely to speak to you. you know that thing where you have a meal and somebody already goes through the bill. i do that, not too divided but just to through the bill. i do that, not too divided butjust to check i haven't been overcharged top white by way of clarification, you know we were speaking about your trip to bulgaria, we have discovered that in fa ct bulgaria, we have discovered that in fact the total bill will be different, because you paid £1 for your glass of wine, not the bottle. that is bulgaria cancelled!m your glass of wine, not the bottle. that is bulgaria cancelled! it is still cheap, right? quite a messy
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picture across the uk, many of us drier than picture across the uk, many of us drierthan in picture across the uk, many of us drier than in the past week, and we're getting some great pictures in already. here is a picture from kings norton in birmingham, the son really starting to show its hand, just a bit misty on the horizon. i think the midlands will fare pretty well for the sunshine today. it is looking rather grey across south wales, but a few glimmers to the rear. the fog and low cloud could be short lived. claudia towards the east, a breeze coming in from the east, a breeze coming in from the east as well, always cooler. you are probably onto a winner in the belfast area, and aberystwyth you are further away from the north sea so not quite the same bracing effect of the north sea wind. looking on
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the face of it it is not all that clea n the face of it it is not all that clean cut, because we have cloud swirling around. gaps across the middle part of the uk at the moment, as we saw for the midlands, and some thicker cloud in the west. give it a few hours and i think what we will tend to see is western areas brightening, south—eastern areas with some thicker cloud, and a weak weather front bearing rain on and off through the day, particularly through central and southern scotland. dumfries and galloway could do quite well, and eventually the highlands and northern isles. northern ireland as promised, north—west of england and wales, south—west of england with sunshine. a chillierfeel south—west of england with sunshine. a chillier feel the closer you get to the east coast. for the grand national, it is looking very good in liverpool. i think an afternoon high of about 13 degrees, perhaps you
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could take about one degree of by the time we get to the time of the race itself. this evening, if you are heading out, quite cloudy with some more rain to come, and rain coming into the south of scotland as well. a bit more cloud with a night just gone, so a bit lower overnight. a touch of frost for some areas, with slightly clearer skies. sunday, cloud chasing, some areas will start off right and get claudia, others will go the other way. trying to describe it roughly, some breaks in the cloud across england and were, particularly further east is the day goes on, but then as we start to see some sunshine it could warm up very nicely, up to perhaps 15, 16, 17, enough to spark off some thunderstorms. the boat races tomorrow, and apparently the only thing that can stop that is thunder.
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asa thing that can stop that is thunder. as a forecast, we are watching that pretty closely. 0n as a forecast, we are watching that pretty closely. on monday, a bit of a north—south split. to the north, certainly the driest and brightest of the weather. further south, more cloud around and further outbreaks of rain. it will turn chillier as the days go by. quite a difficult job, certainly for us to describe to you. there are calls to better protect buyers of new build homes after one major developer, persimmon, announced an independent review into the quality of its properties. but advice group the homeowners alliance has told the bbc that issues with new homes aren't limited to just one developer. here's our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith. this was supposed to be justin's dream home.
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he'd saved up for a new build, thinking he wouldn't need to do work to it. we've moved out twice. every ceiling in the entire property has been removed. but the reality has been very different. we have had countless problems with the heating system. everything in here has been replaced. the top floor was totally stripped. it's just an endless list of problems. justin bought his house from one of the biggest developers, taylor wimpey, under the help to buy scheme. it is well below standard. ttrying to negotiate with the builders has been trauma from day one. installation issues, damp issues... a couple of doors up lynn lives in an identical home with her partner and three daughters. this is not isolated to this particular property or this estate, it has got to be national. the developer taylor wimpey say
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they sincerely apologise to justin and lynn and have taken action to put things right. more generally they say "we work hard to resolve any issues as soon as possible." i'm not talking about dodgy kitchen units. i'm talking about major structural failings. at the solicitors, timothy takes new calls nearly every day from people battling against a host of different developers right across the country. he thinks the problems with the new bills are down to lack of skills in the workforce. people are making mistakes potentially because they don't realise the significance of what they are doing due to a lack of training, a lack of experience, and a lack of supervision overall. developers are under pressure to build lots of homes and quickly. on top of that, every building company have spoken to in recent years have told me it's a nightmare trying to get hold of enough staff with the right level of skill. what newbuild homeowners
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are now living with is the consequences of that. taylor wimpey say last year they increase the number of workers they hire directly by nearly 30% stop the government say they are trying to tackle the issue by creating a new homes ombudsman and spending more on new construction training hubs. there are now calls for a new law to let owners hang on to some of their final payments for a couple of years. there is no incentive for a builder to build right and move on. so that's why we're calling for a snagging retention so people can hold back the money so they put their money where their mouth is and the builder will get things done properly. that's too late forjustin and lynn. they have some advice for anyone else facing similar problems. it does get you down, doesn't it, but you have got to keep going on and use each other to badger off. if you didn't you would cry. colletta smith, bbc news, in norwich.
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imagine the frustration, that is the least of it, having spent all that money. let's have a look at the papers, we begin with the guardian, talking about brexit. they are reporting complaints that the government is not offering anything more than the previous offers. "brexit betrayal" says the telegraph, it says this is the week pm risked everything and achieve nothing. another picture there from aintree. the daily mail claims cannabis users are being let off because police officers don't wa nt to off because police officers don't want to harm their life chances. the sun leads with a big cat on the
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loose in cornwall. the paper says five pet cats are dead and a deer is missing, amid sightings of a black panther. and they have some pictures inside, as well. those pictures are fascinating. did you say... often it turns out not to be a panther, we we re turns out not to be a panther, we were saying, there have been some people who are vehement that there are panthers people who are vehement that there are pa nthers out people who are vehement that there are panthers out there and we should... if you think you have a picture that proves it, bring them our way because we would like to see them this morning. this is a really cute picture. have a look at this, some penguin chicks, and it is brilliant because they have compared it to the scene of course from disney's mary poppins film, and these are in the same position having a little dance, by the looks of things.
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if you struggle with passwords, when you think about the list of things you think about the list of things you need passwords for now, so many, so is ita you need passwords for now, so many, so is it a surprise that on average we forget our passwords 36 times a year, more than once a fortnight, andi year, more than once a fortnight, and i guess, you know, are you good with passwords? know, terrible. and i end with passwords? know, terrible. and iend up with passwords? know, terrible. and i end up writing them down, which you shouldn't do. next to the device? 0n the back of it? you shouldn't do. next to the device? on the back of it? not like my pin number on my card, i'm not that daft. then you go around the house because you think of one that you think is really clever, and then you think is really clever, and then you can't remember it because it is too clever to remember! not easy. a huge exhibition of rarely seen guitars from the biggest stars of rock ‘n' roll is opening in new york next week. instruments from the likes of bob dylan, elvis presley and the beatles will be on show at the city's metropolitan museum of art. 0ur north america reporer
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nada tawfik has had a sneak peak. the quiet galleries of the met are filled with precious masterpieces from the world's greatest sculptors and painters. but the volume has been turned up to showcase a very different artistic movement — rock tn! different artistic movement — rock ‘n' roll. the exhibition ‘play it loud' let's people get up close to the instruments of legend, from bob dyla n to the instruments of legend, from bob dylan to others. this exhibition is dedicated to the stars of rock ‘n' roll, some of them belonging to the greats themselves. jimmy page from british rock band led zeppelin let several of his prized possessions, like this double necked guitar and
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stage outfit, used in a performance of the hip stairway to heaven. he said when the matter approached him with the idea he loved it. it was said that you come to the gallery and the first thing you see is chuck berry's guitar. i said, the blonde guitar? and i said what exactly would you like? i really wanted to help the thing along as best i could. electric guitar is synonymous with rock ‘n' roll. this one was used by chuck berry to record johnny b goode, and each so—called guitar quy b goode, and each so—called guitar guy had their own style. this piece is called frankenstein, and it was built and decorated by eddie van halen, one of the great 70s and 80s guitarist. these are cigarette burns, and these decorations, spray paintand tape burns, and these decorations, spray paint and tape and cutting it away,
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creating a visual motif that was highly copied, certainly in the 80s when i was growing up. some of the items you have a from the beatles, right? yes, i think one of the most iconic things in the show is this beautiful black oyster pole drum set that was used by ringo starr. in fa ct, that was used by ringo starr. in fact, this was the first american ludwick drum said that he owned after people saw him play everybody wa nted after people saw him play everybody wanted one that looked exactly the same with that exact declaration. each one of these rock relics tells a story, as does the exhibition itself. a movement built on rebellion is now being revered at the heart of the artistic establishment. coming up in the next 15 minutes, mike blaise korfball, a sport where men and women playing on the same team, and mike learns the rules the ha rd team, and mike learns the rules the hard way, as he often does! ——
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plays. thank you very much. lovely to speak to you. hello. this is breakfast with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. it's unclear whether the government and labour will hold further talks on brexit over the weekend, after three days of discussions ended without agreement yesterday. meetings have been taking place to try and find a proposal to put to another commons vote, before an emergency eu summit next week. labour says the government hasn't proposed any changes to theresa may's brexit deal. downing street insists it is ready
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to hold further discussions. millions of workers will have to put more into their workplace pension from today. the minimum contribution is going up from 3% to 5%. that will mean less take—home pay. there's concern the changes will make it harderfor women, who are more likely to work part—time and earn less. the aircraft manufacturer boeing says it's temporarily cutting production of its 737 airliner, following two crashes. production will decrease from 52 to 42 planes a month, while the firm works on changes to its max model which was involved in crashes in ethiopia and indonesia. a soldier who walked towards a bomb left on an underground train is being awarded the queen's commendation for bravery. lieutenant colonel craig palmer was travelling to work when the device partially exploded a few carriages away at parsons green station.
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a fireball swept through the tube train injuring more than 50 people. colonel palmer took photographs of the smouldering bomb before contacting the police. sir mickjagger says he is on the mend after having a heart operation in the united states. in a tweet, the singer said he was feeling much better and thanked hospital staff for doing a superb job. the stones postponed their tour of the us and canada, after their frontman pulled out on doctors orders. the cheapest european resort for uk holiday makers has been revealed. analysis of 20 destinations was carried out by the post office. bulgaria's sunny beach came out on top, where you can get a glass of wine for £1.17, and a two course lunch for two for £8.42. sorrento in italy was the most expensive, where lunch costs more than £35.
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that is quite a big difference. that is quite a big differencem isa that is quite a big differencem is a big difference. i dare say a few pounds will be spent at the grand national today. few pounds will be spent at the grand nationaltoday. on the liquid stuff and food as well and also betting on the grand national. we will talk about the horses and the runners and riders. it could be a big day for 22. arctic role is a delight you can have a putting... swiss role. jan roly poly. liverpool were on a roll last night. liverpool came through a really tough test, of their title winning credentials, recovering from conceding an early goal, at southampton, to return to the top of the table, and keep the pressure on manchester city. david 0rnstein reports.
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the smile of a man who is getting ever closer to returning liverpool to where they believe they belong. jurgen klopp's men didn't make life easy for themselves, allowing shane long to give southampton a deserved lead in their battle against relegation. the manager a picture of frustration. those soon his moon would be lifted by the rise of naby keita, the midfielder‘s first goal for the club standing despite a possible offside in the build—up. liverpool level. after the break they went for broke. naby keita to the fore once more, falling, was this a foul? the referee said no. however, liverpool would come again. and now there was no stopping them. 0f mohamed salah's many contributions, perhaps the most important so far — the result was rubberstamped byjordan henderson. liverpool back to the top.
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a first league title in 29 years moving into sight. david 0rnstein, bbc news. it's fa cup semifinal weekend. tomorrow, watford will face wolves, while later today, manchester city, will be hoping, to continue their march, to the quadruple, when they face brighton at wembley. and for city manager, pep guardiola, reaching the final, would be a special moment. i think when i was young, in catalonia, so it was quite usual to see the final of the fa cup rather than the premier league games. so in the tradition, wembley, both managers going there plumb in front of the players, to hold this trophy. i have never been there and i cannot deny how nice it would be personally. but i think for the players as well and for the club. it is live on bbc one at 5:30 p.m.. england's women were beaten 1—1 by
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canada. phil neville's team, were undone by one of the game's evergreen stars. 35—year—old christine sinclair of canada scoring a remarkable 180th international goal. she made her debut as a 16—year—old, back in the year 2000. that proved to be the winner. scotland drew 1—1 in a friendly with chile. scotland took the lead through erin cuthbert. but chile equalised thanks to a penalty. scotland play brazil next on monday. as we were talking about earlier... at 5:15 this afternoon, the eyes of the sporting world will be on aintree, as the grand national gets under way. if you're having a flutter, there is one horse, that stands out in the a0 runners — one that could make history. the hot favourite tiger roll would become the first horse, to win back to back, nationals since red rum in the 19705. andy swiss reports. he is the horse with history in his sights. this is tiger roll, last year's grand national winner now chasing a place in the record books. there is red rum...
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not since the great red rum in 1974 has a horse on back—to—back nationals. but after a scintillating season, tiger roll is once again at the one to beat. he could be going to the grand national with a bit of preparation. there are a lot of fences to jump. they have been racing over these famous fences for some 180 years now. in that time only four horses have ever won consecutive grand national. but such is the confidence in tiger roll he could start as one of the hottest favourites that aintree has ever seen. the hottest ever was back in 1935, golden miller. although as so often with a national, it didn't count for much. golden miller is down. he tries to refuse, shoots his jockey out of the saddle. tiger roll could set off as the biggest favourite since than and should he win bookies face a staggering £200 million pay—out. as far as we're concerned it
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will be the worst resulting grand national history. the public adore him. so many reasons. he won it last year. he's looking to emulate red rum. he is a fantastic horse. he is the public horse. at the course where red rum became a legend, winning three nationals in total, can another horse put his name into racing history? andy swiss, bbc news, aintree. however barry geraghty took a follow will not be riding today. geraghty had been due to ride on one of the favourites — anibale fly. in the same race as well, fellow rider mark enright was also taken to hospital after falling from his horse in the same race. and two horses were fatally injured on the second day of the meeting. sale have narrowed the gap between them and saracens. —— harlequins.
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this opportunist try, from byron mcguigan, made the difference, for the home side as they moved to, five points behind harlequins. the scottish international ran over half the pitch, for sale's only try of the match, in a 28—17 win. glasgow, meanwhile, remain top of the pro 14. they beat ulster by 30 points to seven. tommy seymour scoring, one of four tries for the warriors, against his former side. next to an incredible comeback from castlefield. they beat duigan. castleford had trailed by 16 points at halftime, but they fought back brilliantly, in front of their home fans, and keep up, the pressure on the top two, while wigan remain in the bottom four. —— wigan. elsewhere, there were wins for wakefield, and warrington, are top on points difference. charley hull remains in contention. she shot a second round of 69, to finish on 3—under par. but five strokes ahead is the leader, in—kyung kim of korea — she's 8—under par.
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next to the most confident penalty you will ever see taken in hockey. this is the culmination of a penalty shoot out, and the south korean captain lee nam—young dribbles the ball up before wow, lifting the ball up on his stick then flicking it up and in over the head of the indian goalkeeper as south korea clinched the title for the third time. it's the mixed gender sport, that's played in 70 countries i was think being a goalkeeper is a tha nkless i was think being a goalkeeper is a thankless task. you take a beating. you have a lot of kids in there. they can noise slip through the guards and he where it has —— kicks. it's the mixed gender sport, that's played in 70 countries around the world. korfball is commonly described as a mixture of netball and basketball and is all about inclusion. with the season reaching its climax i've been to see how it works and how it all started. music plays.
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imagine it's the netherlands in 1902 and this is schoolmaster, nico broekhuysen, on his way to class and suddenly has the idea of a sport that would allow men and women to play on the same team. the notion of women playing with men because worldwide controversy. korfball was branded an outrage, immoral, a monster. the professor wasn't going to be stopped. it was an olympic demonstration sport 20 years later. the teams of 2019 have a lot to be thankful for. korfball is still unique. a spot that can only be played with four men and four women on the same team. as i found out early on, the rules were devised to make it easier for both men and women. what's that? penalty. boys can only defend boys and girls can only defend girls. you can see adam's rather large compared to our girls. you can't have one player clearly dominating the entire game. that makes sense. if i were to try to mark them i would be taken out. each gender can bring different things to the sport. so women tend to be a bit
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quicker and nippier. it is most instinctive to try to block whoever it is. the game is so fast. sorry! that was obviously a foul. i always say that the girls win korfball matches rather than the boys. they are more skilful shooters. exactly. it is a bit like basketball, a bit like netball, you can't run with the ball, but you pass and move and the key thing is, look, the size of the basket. it's huge. much higher than a basketball or netball. after two goals the opposition team become the attackers. attacking for the blues. have to defend the shot. not again. i discovered another way to negate any advantage to size and strength in this noncontact sport. you can't even shoot when someone is within arm's reach of you. it is about creating that space.
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obviously i am quite small and i can come against some giants in the matches we play. but it is all about getting them off—balance and running and shooting at about creating the distance between you. with the emphasis on equality and teamwork it is not surprising that the basingstoke team includes five married couples like sarah and rich, who met here. does it help on court telepathy that you know? absolutely not. he doesn't listen. eventually i did manage to create enough space for a clear shot at that really high basket. handy. this meant the game ended level and, so, penalties. too much pressure. it is a draw. the pros of taking the last penalty. we have got a lot to thank them for —— the pressure.
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we have got a lot to thank them for -- the pressure. did we see you do a 1—handed... -- the pressure. did we see you do a 1-handed... yes. -- the pressure. did we see you do a 1-handed. .. yes. i could -- the pressure. did we see you do a 1-handed... yes. i could not score to save my life until i held a gopro camera in one hand. that was the secret. that is why i turned it around, i could not believe it myself. it is difficult because the basket is 3—.5 metres up. myself. it is difficult because the basket is 3-.5 metres up. what happened to the beard? i'd like to thank basingstoke for providing the classroom. let's have a look at the weather for the weekend. this weekend, something a bit drier after the week just this weekend, something a bit drier after the weekjust gone, which saw low pressure bringing up some lively showers. however, this week the headache will be cloud. as a rule of thumb for this weekend, generally in
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the east there will be thicker cloud, grey skies, and quite murky prospects, and it will be chillier. temperatures struggling at about eight or nine degrees. further west, sheltered from the easterly breeze, we should see more sunshine and warmth, and some spots up to 15 or 16 degrees. but of course, it is the weather and it is never that straightforward. not a clear east—west divide at the moment, but when we look at our satellite picture this band of cloudy swelling across us, some clear spells and clear skies to the north. what you start the day with today may not be what you end up with. for wales and the south—west of england the prospect of brightening up significantly. through the course of today we will also get some thicker cloud pushing into eastern coastal counties of england. this is the way saturday shapes up. for much of scotland, grey with outbreaks of rain. the highlands and the northern
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islands with some decent sunshine. northern ireland cloudy additionally. along with that weston swathe of england. always more cloud and always chillier along the east coast. looking for entry this afternoon, our top temperature, perhaps a shade also down, by the time we get to the race itself. a lovely afternoon to be had for the grand national. if you are heading out to spend your winnings, some rain still in the forecast across scotland. cloudy elsewhere, so i'm milder night than thatjust gone. eve ntual lows milder night than thatjust gone. eventual lows around five or six degrees. starting with a more widespread covering of cloud today, and scotland will struggle with more persistent cloud but should see a little less in the way of rain. not looking too bad come tomorrow afternoon for wales and northern
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ireland, but as the day pans out we could see some heavy, thundery showers developing across eastern england if things brighten. top temperatures up to 17 degrees perhaps, but thunderstorms could complicate the boat race because a p pa re ntly complicate the boat race because apparently lightning is the only thing that can stop to the water. watch this space. let's hope it stays good. we'll be back with the headlines at 8:00. time now for newswatch. hello and welcome to newswatch. coming up on this edition: not everyone is bored by brexit. meet the television channel that has been enjoying record audiences for politics. should last week's question time have included a question from the audience, asking if it is morally right for a five—year—old to be taught about lgbt issues in school? the costs of the last few months of political turmoil in the uk
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are debated, but there has been at least one winner. a television channel which many viewers had previously been unaware. 0rder. bbc parliament has made an international star of speaker john bercow because the live coverage of brexit. the channel attracted a record 3.5 million viewers in january, as well as its five biggest daily audiences of the past decade. bbc parliament broadcast live all the proceedings of the house of commons, as well as providing the house of lords, committee hearings, the scottish parliament, and the welsh and northern irish assemblies. it also makes programmes of its own. mike darcey and ruth fox from the hansard society have been providing expert commentary on some of the big debates. an addition much appreciated by viewers like michael mcdonald. television cameras didn't arrive
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in the house of commons until 1989. it took a lot of lobbying by the bbc and other broadcasters before they were allowed. some mps said the lights and the microphones would cause political debate and trivialise the workings of parliament. one of those who voted against the cameras, the late ian gow, ended up delivering the first—ever speech to be televised. tongue firmly in cheek, he related advice offered to him and other mps by a pr expert. the impression you make on television depends mainly on your image, 55%, with your voice and body language accounting for 38% of your impact. only 7% depends on what you are actually saying. laughter. that suspicion of the cameras encouraging style over substance persists today.
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since bbc parliament started broadcasting in 1998 it has established itself as a fixture of the landscape. last summer the bbc said the channel would no longer show bespoke programmes and would be on our only when parliament was sitting. in october, that decision was reversed after protests politicians, including, guess who — one of its stars, speakerjohn bercow. 0rder! peter nelson has come in just two peter knowles. peter nelson has come in to our studio. what is your explanation for these bumper audiences that your channel has been enjoying? the audience knows there is a lot at stake. they can see it unfolding in front of their eyes. there is an excitement that we don't know, they don't know what's going to happen next. and that makes it really compelling viewing. so you have drama, you have a certain amount of intrigue going on... jeopardy. certainly plenty of that.
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how do you deal with the fact that you are explaining world for a lot of the audience, particularly new viewers, is quite an alien one, and arcane on. we don't intervene in a big way. on screen we have useful captions to guide you as to what is happening. what we have done through this, because we recognise it as a complex and difficult, is that in the divisions on the really big votes, on the big debates, our correspondent mark darcy from today in parliament, and ruth fox from the hansard society, they come in and give commentary when the mps aren't speaking as to what's going on and a guide as to what to look for. one of the frustrations we get regularly from viewers of newswatch as they say some of the big events, prime minister's questions is a big one from you are have bbc parliament doing it, the news channel doing it simultaneously, bbc two because it is on politics lie.
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because it is on politics live. it is kind of crazy. talk about observing an audience. let us just turn it around and think, if we accept the idea that it is worth having a parliamentary channel, and i think most people would get it, what with the alternative beer? the alternative be? would it be saying to the news channel that it can't weave the parliamentary story into its telling of the wider political story? that would not make sense. to be telling bbc one or bbc two they can't touch parliament, they have to back off another cover parliament? if you turn it round like that you can see why we end up sometimes with, briefly, with the same pictures being seen in several places. but i do understand the audience wondering what is going on. what about the question of restrictions? they clearly are limits to what you are allowed to show. because you only have the pictures that are supplied. some of it has changed over time. how has it changed and what are the continuing frustrations? it changed a lot. there is a much more flexible understanding of the rules. very importantly, we can see mps or peers listening and taking part in debates without necessarily
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being on their feet and speaking. so it is a much more natural way of seeing, it is more like the experience of being in the chamber and watching it unfold. the other thing that has made an incredible difference is we have got cameras either side of the speaker that looked down the barrel of the chamber, so they come up to you. you have a close—up view of the frontbenchers. it has really dramatically changed. if you like you are there. on monday evening we had this protest that briefly disrupted proceedings, the seminaked climate change campaigners who appeared in the press gallery. mps were reacting to that, making some weak jokes, perhaps, but it was clearly part of the event that night. yet the viewers bbc parliament would not have seen it. that does rather feel like it is cheating the audience. 0ther parliaments take
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a different view of it. it restrict the pictures we can see and doesn't allow pictures of the visitors' gallery. as a journalist does that make you uncomfortable? i'd love to be able to see the whole of the chamber. i also get way that rule might be there to discourage protests. if the protest happened anywhere else, as a journalist, used to work on the news channel, you would want to report that. it is on social media, in the papers. it is still my instinct. therefore, in the reported coverage later, we have a programme the day in parliament, we have the image taken by an mp of the protest that that mp tweeted out. we still have a journalistic instincts. it seemed legitimate to use that because it had been put in the public domain by an mp. without any flak from the health authorities. they are very sensible. we ask you about the question ian gow asked all those years ago, when he talked about the pr
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that was being given to mps to encourage them to look and sound of their best. do you ever worry a bit that there is an element of grandstanding, may be an element that has crept in as a result of televising, that the cameras have attracted that kind of behaviour or encouraged it? i don't think there is, that people are playing up to the cameras. these are very long days, exhaustingly long days. it is beyond anybody‘s capacity to preen themselves and play to the cameras for such a long stretch of time. it is just part of, the cameras are part of their lives. peter knowles, thank you very much. thank you. inside and outside parliament emotions have been running high. insults are hurled and the rhetoric becomes ever more emotive. after the prime minister announced she would meetjeremy corbyn in an attempt to resolve the deadlock several furious conservative mps
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denounced the leader, called him a marxist. we have had a whole series of tory mps getting up amazed that mrs may is prepared to do a deal with a marxist, rather than with her own party. some viewers objected to that term being given currency, as they saw, by the bbc. one had this to say. jack was among those who counted the complaints about the coverage. last thursday's edition of question time picked up on the protests against lessons in diversity and equality which are being taught at some birmingham primary schools,
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it includes same—sex relationships and the rights of lgbt people. is it morally right that five—year—old children learn about lgbt issues in school? oh, i can hear all sorts of sounds coming from the audience... there was an angry response from some members of the wider tv audience to the inclusion in the programme of the question which was then posted on twitter by the question time team. one of those expressing views in a forthright way was ben thompson. 0thers agreed.
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well, the bbc issued the following explanation. we had a general reminder of the use of social media in news which found its way into the public domain. it advised...
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thank you for all your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions on bbc news and current affairs or appear on the programme then please e—mail newswatch. or you can find us on twitter. you can call us. and do have a look at our website. that is all from us. i will be back to hear your thoughts on bbc news coverage at the same time again next week. goodbye.
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