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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 8, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today. social media companies could be fined or blocked if they fail to tackle harmful content on their sites, under new government rules. pollution penalty. from today, drivers of older cars will have to pay £12.50 to travel into central london, on top of the congestion charge. named and shamed. holland & barrett is criticised over the way it treats suppliers as part of a wider crackdown on late payments. i'll have all the details. watford complete a stunning comeback to reach the fa cup final for the first time since 1984. they came from 2—0 down to beat wolves 3—2.
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good morning from oundle castle, we are here for the tulip festival under way and you can see some fabulous daffodils and tulips behind me. we have a fair bit of mist and fog around, some rain in the south and a bit of sunshine to look forward to. i'll have more in 15 minutes. it's monday april eighth. our top story. for the first time, social media companies such as facebook and twitter, could have their services blocked and face heavy fines, if they don't stick to new internet safety laws. under government proposals, bosses could be held personally responsible for sites failing to tackle terrorist propaganda and child abuse. here's our media editor, amol rajan. over the past few years, the tech giants have come under sustained pressure to clean up their act. terrorist propaganda such as the live broadcast of a recent attack in new zealand have caused horror. so, too, have stories about child grooming online, and the appalling death of 14—year—old molly russell, who took her own life after seeing
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images of self—harm on instagram — which is owned by facebook — prompted an outcry. this long—delayed white paper is broad in scope and bold in its recommendations. for the first time, oversight of the internet will be entrusted to a regulator. a statutory duty of care to protect users will be enforced. and there is a potential for heavy fines to be administered. but many details remain unclear, which is why there is now a 12—week consultation. the government hasn't yet decided whether it will set up a new regulator or entrust this work to an existing watchdog, such as ofcom. children's charities want tough penalties. now is the time to act, and the uk has an opportunity now. if we see statutory regulation, that will be the uk going further and faster than any other country in the world to tackle online harms. the new rules will apply to any company that allows people to share or discover user—generated content, or to interact with others. while facebook welcomed the proposals in principle, they say any new rules must protect
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innovation and freedom of speech. critics say applying the same rules to companies of such varying size will favour those few companies that can afford staff to oversee compliance, so entrenching the power of big tech. just after seven o'clock we'll quiz the culture secretary, jeremy wright on whether the government's proposals are workable. if you'd like to get in contact with us on if you'd like to get in contact with us on that one, you can do. the worlds first ultralow low emission zone has come into force in london. drivers of diesel cars over four years old and petrol cars registered more than 13 years ago will have to pay an extra £12.50 a day to drive into the centre of the city. leeds and birmingham are planning similar rules. with just five days to go before the uk is due to leave the eu, talks between the conservatives and labour could continue later. they failed to reach an agreement last week after three days of meetings. theresa may says both parties
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will need to compromise if there is to be a deal. our political correspondent, ben wright is in westminster. another week, another deadline. we say every week is a big week in brexit but this potentially is a decisive one, believe me, because as you just said if there is no deal passed in the house of commons, then there is a chance britain leaves that eu without any deal on friday. nobody wants that to happen, not within the government or eu. which is why the special summit on wednesday, theresa may will argue her case for another extension to brexit. she wanted to go up tojune 30 but in order to get that extension that you are looking for proof she has a plan for resolving this, for wrapping brexit up which is why she and ministers are in talks with label about some sort of compromise agreement. not much progress has been made on that front. there is a chance the house
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of commons gets another sets of votes on various brexit options not necessarily this week but in a week 01’ necessarily this week but in a week or two. theresa may's challenge is to persuade the eu she has a credible plan but they are in the driving seat, they will decide whether to give her that extension, perhaps a shorter extension, perhaps a much longer extension. as always theresa may is caught between her own party, her war in cabinet, the demands of labour, the demands of the eu and all that will come to a head again over the course of this week. ben, thank you very much. a british woman is facing a possible two—year jail sentence in dubai after allegedly breaking the state's cyber crime laws with facebook posts she wrote while in the uk. laleh shahravesh posted critical comments about her ex—husband's new wife three years ago. she was arrested while visiting dubai last month. ben ando reports. 0n the 10th of march, laleh shahravesh and her daughter travelled to dubai from their home in london to attend her ex—husband's funeral. but, on arrival, laleh was arrested and detained because of something
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she'd written on social media three years ago. in 2016, she logged onto facebook and seen that, unknown to her, and shortly after their divorce was finalised, her ex—husband had remarried. angry, she posted... "you married a horse, you idiot". the comments were reported to the police and, under dubai's strict cybercrime laws, laleh shahravesh was potentially a criminal. her daughter was allowed to fly home but laleh‘s passport was confiscated and she was put on bail awaiting trial. she was actually quite distraught. she was in tears for most of the conversation. just the anguish of being separated from her daughter and the reasons they went over there to pay respects to her ex—husband and the father of her daughter. and it's just kind of shocking. no one would expect that, having posted something on facebook several years ago, could possibly lead to such a traumatic experience. the foreign office says it is in contact with the authorities in the united arab emirates and its staff are providing
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support for the family. unless dubai's ruler does intervene, the next court date for laleh shahravesh is on thursday, when she is expected to plead not guilty. if convicted, she could be jailed for up to two years. ben ando, bbc news. ministers should consider banning the use of 56 technology made by huawei in westminster and other sensitive areas, according to a government cyber—security official. ian levy, technical director of the national cyber security centre, told panorama that "shoddy" engineering makes the chinese firm's products more likely to be vulnerable to attack. huawei says it will soon reveal plans to tackle the problem. spencer kelly reports. it's the company that could soon be allowed to build the uk's next—generation mobile network but now, as well as concerns over links to the chinese state, a top cyber security official says its mobile network gear should be banned from sensitive areas
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of the uk because of concerns over the company's security practices. the security engineering in huawei is unlike anything else. it's engineering like it's back in the year 2000. it's very, very shoddy. and leads to cyber security issues that we then have to manage in return. huawei says it plans to spend more than $2 billion tackling the problems identified. translation: we hope to turn this challenge into an opportunity moving forward. i believe that if we can carry out this programme as planned, huawei will become the strongest player in the telecom industry, in terms of security and reliability. so, this is the $2 billion, the transformation programme they've announced. as we say in the report, we've seen nothing to give us any confidence that transformation programme is going to do what they say is going to do. the us has concerns about deployment of huawei's products, with some claiming it may have an impact on information
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sharing with the uk. we can always share things the old school way, you know, paper, back and forth. but in terms of electronically communicate across huawei gear, huawei networks would be... risky at best. the company is dismissive of the us‘s accusations. translation: we have a country here that virtually uses no huawei equipment and doesn't even know if our 56 equipment is square or round. yet, it has been incessantly expressing security concerns over huawei. uk ministers are expected to reveal in may whether the government will restrict or even forbid use of huawei technology in the uk's next—generation mobile networks. spencer kelly, bbc news. if you want to see more on that, panorama's investigation is on bbc one at 8:30pm tonight. a campaign is being launched to raise awareness of a system to help people alert the police
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if they're in danger but unable to speak. the silent solution system prompts the caller on a mobile to press five five if they call 999. peter cooke reports. just one of the 20,000 silent calls made to 999 in the uk every day. but many callers using a mobile are unaware of a system to inform police, without speaking, that they might be in danger. it enables someone who is too scared to make a noise or speak to press 55 when prompted. the system has been operating in the uk since 2002, but officials say it's not widely known to the public. the prompts, the questions and the automated system allow that filter to take place, to make sure that when you do press 55, it's when you're in danger,
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when you've got a real need, that you will get that response that you need as a priority. today's campaign is being launched during national stalking awareness week. it is being supported by the family of murder victim kerry power. she was strangled by her former partner david wilder at her home in plymouth in 2013. her death led to calls for the system to be reviewed, as she may have been misinformed about what happened during a silent call. hello, metropolitan police, what's your emergency? it's hoped a wider understanding of how the system works could potentially save lives in the future. we like dogs on this programme, don't we? any kind of dog. i've got serious puppies on the way. vets in arizona helped this great dane, called cleo, deliver 19 pups via caesarean section.
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all but two survived and in just a few weeks, they will weigh more than 20lb, and a fully grown male can weigh as much as 1ast. only 17 survived. it is still a lovely story. it is extraordinary! what would you do? we were having a discussion outside, normally eight 01’ discussion outside, normally eight or nine is a good number, 17 is quite a bumper crop. how would you hope? sally? i don't know how i'd cope. i've got two dogs. i've only got one but i think she needs a friend. are you double doggy? i'm not sure thatis are you double doggy? i'm not sure that is the best phrase.
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laughter. what have you got for us this weekend? watford had the unenviable task of stopping manchester city. they came from 2—0 down to stun wolves 3—2 in extra time in the semi—final. it's the first time in 35 years watford have reached the final. fantastic comeback from them yesterday. arsenal's hopes of a top four finish were dented by everton. philjagielka's goal condemned them to a 1—0 defeat and they'll slip down to fifth in chelsea pick up a point tonight. the thames was a sea of light blue as cambridge surged to victory in the men's and women's boat races. james cracknell became the oldest winner at the ripe old age of 46. old?! american madison keys won her first title on clay. she beat caroline wozniacki in straight sets to lift the charleston open. elsewhere, garbine muguruza
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won the monterrey open. daniel. excellent work. we have sent carol out again. carol is at the annual tulip festival at arundel castle in west sussex for us this morning. look at those lovely flowers! good morning, all! it is stunning here, the backdrop of arundel cathedral, this is known as the labyrinth and there are plentiful red tulips and white daffodils. it is gorgeous and through the morning we will show you around different parts of the grounds here and you can see how spectacular they are. there are over 60,000 tulips and round about 140 varieties for different tulips as well. we will have a look at them through the morning. the forecast for all of us is mixed.
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there are sunny spells around but some rain in the south and that is after a cloudy start with some mist and fog, particularly across the south—eastern quarter of the country where visibility is low, about 200 metres. high—pressure's to the north, low—pressure's to the south with the easterly wind and a weather front which is what is producing the rain across the southern counties. this morning we are looking at some cloud, for many of us that breaking up, showers cloud, for many of us that breaking up, showers across western cloud, for many of us that breaking up, showers across western scotland clearing, showers across parts of northern ireland at times but the main zone is across southern counties into south wales and through the day some of those will be heavy and thundery with hail and they could go as far north as merseyside. we hang onto low cloud across north—east england and scotla nd across north—east england and scotland with temperatures held back but we could hit 19 today in parts of norfolk, 17—18 in the midlands and 13 for most of us. this evening
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and 13 for most of us. this evening and overnight, we hang onto the band of cloud and rain in the same area. under clearer skies we could well see pockets of frost for example in scotland. tomorrow we start off with the scenario once again. in the south, the cloud and outbreaks of rain at times, we hang on to a bit of cloud across western parts of scotla nd of cloud across western parts of scotland with easterly wind as well, some along the east coast in between the sunshine. you notice note today to make temperatures will not be as high tomorrow, up to 13. as we head on into wednesday, high pressure in scandinavia is dominating our weather, pushing the cloud plaguing these south down into the south—western corner, so more sunshine around, but temperatures bit below average for this stage in april. if you like it warmer, make the most of today. 19 degrees in
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norfolk is quite high for this time of year. it is absolutely glorious there today! thank you. she was in the thames yesterday. she was doing the weather for the boat race. of course she was, yes. she was working! let's have a look at the front pages. the ultimate compromise from theresa may. and a picture of the duchess of sussex claiming her mother is set to fly in for the birth of her baby. the guardian are claiming they are increasing expectations of the prime minister's talks with labour won't produce anything concrete. a picture ofjames produce anything concrete. a picture of james cracknell, sally will be mentioning him throughout the morning, the oldest winner of the boat race at 46 years old. eight
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others with him in the boat! jack sheppard has apologised to the pa rents of sheppard has apologised to the parents of charlotte brown who died ina parents of charlotte brown who died in a crash involving his boat on the thames. the daily mail describes what it calls the new betrayal of the brave, none of the 50 afghan interpreters promised sanctuary after helping british troops have yet arrived in the uk. they have a picture of mr cracknell as well. trending on twitter, i am worried about this, is last night's episode of line of duty. it's good! i don't wa nt to of line of duty. it's good! i don't want to give anything away. a p pa re ntly want to give anything away. apparently lots of bent coppers. we knew though. that that, is the theme of the whole thing. you need to start watching it so i can talk to you about it on a monday! sorry, i need some sleep. we are having to have a clipped conversation. did you see...? sally is, like, shut up! all
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i will say to you is when you watch it do to make shallow text you? when you watch it, look what is written on the draw. what is written on the draw? you have to pause it, rebind it. how long does it take you to watch these things? about 14 hours! the only thing i'll say about it is, it can't be the obvious answer, can it? that's what i think, there has got to be more twists. how many weeks you have to go through with this? a few weeks. brilliant, though. it's great if you've watched it. when you are part of this conversation. it depends how much homework i've got to do. it's hard to get to sleep on a sunday because there is such a cracking telly. race across the world, brilliant! can't talk about that, either! sally
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hasn't watched it. i haven't watched any telly, i've been far too having fun. what have you got? i was talking about debenhams and the issue they have at the minute with cash flow, raising money, and mike ashley who owns sports direct, has offered on several occasions now money to help the business in return for being chief executive. it is now kicking off to another level because mike ashley is accusing various members of the board of lying. so, he is saying they should take a lie detector test to do with what has been said in meetings. he said him and another colleague from sports direct have both done the lie detector test to prove they are not lying about it but there is a lot of dispute about what has happened in these various meetings. it is some type of soap opera. it is a bit like jeremy kyle. who is the father? always mike ashley. let's have a look at the times. a great picture
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of tiger roll yesterday who won the grand national on saturday. looking so grand national on saturday. looking so well with friends and family. the mike 0'leary kids with the grand national trophy. if you can zoom in, that has got to be the best fringe i've ever seen on human or horse, tiger roll is the best haircut! beautiful, beautiful brave horse and it is in all the papers. he got quite a lot of mentions yesterday, james cracknell. not the only man in the boat about breaking records and making history yesterday on the thames. talk about making history, this is how to make money. this mother started putting videos of her children with toys on youtube. apparently, she is making £1 million a year. things they do, they open toys. i don't get it.
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a year. things they do, they open toys. idon't get it. ijust a year. things they do, they open toys. i don't get it. ijust don't get it. you just open stuff and play with it. i want to mention because i think they do a little bit of art as well. they have been designing eggs, and we have a special design here later. lots of people have been doing that over the easter holidays. have you been doing that? why not send us your photos. can we call it 999 send us your photos. can we call it egg art? ask to see sally's. i did see it. talk about tiger roll, it is the masters this week. it starts on thursday. tiger roll... tiger dot to make this dog, five golf balls in his stomach. hungry hound lewis was feeling below par, vets removed five golf balls. he was being sick, his
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owner was worried, took it to the vets, x—rayed it, five golf balls removed! the dog is ok. all happy, a happy dog story. don't eat golf balls. what kind of dog was it? a black one. labrador cross springer spaniel labrador cross. black one. labrador cross springer spaniel labrador crosslj black one. labrador cross springer spaniel labrador cross. i know one of them, they are bonkers, those dogs. thank you, both. see you later. a british woman is facing two yea rs later. a british woman is facing two years injailfor calling x buzz —— my ex husband's wife a horse. she was arrested when she flew out for her ex—husband's funeral. radha stirling, who represents her,
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joins us now from spain. ifind i find interesting the comments were made a few years ago in the uk on facebook so at what point did she find out she was in trouble? she found out on arrival in dubai last month where she was arrested at the airport en route with her daughter to visit the grave of the daughter's father. she hadn't considered whatsoever it would be any sort of criminal offence and had considered that a long time in the past and she had been friends with the ex—husband. she wouldn't have suspected anything like this could happen. the fco hasn't warned people about the serious nature of these cybercrime laws and they need to do more in that respect. most british nationals who arrive in dubai already potential criminals just due to their use of twitter and facebook. so, there is a court case that takes place this thursday. she is obviously still there, her
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daughter has come back to the uk. what sort of punishment could she expect? she is looking at up to two yea rs expect? she is looking at up to two years imprisonment. and a fine of up to £50,000. so she's obviously very fea rful to £50,000. so she's obviously very fearful about this court date, she doesn't want to turn up and she's got a very bad feeling. when i spoke to her, she was almost crying the whole time, it is very distressing for her. you set a dilute to make quite a lot of people arriving in dubai could have broken the law without knowing it. why was she singled out for this? it was the new wife of the ex—husband who made the complaint. and it was made surreptitiously and without advising her so that when she did come to dubai the next time, she would be arrested. so, the fco and i believe the dubai police have contacted the complainant and asked her to drop the charges which she refuses. complainant and asked her to drop the charges which she refusesm complainant and asked her to drop the charges which she refuses. is it an unusual case? you are seeing
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quite a few people have broken the law but how many people tend to be dealt with in this way? it is not an unusual case. the ones that go to the public, and we can have a look at those sorts of cases, scott richards was arrested for showing a charity page, a woman for uploading a photograph of a car which was an invasion of privacy, as it was considered. there were quite a few cases already of an american man who bought his wife something not nice. there is lots of cases we deal with ona there is lots of cases we deal with on a daily basis in relation to these cybercrime laws which are the greatest risks to british visitors. thank you very much for giving us that information,. the court cases on thursday and potentially a £50,000 fine or a two year imprisonment sentence. we'll talk
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about that throughout the programme. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. it's thought around 40,000 vehicles will be affected by the capital's new ultra low emission zone. from today, older and more polluting cars will have to pay to enter central london. the mayor hopes it'll help to reduce toxic air but londoners and businesses will be unfairly hit. drivers can check whether their vehicles meet the standards on the transport for london website. i accept there are businesses will find this transition difficult. tfl, we have made sure that our buses are compliant, which has been an expensive process. we've reached a deal with the nhs, the police, the fire service, small business and charities, is low income families.
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this is a hidden, invisible killer and i'm not willing to stand by while things get worse. uncensored pages of the met‘s so called gangs matrix — which included names of those suspected of being involved in crimes — was emailed to more than 40 people by a worker at newham council and then posted on social media. newham has apologised for the breach in 2017 and said "lessons had been learned." first—time buyers in london face a wait of a decade and a half to save enough to get on the property ladder. that's according to research by estate agents hamptons international. experts are advising buyers to think about clubbing together with a friend or partner, as saving up could take half the time. onto the travel... turning to the roads — let's have a look at how traffic is coping in the new ulez zone. this is waterloo bridge.
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all clear there so far this morning. in harrow station road is closed because of an unsafe building. there will be lots of disruption around there. finally, one lane is closed for emergency electricity work. on the a200 greenwich church street at creek road. time for a look at the weather with lucy martin. hello, good morning. it's a day to keep the umbrella close to hand with the potential for some quite heavy, possibly thundery showers later in the day. bit of a grey, murky start this morning. plenty of cloud around and some mist and fog and one or two showers, as well. that mist and fog should lift, and as we go through the day it will gradually brighten with some breaks developing in the cloud to allow for some sunny spells. but with increasing amounts of sunshine, chance of a few heavy, possibly thundery showers with some hail mixed in. temperatures, though, not doing too badly in the sunshine — highs of around 17 degrees celsius. as we go through this evening and overnight, we hold onto a few showers. showers merging into longer spells of rain as we move into the early hours, particularly the further south you are. temperatures not falling too far, though — overnight lows around
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seven to 10 celsius. a noticeable dip in temperatures to come tomorrow. plenty of cloud and some outbreaks of rain. we'll see more in the way of settled weather later in the week, but it does stay that little bit cooler. bye— bye. that's all for now — i'll be back in half an hour. now, though, back to dan and louise. have a lovely morning. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it's 6:30am. all the latest news and sport. also on the programme today... as london launches its air pollution charge, we'll find out which other uk cities are bringing in similar penalties. we'll meet extraordinary surgeon featured in a bbc documentary about risky medical procedures. a new legal thriller tells the story of a trial through the eyes of the accuser — and the accused. we'll be joined by the show‘s writer
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and one of its stars. all that still to come. for the first time, social media companies such as facebook and twitter, could have their services blocked and face heavy fines, if they don't stick to new internet safety laws. under government proposals, bosses could be held responsible for sites failing to tackle terrorist propaganda and child abuse. the plans also suggest setting up an independent regulator to hold internet companies legally to account. now is the time to act, and the uk has an opportunity now. if we see statutory regulation, that will be the uk going further and faster than any other country in the world to tackle online harms. that can only be a good thing and that will fundamentally ensure that we can see, really, a game—changer in protections for children. the wealth's first ultra low
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emission zone has come into force in london in an attempt to lower the city's dangerous levels of pollution. drivers of diesel cars over four years old and petrol cars registered more than 13 years ago will have to pay an extra £12.50 a day to drive into the centre of the city. leeds and birmingham are planning similar rules. it's thought brexit talks between the conservatives and labour could continue later. they failed to reach an agreement last week after three days of meetings. the prime minister says both parties will need to compromise if there's to be a deal. mrs may is due at an emergency summit in brussels on wednesday, when eu leaders will expect to hear fresh plans. a british woman is facing a possible two—year jail sentence a british woman is facing a possible two—yearjail sentence in a british woman is facing a possible two—year jail sentence in dubai after allegedly breaking the state's cybercrime laws with facebook post she wrote while in the uk. laleh shahravesh, was arrested while visiting dubai with her teenage daughter last month. she had posted critical comments about her ex—husband's new wife three years ago.
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it's the final day of campaigning in israel before citizens get to vote on what is billed as one of the toughest general election is that benjamin netanyahu toughest general election is that benjamin neta nyahu has toughest general election is that benjamin netanyahu has everfaced. his right—wing likud party is in a tight race with the new centre—right blue and white alliance, led by the former army chief benny gantz. president donald trump has announced he's replacing homeland security secretary kirsten neilson. mr trump thanked nielsen for her service but gave no immediate reason for the change. her departure follows growing anger in the white house at the failure to reduce the number of migrants entering the us illegally across the southern border. the internationally recognised government in libya says more than 20 people have been killed in four days of fighting around the capital tripoli. rebel forces led by general khalifa haftar are trying to seize the city, in defiance of international calls for restraint. the un has called for an urgent truce whilst the united states have demanded an immediate halt
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to the offensive. ministers here should consider banning the use of 5g technology made by huawei in westminster. the technical director of the national cyber security centre told bbc panorama that "shoddy" engineering makes the chinese firm's products more likely to be vulnerable to attack. huawei says it will soon reveal plans to tackle the problem. a campaign to raise awareness of a system to help people alert police when in imminent danger but unable to speak, is being launched today. the silent solution system enables a 999 mobile caller who is too scared to make a noise or speak, to press five five when prompted — to inform police they are in a genuine emergency. around 20,000 silent 999 calls are made every day. the prompts, the questions, and the automated system allow that filter
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to ta ke automated system allow that filter to take place, to make sure that when you do press 55, it's when you're in danger, when you've got a real need, that you will get that response you need is a priority. we love dogs on this programme and we've got 17 great dane puppies to show you. they were all born in a single litter. he has mum. vets in arizona helped this great dane, called cleo, deliver 19 pups via caesarean section. all but two survived and in just a few weeks, they will weigh more than 20 pounds, and a fully grown male can weigh as much as 14 stone. they are magnificent dogs, aren't they? they are. big old units eventually. gorgeous! sally, good morning. good morning. lots to talk about. the romance of the fa cup. it has been so exciting. you were there at the weekend. it was an amazing story for watford, but i can see
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white wolves 2—0 up with ten minutes to go would be gutted. and crying this morning. 18th may. wembley stadium. manchester city against watford. it's after watford produced one of the finest comebacks in fa cup semi final history to see off wolves in extra time. our correspondent david ornstein has the details. in the competition renowned for producing moments of magic, the latest courtesy of watford — through to a first fa cup final since 1984, thanks to an incredible comeback. although they made the better start, it was wolves who were the more clinical, and matt doherty gave the travelling gold masses reason to believe this would be their day. after the restart, it was two — rauljimenez with a goal as flamboyant as the celebration. that is brilliant! and the mexican wrestler‘s mask to celebrate. the wolves' joy was tempered when a moment of sheer audacity by gerard deulofeu gave watford hope, and hope became reality as a challenge on troy deeney
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in the closing minutes allowed the captain to net a dramatic late equaliser. 0h! absolutely emphatic! watford carried their momentum into the added period, and duly capitalised — deulofeu again the man to make the difference, completing a remarkable turnaround. heaven for watford, heartbreak for wolves. a cup tie for the ages. watford are now within touching distance of the fa cup. they'll return here on may 18 for that shot at glory. only standing in their way are the might of manchester city. in this moment i am only thinking, we have to come back here, and it will be a blessing. playing against city, we know it will be very, very difficult for us but we'd like to enjoy it. in the premier league, arsenal
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missed the chance to jump up to third after a narrow defeat at everton. philjagielka poked in the only goal at goodison park. arsenal remain fourth but could slip out of the champions league qualification spots if chelsea avoid defeat against west ham. there was more cloud unrest in scotla nd there was more cloud unrest in scotland as rangers beat motherwell 3-0. rangers captainjames tavernier had a cigarette lighter and other objects thrown at him in the first half. as for the match itself — scott arfield's hat—trick cemented rangers second spot in the table. deeply unpleasant to see, isn't it? yesterday we were talking about james cracknell being the oldest competitor in the boat race. this morning we can describe him as the old est morning we can describe him as the oldest winner. at 46, he was part of the cambridge crew that pipped oxford by a couple of seconds. it was the light blues' 84th win to oxford's 80. and for the human evolution masters student — it was extra special to add another medal to his two olympic golds. it's more amazing
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sitting on the start. at the olympics, there's no—one there and suddenly your boat and thousands of people there and then there's noise all down the course. and today with a group of guys that have gone through the early mornings and not living like full—time athletes is really special. age is... callum is less than half my age so i'm going to have to look after him. i was designated driver on the way home. it was a clean sweep for cambridge — the women easing to victory in the thames, too. both reserve crews also won their races. there were tries galore in the premiership with 11 in total as gloucester built northampton. will atkinson scored a first—half hat—trick to bolster gloucester‘s bid for spot in the end of season play—offs. they're third with four games still to play. it's been more than four years since newport—based dragons last won away from home in the pro 14. they didn't lose at south african side southern kings — instead coming from behind to draw 18—18. the american madison keys has won the wta event in charleston, beating caroline wozniacki in the final.
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wozniacki is a former world number one but couldn't find a way past keys — who claims the fourth wta title of her career. she's currently ranked as the 18th—best player in the world. garbine muguruza won the monterrey open in mexico. sometimes on a monday morning we do show you some really bad, embarrassing misses. ithink show you some really bad, embarrassing misses. i think this might be the best so far. the best or the worst quits and this could be the worst ever, couldn't it? erik choupo mouting somehow manages to stop this shot going in. i think we're going to see this again. watch the replay. what do macro watch what happens. he knows, doesn't he? i think he kind of saves it. the ball is going in... side i would love to see it but my computer was just would love to see it but my computer wasjust in would love to see it but my computer was just in the way. would love to see it but my computer wasjust in the way. he blocks it on the line himself. if he had left it alone the ball would have gone in. he literally took it out the side.
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your screen and blocked it, you'll have to wait until next time. might not show it again! look on that screen now. can we show it again? there you go. there he is, look. 0h, no! yeah! can you believe it? there we go. oh, now i feel guilty that we're showing it 75 times. you just think... there have been some bad misses over the years but that's right up here. that's possibly the worst. did he forget who he was playing for? i think he thought he was the goalkeeper. absolute brain fade. never happens to us. if you've got a child under five, how many hours a week do you spend helping them with activities like learning their alphabet or reading? the government says thousands of children in england are not doing enough before they reach school age, and is launching a campaign to change that. we asked parents in
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manchester what they think. it's just having the time when you're not at skill to do those activities. it's quite hard. it's ha rd activities. it's quite hard. it's hard to do more stuff after school if you are in work until 5pm, 6pm. for me, i think as long as they are getting fresh air and learning through experience and being out and about, that'sjust through experience and being out and about, that's just as good as a sitting and doing planning is. pa rents a re sitting and doing planning is. parents are taking more responsibility for their children and not leaving anything to school. sometimes it can impact children if they aren't taught correctly, so teachers are obviously qualified to doa teachers are obviously qualified to do a job teachers are obviously qualified to doajob and teachers are obviously qualified to do a job and it's a fine balance between quality and quantity. people do what they can and i don't think anyone deliberately doesn't do enough but you can only do so much. joining us now is paul howard—jones, professor of neuroscience and education at university of bristol. familiarface for us familiar face for us here. familiarface for us here. good
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morning. what do you make of this campaign? how important is it to your mind? i think it's really important because we are beginning to realise how important these early yea rs are. to realise how important these early years are. it's a time when children's brains are at their most plastic and it's important for gaining that foundational learning for supporting them later in skill. at the department for education's your own data is showing we have about 100,000 children who are not actually receiving a daily reading experience between 0—5. sorry, a third. it's a third of children who are not receiving a daily reading experience at home. about 100,000 are not having any sort of learning activity at all. nursery rhymes, counting. what is a learning activity? government talk about chat, play and read. quite different things. when we talk about learning activity, this is not a teacher —like interaction as if you are in a classroom. the sorts of things that
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really help children develop, help their literacy and communication, can be having those conversations. for example, a child's vocab at age three is quite predictive of how their reading will be at nine years old. the parent is the first teacher, essentially, and most important one. if you are a time port parents, as quite a few are watching this morning... not trying to make people feel guilty but it's ha rd to to make people feel guilty but it's hard to fit fit things in. what is a good tip? a daily activity you would a lwa ys good tip? a daily activity you would always do anyway to try to encourage, to use that to talk to your children. this is really important. i don't think the government is trying to make us all feel guilty because we are all time strapped. i appreciate that myself. this is supporting parents in trying to make the best use of the time that they do have with their children. finding and pointing out activities and ways of engaging with children that really support them. think about travelling in the car,
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that's an excellent time for a conversation. bath—time, that's an excellent time for play. getting children involved when are cleaning the house. you are doing two jobs at once. the house getting cleaned and you are having those really important conversations that will actually develop language and support their school achievement later on. i love watching the secret life of four and five—year—olds will stop we watch the last series, have you noticed there is an impact of technology? you mention the car. quite often the child might be in the cart with some sort of tablet available, for example. the cart with some sort of tablet available, for examplelj the cart with some sort of tablet available, for example. i get asked about this a lot, especially since the last series when we saw children becoming so completely absorbed in their technology. also, parents get com pletely their technology. also, parents get completely absorbed in technology. technology to some extent can be a real boon to children, introducing them to all sorts of interesting stimulus. the danger is when it displaces some of these learning
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activities that we are talking about, particularly that face—to—face human interaction. there is nothing you will get from technology that is as valuable as that. you talk about that plasticity of the brain. is that the right phrase? yes. absorption rates, are they taking in so much at this point that you can't give them enough information? how many languages do you speak? not enough! one of my great regrets in life! think about how a child wasn't on the planet five years ago comes to be able to speak and use language. it's a miracle of learning. and how much more difficult we find that later on. we note this is a really important time for learning because the brain is so sensitive. important time for learning because the brain is so sensitivelj important time for learning because the brain is so sensitive. i love that thing about chat. yeah, so chatting. it's a matter of making every interaction account, essentially. we know parents are strapped in terms of time but when you have those opportunities, if you
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are out shopping, pointing things out, asking questions. it's absolutely fundamental to kick—sta rt those communication skills are. thank you very much. i love that age when they get to why? why? why? why? impossible questions! it can be exhausting. it can be exhausting. it makes you think! i don't know why i think that or why i think that. carol is at the annual tulip festival at arundel castle in west sussex for us this morning. we sent her there because it's lovely and she's going to tell us all about the weather, too. good morning. good morning. you're absolutely right. it is lovely but let's talk to somebody that knows an awful lot about it. one of the gardeners here, daniela. good morning. hello. you are a gardener now but you came here via an interesting route tell us about it. i lived in germany for 20 years as a nurse, decided to move back home to sussex. very glad i did, started volunteering here and decided i would like to start gardening as my
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profession. the head gardener here offered me a full—time job and i'm very glad he did. you do a fabulous job. tell us about the tulips, how many varieties do you have currently? 140 this year. we have 60,000 bulbs planted throughout the grounds and gardens. behind us we have some lovely pots with purple dream, purple prince will be coming soon, following afterwards with ones that reflect on the water and look beautiful, stunning. you are not wrong. which are your favourites? some of my favourites is this. it's a classic, old—time tulip. you have this vibrant and tropical looking orange one. how you cope with the weather? it's been really one, then cold. some have seem some snow. must be difficult as a gardener. you have to love it! and i do, every day. i really enjoy coming here. i'm the
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same. thank you very much. i'll let you get on. it is a real pleasure to be here always. the weather this morning is not too chilly, but it is fairly cloudy. the forecast for us all today is a starting off on a cloudy note. some of us will see some rain, my predominantly in the sheu some rain, my predominantly in the shelf but show is developing for the course of the afternoon. because we have high pressure to the north, low pressure to the south. also a weather front in between producing showery outbreaks of rain. in between, we are starting to drag in any winds. it will turn cooler after today. this morning, we have mist and fog to watch out for. visibility is poor in the south—eastern quarter of the uk and we have that weather front producing a line of cloud and some showers across southern counties into south wales. showers into northern ireland, clearing from western scotland, and we will see further showers developed which could be heavy and thundery with hailfor parts of could be heavy and thundery with hail for parts of england and wales, even as far north as merseyside. the
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other thing is low cloud across north—east scotland and the north—east scotland and the north—east of england. temperatures will be held back but today we could hit 19 degrees in norfolk. generally between 13 and about 16 or 17. this evening and overnight, we have a weather front in the same places. that will still produce cloud and some rain, as well. there will still be some low cloud lapping on shore along north sea coastline and locally in scotland a touch of frost around. that's how we start tomorrow. still with the weather front in the south, still producing some rain at times. western scotland also seeing a bit more cloud and tomorrow we have the easterly wind, so temperatures will be well down for many of us on what we are looking at today. top temperature tomorrow likely to be 13 degrees and as we head into wednesday the high pressure establishes itself over scandinavia. it pushes the weather front into the south—western corner. fairly wea k front into the south—western corner. fairly weak by then with some cloud and may be the odd spot of rain, but and may be the odd spot of rain, but a lot of low cloud across eastern
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scotland, the north—east and scotla nd scotland, the north—east and scotland and eastern parts of england. if you aren't in these areas, you can expect to see some sunshine. temperatures below part for this stage in april. it certainly felt like it this weekend. thank you. good morning to you. the uk's biggest health food retailer holland & barrett has been named and shamed over the way it has treated one of its suppliers. steph's got more on this. we have someone who has been involved in the case to chat to. this is all about big companies taking to long to pay the small ones. in this case holland & barrett has been accused of having a "purposeful culture of poor payment practices". paul uppaljoins me now. the small businesses contacted us before christmas. they were messed around december, they were
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contacting holland & barrett and continually asking, where is our payment? we got involved and when we spoke to the finance director at the beginning of january they finally got paid in the middle ofjanuary. in essence what should have taken 30 days ended up taking about 67. when we spoke to holland & barrett about this they said it was a single case, it was one single supplier, it was over the busy christmas period and once they had established what happened, they said they resolved it quickly. would you disagree? i'm glad they are speaking to you. we would love to speak to them! the point i would make is that this is the human angle on this. we dealt with this small business and saw the stress it puts them under. for all of your viewers who are watching this morning, if you are expecting to get paid at the end of november, beginning of december, and you are not paid until the middle ofjanuary in the run—up to christmas, january next year, how would you feel about that? i think sometimes that so often, big businesses, it's an
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e—mail in an inbox, but there is a family behind that and it causes huge stress and anxiety for those small businesses. it's interesting you say that holland & barrett don't talk to you. why is that? you are the small business commissioner? generally we talk to companies. we look at their payment practices and interesting one of the stats that jumped out is they pay 60% of their invoices outside of the agreed terms. this is a real concern and a real worry for us, this continual practice we are seeing. in essence, pick up the foehn and speak to us. what can you do about it? can you stop this? we have the power to name and shame, that is our statutory right we have to do. what we want to do is change the culture around this in terms of late payment because i am convinced this is the biggest impact for small businesses on stopping them growing. if they are going to take on staff, increase turnover, unpredictable cash flow is what is holding them back. you mentioned it is big problems for small businesses and it's notjust
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holland & barrett because we spoke to andrew osman who was owed £5,000 bya to andrew osman who was owed £5,000 by a client who didn't pay him four months. not getting paid on time can have a really serious impact on small business. from cash flow point of view, this is crippling. in our circumstances we have suppliers we have to pay ourselves. we always pay our suppliers on time. if we can we like to pay them slightly earlier. i think that's how it should be in business and i think the way these large organisations treat small businesses, it'sjust large organisations treat small businesses, it's just appalling. large organisations treat small businesses, it'sjust appalling. how big a problem is it? that'sjust one voice, holland & barrett is another case but how wide is it? it is a widespread problem and the truth is it's probably a secret thing. small businesses feel very uncomfortable talking about this but actually when you get them in a room and i've spoken to about 1500 small
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businesses in the past year, it's a very widespread problem.” businesses in the past year, it's a very widespread problem. i guess it's that issue between wanting to get the money and needing it but also not wanting to lose the contract they have with these big companies, as well. but it's your money. you worked for it. this is just not an ethical point of view. i a lwa ys just not an ethical point of view. i always say to the chief executives and finance directors, if you have a small business, please pay them on time because that business will come back to you much more quickly. it's a win—win for everyone involved. it's a financial boomerang. a win—win for everyone involved. it's a financial boomerangm a win—win for everyone involved. it's a financial boomerang. if they don't do this, you can name and shame, but can you do anything else? can they be fined, you have power? government is currently looking at this. we are expecting something eminently or certainly over the summer in terms of the call for evidence about businesses' view on this. i would like our office to be at the centre of this but there are initiatives. there is duty to report, part payment code and our offices good to talk to you. if you
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area offices good to talk to you. if you are a small business, get in touch and let us know your thoughts on this if you have had problems with payments and your contracts with big business, let us know. stay with us because you will love this. don't adjust your set! we are still here. it's quite elaborate. just before 8am we will meet the seven—year—old who has created this beautiful replica of our set for his skill‘s easter egg competition. all the presenters either. can you go round the other way? there is carol. she is represented by a fried egg. because the weather is so hot during this particular broadcast! carol is a fried egg. we love it! it's even got words. fletch has done it. look, there is a script on the wheels! lots of egg ponds in there. lots of
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999 lots of egg ponds in there. lots of egg ponds. very detailed.” lots of egg ponds in there. lots of egg ponds. very detailed. i don't imagine anyone has anything more elaborate than that, but i know lots of people in the run—up to easter weather be making this kind of thing at school. thank you, fletcher, for that top right we love it! i'm looking forward to finding out who is your favourite. you know the a nswer is your favourite. you know the answer already! what do you mean? you know it's you! how discerning! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from london news, i'm tolu adeoye. it's thought around 40,000 vehicles will be affected by the capital's new ultra low emission zone. from today older and more polluting cars will have to pay to enter central london. the mayor hopes it will help to reduce toxic air but critics claim the poorest londoners and small businesses will be unfairly hit. drivers can check whether their vehicles meet the standards on the transport for london website.
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i accept there are businesses that will find this transition difficult. tfl, we have made sure that our buses are compliant, which has been an expensive process. we've reached a deal with the nhs, the police, the fire service, small business and charities, low—income families. but the fact is this is a hidden, invisible killer and i'm not willing to stand by while things get worse. it's emerged a secret police list of alleged gang members was leaked by a council and then fell into the hands of criminals. pages of the met‘s so—called gangs matrix was emailed to more than 40 people by a worker at newham council and then posted on social media. newham has apologised for the breach in 2017 and said "lessons had been learned". london's theatre scene has been celebrated at the annual olivier awards. the best new play went to
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the inheritance, which focuses on the lives of gay men in new york. kyle stroller took home best actor for his part in the play. turning to the roads, let's have a look at how traffic is coping in the new ulez zone. this is waterloo bridge. all clear there so far this morning. it is the easter holidays, of course, as well! in harrow station road is closed because of an unsafe building. finally one lane is closed for emergency electricity work. on the a200 greenwich church street at creek road. 0k, ok, let's look at the weather with lucy martin. hello, good morning. it's a day to keep the umbrella close to hand. the potential for some quite heavy, possibly thundery showers later in the day. bit of a grey, murky start this morning. plenty of cloud around and some mist and fog and one or two showers, as well. that mist and fog should lift, and as we go through the day it will gradually brighten with some breaks developing in the cloud to allow for some sunny spells. but with increasing amounts of sunshine, chance of a few heavy, possibly thundery showers with some
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hail mixed in. temperatures, though, not doing too badly in the sunshine — highs of around 17 degrees celsius. as we go through this evening and overnight, we hold onto a few showers. showers merging into longer spells of rain as we move into the early hours, particularly the further south you are. temperatures not falling too far, though — overnight lows around seven to 10 celsius. a noticeable dip in temperatures to come tomorrow. plenty of cloud and some outbreaks of rain. we'll see more in the way of settled weather later in the week, but it does stay that little bit cooler. bye— bye. that's all — back in half an hour. good morning welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today.
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social media companies could be fined or blocked if they fail to tackle harmful content on their sites, under new government rules. pollution penalty. from today, drivers of older cars will have to pay £12.50 to travel into central london, on top of the congestion charge. will that new charge change the type of cars we drive and buy? i'll have more. watford complete a stunning comeback to reach the fa cup final for the first time since 1984. they came from 2—0 down to beat wolves 3—2. good morning from the cut flower gardens of arundel castle. you are looking at the wedding cake display and the bowtie display here. the weather is quite colourful today as well, mist and fog to start with, showers and outbreaks of rain in the south but brighter skies in the west. i'll have more in 15 minutes.
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it's monday april 8th. our top story. for the first time, social media companies such as facebook and twitter, could have their services blocked and face heavy fines, if they don't stick to new internet safety laws. under government proposals, bosses could be held responsible for sites failing to tackle terrorist propaganda and child abuse. here's our media editor, amol rajan. over the past few years, the tech giants have come under sustained pressure to clean up their act. terrorist propaganda such as the live broadcast of a recent attack in new zealand have caused horror. so, too, have stories about child grooming online, and the appalling death of 14—year—old molly russell, who took her own life after seeing images of self—harm on instagram — which is owned by facebook — prompted an outcry. this long—delayed white paper is broad in scope and bold in its recommendations. for the first time, oversight of the internet will be entrusted to a regulator. a statutory duty of care to protect users will be enforced. and there is a potential for heavy fines to be administered. but many details remain unclear,
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which is why there is now a 12—week consultation. the government hasn't yet decided whether it will set up a new regulator or entrust this work to an existing watchdog, such as ofcom. children's charities want tough penalties. now is the time to act, and the uk has an opportunity now. if we see statutory regulation, that will be the uk going further and faster than any other country in the world to tackle online harms. the new rules will apply to any company that allows people to share or discover user—generated content, or to interact with others. while facebook welcome the proposals in principle, they say any new rules must protect innovation and freedom of speech. critics say applying the same rules to companies of such varying size will favour those few companies that can afford staff to oversee compliance, so entrenching the power of big tech. in a few minutes, we'll ask the culture secretary, jeremy wright whether the government's proposals are workable.
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something we talk about a lot and we will asking those questions. the world's first ultra low emission zone has come into force in london to lower the levels of pollution. drivers of diesel cars over four years old and petrol cars registered more than 13 years ago will have to pay an extra £12.50 a day to drive into the centre of the city. leeds and birmingham are planning similar rules. we'll be talking to the mayor of london about the new charge in the next hour. do let us know what you think about that because a lot of people were encouraged to get diesel cars and i will be charged extra for driving them into the ultra low emission zone. it's thought brexit talks between the conservatives and labour could continue later. they failed to reach an agreement last week after three days of meetings. the prime minister says both parties will need to compromise if there's to be a deal. theresa may is due at an emergency summit in brussels on wednesday, when eu leaders will expect to hear fresh plans.
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our political correspondent has been digesting this. i know it is a regular refrain but it isa i know it is a regular refrain but it is a big week are potentially a request will go in on wednesday for an extension but it is about these talks with labour, particularly theresa may and jeremy corbyn over the next few hours. and we expect them to restart those today. we are not sure whether they will be face—to—face meetings because we don't think theresa may and jeremy corbyn will be sitting down but the two sides have appointed teams of negotiators who have been chatting informally over the weekend, writing letters to each other, because the outcome of these talks between the government and labour are quite key to that summit happening between theresa may and eu leaders because she was going there to say i need more time, i want until the 30th of june so that i can find some way of getting a brexit deal through parliament. it has been rejected by
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mps three times. theresa may has accepted she needs to find another route through this political crisis and then her mind that means finding and then her mind that means finding a compromise with labour. some cross— party a compromise with labour. some cross—party agreement for what the shape of brexit should look like like. those talks are continuing i think it will help the promised if she goes through this credible route map for how labour and the government plan to sort out brexit in the future. that is a big ask and i think there is a lot of scepticism on behalf of the eu whether she can deliver it in the time she is asking and it may well be by wednesday eu leaders say we don't believe you, you can have either a very short amount of time to sort it out or a much longer brexit but it will be another big week, as you say. thank you for that. a british woman is facing a possible two—year jail sentence in dubai after allegedly breaking the state's cyber crime laws with facebook posts she wrote while in the uk. laleh sharavesh, posted critical comments about her ex—husband's new wife, three years ago.
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she was arrested while visiting dubai last month. ben ando has the details. on the 10th of march, laleh shahravesh and her daughter travelled to dubai from their home in london to attend her ex—husband's funeral. but, on arrival, laleh was arrested and detained because of something she'd written on social media three years ago. in 2016, she logged onto facebook and seen that, unknown to her, and shortly after their divorce was finalised, her ex—husband had remarried. angry, she posted... "you married a horse, you idiot". the comments were reported to the police and, under dubai's strict cybercrime laws, laleh shahravesh was potentially a criminal. her daughter was allowed to fly home but laleh‘s passport was confiscated and she was put on bail awaiting trial. she was actually quite distraught. she was in tears for most of the conversation. just the anguish of being separated from her daughter and the reasons they went over there to pay respects to her ex—husband and the father of her daughter.
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and it's just kind of shocking. no one would expect that, having posted something on facebook several years ago, could possibly lead to such a traumatic experience. the foreign office says it is in contact with the authorities in the united arab emirates and its staff are providing support for the family. unless dubai's ruler does intervene, the next court date for laleh shahravesh is on thursday, when she is expected to plead not guilty. if convicted, she could be jailed for up to two years. ben ando, bbc news. it's the final day of campaigning in israel today before citizens go to the vote in what is being billed as one of the toughest general elections prime minister benjamin neta nyahu has ever faced. his right—wing likud party is in a tight race with the new centre—right blue and white alliance, led by the former army chief benny gantz. president donald trump has announced he is replacing his homeland security secretary kirstjen nielsen. mr trump thanked nielsen for her service but gave no
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immediate reason for the change. her departure follows growing anger in the white house at the failure to reduce the number of migrants entering the us illegally across the southern border. a campaign to raise awareness of a system to help people alert police when in imminent danger but unable to speak, is being launched today. the silent solution system enables a 999 mobile caller who is too scared to make a noise, or speak, to press 5—5 when prompted, to inform police they are in a genuine emergency. around 20,000 silent 999 calls are made every day. it is 7:09am. let's return to one of our top stories. should social media firms like facebook and twitter be held legally responsible when it comes to keeping users safe from harmful material. 14—year—old molly russell took her own life in 2017
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after viewing distressing pictures that promoted self—harm. this morning, the government is publishing proposals to tackle the issue. let's hear more from the culture secretaryjeremy wright, who joins us from westminster. thank you forjoining us. let's just go straight to molly russell and her pa rents go straight to molly russell and her parents and their campaign. what in your proposals do you think will make a difference? i think what molly russell's family and all those affected by harms of various kinds on the internet is to have a system that will be effective. what we are proposing to do is to say to those companies that operate online and that deal with material that is user generated content that they must abide by a duty of care to keep their users as safe as possible and we will set out in codes of practice exactly what that might involve and there will be an independent
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regulator to make sure that is what happens with penalties that will make these companies sit up and take notice. that is the kind of system we believe will work most effectively in making the internet a safer place. you talk about penalties, what type of penalties? how much would they be fined? that'll be up to the regulator to decide but what we want to make sure is there are a range of penalties available. we will be consulting not just on fines of substantial size bottle and also remedial notices to make these companies change their behaviour and, if we think it is appropriate to do this, to get to the point where individual managers might be held reliable —— liable for the companies, and will ask people to consider blocking a particular website if it refuses to comply with what the regulator is asking it to do. we will ask people for their views in the course of responding to this white paper about what they think the range of penalties should
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be but we think a full range of penalties should be considered because we need to make sure behaviour changes. one thing we know for sure is a lot of the social media companies are making extraordinary amounts of money so can you give us an example of perhaps in what range are talking about, the fines? it'll be up to the regulator to decide but if you look at the fines available to the information commissioner under the gdp our rules, that can be up to 4% of the compa ny‘s gdp our rules, that can be up to 4% of the company's turnover. so percentages of turnover? that is what you'd be looking out? these are substantial penalties available under gdp substantial penalties available undergdp are and substantial penalties available under gdp are and we should be looking at something comparable here but in the end we want to make sure people have the chance to respond to what we are proposing in this white paper and give us their views. we are determined that what we should have available to a regulator will be independent is a range of penalties effective in making sure this duty of care is complied with. we wa nt this duty of care is complied with. we want to make sure online
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companies do whatever it is reasonable to do to keep their users safe online. if they are not based in the uk, can you find them? well, we can find them and under the gdp our rules that is what happens for the information commissioner and there are a number of other particular penalties that we will be looking at, all of them have different challenges associated with them which is why we want to work through those potential penalties but the white paper in my view needed to include a full range of penalties so we should consider them all. you mentioned about managers being prosecuted. is it prosecuted for behaviours of the company was yellow it could be civil or criminal liability and we want to hear what people want out of it. it is important that range of penalties is available for consideration. in the end it is important companies take very seriously their duty of care. we are not asking something unreasonable of them. we are not saying that every instance of harm that breaches any —— reaches any
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user is a breach of duty of care but we say they must do everything they can to keep people safe and have systems in place to make that happen and it'll be up to a regulator to determine whether they've done that or not. can you give us an example of the type of thing that somebody in charge of a company might be liable for, then? as we are speaking, so many thousands of things are being uploaded onto the internet so what kind of thing might they be responsible for?“ internet so what kind of thing might they be responsible for? if you don't do everything reasonably practicable to do to keep people safe from online terrorism, child sexual exploitation, the notion of self—harm or suicide, disinformation, all of these things the white paper covers, if you have not done what you can sensibly do to put in place procedures that'll keep people safe from that kind of harm, you are unlikely to be found by the regulator to be in compliance with your duty of care. and if you are
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not, the regulator will have penalties available to it to take action against you. we are not asking companies to do anything that is unreasonable. if it is impossible to do, we won't ask you to do it. but it if it is possible, if the technology exists and it requires the will to do it and you refuse, then there will be consequences. that is what the regulator will concern itself with. can i ask about something we've talked about so much here on breakfast, the technical deadline for brexit is this friday. the question for you and other ministers, how are you planning to compromise with labour? the conversations with the labour party are ongoing and i believe they will continue today and everybody needs to compromise, not just continue today and everybody needs to compromise, notjust the government. we all need to find a way through. people have decided in a referendum, unprecedented in its scale, we should leave the eu. we have to decide how to do that. the prime minister has pursued what i think is still a good deal but it is
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clear that parliament isn't willing at the moment to accept that deal so we need to find an alternative way forward. that's what these conversations are about. i can't predict how they will resolve themselves but there is clear well on both sides, to be fair, to engage in sensible discussion so those discussions will continue today. could you live with a customs union in order to get labour supporter?m is too early to say exactly how those talks will resolve themselves but as i say everybody needs to enter into it in the spirit of wanting to honour what the people have decided, which is to leave the european union, and to do so in a way that gives us the best possible arrangements for the future. let me ask that question again. could you live with the customs union? ask that question again. could you live with the customs union7m isn't a matter of what i can live with, it is a matter of what i can establish. we don't know what the outcome of these talks will be as yet. i am entirely supportive of the prime minister's view that she needs
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to find a way through this, that she has tried everything else, she has tried her deal and that hasn't worked, and we now need to talk about what else might work. that is what these talks are for and i think it is entirely appropriate we sit down with the leader of the opposition and his team, it's not a question of whether we approve of what they need of of the opposition says on this issue, he is the leader of the opposition so it's right to sit down with him and talk about what might be a way forward. are you meeting today, then? it will not be meeting today, then? it will not be me but there will be conversations that continue today and we need those conversations to proceed and i hope to reach a sensible conclusion. jeremy wright, thank you very much for your time with us this morning. louise has got in contact with us, another louise, not you. can we have less brexit and more discussion of line of duty, she says? she wants three quarters of an hour discussing the plot of line of duty? no,
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because i haven't watched it! louise, i will give you a call, i can't talk to louise, nobody else because i will give the plot away. don't talk to carol about it, either! she is at the tulip festival at arundel castle. people didn't believe you are actually there because it looks so lovely. i absolutely am! i love line of duty, for the record. arundel castle is stunning. the tulip festival is on. the excitement around tulips started way back in 1636 with an era called tulip mania which was when tulips were so popular royalty, aristocracy were clambering to get them and they were a symbol of great wealth. the dutch actually noted this and started a stock exchange for tulips. and tulips, one tulip
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was worth more than its weight in gold, it is quite staggering, and one tulip could buy you a house in amsterdam in those days. sadly, it didn't last and after about a year, the whole thing collapsed. you can see this beautiful bed here. this is full of different kinds of tulips. we've got the purple flag tulips, and agree to, the purple dream, and the lovely soft herbaceous border, called soft because of the colours. the weather for all of us today is mixed. a cloudy start, some rain in the south. what is happening is we have high pressure to the north, low pressure to the south and easterly winds developing in between and a weather front in between and it is that weather front in the southern counties of england and south wales bring in the thick of cloud and some showers. we have that to start the day. we have some low cloud in parts
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of northern and eastern scotland and north—east england and through the day the showers will develop especially across england and wales, some heavy and sundry, getting as farup as some heavy and sundry, getting as far up as merseyside. they will be showers in northern ireland developing but showers easing in western scotland. temperatures, though, high for this time of year, 19 in parts of norfolk. 17 or 18 in the midlands, but generally we are looking at 10—14. heading through the evening and overnight, we have the evening and overnight, we have the weather front in the south, still producing cloud and rain in the same areas, and that low cloud tripped across the north sea coastline. where it breaks in parts of scotla nd coastline. where it breaks in parts of scotland it'll be cold enough for, locally, some frost. we start like that tomorrow morning, still with the weather front in the south, still producing showery outbreaks of rain, and tomorrow, too, cloud across scotland and we are pulling
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in this easterly feed so it'll feel colder than today. our top temperature tomorrow is likely to be 13. then, moving on into wednesday, finally with the high—pressure dominating across scandinavia, it pushes away the front into the south—west producing not much more than a band of cloud for south—west england and wales, may be the odd spot, and a lot of low cloud in the north and east of the uk, the brighter skies in the west. feeling cooler. and louise. thank you, carol, back with you and those lovely tulips later. a new chance to reduce high levels of pollution starts today. the introduction of what has been cold do to make called an ultra low emission zone. drivers with the most polluting vehicles will be charged to drive into the centre of the capital and there are plans to introduce the scheme and other parts of the uk. victoria gill has more. the dangerous reality of city life.
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these images, filmed with a heat sensitive camera, show the pollution from vehicles being pumped into our streets. it's invisible, but on busy city streets like this we're all breathing it, and long—term exposure to pollution from traffic can damage our lungs, our hearts, and it reduces our life expectancy. that's why london is embarking on a bold venture — the world's first ultra low emission zone. from today, the most—polluting vehicles will have to pay to enter the city centre. the idea is to discourage people to drive into central london if they've got polluting vehicles, to encourage them to walk, cycle, use public transport. if they have to drive into central london, to use a clean form of vehicle — electric, hybrid, hydrogen powered. but if you are going to drive in a more polluting vehicle, you have to pay for that. so what is a more polluting vehicle? well, it's based on a standard emissions test. petrol vehicles registered before 2005 are likely to be subject to this new charge.
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but most diesel vehicles registered before 2016 will be liable. and what will it cost? well, if you include the congestion charge, it could cost £24 per day to drive a car or van into central london. for small—business owners like alex, who runs a house clearance and recycling company, it's meant upgrading his van to a newer one that's compatible with these ultra low emission rules. i haven't been paid in two months. really? yeah. and that's because of the outlay for the new vehicles? entirely due to this, yes. the vehicle itself was 19,000 and then we had to pay for the box on the back, so the total is nearly 30,000. you specifically bought that because of the new regulations? yes, i had no choice. it's been really, really tough and we've had to borrow money right, left and centre and really scrape through. alex supports the effort to improve air quality. this is the boundary, where there's that red thing.
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the timing of these regulations has actually left him unable to invest in newer cleaner technology than his company van. i'd much rather have fully electric, but then the infrastructure's not there yet, and also the electric vehicles are not quite there yet. similar schemes are planned in leeds and birmingham next year, but this national experiment to clean up the air that we breathe will begin on the busy streets of central london. victoria's in birmingham for us this morning with more on this story. good morning to you. good morning. i am struggling to hear you over the noise of the traffic which is appropriate. we are perched above what i am told is the infamous five ways what i am told is the infamous five wastunction. what i am told is the infamous five ways junction. traffic what i am told is the infamous five wastunction. traffic is really starting to build. it is very noisy but it is the invisible pollution that all of that traffic in the city centre is causing that is really the
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national talking point today. birmingham will be one of the two places that will follow london in introducing a central clean air zone as soon asjanuary introducing a central clean air zone as soon as january 2020, anything within this ring road will be included in that clean air zone and more polluting vehicles will be charged. somebody who has been campaigning hard for that is sandra green from the clean air parents network. thank you forjoining us. how much of a step forward is the introduction of a cleaner zone? why have you campaigned for it is blue it's a big step forward and i'm pleased about it because we have known for a while now that air pollution caused by traffic and caused by individual causes causing problems for health. for the next generation and us as well. so it is about time we did something about it. tell me about those health problems, particularly for you as a parent, it is a real concern children being exposed to those polluta nts children being exposed to those pollutants but it affects all of us.
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what are the issues it causes? pretty much everything. we know about lung disease, it affects heart disease, our brains, our immune systems, everything, really. we've got people dying prematurely, air pollution is causing problems for our health and it is building up and we are getting particulate matter stuck in our lungs. it'sjust horrible. how do you hope this site will change, then? in the next year, if we come back in five years, should it be a lot less noisy and smelly? how do you see the city changing as it becomes cleaner?” hope it is going to change because we have started in birmingham, it is different to what it used to be. it isn't the car city any more, the car isn't the car city any more, the car isn't going to be king anymore and it's going to be so much more pleasant to live in and come to an shop in. thank you so much for joining us. this is certainly going to be the start of an experiment
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that should change and make it a lot less noisy here, so we will see as this experiment to clean up our air moves forward. thank you very much indeed. we've got loads of great guests coming up later on, nicole taylor, who has written a new film called wild rose, with a fantastic cast. it's all about country music. the script writer and one of the stars of the victim, which you've seen and you love. i couldn't stop watching that! a surgeon while they're awake to remove a tumour from a part of their brain so they can see it doesn't affect their speech as they are operating. they kept talking to make sure they didn't take out the wrong part of the brain. extraordinary story. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye.
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it's thought around 40,000 vehicles will be affected by the capital's new ultra low emission zone. from today older and more—polluting cars will have to pay to enter central london. drivers can check whether their vehicles meet the standards on the transport for london website. i accept there are businesses that will find this transition difficult. tfl, we have made sure that our buses are compliant, which has been an expensive process. we've reached a deal with the nhs, the police, the fire service, small business and charities, low—income families. but the fact is this is a hidden, invisible killer and i'm not willing to stand by while things get worse. a man's been arrested after a woman in her 20s was found dead on a street in enfield. police were called to brookbank, turkey street at around 5:50pm yesterday evening. the man was detained on suspicion of murder. it's emerged a secret police list
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of alleged gang members was leaked by a council and then fell into the hands of criminals. pages of the met‘s so—called gangs matrix was emailed to more than 40 people by a worker at newham council and then posted on social media. newham has apologised for the breach in 2017 and said "lessons had been learned". london's theatre scene has been celebrated at the annual olivier awards. the best new play went to the inheritance, which focuses on the lives of gay men in new york. kyle stroller took home best actor for his part in the play. on to the travel... turning to the roads — let's have a look at how traffic is coping in the new ulez zone. this is waterloo bridge. all clear there so far this morning. it is the start of the easter holidays as well. in harrow, station road is closed because of an unsafe building. finally, one lane is closed
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for emergency electricity work. on the a200 greenwich church street at creek road. time for the weather with lucy martin. hello, good morning. it's a day to keep the umbrella close to hand. the potential for some quite heavy, possibly thundery showers later in the day. bit of a grey, murky start this morning. plenty of cloud around and some mist and fog and one or two showers, as well. that mist and fog should lift, and as we go through the day it will gradually brighten with some breaks developing in the cloud to allow for some sunny spells. but with increasing amounts of sunshine, chance of a few heavy, possibly thundery showers with some hail mixed in. temperatures, though, not doing too badly in the sunshine — highs of around 17 degrees celsius. as we go through this evening and overnight, we hold onto a few showers. showers merging into longer spells of rain as we move into the early hours, particularly the further south you are. temperatures not falling too far, though — overnight lows around seven to 10 celsius. a noticeable dip in temperatures to come tomorrow. plenty of cloud and some outbreaks of rain. we'll see more in the way of settled
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weather later in the week, but it does stay that little bit cooler. bye— bye. that's all for now — i'll be back in half an hour. now, though, back to dan and louise. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it's just gone 7:30am. let's bring you an update on the main news from the bbc. for the first time, social media companies such as facebook and twitter could have their blocked and face heavy fines if they don't stick to new safety laws. proposals being considered by the government include holding managers responsible for sites failing to tackle terrorist propaganda and child abuse. the plans also suggest setting up an independent regulator to hold internet companies legally to account. their world's first ultra emission zone has come into force in london. it's an attempt to lower the city's
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dangerously high levels of pollution. drivers of diesel cars over four years old and petrol cars registered more than 13 years ago will have to pay an extra £12.50 a day to drive into the centre of the city. leeds and birmingham are planning similar rules. it's thought brexit talks between the conservatives and labour could continue later. they failed to reach an agreement last week after three days of meetings. the prime minister says both parties will need to compromise if there's to be a deal. mrs may is due at an emergency summit in brussels on wednesday, when eu leaders will expect to hear fresh plans. a british woman is facing a possible two—year jail sentence in dubai after allegedly breaking the state's cyber crime laws with facebook posts she wrote while in the uk. laleh shahravesh was arrested while visiting dubai with her teenage daughter last month. she had posted critical comments about her ex—husband's new wife three years ago. ministers here should consider banning the use of 5g technology made by huawei in westminster.
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that's according to a government cybersecurity official. the technical director of the national cyber security centre told bbc panorama that "shoddy" engineering makes the chinese firm's products more likely to be vulnerable to attack. huawei says it will soon reveal plans to tackle the problem. a campaign to raise awareness of a system to help people alert police when in imminent danger but unable to speak is being launched today. the "silent solution" system enables a 999 mobile caller who is too scared to make a noise, or speak, to press five five when prompted — to inform police they are in a genuine emergency. around 20,000 silent 999 calls are made every day. this is a rather lovely. we love dogs aren't breakfast. we love puppies. here are 17 great dane puppies. here are 17 great dane puppies. in a single litter! this is in arizona. vets in arizona helped this great dane, called cleo, deliver 19
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pups via caesarean section. all but two survived and in just a few weeks, they will weigh more than 20 pounds, and a fully grown male can weigh as much as 14 stone. how would you have enough space in your car, your house, anything for a great dane? i'm about 14 stone, i think. i haven't weighed myself for about four years... i have no idea how much you weigh. neither do i! should really sort that out. i'll dig out the weighing scales. you should know. anyway, maybe they weigh the same as dan. normally we compare everything to the size of a double—decker bus... 7:34am. really busy weekend for sport. really busy in the fa cup. the magic is alive and well. 18th may. wembley stadium. manchester city against watford. it's after watford produced one
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of the finest comebacks in fa cup semi final history to see off wolves in extra time. our correspondent david ornstein has the details in the competition renowned for producing moments of magic, the latest courtesy of watford — through to a first fa cup final since 1984, thanks to an incredible comeback. although they made the better start, it was wolves who were the more clinical, and matt doherty gave the travelling gold masses reason to believe this would be their day. after the restart, it was two — rauljimenez with a goal as flamboyant as the celebration. that is brilliant! and the mexican wrestler‘s mask to celebrate. the wolves' joy was tempered when a moment of sheer audacity by gerard deulofeu gave watford hope, and hope became reality as a challenge on troy deeney in the closing minutes allowed the captain to net a dramatic late equaliser. 0h! absolutely emphatic!
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watford carried their momentum into the added period, and duly capitalised — deulofeu again the man to make the difference, completing a remarkable turnaround. heaven for watford, heartbreak for wolves. a cup tie for the ages. watford are now within touching distance of the fa cup. they'll return here on may 18 for that shot at glory. only standing in their way are the might of manchester city. in this moment i am only thinking, we have to come back here, and it will be a blessing. playing against city, we know it will be very, very difficult for us but we'd like to enjoy it. in the premier league, arsenal missed the chance to jump up to third after a narrow defeat at everton. philjagielka poked in the only goal at goodison park. arsenal remain fourth but could slip out of the champions league qualification spots if chelsea avoid
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defeat against west ham. there was more crowd unrest in scotland as rangers beat motherwell 3-0. rangers captainjames tavernier had a cigarette lighter and other objects thrown at him in the first half. as for the match itself — scott arfield's hat—trick cemented rangers second spot in the table. yesterday we were talking about james cracknell being the oldest competitor in the boat race. this morning we can describe him as the oldest winner. at 46, he was part of the cambridge crew that pipped oxford by a couple of seconds. it was the light blues' 84th win to oxford's 80. and for the human evolution masters student — it was extra special to add another medal to his two olympic golds. it's more amazing sitting on the start. at the olympics, there's no—one there and suddenly your boat and thousands of people there and then there's noise all down the course. and today with a group of guys that have gone through the early mornings and not living like full—time athletes is really special. age is... callum is less than half my age so
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i'm going to have to look after him. i was designated driver on the way home. it was a clean sweep for cambridge, the women easing to victory in the thames too. both reserve crews also won their races there were tries galore in the premiership with 11 in total as gloucester beat northampton. mark atkinson scored a first half hat—trick to bolster gloucester‘s bid for spot in the end of season playoffs. they're third with four games still to play it's been more than four years since newport—based dragons last won away from home in the pro 14. they didn't lose at south african side southern kings — instead coming from behind to draw 18—18. sometimes we show you some terrible misses aren't breakfast, don't we? this might be the worst yet. fomer stoke forward eric choupo—moting somehow manages to stop this shot going in.
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we need to see that again. watch this. i'm just leave it! we need to see that again. watch this. i'mjust leave it! he we need to see that again. watch this. i'm just leave it! he actually saved it, didn't he? great clea ra nce! saved it, didn't he? great clearance! terrible, terrible. i think one of the best and worst mrs of all time. up there with the famous ronnie rosenthal. someone tweeted last night, great moment for ronnie rosenthal. you'll be hanging around because we are talking about this a lot. racism in football has hit the headlines again this weekend after incidents of alleged abuse towards several players in the english football league. it follows comments made by the england footballer danny rose, who said he "couldn't wait to see the back of football" because of racism in the sport. so is enough being done to tackle it? we're joined now by former watford striker danny webber. lovely to see you, thank you for coming in. why do you think we've had a weekend where there have been a few incidents reported? is it the case that awareness... i know we are
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aware but awareness has raised the issue again and people are talking about it? its a case of exposure now. there are enough people willing to speak. the lads at the top, danny rose, raheem sterling, they are speaking. other people need a voice sometimes. the fact it is there, people have a platform with social media to be able to speak, it means that things that normally would be an undercurrent have now come to the forefront. social media works both ways because people can speak out against it but can also use it to be abusive. that's right. that's why you see things... a lot of people saying over the last ten or 20 years that it has got better. it hasn't. it exists. people do... they have the platform. for abuse of all kinds, but racism is the hot topic at the moment that needs to be
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addressed. what are your own experiences from when you are playing? i've had many experiences. normally i can go to different clu bs, normally i can go to different clubs, warming up down the sideline when i'm sat on the bench, but on the sideline as you are warming up you would hear things in the crowd. you'd hear different levels of abuse but they would always... not always, but they would always... not always, but often a racial slant on that abuse. then you are faced with what do you do about it? it goes back to when you are a child and your dad would say how you deal with it. him being the generation before, if you are playing on the pitch there is a way to answer it but if you aren't on the pitch it's... what do you do? turn around and face it? the odd time you look in the crowd and see the malice in people space. that shows how much they mean it. there's nothing you can do. you look into a crowd of 30,000, 40,000 people and there's not much you can do. that's there's not much you can do. that's theissue there's not much you can do. that's the issue as to how authorities and players deal with it. we spoke to
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troy townsend last week and he was suggesting there might be a time when players take it into their own hands and start walking off the pitch more regularly, but is that the best answer or is it a case of trying to find the people shouting those things and removing them from football and banning them for life? how do you get to the bottom of it? it's difficult. i agree with walking off the pitch but that's the first point. everybody making a stand and making everyone aware. if that continues the next week, then it's not really made much of a difference. you have to get a think tank of people together, its about education. that's from the schools, nurseries, the football industry, other industries. men, women and everybody from every sort of background and try to think of a way to tackle it. it's about education because i don't believe anyone is born racist. the walking off the pitch, you think that might work, would be a good thing? it's good to raise awareness, definitely. good to say, listen, i'm not standing for it, and walk off the pitch. but
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after that it's what gets done and who is in control. i spoke to john barnes, who has been very vocal about this for a long time. the point you made —— he made about walking off the pitch. let's say you walking off the pitch. let's say you walk off the pitch for a monkey chant and walk off the pitch the next week, those who were doing the monkey chants will think, actually, we will show we are racist by not monkey chanting, we will sarcastically clap. now we have to walk off the pitch was sarcastic clapping. the next week it will be something else, different noise. again, it is rather than dealing with that, going back to the education process and dealing with it as education process and dealing with itasa education process and dealing with it as a societal issue. totally. i think back to my dad and what he used to say, he would say, answer them on the football pitch. like the juventus player, he scored and that was his answer, the way to do it. beyond that, how do you deal with the splinter groups within the crowd ? the splinter groups within the crowd? they the splinter groups within the
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crowd ? they need the splinter groups within the crowd? they need to be banned, the enforcement need to take place. however, it can be abused the whole situation can be abuse. say for i commit‘s sake, cameco city play liverpool, rival fans will go commit‘s sake, cameco city play liverpool, rivalfans will go in commit‘s sake, cameco city play liverpool, rival fans will go in and abuse a player to get an advantage for their team and you talk about points docking, it's very difficult. your dad's advice sounds brilliant but that relies on you, the player, having enormous self—control.m does. but what are your choices? players need to have more choices. at the moment the choice is either walk off the pitch or suffer it or a nswer walk off the pitch or suffer it or answer on the football pitch. everybody needs to come together as a collective. danny, lovely to see you and thank you for talking to us about it. good to get you a perspective. 7:45am. let us know what you think of that and you can get us on social
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media. people are telling us on social media that they think carol's background is so gorgeous they have suggested it is fake. you are at allan dell castle, aren't you?” absolutely am. it's not fake. i'll try to be gentle. the chilli festival is on so let's talk to the head gardener and designer, martin duncan. good morning, lovely to see you. you, too. you have been awarded aq you. you, too. you have been awarded a q guild medal and only one is awarded a year in the uk. i felt very proud and all the wonderful gardeners i work with contributed to that award. you are very humble but we can see all around the work you have put in. we are in the wonderful garden which they asked me to design a few years ago and it's known as a hobbit guarded by all the children.
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we have some beautiful spring flowers in here. we have all of the botanical tulips, as well. you are talking about them earlier, from turkey. they came from turkey. we have persian pale. this area is an abundance for wildlife because all these stumps add to the attraction for wildlife to go in and hide and live in the stumps and we also have other things and it's an architectural mind... there some great beauty about it. it's a very harry potter. for now, thank you very much indeed. it is indeed beautiful. you can see all around me these lovely stumps and the weather, well, fairly cloudy here in arundel. it's cloudy for all of us at the moment with mist and fog, particularly in the south—eastern quarter of the uk, where it is dense
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in places. there is some sunshine in the forecast but also some rain. you can see in the pressure chart, a weather front draped across the southern uk. that is producing the rain. high pressure to the north, low to the south. an easterly wind, chilly for us but today won't be chilly. this morning, if you are standing around waiting outside it will feel chilly despite temperatures heading up towards the high single figures now. a lot of cloud. that will melt for some parts of the uk, but in the south we hang onto it with our weather front and some showery outbreaks of rain. they will develop further, heading north through the date. northern ireland, a few showers, western scotland showers were clear. the sun will come out. north—east scotland and north—east england, hanging onto the cloud. temperatures in norfolk could get up to 90. midlands 17 or 18 but is generally 10—14. overnight tonight, we hang on to the low cloud
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across the north and east of the country. we still have our cloud across the south with its rain and where the clear skies develop across parts of scotland, we could see a touch of frost. tomorrow we start on that note, still with the rain in the south. it's not moving anywhere particularly quickly. a bit more cloud across western scotland, but equally a lot of dry weather and again tomorrow, temperatures up to 13 degrees. for some of us, where we have had 17—19 today, there will be a big drop as we pull in that cooler easterly wind. wednesday, high pressure becomes ensconced over scandinavia. that will chase away the weather front from the south, pushing it into the south—west of england, south wales, as a band of cloud with an odd spot of rain in it. once again, a lot of low cloud across the north and east of the uk coming in from the north sea. once again, the west is best with highs disappointing for this stage in april. are really gorgeous there,
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this morning. thank you very much for that. 7:48am. this morning we've been talking about london's new ultra low emission zone, which comes into force today. steph's looking at how the new charges on the most polluting cars and lorries might impact businesses and drivers. we are talking to the mayor of london, said it can't come in about half an hour. this is just about what it might mean for drivers. will it change what they decide to buy? good morning. from today there will be an extra charge for the most polluting cars and lorries to drive in central london. there are also plans underway for similar charges in birmingham and leeds, too. so what does all this mean for the types of cars we drive? i'm joined now by rachel burgess, news editor at autocar and what car? magazine. good morning. good morning. from your opinion, what is the best environmental option when it comes to buying a car, to try and not have to buying a car, to try and not have to pay these potential charges? the most environmentally friendly option
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are electric cars, but obviously there's still some problems with these cards, for example the cost is prohibitive to a lot of people. it very much depends on your usage. long journeys, it just won't work for you. something that is a middle ground is a plug—in hybrid. a plug—in hybrid that has more than 20 miles of zero emissions range are exempt from these charges in london. that is something we are seeing is gaining traction in the car market and lots of people are starting to buy these cars because they can still do long distances as well as benefit from bonuses of being in the city. we talked about electric cars before on this programme. you mentioned some problems are still but i though is likely to go? will be see my charging points, more people with electric cars, and will the price start to come down, do you think? yes. there is massive investment in infrastructure and thatis investment in infrastructure and that is ongoing as more and more electric cars arrive. in the next 12
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to 18 months they will be a plethora of new electric cars on the road and there are a lot already. there's already a much bigger choice for consumers and we are hoping that prices will be able to start on a new cars from just below 20 grand and hopefully it will become more accessible to people. 20 grand is still a lot of money for people. you mentioned hybrid cars. what kind of cost are we talking for them? u nfortu nately, cost are we talking for them? unfortunately, they are no cheaper. at the moment the cheaper plug—in hybrid on the road is a little under 30 grand but obviously as the skies exist for longer they will go into the used car market so there is the benefit of getting them on the used carfor benefit of getting them on the used car for quite. benefit of getting them on the used carfor quite. of course, if you can't afford those, and lots of people won't, you can get any modern petrol or diesel and it is relatively environmentally friendly. we hear a lot to the country but if we are looking at ten or 15 years ago they were not. looking at the last five years, for many people they are still the most appropriate choice. have you bought a car, a new
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car in the last five years, it is likely that won't be too bad on the environment front, even if it isn't a hybrid or electric? no, it's not nearly as bad as has sometimes been reported. obviously electric is cleaner and plug—in hybrid gives you the option of being on electric only when you are driving at low speeds and in cities, which is perfect. for and in cities, which is perfect. for a lot of people that is not appropriate. thank you very much. rachel burgess, news editor at auto car. we might have to borrow you in a moment. look what we've got here! i'm cumming! now, take a look at this. it's a familiar scene — the famous red sofa, the round coffee table, and a selection of bright—eyed presenters. but look a bit more closely and you mightjust spot that this is not the real bbc breakfast studio. it's very hard to tell the difference. it's a replica, and the presenters are actually eggs. the "bbc bregg—fast" set was created by seven—year—old fletcher,
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with a little help from his mum sarah, for a school competition — which he won. they join us now. good morning, both. thank you so much. your attention to detail is fantastic! why did you want to do this with the breakfast set? we wa nted this with the breakfast set? we wanted to do this because we watch it every morning when i meeting my first, i always watch it. what is your little slot, when do you watch from? we watch from about 6:30am until 7:30am. that's early! do you goaljust until 7:30am. that's early! do you goal just before sally's until 7:30am. that's early! do you goaljust before sally's sport or do you wait for the weather? when do you wait for the weather? when do you leave for school? i know you really like sally, don't you? so do you wait for the sport and then go to school? yeah! how closely did you look at us to get it right? you've
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even got the difference between mine and louise's hair colour right. when you staring at us for days? we did research, didn't we? we looked you up research, didn't we? we looked you up on the internet. some close-up pictures of each presenter and we think we've got a good likeness to you, steph. i look really cozy in that top. you've got fringe issues, don't you? i have a few fringe issues! look at steph's hair! is that me with the red tie? yes. i like my dress. fletcher, that is my favourite red dress, thank you so much for putting me in that. what i would like to know is, in terms of the project, did you do this yourself or is there help from yourfamily? this yourself or is there help from your family? a bit of help from my mum. what do you get involved in
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with? i'm probably responsible for the finer details on the eggs. the hair at... the finer details on the eggs. the hairat... you can the finer details on the eggs. the hair at... you can thank me for that! we constructed the set together, the tv set in the background and painted and glued it altogether. it was collaborative.” love all the comments. brexit has eve ryo ne love all the comments. brexit has everyone scrambled, was that your idea? we researched other words and worked together. leicester city poche temper macro plays, that's my favourite. what did you went for the design? i won an easter egg, a big one! —— leicester city poche eggcellent players. what are you planning for next year?
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eggsperiments! . laughter you can't come on here with great puns! carol is a fried egg, why is that? because it's really hot. eggstreme temperatures, expect to be boiling! you sent the picture to us, is that right? we saw it on to social media. excellent example of the power of social media. we are very happy with it. i'd love to give it but i'm sure it's got a special place in your house. we did talk about this. we kept his entry from last year and said there's no way we can get rid of this one. it's very sturdy. you can take it home and enjoy your massive easter egg. who is your favourite presenter? dan!
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0h, is your favourite presenter? dan! oh, i felt it was me! high five. me and fletch, me and fletch. fletch, thank you. stay tuned. thank you very much —— stay true to your height. we'll have a picture without the rest of them, just you and me. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. it's built around 40,000 vehicles will be affected by the capital's ultra low emission zone. from today, older and more polluting cars will have to pay £12.50 to enter central london. critics claim the poorest londoners and small businesses will be unfairly hit. drivers can check whether their vehicles meet the standards on the transport for london website. i accept there are businesses who will find this transition difficult. tfl, we have made sure that our buses are compliant,
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which has been an expensive process. we've reached a deal with the nhs, the police, the fire service, small business and charities, low—income families. but the fact is this is a hidden, invisible killer and i'm not willing to stand by while things get worse. a man's been arrested after a woman in her 20s was found dead on a street in enfield. police were called to brookbank, turkey street at around 5:50pm yesterday evening. the man was detained on suspicion of murder. it's emerged a secret police list of alleged gang members was leaked by a council and then fell into the hands of criminals. pages of the met‘s so—called gangs matrix was emailed to more than 40 people by a worker at newham council and then posted on social media. newham has apologised for the breach in 2017 — and said "lessons had been learned." london's theatre scene has been celebrated at the annual olivier awards.
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the best new play went to the inheritance, which focuses on the lives of gay men in new york. kyle soller took home best actor for his part in the play. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on all tube lines so far this morning. turning to the roads, let's have a look at how traffic is coping in the new ulez zone. this is waterloo bridge. all clear there so far this morning. it is the start of the easter holidays, as well, of course. in harrow, station road is closed because of an unsafe building. finally, one lane is closed for emergency electricity work. on the a200 greenwich church street at creek road. time for the weather with lucy martin. hello, good morning. it's a day to keep the umbrella close to hand. the potential for some quite heavy, possibly thundery showers later in the day. bit of a grey, murky start this morning. plenty of cloud around and some mist and fog and one or two showers, as well. that mist and fog should lift,
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and as we go through the day it will gradually brighten with some breaks developing in the cloud to allow for some sunny spells. but with increasing amounts of sunshine, chance of a few heavy, possibly thundery showers with some hail mixed in. temperatures, though, not doing too badly in the sunshine — highs of around 17 degrees celsius. as we go through this evening and overnight, we hold onto a few showers. showers merging into longer spells of rain as we move into the early hours, particularly the further south you are. temperatures not falling too far, though — overnight lows around seven to 10 celsius. a noticeable dip in temperatures to come tomorrow. plenty of cloud and some outbreaks of rain. we'll see more in the way of settled weather later in the week, but it does stay that little bit cooler. bye— bye. that's all for now — i'll be back in half an hour. good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today:
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social media companies could be fined or blocked if they fail to tackle harmful content on their sites, under new government rules. pollution penalty. from today, drivers of older cars will have to pay £12.50 to travel into central london on top of the congestion charge. named and shamed. holland & barrett is criticised over the way it treats suppliers as part of a wider crackdown on late payments. i'll have all the details. watford complete a stunning comeback to reach the fa cup final for the first time since 1984. they came from 2—0 down to beat wolves 3—2. good morning from our rental castle. the tulip festival is under way. pippin the cat is here along with this beautiful christening cake, also known as flora. so mist and fog to clear and some showers in england and wales but some brighter skies and wales but some brighter skies andi and wales but some brighter skies and i will tell you where 15
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minutes. good morning. it's monday april 8th. our top story: for the first time, social media companies such as facebook and twitter could have their services blocked and face heavy fines if they don't stick to new internet safety laws. under government proposals, bosses could be held responsible for sites failing to tackle terrorist propaganda and child abuse. here's our media editor, amol rajan. over the past few years, the tech giants have come under sustained pressure to clean up their act. terrorist propaganda such as the live broadcast of a recent attack in new zealand have caused horror. so, too, have stories about child grooming online, and the appalling death of 14—year—old molly russell, who took her own life after seeing images of self—harm on instagram — which is owned by facebook — prompted an outcry. this long—delayed white paper is broad in scope and bold in its recommendations. for the first time, oversight of the internet will be entrusted to a regulator. a statutory duty of care to protect users will be enforced. and there is a potential for heavy fines to be administered.
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but many details remain unclear, which is why there is now a 12—week consultation. the government hasn't yet decided whether it will set up a new regulator or entrust this work to an existing watchdog, such as ofcom. children's charities want tough penalties. now is the time to act, and the uk has an opportunity now. if we see statutory regulation, that will be the uk going further and faster than any other country in the world to tackle online harms. the new rules will apply to any company that allows people to share or discover user—generated content, or to interact with others. while facebook welcome the proposals in principle, they say any new rules must protect innovation and freedom of speech. critics say applying the same rules to companies of such varying size will favour those few companies that can afford staff to oversee compliance, so entrenching the power of big tech. amol rajan, bbc news.
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drivers of diesel cars over four years old and petrol cars registered more than 13 years ago will have to pay an extra £12.50 a day to drive into the centre of the city. leeds and birmingham are planning similar rules. in a few minutes we'll be talking to the mayor of london about the new charge. it's thought brexit talks between the conservatives and labour could continue later today. they failed to reach an agreement last week after three days of meetings. the prime minister says both parties will need to compromise if there's to be a deal. theresa may is due at an emergency summit in brussels on wednesday when eu leaders will expect to hear fresh plans. our political correspondent, ben wright, is in westminster. good morning. i heard from one minister that more talks will take place today. lots of talk of compromise. is it possible? these talks are spluttering along and there has been no breakthrough so far. theresa may's big hope is that she can do some kind of deal with
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labour which you can take to the european union, and say, look, i can find a way through the impasse at westminster. there is a way through to get the deal over the line. cross— party to get the deal over the line. cross—party consensus on what brexit would look like in the future. that is what you are trying to do with labour. both she and the labour leader are under pressure from their own side not to compromise, which is making the talks pretty difficult. and there is no guarantee at all that there will be face to face discussions today. clearly these talks are not dead. they are continuing. this really is a big week for brexit. as things stand, we are set to leave the european union on friday without a deal, but theresa may is going to go to a summit of eu leaders on wednesday and ask the more time again, another extension. she hopes until the end ofjune so extension. she hopes until the end of june so that extension. she hopes until the end ofjune so that the uk can get its act together and try and get a brexit agreement through. but i think she is likely to face quite a lot of resistance and questions from eu leaders who want to know why.
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what is she going to use the time for? is there any guarantee that you can break the impasse at westminster? it promises to be another significant week in brexit. we said to have counted how many there have been! how many times have isaid there have been! how many times have i said that? i would like to know! 802, i think. i said that? i would like to know! 802, ithink. a i said that? i would like to know! 802, i think. a british woman is facing a possible two yetjail sentence in dubai for cybercrime posts that you posted right here in the uk. laleh shahravesh was arrested while visiting dubai with her teenage daughter last month. she had posted critical comments about her ex—husband's new wife three years ago. ministers should consider banning the use of 5g technology made by huawei in westminster and other sensitive areas, according to a government cyber official. the technical director of the national cyber security centre told bbc panorama that shoddy engineering makes the chinese firm's products more likely to be vulnerable to attack.
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huawei says it will soon reveal plans to tackle the problem. the uk's biggest health food retailer, holland & barrett, has been named and shamed over the way they have been treating one of their suppliers. we have been looking into this. what is happening? this is all about big companies and how they pay their smaller suppliers. one particular case has been highlighted by the small business commissioner, and it is a case where holland & barrett owed an it supplier £15,000. this is a small business, a small it supplier, they will then visit mega money. it took holland & barrett 67 days to pay them. they should have done it in 30. it was not until the small business commissioner intervened that they sped up the process but even then it took a long time. the small business commissioner that looked into holland & barrett to see what was going on and whether it was happening to other suppliers, and
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they found that in 60% of the cases with suppliers, they were not meeting the agreement on payments. they wanted to name and shame them because it is a big problem. holland & barrett themselves have come back and said it was one particular case and said it was one particular case and it was over the busy christmas period and as soon as they realised, they did pay the money. but this highlights how big the problem is. there are fascinating figures on this. the federation of small business says that 84% of small businesses have problems with getting money from big suppliers. there are 50,000 businesses put out of business because they have not been able to get their money. it is a big problem for companies. i have had lots of messages since i mentioned it on telly. people saying this is happening in the construction sector, in other sectors as well. what we heard from the chancellor in the spring statement was that actually what we need to do is make companies more accountable and get them to stay in their annual statements how they are paying people, how often they pay
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them on time and making that more of a formal thing so there is more transparency. big problems. thank you. a campaign to raise awareness ofa you. a campaign to raise awareness of a system to alert police when they are in imminent danger but they cannot speak is being launched today. the silent solution system enables a 999 mobile caller who is too scared to make a noise, or speak, to press 55 when prompted to inform police they are in a genuine emergency. around 20,000 silent 999 calls are made every day. it is just it isjust coming up it is just coming up to it isjust coming up to eight it is just coming up to eight to 10am and this is breakfast. good morning. —— 8:10am. poor air quality is the largest environmental risk to public health in the uk, according to the government. in a bid to tackle the pollution problem, cities across england will introduce ultra low emission zones, charging drivers of the most polluting vehicles a daily fee to enter city centres. the scheme, a world first, hasjust come into effect in london today.
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the mayor of london, sadiq khan, joins us from our london newsroom. thank you for coming on the programme. it is good to talk to you this morning. i wanted to talk about the figures. this means that some drivers will end up paying £24 per day to go into the city centre in london. what is a fair price? that is an awful lot of money especially for small businesses trying their best to face very tight margins. for small businesses trying their best to face very tight marginsm is worth explaining the rationale behind this. each year in london and across the country there are thousands of premature deaths. 40,000 across the country, and they are attributed to poor air. there are attributed to poor air. there are children with underdeveloped lungs because of the poor air quality. each day four londoners are hospitalised, one of them children, because of bad air, and there are a range of health issues from asthma, to heart disease to cancer, directly attributable to poor quality air. it costs the london economy £3.7 billion a year and the national economy £20 billion a year, so we
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have got a public health crisis. and it is the poorest londoners, who own the fewest cards, suffering the worst air. this policy is part of a package of measures that we are taking to fix the air in london. the problem is that we can't see it because it is invisible. in the 19505 because it is invisible. in the 1950s you could see the spark and brave politicians took action then. —— the smog. now if you have a petrol car older than 2006 or diesel vehicle older than 2015, and you wa nt to vehicle older than 2015, and you want to enter central london, you pay an additional £12.50 to come into that part of london. and the good news is that since i announced this policy two years ago, we have seen a massive reduction in the number of noncompliant vehicles. it has gone down by 35% and a massive increase in compliant vehicles, going up by 55%. already in two yea rs before going up by 55%. already in two years before the policy has begun we have seen an improvement. you are admitting that it is a drastic
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measure but from what you are saying, it is required because of drastic circumstances. quite a few people have mentioned this. you will know full well that gordon brown and others were encouraging people to buy certain types of cards and there was a dash for diesel. we had 3 million diesel cars in 2000 and now there are 12 million on our street. people were encouraged to go diesel and they are now being punished for that to drive not only into london but other city centres in the years and months to come as well. how is that fair? it is not fair. one of the reasons i have been lobbying the government for a national diesel scrappage scheme is to help businesses and families who were encouraged ten, 15, 20 years ago to move from petrol to diesel. why? diesel emits 15% less carbon than petrol. there were concerns, justifiably so, around carbon emissions. but we now know that diesel is less damaging in relation to carbon emissions but it is more damaging in relation to nitrogen
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dioxide, and i have been lobbying the government for assistance and they have said no. in london we have introduced a london diesel scrappage scheme to help micra businesses, those businesses employing less than ten people, charities and low—income families. i appreciate that the national government is not giving support and the conservatives in london are against my plans but it is really important to get a grip with the national health crisis that we have got. can i ask you to answer this briefly so that viewers will know the answers? where does the money know the answers? where does the money go? we are spending double the amount of money fixing the air than the money we get in but the money we get in is ring fenced and it can only be spent on air quality and public transport. those people who pay will use it for a quality reason and not other things. and why are black cabs are exempt but emergency vehicles are paying the charge?” have stopped licensing diesel taxes and the good news is we have now got 1400 electric taxis and they will
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soon be phased out. i am also consulting on any taxi older than 12 yea rs not consulting on any taxi older than 12 years not being allowed into london, so we are moving away from the most polluting vehicles to the cleanest vehicles and the same goes for buses. all of buses within this emission zone will be compliant but also the police and the fai surface are playing ball on this and it is a public health crisis. -- fire service. what about people thinking it is fine, and they support it because they're worried about the environment, but in that respect public transport has to be of a better standard, reliable, getting you to school and work on time? this is not just an you to school and work on time? this is notjust an environment and transport issue, it is a public health crisis. i am encouraging people to move away from a polluting vehicle to either walking or cycling or using public transport. in london i have frozen transport for london fairs sincei i have frozen transport for london fairs since i became mayor because it is really important for public transport to be affordable and reliable. we are making it easier
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for people to walk and cycle. in london we have roughly speaking 9 million people and we will be at 10 million people and we will be at 10 million very soon. gross is a problem and we have got to plan for it. it is not sustainable for everybody to drive around the city with that kind of population. and one last question on brexit. people will have seen you talking to a deputy political editor, saying the government should without article 50. talking about red lines and labour and the conservative party are meeting again this week. in terms of your own red lines, do you think... would you support a deal if there is a referendum on that deal? what are your own red lines on what might happen? i speak as the mayor of london and i have seen the consequences of a no—deal brexit or a bad brexit deal. what is being offered now is 1 a bad brexit deal. what is being offered now is1 million miles away from what was offered three where ago and the public needs to have the final say on whether we accept the
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deal in parliament, negotiated by the prime minister may be, with the option of remaining in the eu. now we know whether we will have a better deal outside the club or the same terms inside the club, it is important to debate and give the public to say on accepting them. so you will not accept it unless there isa you will not accept it unless there is a vote on the final deal? i think the british public should have a say. i can't think of anything more democratic than the british public getting a say and it is really important. the reason why there is this panic is because the article 50 notice was served prematurely. stop the panic, stop the clock. withdraw article 50 and that gives parliamentarians time to see if they can negotiate a deal that is less worse for our country. once that is done, we can give the british public a final say. you accept the best deal that the government can do, with the option of staying in the eu. so you are saying revoke article 50? yes, stop the panic, stop the
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clock. why is there a rush to reach a deal by the 29th of march or the 10th of april or 22nd of may? how do you justify that to the people who voted precisely for that? you wouldn't serve notice to quit on your landlord without finding any property to go to. similarly, what the government should have done was to negotiate the terms of exit from the european union, including the thames for future business. the european union, including the thames forfuture business. once that had been done, they should have said notice to quit with article 50. because the prime minister has been focused on a national party political interest rather than the national interests, she had done it the wrong way round. the ecj has confirmed that we can do this, as have the european union, and we should with your article 50, remove the panic, do a deal with the eu, and once we have done that deal, brexiteers can bring forward article 50 again, but then we will know the best deal that we have got and then we can serve notice to quit. what we
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have got it 1 we can serve notice to quit. what we have got it1 million miles away from what the brexiteers like boris johnson, jacob rees—mogg, nigel farage were saying three years ago. give the public the final say. do you accept the terms of exit, with the option of staying within an imperfect european union? thank you for your time, sadiq khan. imperfect european union? thank you foryourtime, sadiq khan. it is 8:20am. carol is in a very snazzy green house. it is properly not even called a greenhouse. she is at huawei. it is a vine and beach house dating back to 1852 and you can see the beaches. you can see the vines behind me. it was designed by the duchess of norfolk 23 years ago and there is only three left in the world, one on the isle of wight and one into gardens and this one. but look at the kaleidoscope of colour. beautiful tulips. the tulip festival is on at a arundel castle at the moment. there are three weeks left
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of it, and if you get the chance, you will be amazed to see it. the weather today is cloudy to start with and there is some sunshine in the forecast but also some rain. the rain is in the south of england and some of it will develop further north as we go through the day in the shape of some showers. we have got high pressure to the north, low pressure to the south—west, and in between we have got a weather front producing cloud and rain which will develop and some of us are already seeing it in parts of southern england and wales, and we will be pulling in a cooler easterly wind this week but not necessarily today. we have had patchy mist and fog in the south—east. some of the cloud will melt away and showers will develop not just in will melt away and showers will develop notjust in southern england and south wales, but into northern wales, the midlands and into merseyside as well. showers developing in northern ireland. showers across western scotland melting. temperature—wise we could get to 19 today across norfolk and 17 or 18 get to 19 today across norfolk and 17 or18 in get to 19 today across norfolk and 17 or 18 in the midlands and london.
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—— london 11 to 14. we have stubborn cloud in north—east england. the cloud in north—east england. the cloud will stay with us through the course of the night. the weather front in the south will stay with us producing cloud and also some rain once again. where the cloud players across parts of scotland, locally it will be cold enough for frost. tomorrow we start off with that pesky weather front in the south producing a fair bit of cloud and again some outbreaks of rain. moving away from that, some brighter skies but cloud across western scotland. we pull in easterly winds tomorrow so temperatures will be down after being high today. the top temperature tomorrow is likely to be 13 degrees. into wednesday, we will still have that easterly wind, so we are putting in a lot of low cloud from the north sea into the north and east of the uk, but by then the weather front put it into the south—west of england, south wales, has a weaker feature with the odd spot of rain and brighter the
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further north west that you travel. temperature is below average for this stage in april. thank you. i knew it wouldn't be just a normal greenhouse. very perceptive! 8:21am. this is bbc breakfast. much—needed regulation or an attack on free speech? there's lots of reaction to government proposals out this morning to fine or block internet sites which fail to protect people from harmful material. let's speak to alisha cowie, the current miss england, who harmed herself after a bad experience online. and joining us from our london newsroom is daniel dyball, who's chief executive of the internet association which represents online companies including google, facebook and twitter. good morning to you both and thank you forjoining us. alicia, you are quite young when you had a bad experience. yes, i was around 12, which is when it started, but when it got really bad, i was 13, and
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thatis it got really bad, i was 13, and that is when i got influenced by instagram. it was just a bad that is when i got influenced by instagram. it wasjust a bad spiral really and it all started when i was 13. looking back at that if few yea rs 13. looking back at that if few years old, was it too easy, —— a few yea rs years old, was it too easy, —— a few years on, what it too easy? not enough to prevent you going down those roads? i was only 13 and that was registered on my instagram account because you have got to put on your date of birth. it was found there were no cover images on saying that you shouldn't look at these images. i can't think of the word. there was no kind of cover on it so it was really easy for me to find and it started with me looking at fitness posts because i was really active. i was on the netball team and the cross country team and it all and the cross country team and it a ll started and the cross country team and it all started really innocently. these suggested posts were really
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different. you went looking for it in the first place and you are directed towards it? —— you are not looking for it in the first place. thank you. daniel, this is a white paper that they are talking about fines for companies if they don't abide by the rules. what is your reaction to that? first of all i would say to alisha that i am very sorry to hear her story. and efforts to tackle suicide and self—harm content to tackle suicide and self—harm co nte nt a re to tackle suicide and self—harm content are top of the list for internet companies. when we see the white paper today, we will need to look carefully at any proposals for fines and penalties. it is important that we get a system of regulation for the internet that protects people from online homes, but when it comes to the penalties and fines, we need to make sure they are proportionate and that internet services can continue to provide these benefits to consumers and the services that they love. why do you need to look so closely at that?
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internet companies have been given so much time to get their house in order and it seems it is not in order. this is why the government is moving on it. intranet companies have taken huge steps to protect people from harmful content online and they want to do more on that, investing in system to take down content and investing in teams to scan for content to remove harmful energies. the next stage is getting toa energies. the next stage is getting to a regulatory phase with the government to help companies do that. we want to work with the government on the white paper to get a regulatory framework that protects people from harms but preserves the benefits of the internet. one of the risks with a white paper today is the potential scope of the proposals, where it is notjust covering big social media sites but a right range of services, from people leaving hotel and restaurant reviews, to football fan forums, to
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messaging boards. we need to be careful in our efforts to tackle online harms that we do not lose the things that people love about the internet. would those measures have helped you? internet. would those measures have helped you ? would internet. would those measures have helped you? would it have been different when you were going down those roads? i think they should put pressure on them to change. i think the regulations that they are talking about putting in place would definitely have helped and i think we are going in the right direction. but it is the fact it should have been done a lot sooner. fines, these are huge companies. depending on the fines, it is not really going to be, i don't think, i don't think it will really stop them. theyjust need to nip itand really stop them. theyjust need to nip it and do it really because there have been so many things that have happened to say that it needs to be done. daniel, she is picking up to be done. daniel, she is picking up on what we were saying earlier. too little, too late. it has been going on for so long. it isjust
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clear that they have not got a grip of it. and they are talking about going after ceos if it is not done. what do you think of that? intranet companies have been taking steps in the past to try and tackle harmful content. i think they want to do much more in the future. when it comes to the regulation, it is important that we tackle the online harms, but it is important to think about fines and going after directors very carefully. it is not just big companies that could be covered here but smaller companies as well. we don't want to have a situation where smaller internet companies, uk companies, are not able to participate in the market because of big fines or potentially disproportionate penalties. companies are trying to do a lot in this area that we need to be careful about the balance. alisha, you are still on social media, but did you
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spend time once you had recovered removing all those accounts and making sure you are not anywhere near that stuff again? exactly. when i had recovered it was making sure i didn't go back to those hashtags and those accounts. also when i was finding myself comparing myself to anyone i would just unfollow them. it was nothing against them, ijust found that i was doing that so i would just unfollow those people. really good piece of advice. thank you to you and to daniel. there is advice available on this online. now we will get the news, travel and weather wherever you are.
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hello, good morning. a rather misty and murky start to the date. some fog across the south—east of england. through this afternoon for many of us warm, sunny spells developing. some showers particularly in southern areas. you can see the stone of cloud with showers across wales, the midlands, into the south—east of england. the shower turning heavy, perhaps thundery perhaps as far as merseyside later on. a good deal of sunshine away from north—east coast in north—east scotland, england, it will stay quite chilly. elsewhere, temperatures reaching 14—17, perhaps 18 or 19 degrees and the home counties. tonight we continue with showers across central and southern areas, merging to give longer spells of rain. the rain spreading south. some clear spells tonight, not a particularly cold night especially in the south, temperatures reaching
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9-10d. in the south, temperatures reaching 9—10d. across the south during tuesdayis 9—10d. across the south during tuesday is where the front bringing outbreaks of rain. further north, dry and again some sunshine. that cloud will stick around across southern areas of england and south wales. still some outbreaks of rain into tuesday afternoon. temperatures will be lower compared to today. a chillier feel to the weather, temperature is about 9—11d. turning even colder. you can see we have a north—easterly wind bringing in cold airfrom scandinavia. north—easterly wind bringing in cold air from scandinavia. pushing north—easterly wind bringing in cold airfrom scandinavia. pushing away the milder air it down towards the south—west. for all of us, temperatures dropping down to between 9—13d over the next few days. a fair amount of cloud, some sunny spells, looking largely try from mid week onwards. that's all for all of us, temperatures dropping down to between 9—13d over the next few days. a fair amount of cloud, some sunny spells, looking largely try from mid week onwards. that's all from me. goodbye.
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hello, this is business live from the bbc. hello, this is business live from the bbc. carlos ghosn is gone from nissan as shareholders appoint the renault chairman as the new director. live from london, that's our top story on monday 8 april. hello, this is business live from the bbc. carlos ghosn is gone from nissan

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