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tv   The Papers  BBC News  April 6, 2019 10:30pm-11:00pm BST

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the papers are looking interesting this is bbc news. showers during sunday. tonight. with me to discuss the there will be some sunshine developing as well. it may well be quite a cloudy start papers is ruth lea, economic adviser i'm chris rogers. the headlines at 11:00: to the second half of the weekend, at arbuthnot banking group, and and we've still got some drizzle broadcast and regular face on around in scotland. at arbuthnot banking group, and broadcast and regularface on here, theresa may releases a statement probably not quite as wet on sunday lynn faulds wood. saying the longer it takes to find a as it was on saturday. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in. brightening up elsewhere with a bit let's take a look. of sunshine coming through, the brexit deadlock leads deal parliament can agree on, the but we've got these showers coming many of the papers, with the observer reporting that greater the risk of the uk leaving in across the eastern some conservative mps side of the england. are threatening to oust they'll push their way the prime minister if the uk has the uu at all. an alleged sexual towards the midlands, and those could potentially be a little heavy and to fight next month's european elections. even thundery, too. meanwhile, the telegraph says more assault by six male soldiers — an a bit more warmth for most of england and wales. than 100 current and would—be temperatures could be as high as 15 to 17. conservative councillors have still quite chilly though written to theresa may, for north—east england saying they are struggling to get and a good part of scotland, where it is drier as we volunteers to help effectively fight investigation is ordered. thousands protest in sudan. they are calling head into the evening. the upcoming local for military support to overthrow still a fair bit of elections, claiming belief cloud around overnight. the president of 3a years. human we've got this line of showers in the party has gone. pushing across southern england towards wales, the sunday times reports on leaked not far away from northern ireland. emails revealing what they say is the labour party's failure to act rights protest at the dorchester temperatures will drop quite a bit on allegations of anti—semitism. hotel, owned by brunei, where gay in scotland as the cloud begins a picture of tiger roll, the first horse to win back—to—back sex is punishable to break up later in the night, so grand nationals since red rum, quite a cold start here. leads the front of the independent. as we move into the beginning of the week, we've got this zone of showers. that's going to drift its way the duchess of sussex's northwards, further across wales pregnancy makes the front
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of the mail on sunday, towards the midlands with the paper saying and east anglia, and rain develops the first—time mum has more widely and there could be some heavy bursts of rain and thunderstorms in the afternoon. appointment her own medical team, northern half of the uk, led by a female doctor, much drier, some sunshine, a bit cooler and greyer around some for the delivery of her child, eastern coasts of north—east england rather than using the royal and eastern scotland. household's medical professionals. we've got a band of rain, showers, whatever you want to call it. and finally, the sunday express it's moving its way northwards with that weather front there. reports that prince william has been high pressure to the north of the uk, low pressure to the south, working with the uk's security hence that easterly airflow. this band of rain is moving slowly northwards. and intelligence agency services. how far north it gets, still some uncertainty, but heading towards northern that includes securing legally england, not far away from northern ireland, binding changes to address mps and behind that, as it brightens up, concerned with it. we will discuss those temperatures lift. those stories in detail shortly, but some showers, and there could be heavy, thundery downpours as well. first let me bring you a statement most of the rain in just released by downing street on the southern half of the uk. the prime minister, theresa may. it further north, it's a bit chillier. this is cold air from scandinavia, mind you, and that will push its way is about her latest views about down into the uk, and we'll continue where the brexit deadlock is going. to see those temperatures dropping away. many northern areas should be dry. a bit of sunshine coming through. the prime minister says, delivering we are still left with a zone brexit has been my priority and remains so today. i want the uk to where we could see some patchy rain for northern england, the north midlands, and a few showers to leave the eu in an orderly way as the south of that as well.
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soon as possible, and that means but those temperatures are dropping away. maybe 12 degrees, southern parts leaping ina soon as possible, and that means leaping in a way that does not of england, if you are lucky. six to eight though for much disrupt peoples lives. is a language of scotland and northern england. carries on, my preference was to do really quite chilly that winning a majority in for this time of year. not an awful lot really parliament for an agreement the uk changes on thursday. still quite a lot of cloud around reached with the eu in november. i them are still the potential for the southern half of the uk did everything in my power to to catch a few showers, and those temperatures still below persuade conservative and dup mps who form a government majority to par for this time of the year, thanks to that easterly breeze dragging in the colder air. back that deal, including securing as we look further ahead, legally binding changes to address we've got a battle between mps concerns with it, but that deal high—pressure in scandinavia, bringing the easterly breeze, and atlantic winds was rejected three times, she coming in from the west. writes, by parliament, and there is no sign it can be passed in the near notice i haven't put any days on their because the changeover future, so i had to take a new from the easterly to more approach. because parliament has of a south—westerly is a bit uncertain. made clear it. the uk leaving it may well be into next weekend. without a dail, we now have a stark it could be even further ahead than that. but we are likely to see a change choice, leave the eu with a deal or to atlantic weather conditions. do not leave at all. my answer to that means stronger winds. it will be milder, particularly at night, but there will be some showers or even some longer thatis do not leave at all. my answer to that is clear, we must deliver brexit and to do so we must agree a spells of rain. deal. if we cannot secure a majority
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among conservative and dup mps, we have no choice but to reach out across the house of commons. well, the prime minister goes on to write that the referendum was not fought along party lines and people i speak to on the doorstep tell me they expect their politicians to work together with the national interest demands it. the fact is that, on brexit, there are areas where the two main parties agree, we both want to end free movement, we both want to end free movement, we both want to leave with a good deal and we both want to protectjobs. that is the basis for a compromise that can wina the basis for a compromise that can win a majority in parliament, and winning that majority is the only way to deliver brexit. the statement goes on, the longer this takes, the greater the risk of the uk never leaving at all. it would mean letting the british people —— letting the british people —— letting the british people —— letting the brexit the british people voted for slip through our fingers, and i will not stand for that. it is essential we deliver
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what people voted for, and to do that we need to get a deal over the line. to do this, i will go to brussels this week to seek a short extension to article 50 stop my intention is to reach agreement with my fellow eu leaders which will mean, if we can agree a deal at home, we can leave the eu in six weeks. finally, she writes, we can then get on with building a new relationship with our nearest neighbours to unlock the full potential of brexit and deliver the brighter people the british people voted for. a long and unusual statement from the prime minister this saturday evening. what do you make of that? a lot of it is reflected in the papers, what she said, not much new, but the tone is different. she needs media training, because that statement is too long. it's difficult to explain brexit quickly. no, but now we don't need to do the paper review because
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she said it all! i had media training and, basically, this is numberten's training and, basically, this is number ten's entrapment policy, vote for my deal or no brexit, and the key sentence is, whatever it —— the longer it takes to get a deal through, the greater the risk it will never leave at all. it says it may not happen at all for the this is the entrapment policy, deal or no brexit... is the entrapment policy, deal or no brexit. .. she is stuck between a rock and a hard place. its entrapment, because there are options like no deal, but she has ruled it out... she has to! they speak at once. is it's been six months of entrapment policy. so there is no doubt about it, this is saying deal or no brexit. the second thing is
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she isjustifying talking or no brexit. the second thing is she is justifying talking to corbin, and she says this is because she can't get the deal by herself. because she can't get the dup and certain erg members to vote for the deal, that is why she is trying to reach across to jeremy corbyn. deal, that is why she is trying to reach across to jeremy corbynlj wa nt to reach across to jeremy corbynlj want to let lynn speak. honourable lady customer, we've had for three yea rs lady customer, we've had for three years is a shambles and she sees no way out this shambles because the erg and dup will not vote for this blessing deal. we all think it's not a great deal, but it seems the only way out of a country split into, party is split into, cabinet split in more than two bits, and she is saying, and think it's not entrapment, but... this has been their policy for six months, lynn. lets focus on the papers. do you
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think that removing theresa may altogether, sooner rather than later, particularly if we have to fight in the european elections in may, is perhaps the way forward? this is what the observer has its front page on, saying are moves towards removing her. they tried it before, with two votes of no confidence... one vote on her leadership. but she ended up being secure for a year because they handled it in a not very clever way, it's regarded, so they can't get rid of her and the only way she can go is to make life so intolerable she resigns, but she's got the most extraordinary ability to put up with anything you throw at her. she is very tenacious. yes! i think the only thing that could move her is if there was a massive cabinet revolt. apparently most of the cabinet were
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very upset about last week's cabinet meeting where she went on to make a statement about talking to jeremy corbyn, but whether they will have this revolt and oust her is the $100 question, and time is running out. remember how barnier was going on about the clock ticking? we are talking about the 23rd of may for the european parliament, six weeks away, and if the parties are going to start putting up candidates, they have to get a move on. and half the cabinet would like a job as well. come up her job. cabinet would like a job as well. come up herjob. and they are out for themselves. are they acting in the national interest?” for themselves. are they acting in the national interest? i think the deal was shocking and i would leave or no deal. but you can't! it's a serious point for the we didn't vote for a no deal crash out of europe. it's not crashing out. george
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osborne today... he is one of the architects why we are sitting here with brexit, but he is claiming it is costing £500, £500 million a week, brexit, so far. these are fa nta sy week, brexit, so far. these are fantasy figures, i am a economist. but economists don't agree. we would leave on wto rules. i am feeling more likejeremy leave on wto rules. i am feeling more like jeremy kyle leave on wto rules. i am feeling more likejeremy kyle tonight! shall we move on to the sunday telegraph? at dinner tables and pubs across the table everybody trying to make sense of the way forward, it also at downing street, and the sunday telegraph is saying that a lot of conservative activists are going on strike. and their sponsors, they are not coughing up to fill the coffers if they have to be elections in
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europe, and! if they have to be elections in europe, and i was thinking of being an mp, i announced i'd stand ten yea rs an mp, i announced i'd stand ten years ago. . . an mp, i announced i'd stand ten years ago... independent? well, several different parties contacted me to ask if i would run for them, because i used to be but well known. honourable lady nigel farage's new party? not that one! he didn't exist then, life was lovely. think of these poor meps who have been stood there and were developing otherjobs and lives, and the people who work for them, their staff, they are gone as well, and suddenly they are told, hang on, don't go because we might be locked into another election. hang on, don't go because we might be locked into another electionm the sunday telegraph, one wouldn't be surprised, if there is a snap election or certainly the next general election might see a rise in independents. you will see a rise in all the parties apart from labour and conservatives, because they are generally regarded to have made a
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pretty big mess of all of this. newport election was interesting, because the labour vote fell away and the conservative vote fell away less than the labour vote, and it was a labour seat. turnout was down. ukip didn't pick up that well, but i think that's because they are now a damaged brand. the other part of the sunday telegraph headline is, as may woos corbyn and i'm not quite sure about that, i think she is trying to, but the way they are talking today, it was confusing if there had been any talking. they had been talking and wooing for three days, and what various people including diane abbott were saying this morning is that nothing really has moved, and yet you've got lip and went doing something or other —— philip hammond claiming there are no red lines from the government, and that things are going quite well.
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who knows? i think the fact that there was a reach out to corbyn it didn't go down well in the shires, and didn't go down well in the shires, and she didn't go down well in the shires, and she was talking about a softer brexit involving a customs union, which is against the manifesto, because their manifesto said they would leave the customs union, and theresa may is talking about it again. they have been suggestions in the last few weeks that perhaps it would have been better if there was a coalition cabinet delivering brexit from the start. we might be somewhere! apparently, she is trying to calm nerves by agreeing an end to free movement, and labour appears to have agreed to that as well for the in the sunday times, more interesting revelations in their may bids to save deal with a boris proof brexit. what is that? i don't know
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how this can happen,... black to what is it? how this can happen,... black to what is it? i do the first line and you can do the rest. i'll be the backing group. a boris lock is designed to stop, when may goes in the not—too—distant future, because she deftly said she is going, the next person that comes in as prime minister may scrap all of that, so any agreement she's got with labour could be scrapped, and even though she thinks she is locking it in now, the idea of a boris lock is to get the idea of a boris lock is to get the law changed before she leaves so that the next prime minister can't change it. but it will not be binding, sol change it. but it will not be binding, so i think is an impossibility, yet another story of the whole horror. then, growth there is the whole horror. then, growth there isa dangera the whole horror. then, growth there is a danger a new prime minister comes in and wants a different kind of brexit. new government, general
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election. they might say, remember that new deal? i'm bringing it back. of the independent has done a poll, and we've not had one of those a while, but it's safe exit poll. this isa while, but it's safe exit poll. this is a bit polling company, and it's looked at three things. one is, well, the one that won was remain or may's deal, that got 32% of the people polled to think that was the best answer, so if you have a referendum or you had some kind of vote for the people to take, then remain or take may's deal turned out the top ten at 32% that they'd look at. the others were no deal and may's deal, 27%, and no deal and remain. in other words, remain has
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less than a third. all it does is pointed to the fact that, if there we re pointed to the fact that, if there were another referendum, defining the question would be... what is the question? the question is, do you wa nt to question? the question is, do you want to remain or do you want may's deal it is less than a third and it points out how impossible it would be to get a worded question. also somewhere there is mark francois and sirjohn redwood saying that polls show most people want to leave, and yougov came out somewhere saying, actually, that isn't what the polls are saying. there is a lot of information out there. some polls say one thing there is usually a high proportion saying they want no
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deal yougov was saying not the majority. let's imagine for one second that the whole population of the uk read hundreds of pages of theresa may's deal, get a complete grasp of it and understand it, more than ourmps grasp of it and understand it, more than our mps seem to have done, what is there to suggest that will not polarise britain in the same way its polarised parliament, that people can't decide or agree because there isn't enough in there for everyone? the problem is you started with something that was split almost right down the middle, even though it was a massive poll. that is how democracy works. yes, but anyone who designs a referendum or a poll which normally built in there that you have to have clear blue water between the sides, and that was never built into it, and from that follows everything else. the tragedy is, follows everything else. the tragedy is, in follows everything else. the tragedy is, in the negotiations, when they negotiated the deal, they considered
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far too much the eu, negotiated the deal, they considered fartoo much the eu, and it negotiated the deal, they considered far too much the eu, and it was unnecessary for them to do that, and under those circumstances, when i first looked at the withdrawal agreement, i thought it was an a cce pta ble agreement, i thought it was an acceptable flip and we are where we are. another story in the sunday times that could be a distraction forjeremy corbyn, the anti—semitism row. it's not leaving him alone, mainly thanks to the sunday times. leaked e—mail reveals the party's shocking failure to act over anti—semitism in the party. shocking failure to act over anti-semitism in the party. they've had over 100 complaints that they've either shelled or done nothing with. i can't read you out some of it, because some of the things that have been said about, for example, there isa been said about, for example, there is a chap called thomas gardner, a corbyn ally and a powerful chief of labour's governance and legal unit, he is frustrated efforts to fast an
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investigation into a member who condemned two jewish mps investigation into a member who condemned twojewish mps for being, ami condemned twojewish mps for being, am i allowed to say... black coat well, no, but you said it for the —— well, no, but you said it for the —— well, no, but you said it for the —— well, no, but you said it anyway! apparently no action has been taken against members accused of anti—semitism, and this is par for the course when you think about what happened to luciana berger, a former labourmp, was in happened to luciana berger, a former labour mp, was in a liverpool seat and she is now part of the independent group. orjoan ryan, who was one... independent group. orjoan ryan, who was one... orjoan ryan -- margaret hodge. in 2016, there was the chakrabarti hodge. in 2016, there was the chakra barti report talking hodge. in 2016, there was the chakrabarti report talking about anti—semitism, and it seemed a whitewash at the time, sol anti—semitism, and it seemed a whitewash at the time, so i am afraid it's par for the course. whitewash at the time, so i am afraid it's par for the coursem is meat and drink to some of the newspapers that labour have this
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trouble, and the conservatives have trouble, and the conservatives have trouble with islamophobia, but you wish to goodness that they'd sort this out, because now corbyn is going to be spending all week dealing with anti—semitism when he should be sorting out what the heck we do about brexit. we've just got time to have a quick look at prince william, sunday express, he's been spying for britain on her majesties secret service. for the last three weeks! it make a good james bond, and they are looking for a new one. i think it's inadvisable to draw a picture of him with a gun in his hands. they claim that for three weeks he's been shadowing members of mi5 weeks he's been shadowing members of m15 and weeks he's been shadowing members of mi5 and mi6 weeks he's been shadowing members of m15 and mi6 and staff at gchq, and he's even gone out with an operation and he's been shadowing counterterrorism teams. apparently what he's saying, although he didn't
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tell me personally, is that this is going to help him understand what's going to help him understand what's going on at the moment in the world. i have big reservations, because i think he's a major security risk. but he's pretty safe there! even so, i think he is security risk and i'm not happy with him getting involved with mi5 and mi6. mission to fight terror threats, please? no, with mi5 and mi6. mission to fight terrorthreats, please? no, no, no. i think his mission is to do something with his time. i'm not terribly happy. i am sure the inside of gchq was very safe of but he won't be in there all the time, and he goes outside, i think it is potentially problematic and quite worrying. and these men and women are working so hard, putting their own lives in danger, going through
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hours and hours of various material intelligence, isn't it great to have some interest from somebody like prince william that the guys are doing a good job? i see it is no different to him going to an army or a naval base. it would be a good idea if it wasn't on the front page of the express. idea if it wasn't on the front page of the express. i don't mind that, andi of the express. i don't mind that, and i am of the express. i don't mind that, andiama of the express. i don't mind that, and i am a bit of of the express. i don't mind that, andiama bit ofa of the express. i don't mind that, and i am a bit of a republican! thank you for taking us through the papers entertainingly and not to be at times. sorry about the behaviour of our guests! we will be back at 11:30pm for more papers as they come into the newsroom. dojoin us 11:30pm for more papers as they come into the newsroom. do join us for another look. you can see the front pages online, on the bbc news website, it is therefore you seven days a week. that's it. good night. hello there.
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it's been a day of mixed fortunes out there. some of us have kept the cloud and drizzly outbreaks of rain all day. elsewhere, there's been a bit of sunshine, particularly in the west. this was the picture earlier in the day in derbyshire, taken by one of our weather watchers. as we head through into sunday, another fairly cloudy picture. there will be a few showers on the cards tomorrow, particularly towards eastern parts of the uk. for the remainder of this evening and tonight, we've still got some clear spells, particularly for northern ireland down towards parts of wales. a few showers for the south—west of england. a lot of cloud for central and eastern england and across scotland, with a little bit of drizzly rain, so quite a murky sort of night out there. temperatures down to around about 4 to 8 degrees, so it's looking like a frost—free start to sunday morning, but we start on a murky note, so some low cloud, mist and fog possible. through the day, many places stay fairly cloudy, but there will be some sunny spells for northern ireland, wales, the south—west too. further east across england, some heavy showers rattle in through the afternoon. it's reasonably mild, around about 13 to 17 across england and wales, but north—east england, northern ireland and scotland a touch cooler than that. we could see some heavy showers
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in the east affecting the boat races in london during sunday afternoon, so just a chance that some of those showers could be potentially quite heavy. a small risk of the odd isolated thunderstorm. as we head into monday, we've still got quite a lot of cloud and a few showers, particularly for the southern half of england and across wales. it's the northern half of the uk that will see more in the way of sunshine, so not a bad day for northern england, northern ireland and scotland. temperatures generally around about 10 to 111, so it's a bit cooler by the time we get to monday, and as we work through monday night and into tuesday we're going to see this frontal system drifting its way slowly further north across the uk. that is going to bring a few spots of rain through the day on tuesday, most likely through parts of northern england, perhaps north wales, northern ireland. to the north of that, for much of scotland, not a bad day, some sunny spells, largely dry, but you'll notice these heavy and potentially thundery showers developing across southern england and wales. temperatures range between 8 in aberdeen to around 15 in london, and then it looks like we're
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going to see some slightly cooler conditions moving in from the north as we head into the middle part of the week. bye for now.
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