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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  April 8, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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internet sites carrying harmful content could be blocked orfined, under new government plans. images of child abuse and terrorist you're watching bbc newsroom live. propaganda are among the content it's 11 o'clock, and these that could see companies punished. are the main stories this morning. tech companies could be fined too many social media firms still or blocked if they fail seem to think that they can get away with providing the service without to protect children. campaigners say the plans would make providing the protection for users. britain a world pioneer. five days before the uk is due but critics say the proposals could threaten free speech, we‘ll bring you all the details. to leave the eu without a deal, also this lunchtime — theresa may will go to berlin and paris tomorrow labour say they are still waiting to to hold talks on brexit — hear about more talks with the a deal with labour remains work in progress. government to try to break the a new pollution charge begins deadlock. at the moment we haven't in london, with drivers of older, dirtier vehicles paying more. seen a change of position from the government. if there is a change of a british woman faces jail in dubai, for a facebook post calling her position, we need to consider that, we will consider it. so we will have ex—husband an idiot, to see what happens today. you can't and his new wife a horse. go into any of those discussions with big red lines, because otherwise there is no point in having them, but we are very clear about the type of brexit that we want. the ultra low emission zone.
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the new pollution charge comes into force in central london to tackle the capital's toxic air. a british woman faces a prison sentence in dubai for calling her ex husband's new wife a horse. it is just shocking. no one would expect that having posted something on facebook several years ago it could possibly lead to such a traumatic experience. the fatal accident inquiry into the clutha helicopter crash in glasgow begins this morning. kirstjen nielsen, the woman who has enforced some president trump's more controversial border policies, resigned as us secretary of homeland security. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. for the first time, internet sites
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and social media companies such as facebook and twitter could have their services blocked and face heavy fines if they don't stick to new internet safety laws. under government proposals, bosses could be held responsible for sites failing to tackle terrorist propaganda and child abuse. here's our media editor, amol rajan. over the past few years, the tech giants have come under sustained pressure to clean up their act. terrorist propaganda such as the live broadcast of a recent attack in new zealand have caused horror. so, too, have stories about child grooming online, and the appalling death of 14—year—old molly russell, who took her own life after seeing images of self—harm on instagram — which is owned by facebook — prompted an outcry. this long—delayed white paper is broad in scope and bold in its recommendations. for the first time, oversight of the internet will be entrusted to a regulator. a statutory duty of care to protect
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users will be enforced. and there is a potential for heavy fines to be administered. but many details remain unclear, which is why there is now a 12—week consultation. the government hasn't yet decided whether it will set up a new regulator or entrust this work to an existing watchdog, such as ofcom. children's charities want tough penalties. now is the time to act, and the uk has an opportunity now. if we see statutory regulation, that will be the uk going further and faster than any other country in the world to tackle online harms. the new rules will apply to any company that allows people to share or discover user—generated content, or to interact with others. while facebook welcomed the proposals in principle, they say any new rules must protect innovation and freedom of speech. critics say applying the same rules to companies of such varying size will favour those few companies that can afford staff to oversee compliance, so entrenching the power of big tech. amol rajan, bbc news. the home secretary, sajid javid, set out the plans a short time ago in central london
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last year, facebook revealed over 1a million pieces of content related to extremism or terrorism. in three months, they moved 8.7 million items that breached policies on child nudity and sexual exploitation. but how much more illegal material remains? and how much damage is being done by this cruel content is even less clear. the cyber bullying, the trolling, the posts glorifying self—harm. truly horrifying content thatis self—harm. truly horrifying content that is linked to depression, anxiety, mental health problems and even suicide. sajid javid speaking earlier. now, with just five days to go before britain is due to leave the eu, labour is still waiting to learn whether the government will put forward proposals which could break the
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impasse over brexit. the prime minister says both parties will need to compromise if there's to be a deal but they failed to reach an agreement last week after three days of meetings, and she's been heavily criticised by some conservatives. the prime minister will meet the german chancellor angela merkel in berlin tomorrow ahead of an emergency summit in brussels on wednesday, when eu leaders will expect to hear fresh plans. our political correspondent nick ea rdley our political correspondent nick eardley joins our political correspondent nick eardleyjoins me now our political correspondent nick eardley joins me now from westminster. she has got a busy schedule ahead of wednesday, hasn't she, nick? doesn't shejust, and a lot to figure out in that time. a meeting with the german chancellor tomorrow will be setting out the case for the extension the prime minister wants, just a few weeks, remember, not the lengthy extension that many in brussels have floated. some at westminster are saying that should happen as well. the fact that the prime minister's off to berlin
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tomorrow as well suggest perhaps that there would be much time for further talks with jeremy corbyn that there would be much time for further talks withjeremy corbyn on that compromise that we've all been discussing over the weekend. so far, no breakthrough on that. there were some talks over the weekend by phone, some ideas exchanged, some papers flying about, but nothing formal that could end the impasse between labour and the government on that. we caught up with the foreign secretaryjeremy that. we caught up with the foreign secretary jeremy hunt a that. we caught up with the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt a couple of hours ago, and he was filling us in on where those talks are. we don't have a majority in parliament, and so we have a majority in parliament, and so we have to look to other parties to seek agreement that will allow us to seek agreement that will allow us to get brexit over the line as the law requires. you can't go into any of those discussions with big red lines, because otherwise there is no point having them. but we are very clear about the type of brexit that we want, that is in our manifesto and we made that clear, so what i think i will be saying to my
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colleagues in the european union todayis colleagues in the european union today is that you can see from this that theresa may is leaving stone no unturned to try and resolve brexit. they want brexit to be resolved as quickly as possible, and so do we and so do the british people, so do m ps, so we are doing absolutely everything we can to try and get a resolution to get brexit over the line. so a bit of a preview there as to what the prime minister might be saying to eu leaders when she meets them over the next few days. the big sticking point is exactly what changes the government is prepared to make. labour want the political declaration, the bit on the future relationship, to change to include some of their demands, things like a customs union which would mean staying in the eu trading block following a lot of eu trading rules. they want that written in, and so far, they say that hasn't been forthcoming, they haven't got what they want, so they are waiting for they want, so they are waiting for the government to come back to them today with some new offers. we got a
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taster of what exactly might labour once from its shadow brexit secretary, keir starmer. we are all in the talks in good faith. the talks are ongoing. as you know, on friday, it was made clear that the government wasn't changing its position over the political declaration. there have been changes over the weekend, and we will see what happens today, but i think if a bodyis what happens today, but i think if a body is hoping we will continue with the talks. what would it take to reach an agreement? at the moment we haven't seen a change of position from the government. if there is a change of position, we need to consider that, we will consider it. so we will have to see what happens today. but i have to say both sides, both us and the government, have approached this in the spirit of trying to find a way forward. we haven't done that, but we will continue to do so. said talks will continue to do so. said talks will continue to do so. said talks will continue to happen today? we have had exchanges of communication over the weekend, but not talks. there are no scheduled talks, but i've no doubt that things will go forward today. how will you stop the split
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of the party with any deal? at the moment we wait to see what the government is putting on the table asa government is putting on the table as a proposal. all they have done so faras to as a proposal. all they have done so far as to indicate various things but not to change the political declaration, so the ball is in the government's court, we need to see what they will come back with. and then we will take a collective position on that. that last idea there about how to avoid splits is one that is still staring here. there are still conservatives absolutely furious that the prime minister is entertaining the prospect of pivoting towards labour's position, and at the same time labour's positions have been speaking to us this morning adamant thatjeremy corbyn has to include provision for another referendum for any deal he includes with the government, so there is a lot still being played out here. it seems that those talks aren't quite at that point yet where they can all get back round a table and thrash something out. we will have to keep an eye on that to date to see
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whether the government comes forward with something that means labour can say, we are back in business, let's try and figure this out. nick, thank you very much indeed. our brussels correspondent adam fleming is in luxembourg. there is an important meeting going on, not about brexit, but we are concerned with brexit, and we are hearing from reuters that mrs may is going to be travelling not only to berlin to meet chancellor merkel, but also to the elysee palace in paris? yes, so ifi the elysee palace in paris? yes, so if i had been speaking to ten minutes ago, i would have told you that the diplomats here are saying, she is going to berlin, why is the prime minister not going to paris? because it is emmanuel macron, the french president, who is being the toughest and asking the most questions about what the point of an extension would be. and lo and behold, the prime minister is going to paris to talk to president macron
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to paris to talk to president macron to talk about the extension of what the conditions might be. there are two things people are talking about. first of all, what is theresa may's plan. you remember the agreement she struck with a 27 eu leaders at the last summit was that she would come to them with a plan for the way forward at about this point, and there are plenty of people here saying, 0k, there are plenty of people here saying, ok, it's good that she is reaching out to jeremy corbyn saying, ok, it's good that she is reaching out tojeremy corbyn and there are cross—party talks happening, but what is actually happening, but what is actually happening in those talks? when are we going to get an end product, and what will that end product be? lots of people here saying that does not amount yet to a convincing way forward , amount yet to a convincing way forward, and i suspect that is why whenjeremy forward, and i suspect that is why when jeremy hunt arrived forward, and i suspect that is why whenjeremy hunt arrived here at this meeting a couple of hours ago, he was really getting home that message that the prime minister is leaving no stone unturned, in his words, in the search for a resolution to brexit, and also pointing out to the people here that in the british system, reaching across the house of commons to the
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opposition and asking them for help isa opposition and asking them for help is a big deal and not an easy thing to do. in other words, i think he's trying to suggest that what theresa may is doing now does amount to a plan, and she does deserve some credit for doing something that is politically quite difficult for her. the second thing that people are talking about here is this idea of what conditions would be attached to the uk if it stays in the eu for a longer period, for a longer extension that could last until the end of the year or even into 2020. up end of the year or even into 2020. up to now, the government has said that it would behave using the principle of sincere cooperation, in other words being a good member of the eu. here people are saying they wa nt the eu. here people are saying they want some more flesh on those bones. what precisely is the uk prepared to do and not do to ensure the correct functioning of the eu institutions during that long extension? the two big issues that people always bring up big issues that people always bring up are, what with the uk do when it comes to decisions about the eu's
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next long—term budget, which kicks in in 2021, but has to be decided next year, and how would the uk behave when it comes to the appointment of a new president of the european commission, which will happen in the summer. and now there is an interesting little discussion happening when you speak to diplomats over coffee, and they say, will it be for the eu to set those conditions and the uk to sign up to them, or should theresa may set those conditions herself and the eu a pproves those conditions herself and the eu approves them? so those are the two things that people are really talking about now. what is theresa may's plan, does it amount to a plan and what about these conditions for if the uk stays in the eu for much longer than theresa may is planning so longer than theresa may is planning so far? adam, as ever, thank you very much for that. speak to you later. let's return to the news that for the first time, internet sites and social media companies such as facebook and twitter, could have their services blocked and face heavy fines if they don't stick
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to new internet safety laws. joining me now is belinda parmar, campaigner for the empathy business and campaigner for tech. what campaigner for the empathy business and campaignerfor tech. what you think of this? i think it is great that what we call the digital gangsters of our time are being held to account. i would have liked to see more action, it is very vague, it is going to public consultation. i called up the dcms this morning and asked for a timeline, and there is no timeline. as soon as parliamentary process can. so i would have liked to see a lot less vagueness, a lot more action, but in general it is a good step forward. but that is the point about the internet, it is so vague. this is why we have got into this position in terms of children particularly not knowing who and what they are dealing with exactly. so how would you like to move things forward, to really ensure that you have the right regulation protections in place? if you look at what germany
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have done, what they have said is within 2a hours if there is hate speech up there, if they see it they will take it down and there will be a fine of 50 million euros. that hits the tech companies in their pockets. that is small change. it is, but it is a symbol that we won't accept this. i am a mum of teenagers, i don't know how to navigate this. i run workshops in schools. my friends, parents, we don't know what we are doing, because no one is going to stand up and say, this is what our kids should be doing. so it really is the digital cocaine of our time, and i find it really difficult as a mum to navigate this. 0k, find it really difficult as a mum to navigate this. ok, let's talk about, like you say, it is most parents who will be cheering, but then they will be saying, how do we do this? when the internet even now can't really confirm the age of the child who is trying to access a social media account? something as basic as that. they can, you see. this is the
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thing, they don't want to. if you ta ke thing, they don't want to. if you take molly russell, it had to take the tragedy of molly russell dying for them to actually take down self—harm content. how is it that they have managed to do that within three weeks of that coming out? so it can be done. is it easy? no. is it can be done. is it easy? no. is it nuanced ? it can be done. is it easy? no. is it nuanced? absolutely. but is it their responsibility? fundamentally, yes. and what is good about this white paper is that the individuals who work for these tech companies will be personally responsible, so we need some accountability. we need some actual guidelines. but the sad thing about this white paper is its another, how long is it going to take? we have got the new zealand prime minister who comes out and within a week she has said she is banning semiautomatic rifles, within two weeks she wants a bill. what we've got here is 12 weeks consultation. we need proper action and we need it now. our kids, it is too important. until now, internet
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companies, social media platforms, have used the argument of censorship, freedom of speech and retaining that. how do you strike that balance, and we see many companies that have a duty of care, and yet the internet seems to be an exception to that. i think it is going to be that, so we are going to get things wrong, but we have to try, otherwise we let our teenagers commit suicide and all these terrible things that are happening in the world. so will we get it right first time? know, but we do have to try. and i do think, of course we want free speech, of course we want free speech, of course we want to be able to say what we want, but somebody has to ta ke what we want, but somebody has to take responsibility. there is no other part of society that takes no responsibility for their actions, andi responsibility for their actions, and i think that is what we are really looking for. belinda parmar, thank you very much indeed. you are watching bbc news. the time is 17 minutes past 11.
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theresa may will meet french president emanuel macron and german chancellor angela merkel tomorrow five days before the uk is due to leave the eu without a deal. new online regulations mean tech companies could be fined or blocked if they fail to protect children. campaigners say the plans would make britain a world pioneer. a new pollution charge comes into force in central london to tackle the capital's toxic air. and in sport, watford are in an fa cup finalfor the and in sport, watford are in an fa cup final for the first time in five yea rs cup final for the first time in five years after they came from 2—0 down to stu n years after they came from 2—0 down to stun wolves 3—2 in extra time. they will face manchester city at wembley next month. arsenal's hopes of a top four finish have been dealt a bit of a blow by everton. philjagielka's goal condemned them to a 1—0 defeat, and they will drop to fifth if chelsea pick upa they will drop to fifth if chelsea pick up a point against west ham tonight. and the thames was a sea of light blue as cambridge surged to victory
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in the men's and women's boat races. james cracknell became the oldest winner at the ripe old age of 46. more on those stories just after half past. a new scheme to reduce high levels ofair a new scheme to reduce high levels of air pollution in big cities sta rts of air pollution in big cities starts today. it is the introduction ofan starts today. it is the introduction of an ultra low emissions zone in london. it is a world first, and under the new rules, drivers with the most polluting vehicles will be charged to drive into the city centre. now, the ultra low emissions zone is set to be expanded to cover the entire area between the north and the south circular roads come 2021. cities across england are also considering similar schemes, with birmingham and leeds saying they'll introduce clean air zones. 0ur science correspondent victoria gill is in one of those cities for
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us gill is in one of those cities for us now, birmingham. victoria. hello. you can't really imagine this being a traffic fee clean air zone, but we are basically standing above the five ways junction just inside the ring road where birmingham's clean airzone ring road where birmingham's clean air zone will be, and you can certainly hear the traffic and see the congestion, but what you can't see is the pollution, those small particulates and the nitrogen oxide gases that are toxic and are released from car emissions. so this is one of the two cities that will be next on the list to introduce a clea n be next on the list to introduce a clean air zone be next on the list to introduce a clean airzone in be next on the list to introduce a clean air zone in its centre, but we have been in london finding out about what the first national clean airzone, the about what the first national clean air zone, the ultra low emissions zone, will bring to our capital. the dangerous reality of city life. these images, filmed with a heat sensitive camera, show the pollution from vehicles being pumped into our streets. it's invisible, but on busy city streets like this we're all breathing it, and long—term exposure to air pollution from traffic can damage our lungs,
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our hearts, and it reduces our life expectancy. that's why london is embarking on a bold venture — the world's first ultra low emission zone. from today, the most—polluting vehicles will have to pay to enter the city centre. the idea is to discourage people to drive into central london if they've got polluting vehicles, to encourage them to walk, cycle, or use public transport. if they have to drive into central london, to use a cleanerform of vehicle — electric, hybrid, hydrogen—powered. but if you are going to drive in a more polluting vehicle, you have to pay for that. so what is a more polluting vehicle? well, it's based on a standard emissions test. petrol vehicles registered before 2005 are likely to be subject to this new charge. but most diesel vehicles registered before 2016 will be liable. and what will it cost? well, if you include the congestion charge, it could cost £24 per day to drive
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a car or van into central london. for small business owners like alex, who runs a house clearance and recycling company, it's meant upgrading his van to a newer one that's compatible with these ultra low emission rules. i haven't been paid in two months. really? yeah. and that's because of the outlay for the new vehicles? entirely due to this, yes. the vehicle itself was 19,000 and then we had to pay for the box on the back, so the total is nearly 30,000. you specifically bought that because of the new regulations? yes, i had no choice. it's been really, really tough and we've had to borrow money right, left and centre and really scrape through. alex supports the effort to improve air quality. this is the boundary, where there's that red thing. but the timing of these regulations has actually left him unable to invest in newer cleaner technology than his company van. i'd much rather have fully electric, but then the infrastructure's not there yet, and also the electric
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vehicles are not quite there yet. similar schemes are planned in leeds and birmingham next year, but this national experiment to clean up the air that we breathe will begin on the busy streets of central london. victoria gill, bbc news. and although it begins in the capital, this is really a national scheme, but it is being handled by local authorities. there is a national clean air strategy, but all of the decision—making has been handed over to local authorities, that's why birmingham and leeds will lead the way, starting their clean air zones lead the way, starting their clean airzones injanuary lead the way, starting their clean air zones in january 2020, lead the way, starting their clean air zones injanuary 2020, but a lot of cities beyond england, glasgow will be the first in scotland, the welsh government is working out its own framework for how these clean—air zones will work in that country. so this really is a national scheme to clean up our cities and transform what is a pretty congested scene behind me in the future. victoria, thank you.
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and just after 11:30 we'll be joined by sue terpilowski, the london policy chair for the federation of small businesses and by councillor ian ward, the leader of birmingham city council, to discuss this story a little further. and get a little bit more detail as well. a fatal accident inquiry into a helicopter crash that killed ten people has opened in glasgow this morning. the first hearing began with a minute's silence for the victims, who died when the police scotland aircraft smashed into the clutha pub in the city centre in november 2013. a further 31 people were injured in the crash. 0ur correspondence steven godden is at the inquiry in glasgow. yes, as you say, it is five and a half years since that crash, since the helicopter fell through the roof of the clutha pub. it was late november, it was a friday night, the pub was busy, more than 100 people
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we re pub was busy, more than 100 people were in their watching a band, when without warning the helicopter fell through the roof. ten people were killed, three helicopter crew and seven of the customers, and more than 30 people were more injured. today the inquiry began here at hampden park, it is a venue that is most used hosting football internationals, but for the next six months, an area of the stadium will be specially designated as a court room, and at the outset of proceedings, the sheriff principal, craig turnbull, set out what he expected to achieve. the purpose of a fatal accident inquiry is twofold. firstly it is to establish the circumstances of the deaths. secondly it is to consider what steps, if any, might secondly it is to consider what steps, ifany, might be taken secondly it is to consider what steps, if any, might be taken to prevent other deaths in similar circumstances. it is not the purpose ofa circumstances. it is not the purpose of a fatal accident inquiry to establish a civil or criminal
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liability. it is an inquisitorial process not an adversarial one. after those comments, we then had a very poignant moment, a minute's silence for all the victims of the clutha crash, and then statements we re clutha crash, and then statements were read out on behalf of some of those families, paying tribute to their loved ones. he and a prey, the father of mark who died, described his son as a wonderful man who lived his son as a wonderful man who lived his life to the full, and robert jenkins, partner of another victim, mary kavanagh, jenkins, partner of another victim, mary kava nagh, says jenkins, partner of another victim, mary kavanagh, says she wants to know why she went into the pub with the man she was going to spend the rest of her life with, and came out alone. many of the families were in the gallery watching proceedings which then got under way with eyewitness evidence. the first eyewitness evidence. the first eyewitness was in man called andrew berghan eyewitness was in man called andrew berg han who describe eyewitness was in man called andrew berghan who describe seeing the helicopter, he said he's heard it make a spluttering sound, the tale dipped and the rotor seemed to stop
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spinning. we had further eyewitness evidence after that. the first three days of the inquiry are expected to be spent with eyewitness testimony, but this is going to be a long process. it is expected to last for six months, and much of it will be very technical evidence, but the inquiry here at hampden park in the centre of glasgow continues. steven godden, thank you very much. a british woman is facing a possible two—year jail sentence in dubai after allegedly breaking the state's cybercrime laws— with facebook posts she wrote while in the uk. larla sharavesh posted critical comments about her ex—husband's new wife three years ago. she was arrested while visiting dubai last month. ben ando has the details. 0n the 10th of march, laleh shahravesh and her daughter travelled to dubai from their home in london to attend her ex—husband's funeral. but on arrival laleh was arrested and detained because of something she'd written on social media three years ago. in 2016, she'd logged onto facebook and seen that, unknown to her,
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and shortly after their divorce was finalised, her ex—husband had remarried. angry, she posted: "you married a horse, you idiot". the comments were reported to the police and under dubai's strict cybercrime laws laleh shahravesh was potentially a criminal. her daughter was allowed to fly home, but laleh‘s passport was confiscated and she was put on bail awaiting trial. she was actually quite distraught. she was in tears for most of the conversation. just the anguish of being separated from her daughter and the reasons they went over there to pay respects to her ex—husband and the father of her daughter. and it's just kind of shocking. no one would expect that, having posted something on facebook several years ago could possibly lead to such a traumatic experience. the foreign office says it is in contact with the authorities in the united arab emirates and its staff are providing support for the family. unless dubai's ruler does intervene, the next court date for laleh shahravesh is on thursday,
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when she is expected to plead not guilty. if convicted, she could be jailed for up to two years. ben ando, bbc news. just a little bit of breaking news that has come here to us. it is being reported by the press association that borisjohnson has breached house of commons rules by failing to declare a financial interest in a property in somerset within the required time limit. this coming from the commons standards committee. this was found, this ruling made by the commons standards committee, so just to ruling made by the commons standards committee, sojust to reiterate, borisjohnson committee, sojust to reiterate, boris johnson breached committee, sojust to reiterate, borisjohnson breached house of commons rules by failing to declare a financial interest in a property in somerset within the required time limit. let's turn to events taking place in america. the us secretary of homeland security, kirstjen nielsen, who enforce some of president
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trump's controversial border policies, has resigned. ms nielsen was responsible for implementing the proposed border wall and the separation of migrant families. her departure follows growing anger in the white house at the failure to reduce the number of migrants entering the us illegally across the southern border. we are going to speak to cbs news correspondent laura podesta who is in new york for us. laura, do we know exactly why she thought it was the right time to go? there are still several questions behind the motorfor her departure. we know there has been mounting pressure on the department of homeland security to secure the borders. president trump said he would close the border at one point, then he said he would not but would impose tariffs on american goods if the border wasn't secured within the next year. so the removal of ms neilson could be another tactic to get the situation under control. a
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source tells cbs news that stephen miller is behind the move and it is pa rt miller is behind the move and it is part of a broader overhaul within the department. what about reaction from president trump himself? he confirmed the shuffle on twitter. he thanked secretary nielsen for her service, and said he would name kevin mike lean on, as her replacement. as for ms nielsen, she thanked employees of the department, told them to keep up the good fight and she will remain as secretary until wednesday to help with the transition. it should be noted that with her departure there will be active heads running the department of homeland security, the department of homeland security, the department of defence, the pentagon, and the us department of the interior. laura, cbs news correspondent, thank you
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very much. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king. mixed fortunes in the weather. for quite a few of us, quite a lot of sunshine. for others, a lot of cloud, hazy conditions. some showers, some of them heavy this afternoon, drifting to the north—west. there will be cloud along the coast of north—east england and north east scotland. this evening, we will still have showers across southern parts. that will keep temperatures up at about 7-9dc. will keep temperatures up at about 7—9dc. further north, varying cloud, clear spells, 4—5dc the overnight
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temperatures. 0n clear spells, 4—5dc the overnight temperatures. on tuesday, it is northern parts of the uk that will be dry. there will be sunshine. southern areas remain cloudy, outbreaks of rain. a chillier day for many, with temperatures of only 12, 13 celsius. goodbye for now. hello, this is bbc newsroom live, with lukwesa burak. the headlines: theresa may will meet emmanuel macron and angela merkel tomorrow for brexit talks. five days before the uk is due to leave the eu without a deal. the new online regulations — tech companies could be fined or blocked if they fail to protect children. the ultra low emission zone, a new pollution charge comes in to tackle
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the capital's toxic air. a british woman is facing two years in prison in dubai for a facebook post insulting her ex—husband's knew why. a fatal accident enquiry into the clutha helicopter crash in glasgow. ten people died when a helicopter crashed into the roof of the bar. we will catch up with sport now. it's manchester city against watford in next month's fa cup final. that's after watford produced one of the finest comebacks in fa cup semi final history to see off wolves in extra time. our sports correspondent david 0rnstein has the details. in the competition renowned for producing moments of magic, the latest courtesy of watford — through to a first fa cup final since 1984, thanks to an incredible comeback. although they made the better start, it was wolves who were the more
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clinical, and matt doherty gave the travelling gold masses reason to believe this would be their day. after the restart, it was two — rauljimenez with a goal as flamboyant as the celebration. that is brilliant! and the mexican wrestler‘s mask to celebrate. the wolves‘ joy was tempered when a moment of sheer audacity by gerard deulofeu gave watford hope, and hope became reality as a challenge on troy deeney in the closing minutes allowed the captain to net a dramatic late equaliser. 0h! absolutely emphatic! watford carried their momentum into the added period, and duly capitalised — deulofeu again the man to make the difference, completing a remarkable turnaround. heaven for watford, heartbreak for wolves. a cup tie for the ages. watford are now within touching distance of the fa cup. they'll return here on may 18th
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for that shot at glory. 0nly standing in their way are the might of manchester city. what might arsenal miss the chance to go third after a narrow defeat at everton. —— to go third after a narrow defeat at everton. -- arsenal missed the chance. philjagielka scored the only goal of the game at goodison park. arsenal stay fourth but could slip out of the champions league qualification spots if chelsea avoid defeat against west ham tonight. there was more crowd unrest in scotla nd there was more crowd unrest in scotland as rangers beat motherwell 3-0. rangers captain james tavernier had a cigarette lighter and other objects thrown at him in the first half. as for the match itself, scott arfield's hattrick cemented rangers' second spot in the table. england skipper steph houghton will miss the warm up game against spain because of a drawing in —— groin
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injury. houghton will be replaced, and head coach phil neville has said that he'll make several more changes after england's1—0 defeat to canada on friday. england play further friendlies aginst denmark and new zealand, before their first world cup group game against scotland on the 9th ofjune. barry middleton has announced his retirement from international hockey. middleton is great britain and england hockey's most capped player, having played 432 times and scored 119 goals. he played in four olympic games, four world cups, eight european championships and four commonwealth games. it's been amazing for me to play hockeyin it's been amazing for me to play hockey in so many places, make so many friends, and go to tournaments. i think if you have to pick a couple out, it is obviously winning something was massive for us as a company, in that group that did that in 2009. it was a special feeling. and then for me, london and the
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hague world cup that we had were both really special personally, because they were home tournaments, really, for me. james cracknell says winning the boat race with cambridge makes him realise how much he misses the sport. at a6, he became the oldest rower to participate in and win the annual race as cambridge pipped 0xford by a couple of seconds. it was the light blues' 84th win to 0xford's 80. it was another medal for masters student after two 0lympic golds in 2000 and 200a. it was a clean sweep for cambridge, the women easing to victory in the thames too. both reserve crews also won their races. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. a couple of updates on the latest in
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brexit. we have been hearing from theresa may's spokesperson, who said that the prime minister will be speaking to fellow european leaders by telephone from downing street this afternoon. this is on top of a trip tomorrow that she is also making to to make european countries, —— to two european countries. she will be meeting angela merkel and emmanuel macron. regarding events taking place here in the uk, the spokeswoman went on to say that mrs may hopes for further formal talks between the government and the opposition later today, pointing out that the prime minister wants the uk to have an independent trading policy, and that both sides will need to compromise. so, all of this coming ahead of that really key meeting for theresa may with eu leaders on wednesday. more as and when we get it. a new ultra
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low emissions zone has come into force in london to try to reduce air pollution. it's a world first, and under the new rules, drivers with the most polluting vehicles will be charged to drive into the city centre. cities across england are also considering similar schemes, with birmingham and leeds saying they'll introduce clean air zones. with me i have two guests. in the studio, i have the london policy chair for the studio, i have the london policy chairfor the federation studio, i have the london policy chair for the federation of small businesses. and i am alsojoined by councillor ian ward, the leader of birmingham city council. hello to both of you and welcome. thank you for speaking to us. i want to start with you, sue. we hear a lot of concerns coming from the small business world. what are you hearing from your members? a lot of our members think it was coming in next year, as we had arranged with the previous mayor. there are leases
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that are running out injanuary and february next year because they thought they would be compliant and switch their vehicles, and now they want. businesses face up to an extra £100,000 of costs this year because of this. we wanted a managed scheme. everyone agrees with the principle, but we wanted businesses to be able to cope with what is coming. we are also finding that the second—hand market is completely destroyed, so people don't have deposits to change their vehicles. turning to you, councillor ward, obviously there is concern, and obviously it is a good thing, but before we talk about the general implementation of the clean airzone in birmingham, do general implementation of the clean air zone in birmingham, do you know if there is any support out there for small business and tradesmen? we have been speaking to small business people and tradespeople across the business about the introduction of the clean—air zone here in birmingham. it comes into force on the ist of january
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birmingham. it comes into force on the ist ofjanuary next year, and we have been discussing particularly with taxi drivers, because black cab drivers are particularly affected, about mitigation measures to make the transition in a sensible unmanaged way. how badly does birmingham need this? how bad is air pollution in the centre? it is very bad in birmingham. we know it is killing close on 1000 people in the city every year, and causing respiratory illnesses for many more. this is a public health issue, and we have to do something to clean up out we have to do something to clean up ourairare going we have to do something to clean up our air are going forward, if this is still to be an attractive city in which people would choose to live and invest. like london, we are introducing a clean—air zone with a charge. cars and taxis will be charged £8 a day, and buses and hgv vehicles will be charged £50 a day to enter the zone. we are trying to encourage businesses and individuals to purchase compliant vehicles. if
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you have a euro 6 diesel or a euro 4 petrol vehicle, you won't have to pay the charge. of the 200,000 vehicles that go through birmingham city centre, many of them don't comply with these new emission level. there is going to be a lot of opposition. you have had protests in the city centre already. yes, there is opposition to the introduction of the zone, but as i say, it is a public health issue, and we cannot allow close to 1000 people a year to continue to die from poor air quality. we know it impacts most on the most deprived communities, and children in particular, so we have to introduce this and do much more to introduce this and do much more to clean up the air in the city if we are to address these public health issues. two people who oppose the zone because of the charge, i would say that we have to look to the bigger picture. people's health and lives are much more important than introducing a charge to clean
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up than introducing a charge to clean up the air. sue, turning back to you, a public health issue — what are you advising members and small businesses and trades men and women how to approach and survive this?- the moment, we are trying to get the mayor to do a light touch scheme. it businesses can prove that they have a lease that would run out in february next year, give them light touch because they have tried to be compliant and they are now not. we are urging the fact that there needs to be more charging points. if you buy an electric vehicle, you cannot easily charge a vehicle in london. it hasn't been thought out, and the whole scheme relied on the idea that the whole elizabeth line would be up and running. people would think they would have other means of transport and they can't use them. we are hearing about kits that allow vehicles to be adjusted somewhat without making them fully electric.
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0ur mac business users using those? —— are business users using those? they are really worried that whatever they do now, they won't be able to have that amount of time. there is a breakdown in trust between the mayor and businesses in london with this scheme, and people are very london with this scheme, and people are very nervous. we london with this scheme, and people are very nervous. we have businesses in london that have been hit this month by extra business rates, the living wage, the pension increases. these costs all affect businesses and how they operate, and theyjust don't have the money. finally, councillor ward, i want to turn to you. the zone that has been implemented in london is within the congestion charge because they have the infrastructure and technology. it is burning in a similar position or is it going to cost more to get all that in place? yes, it will cost more because we need to put infrastructure in place. we have had
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just over £40 million from the government for infrastructure, and we have £38 million for mitigation measures, and we are looking closely particularly at small businesses, but also those in deprived communities that live in the clean—air zone in birmingham to ensure we put mitigation is in place that enable people to make a reasonable adjustment over a period of time. counsellor ian ward, and the london policy chair of the federation of small businesses, thank you very much forjoining us here on bbc news. well, we've been discussing london's attempt to stop the worst—polluting vehicles from being used in the city. but there is an alternative to petrol and diesel fuel. the world's longest electric car road—trip has just come to an end in sydney, australia. the bbc‘s tim allman has more. when you have been on a long journey, this must be quite a sight. a convoy of electric cars crossing
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the sydney harbour bridge. leading the sydney harbour bridge. leading the way, the blue bandit, a vehicle that just keeps going the way, the blue bandit, a vehicle thatjust keeps going and going and going. i want to do my bit to promote this technology and do something which really speaks to the imagination, which is driving an electric car from amsterdam to literally the other side of the world, to show it can be done, and if we can do that, why can we not use electric vehicles for daily use? #0n use electric vehicles for daily use? # 0n the road again... #. the scale of this trip was immense. he travelled more than 95,000 kilometres, twice the circumference of the earth. he visited 33 countries in a journey that lasted more than three years. along the way, he relied on the kindness of strangers, who offered him food, shelter and the occasional use of an electrical socket. quite a journey,
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quite a car. but one imagines the trip home is likely to be a lot quicker. tim allman, bbc news. in a moment, we'll have all the business news, but first, the headlines on bbc news: theresa may will meet french president emmanuel macron and german chancellor angela merkel tomorrow for talks, five days before the uk is due to leave the eu without a deal. the new on your line —— online regulations mean tech companies could be fined or blocked if they fail to protect children. campaigners say the plans would make britain a world pioneer. a new pollution charge comes into force in central london to tackle the capital's toxic air. in the business news: retail tycoon mike ashley,
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who has tabled a rescue bid for store chain debenhams, has accused its executives of "a sustained programme of falsehoods and denials". he's now urged them to take a lie detector test and called for an investigation. mr ashley has offered to inject £150 million into the ailing department store chain, in return for being appointed chief executive. ghosn is gone. nissan shareholders have voted to oust the company's former boss carlos ghosn from its board — officially ending his relationship with the firm he rescued from near bankruptcy 20 years ago. mr ghosn was re—arrested in tokyo last week over claims of financial misconduct. business optimism is at its lowest level since 2012 over ongoing concerns over brexit, according to new research. the biggest falls were amongst service sector firms. other recent figures have suggested business output was growing, but analysts suggest that's simply because more firms are stockpiling supplies ahead of the uk's
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departure from the eu. good morning to you. it can't have helped to escape your notice that in five days the uk is due to leave the european union. labour says it hopes for further talks with the government to try to find a brexit deal. theresa may has said only a cross—party pact will get the support of a majority of mps, as the dup and some tories have rejected her deal with the eu. but where does all this indecision leave business? let's speak to emma jones, founder of enterprise nation, that represent small and medium—sized businesses. as we creep closer to friday's deadline, what are businesses doing? good morning, ben, and thank you for having me on. as you refer to, optimism is getting thin, entrepreneurs are known for their optimistic nature, on which we rely, but we can't take that for granted.
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businesses are feeling, and we have been saying it for some time now, is that they want a deal to be done, wa nt that they want a deal to be done, want the politicians to act so businesses can get back to doing what they do well, building their business. i visited a couple of businesses last week that have been stockpiling to make sure they have enough raw materials that they need to get through any uncertainty. clearly, that costs money. they have all that money sat in a warehouse and they can't use it to do other things. that is what he so damaged, isn't it? there are a few signs coming through, and some positive ones as a result of brexit. some small businesses are bringing production back to britain, which could be good for employment. exports are looking very cheap on overseas shelves at the moment. for some businesses, this has been an export boost. but as you say, we are also seeing slightly worrying signs of businesses putting off decisions. i hearfrom of businesses putting off decisions. i hear from lots of businesses putting off decisions. i hearfrom lots of of businesses putting off decisions. i hear from lots of small businesses who say, i was looking to hire someone, but i will wait to hear what happens with brexit. i was
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thinking of raising money, but i will wait. now we are talking about june, and one of the things that small businesses desperately need is confidence in the economy that drives consumer behaviour, but also certainty against the conditions in which they are trading, and i think small businesses feel they don't have either of those things at the moment. we are sort of beyond the point of the politics of all of this, in or out, businesses are saying, whatever happens, tell us and we will deal with it. for some time, businesses have been saying, politicians, please do yourjob, because you don't want to risk, and this is the interesting thing — we have heard in the past few months of large companies making big decisions to move out of the uk. small businesses cannot do that so easily, fortu nately. businesses cannot do that so easily, fortunately. they are rooted in local communities and invested in the future of the uk economy, so in
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post brexit britain we will rely increasingly on small businesses, but they feel at the moment that politicians have to do theirjob so small businesses can get on with doing theirs. lets see if we get any a nswe rs doing theirs. lets see if we get any answers this week. emma, good to talk to you. in other business stories we've been following, oil prices have climbed to their highest level since november last year with brent futures topping $70 a barrel this morning. the price has been driven up by cuts from the cartel 0pec as well as us sanctions against iran and venezuela, and strong usjobs data. the oil price going up could mean that petrol and things in the shops go that petrol and things in the shops 9° up that petrol and things in the shops go up in price also might because they need transported. cho yang ho, the former chairman of korean air, has died in the united states aged 70. he remained chairman of korean air, even after shareholders ousted him following charges of embezzlement and tax evasion. his eldest daughter generated
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international headlines after a so—called nut rage incident, demanding the plane return to the gate as it taxied. the scandals have increased criticism in south korea about the country's privileged group of family—owned conglomerates. kpmg is planning to overhaul its british business to create an independent audit firm, according to the times this morning. the move will be made regardless of any decision by the competition regulator to force a break—up of the big four accounting firms, the paper said. kpmg's audit practice has 200 partners and about 5,000 staff, who could move to a stand—alone entity or to a subsidiary. a quick look at the numbers. the
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ftse100 barely moved. it had a good session on friday. not doing much ahead of the news that we are waiting for about any progress in the brexit talks. as discussed, brent is above $70 a barrel. up more than half of 1%. we will keep an eye on that because it could make things more expensive. a pound would buy you a dollar and 30 cents. that's all the business news. a campaign is being launched to raise awareness of a system to help people alert the police if they're in danger but unable to speak. the "silent solution" system, prompts the caller on a mobile to press 5—5 if they call 999 and can't talk to the call handler. peter cooke reports. just one of the 20,000 silent calls
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made to 999 in the uk every day. but many callers using a mobile are unaware of a system to inform police, without speaking, that they might be in danger. it enables someone who is too scared to make a noise or speak to press 55 when prompted. the system has been operating in the uk since 2002, but officials say it's not widely known to the public. the prompts, the questions and the automated system allow that filter to take place, to make sure that when you do press 55, it's when you're in danger, when you've got a real need, that you will get that response that you need as a priority. today's campaign is being launched during national stalking awareness week. it is being supported by the family of murder victim kerry power. she was strangled by her former partner david wilder at her home in plymouth in 2013. her death led to calls for the system to be reviewed, as she may have been misinformed about what happened during a silent call.
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hello, metropolitan police, what's your emergency? it's hoped a wider understanding of how the system works could potentially save lives in the future. what do you think is cuter than a great dane puppy? 17 great dane puppies, and all in a single letter. —— litter. vets in arizona helped this great dane, called cleo, deliver 19 pups via caesarean section. all but two survived, and in just a few weeks, they will weigh more than 20 pounds, and a fully—grown male can weigh as much as 14 stone. wow! now, it's time for a look at the weather. it is still quite misty in places. this is the scene in hungerford in
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west berkshire. there is some sunshine to be found in scotland, north—west england, towards east anglia, and the south—west of england. this is the scene at the moment in cornwall. the amount of sunshine today will depend on how warm it is going to feel. where you have the sunshine, it will feel quite warm. that zone of cloud from wales, the midlands into the south—east, will continue. a few heavy and thundery showers breaking up, some of which could drift north into parts of east anglia. and there is still cloud on the north sea coast, making it feel chilly. in the sunshine, temperatures could be up to 19 celsius, in parts of the home counties. tonight, we continue with showery outbreaks of rain across wales, the midlands, into the south—east, and that will keep temperatures up to 7—9dc. further north, it could be a little chili,
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temperatures of 4—6dc, with varying cloud. the showers are linked with this weather front that will stick around in tuesday across the southern areas. further north, a largely fine and dry day, lots of sunshine, the cloud and rain continuing across southern parts on tuesday. temperatures will take quite a bit of a dip, tuesday. temperatures will take quite a bit ofa dip, a much chillier day for all of us, temperatures of 10—13dc, even colder along the north sea coast, and that's because we have a north—easterly wind which will drag in cold airfrom north—easterly wind which will drag in cold air from scandinavia, north—easterly wind which will drag in cold airfrom scandinavia, right across the uk. you notice those yellows being pushed away to the south—west. while wednesday will be largely dry with lots of sunshine, much dry out over southern parts, there could be some cloud around, particularly on north sea coast. temperatures of 9—12dc.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live. these are today's main stories: theresa may will travel to paris and berlin tomorrow to discuss a brexit extension — the uk is due to leave the uk is due to leave the eu on friday. meanwhile labour say they are still waiting to hear about more talks with the government to try to break the deadlock. at the moment we haven't seen a change of position from the government. if there is a change of position, we need to consider that, we will consider it. so we will have to see what happens today. you can't go into any of those discussions with big red lines, because otherwise there is no point in having them, but we are very clear about the type of brexit that we want. tech companies could be fined or blocked if they fail to protect children. the campaigners say the plans would make britain a world pioneer. the ultra low emissions
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zone, a new pollution charge comes into force in central london to tackle the capital's toxic air. a british woman facing a prison sentence in dubai for calling her ex husband's new wife of horse. sentence in dubai for calling her ex husband's new wife of horsem sentence in dubai for calling her ex husband's new wife of horse. it is shocking that somebody could have such a traumatic experience over something posted on facebook three yea rs something posted on facebook three years ago. ten people died when a police helicopter crashed onto the roof of the clutha bar in glasgow five years ago. the inquiry opens today. hello there. it's monday morning, it's newsroom live, and its brexit yet again, and to mrs may will travel to berlin and paris tomorrow
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to meet german chancellor angela merkel and france's france's president macron ahead of an emergency eu summit in brussels on wednesday. the uk is due to leave the european union on friday. here, labour says it's still waiting to learn whether the government will put forward proposals which could break the impasse over brexit. talks failed to reach agreement last week after three days of meetings, and were heavily criticised by some conservatives, but downing street said it was hopeful that further talks would take place later today. let's go to luxembourg and our brussels correspondent adam fleming who is following events pretty closely for us. so the big event is wednesday, but a lot going on for mrs may in the build—up? wednesday, but a lot going on for mrs may in the build-up? here in luxembourg tomorrow we will see the european affairs ministers from the other 27 countries meeting to prepare the groundwork for that summit of eu leaders in brussels on
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wednesday, but theresa may will be doing some groundwork of her own, as you said travelling to berlin and paris, totally key places in this, because you have got berlin at one end of the spectrum, quite relaxed about an extension and giving the uk more time to get its departure in order, and at the other end of the spectrum, you've got emmanuel macron of paris, asking tougher questions, much more sceptical about an extension. but here in luxembourg where foreign ministers are meeting, the discussion is moving away from the discussion is moving away from the duration of any extension, in other words whether it is months or a year, and more to what sort of conditions could be attached to the ukfor conditions could be attached to the uk for its good behaviour, if you like, while it remains in the eu for a bit longer, because there are some big decisions coming up for the eu, notably its long—term budget which kicks in in 2021 at last for seven yea rs, kicks in in 2021 at last for seven years, but has to be decided next year, and this summer there will be the selection of the new president
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of the european commission, so quite a lot of people are thinking how can we have ways of limiting the uk's influence on those big decisions if it is heading out of the door, but then other countries are saying, we have the eu treaties, surely that should be enough? then other countries say maybe theresa may should be the one who spells out how she intends to behave if there is an extension to the brexit process and britain stays in for a bit longer, but i can understand that that seems like a technical discussion when actually people at home are focused on is that going to be an extension and are we going to leave the eu on the 11th of april with no deal, or whether we might even still be in the eu at the end of 2019. thank you very much indeed. 0ur correspondent nick eardley is in westminster for us. the big question here is whether
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there can be any sort of breakthrough in talks between the government and the labour party. the last formal talks were towards the tail end of last week, and there has been dialogue over the weekend, chat between the two teams, some ideas exchanged, papers flying about, things like that, but not involving theresa may and jeremy corbyn. what we are expecting this afternoon is for some sort of new proposal to come forward from the government, perhaps saying to labour, we have heard what you say, we have looked at your ideas, and here is what we think we could be able to offer you to try and end this impasse, and a couple of hours ago, we heard from the foreign secretary jeremy hunt. we don't have a majority in parliament, and so we have to look to other parties to seek agreement that will allow us to get brexit over the line as the law requires. you can't go into any of those discussions with big red lines, because otherwise there is no point having them. but we are very clear about the type
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of brexit that we want, that is in our manifesto and we made that clear, so what i think i will be saying to my colleagues in the european union today is that you can see from this that theresa may is leaving stone no unturned to try and resolve brexit. they want brexit to be resolved as quickly as possible, and so do we and so do the british people, so do mps, so we are doing absolutely everything we can to try and get a resolution to get brexit over the line. no formal talks planned for later today, yet that could change. the big thing labour are looking for is a commitment on the political declaration, the future relationship with the eu. they want that to change to reflect some of the demands they have, namely on a customs union, keeping it much closer trading relationship with the european union than they think the government is offering at the moment. 0ne government is offering at the moment. one of the people involved
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in that negotiating team is the shadow brexit secretary, keir starmer. we are all in the talks in good faith. the talks are ongoing. as you know, on friday, it was made clear that the government wasn't changing its position over the political declaration. there have been changes over the weekend, and we will see what happens today, but i think if a body is hoping we will continue with the talks. what would it take to reach an agreement? at the moment we haven't seen a change of position from the government. if there is a change of position, we need to consider that, we will consider it. so we will have to see what happens today. but i have to say both sides, both us and the government, have approached this in the spirit of trying to find a way forward. we haven't done that, but we will continue to do so. so talks will continue to happen today? we have had exchanges of communication over the weekend, but not talks. there are no scheduled talks, but i've no doubt that things will go forward today. how will you stop the split of the party with any deal? at the moment we wait to see what the government is putting on the table as a proposal. all they have done so far
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as to indicate various things but not to change the political declaration, so the ball is in the government's court, we need to see what they conem back with. and then we will take a collective position on that. and will they be more talks between the two sides? might there be some sort of offer from the government that ends the logjam and says to labour, we are a bit closer than you think? all the while remember mps are coming back year after weekend is in their constituencies, and on both sides, there is a lot of pressure on the leadership. 0n the conservative side, there are brexit supporters furious of the idea that the prime minister might pivot slightly towards labour's position, they won't stand for that. on labour's side, there are mps saying, don't do a deal with the tories, you won't be forgiven for it, and other saying don't agree to anything that doesn't commit the government are holding a confirmatory referendum.
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going back to the people and saying, do you like what we've agreed, and if not, maybe want to stay in the european union? so lots of questions to a nswer european union? so lots of questions to answer this afternoon. we will be trying to find those answers over the next few hours. lots of questions with brexit? thank you very much! for the first time, internet sites and social media companies such as facebook and twitter, could have their services blocked and face heavy fines , if they don't stick to new internet safety laws. under government proposals, bosses could be held responsible for sites failing to tackle terrorist propaganda and child abuse. here's our media editor, amol rajan. over the past few years, the tech giants have come under sustained pressure to clean up their act. terrorist propaganda such as the live broadcast of a recent attack in new zealand have caused horror. so, too, have stories about child grooming online, and the appalling death of 14—year—old molly russell, who took her own life after seeing images of self—harm on instagram — which is owned by facebook —
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prompted an outcry. this long—delayed white paper is broad in scope and bold in its recommendations. for the first time, oversight of the internet will be entrusted to a regulator. a statutory duty of care to protect users will be enforced. and there is a potential for heavy fines to be administered. but many details remain unclear, which is why there is now a 12—week consultation. the government hasn't yet decided whether it will set up a new regulator or entrust this work to an existing watchdog, such as 0fcom. children's charities want tough penalties. now is the time to act, and the uk has an opportunity now. if we see statutory regulation, that will be the uk going further and faster than any other country in the world to tackle online harms. the new rules would apply to any company that allows people to share or discover user—generated content, or to interact with others. while facebook welcomed the proposals in principle, they say any new rules must protect innovation and freedom of speech. critics say applying the same rules to companies of such varying size
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will favour those few companies that can afford staff to oversee compliance, so entrenching the power of big tech. amol rajan, bbc news. rob jones is director of threat leadership at the national crime agency, and joins me now. thank you for coming in to speak to us. first things first. do people realise that they are breaking the law on line? absolutely. people who post child abuse images are clear that they are breaking the line, and this makes it very clear what is illegal and other harms that aren't illegal. so what do you make of the white paper? we welcome the white paper. to give you an idea of the scale of the threat that we face, backin scale of the threat that we face, back in 2004 we were seeing about 110,000 reports of images of child abuse from the national centre for missing and exploited children. by the time we get to 2018, those figures have gone up to 18 million, so the explosion in volume has
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demanded a response from law enforcement. that response has been us trying to arrest as many suspects as we can, and trying to safeguard victims. the third element that has been missing is treating the environment where that offending ta kes environment where that offending takes place, and this white paper gives us an opportunity to do that. so what have the challenges been to you in terms of getting a prosecution when you know that there isa prosecution when you know that there is a crime that has been committed online? how easy has it been to work with the platform of the internet and social media? we do some great work with social media companies and technology providers, and they support us with prosecutions. the difference that we see is to move from a reactive stance where crimes happen and are reported to us after the event to a position where industry is proactive and prevents offending in the first place. that means preventing access to images and defining success is preventing access rather than reporting that crimes have taken place and the law
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enforcement investigating and the re—victimisation of children. enforcement investigating and the re-victimisation of children. you are sounding as this it is a very positive move, which it is, but because of your experience of working online and prosecuting online, do you envisage any problems with the white paper in the form that it with the white paper in the form thatitis with the white paper in the form that it is right now? what more needs to be done? we have a 12 week consultation period, and that can be used to work in partnership with industry and technology companies to make sure that this white paper leads to very effective legislation. these two vital things it creates, one is the concept of a duty of care, and the second is a regulator. that basic principle that there is a duty of care for those who run platforms is really important, and we expect companies to create safety by design, by ensuring that their platforms can't be exploited by paedophiles and criminals before they come to market, not after. rob jones at the national crime agency, it has been fascinating, thank you very much indeed. thank you. we have
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got more stories coming out of newsroom live hit at the bbc news. but for now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. the headlines on bbc news: theresa may will meet french president emmanuel macron, german chancellor angela merkel tomorrow for talks five days before the uk is due to leave the eu without a deal. new online regulations mean tech companies could be fined or blocked if they fail to protect children. campaigners say the plans would make britain a world pioneer. a new pollution charge comes into force in central london to tackle the capital's toxic air.
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sport now, here's azi farni. thank you. after watford's stunning win over wolves in the fa cup semifinal yesterday, goalkeeper ben foster said he would refuse to play in the final against manchester city. he is watford's number one keeper, but it is veteran mario gomez who has played in every fa cup match so far this season, including yesterday's dramatic match so far this season, including yesterday‘s dramatic 3— match so far this season, including yesterday's dramatic 3— to extra time win, where gerard ellis a0 —— deulofeu scored the winner. gomez is respected to expected to retire at the end of the season. it is about the end of the season. it is about the team. he understands the game, and if i'm not there, we are well served with ben. england skipper steph horton will miss tuesday's world cup warm up match against
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spain because of a groin injury. she will be one of several changes for head coach phil neville after england's1—0 defeat to canada on friday. england play further friendlies against denmark and new zealand before their first world cup group game against scotland on the 9th ofjune. barry middleton has announced his retirement from international hockey. he is great britain and england hockey‘s most capped player, having played 432 times and scored 119 goals. he played in four 0lympic games, four world cups, eight european championships and four commonwealth games. it has been amazing for me to play hockeyin it has been amazing for me to play hockey in so many places, make so many friends and go to tournaments. i think if you have to pick a couple out, it is obviously winning something was massive for us as a country, and that group that did that in 2009, it was a special feeling, and then for me, london and
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the hague world cup that we had were both really special that we had personally, because they were home tournaments, really, for me. we have seen some bad misses and football down the years, but this one might be just the football down the years, but this one might bejust the best, or worst yet. former stoke forward eric chu somehow manages to stop this going in. the goal would have won them the title, but they are going to have to waitan title, but they are going to have to wait an extra week, and we are not talking about a yard or two really, literally all he had to do was not touch the ball and it would have gone in, that is confirmation. i will leave you with that, lukwesa, more from me later. thank you so much. a new scheme to reduce high levels of air pollution in big
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cities starts today, with the introduction of an ‘ultra low emission zone' in london. it's a world first, and under the new rules, drivers with the most polluting vehicles will be charged to drive into the city centre. the ultra—low emission zone is set to be expanded to cover the entire area between the north and south circular roads in 2021. it's not just london. cities across england are also considering similar schemes, with birmingham and leeds saying they'll introduce clean air zones. 0ur science correspondent victoria gill reports. the dangerous reality of city life. these images, filmed with a heat sensitive camera, show the pollution from vehicles being pumped into our streets. it's invisible, but on busy
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city streets like this we're all breathing it, and long—term exposure to air pollution from traffic can damage our lungs, our hearts, and it reduces our life expectancy. that's why london is embarking on a bold venture — the world's first ultra low emission zone. from today, the most—polluting vehicles will have to pay to enter the city centre. the idea is to discourage people to drive into central london if they've got polluting vehicles, to encourage them to walk, cycle, or use public transport. if they have to drive into central london, to use a cleanerform of vehicle — electric, hybrid, hydrogen—powered. but if you are going to drive in a more polluting vehicle, you have to pay for that. so what is a more polluting vehicle? well, it's based on a standard emissions test. petrol vehicles registered before 2005 are likely to be subject to this new charge. but most diesel vehicles registered before 2016 will be liable. and what will it cost? well, if you include the congestion charge,
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it could cost £24 per day to drive a car or van into central london. for small business owners like alex, who runs a house clearance and recycling company, it's meant upgrading his van to a newer one that's compatible with these ultra low emission rules. i haven't been paid in two months. really? yeah. and that's because of the outlay for the new vehicles? entirely due to this, yes. the vehicle itself was 19,000 and then we had to pay for the box on the back, so the total is nearly 30,000. you specifically bought that because of the new regulations? yes, i had no choice. it's been really, really tough and we've had to borrow money right, left and centre and really scrape through. alex supports the effort to improve air quality. this is the boundary, where there's that red thing. but the timing of these regulations has actually left him unable to invest in newer cleaner technology than his company van. i'd much rather have fully electric, but then the infrastructure's not
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there yet, and also the electric vehicles are not quite there yet. similar schemes are planned in leeds and birmingham next year, but this national experiment to clean up the air that we breathe will begin on the busy streets of central london. victoria gill, bbc news. 0ur reporter leslie ash mel is in trafalgar square in central london for us this morning. the roads are not looking too bad, but quite a significant move for the city of london? yes, trafalgar square is one of the most polluted parts of central london, but the aim is to reduce pollution by about 45% in two yea rs' reduce pollution by about 45% in two years' time. it is quite a bold move, because about 40,000 of these vehicles going past me now are going to have to pay this charge. they don't fall into the pollution standards sadiq khan once, so a lot
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of people will be paying £12 .50, and if you are a lorry and you don't meet the standards, you pay an extra £100. thank you very much, lesley, we will leave it there for now. some breaking news concerning the windrush scandal. 0ur breaking news concerning the windrush scandal. our home affairs correspondent danny sure has just sent us some information regarding a data breach. i willjust read you through the details here. the home office has admitted that it breached data protection rules when it launched the windrush compensation scheme. the department sent information to windrush migrants in a way that that meant that their e—mail addresses we re meant that their e—mail addresses were seen by other people, so an internal review has now been launched, and the matter we understand has been referred to the information commissioner. caroline noakes, the immigration minister, said that she apologises unreservedly for what she said was
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an administrative error. the error was revealed in a written statement from the home office that was also clarifying the details of this compensation scheme. a fatal accident inquiry into a helicopter crash that killed ten people has opened in glasgow this morning. the first hearing began with a minute's silence for the victims, who died when the police scotland aircraft smashed into the clutha pub in the city centre in november 2013. a further 31 people were injured in the crash. 0ur correspondent steven godden is at the inquiry in glasgow. yes, it has taken almost five and a half years to reach this point, which as far as many of the families of the victims are concerned is too long. but what the inquiry is looking at is that night in november 2013, it was a friday night, the pub was busy, there were more than 100 people in there watching a band play
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when without warning that police helicopter that was flying over the centre of glasgow up the river towards its base fell out of the sky and crashed through the roof of the pub. ten people were killed, three of the helicopter crew and seven customers in the pub. that is what the inquiry is looking at, and it began this morning inside hampden stadium which is of course normally a venue stadium which is of course normally a venue for football internationals, but there is a section of the stadium that has been set aside for the next six months, a specially designated court, and at the start of proceedings, the sheriff principal, craig turnbull, set out his thinking for the inquiry ahead. the purpose of a fatal accident inquiry is twofold. firstly it is to establish the circumstances of the deaths. secondly it is to consider what steps, if any, might be taken to prevent other deaths in similar circumstances. it is not the purpose of a fatal accident inquiry to establish a civil or criminal liability.
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it is an inquisitorial process not an adversarial one. now, many of the families of the victims were in the room to hear the sheriff's comments, and afterwards we had a poignant moment where there was a minute's silence held for the victims, and after that we had state m e nts victims, and after that we had statements read from some of the families paying tribute to the victims. for example, mary kavanagh, whose partner robert jenkins victims. for example, mary kavanagh, whose partner robertjenkins was killed. she said to the court room that she wants to know why she went into the pub with the man she was going to spend the rest of her life with, and came out alone. that sums up with, and came out alone. that sums up the reaction of many of the families and their desire for a nswe rs. families and their desire for answers. we then went into the bulk of the proceedings, the start of the proceedings, which were eyewitness accounts. andrew birgen spoke about being on a walkway and hearing a spluttering sound from the helicopter, the rotor then seem to
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stop, spinning, and it immediately seemed to lose height. this inquiry is expected to last six months. it will continue this afternoon. steven godden, thank you very much. the election campaign in india is in full swing, with voting due to get under way on thursday — the process itself will take 5 weeks. it is by a considerable margin the largest democratic process in the world, with around 900 million people eligible to take part. matthew amroliwala is in delhi for us. matthew? welcome to delhi. we are here at the stunning 17th century red fort just a here at the stunning 17th century red fortjust a few miles from india's apartment building. it is a sweltering 36 degrees as we enter the hot season, slap bang in the middle of election season. just three days to go until voting starts in this giant of an election. five yea rs in this giant of an election. five years ago, narendra modi won with a
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landslide. can he repeat it, or will the congress opposition upset the polls? let's look at what and who will decide this election. jobs, security, wages, will all play big, but the difficult for politicians is that there is no one india, there are many different ones. as i have been finding out. there is a famous saying here that india is like a flat bread and has to be flipped on the griddle, but will it flip this time? the elections in 2018 were a major setback, the economy is slowing in a climate is growing, make india, clean india, i will double your wages and to create 10 million jobs, double your wages and to create 10 millionjobs, those promises haven't quite been delivered. so it gives rahul gandhi and the opposition a
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chance. so what will decide this election? will it be urban voters? will it be rural voters? will it be the under 25 is? half the country's population. would it be female voters, it's population. would it be female voters, its expected more women will vote then men this time. and every state is different, the issues are different, the languages are different, the alliances are different. which means small shifts can have huge consequences. which perhaps explains why india has a habit of kicking out the incumbent even when the economy is doing well. but most people expect modi to win, perhaps without an outright majority. in india has a history of getting the predictions wrong. that is just some of the background. there are so many fascinating strands to this election to understand what is driving india in 2019, the politics, the culture, the
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pace of change, the excitement. we are here all week with special coverage, but now it is back to you in the studio. matthew, thank you. a british woman is facing a possible two—year jail sentence in dubai after allegedly breaking the state's cyber crime laws — with facebook posts she wrote while in the uk. laleh shahravesh posted critical comments about her ex—husband's new wife three years ago. she was arrested while visiting dubai last month. ben ando has the details. 0n the 10th of march, laleh shahravesh and her daughter travelled to dubai from their home in london to attend her ex—husband's funeral. but on arrival laleh was arrested and detained because of something she'd written on social media three years ago. in 2016, she'd logged onto facebook and seen that, unknown to her, and shortly after their divorce
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was finalised, her ex—husband had remarried. angry, she posted: "you married a horse, you idiot". the comments were reported to the police and under dubai's strict cybercrime laws laleh shahravesh was potentially a criminal. her daughter was allowed to fly home, but laleh‘s passport was confiscated and she was put on bail awaiting trial. she was actually quite distraught. she was in tears for most of the conversation. just the anguish of being separated from her daughter and the reasons they went over there to pay respects to her ex—husband and the father of her daughter. and it's just kind of shocking. no one would expect that, having posted something on facebook several years ago could possibly lead to such a traumatic experience. the foreign office says it is in contact with the authorities in the united arab emirates and its staff are providing support for the family. unless dubai's ruler does intervene, the next court date for laleh shahravesh is on thursday, when she is expected to plead not guilty. if convicted, she could be jailed for up to two years. ben ando, bbc news.
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time to catch up with the weather. and it feels like spring. it depends where you are. across many parts of the country, beautiful weather, clear blue skies, but not necessarily for southern areas, where it has been cloudy and there are showers developing, and it could be heavy and thundery in one or two areas. hit and be heavy and thundery in one or two areas. hitand miss be heavy and thundery in one or two areas. hit and miss today, and all or nothing. this is the clear weather we've had in the last few hours across northern and eastern areas, but there are clouds in the south. you can see these little blobs of blue, heavy showers. there is more dry weather than the showers, so very hit and miss, but when you catch one, it could be heavy, could last ten or 20 minutes, and there could be thunder and lightning, then it is out of the way. not necessarily every well, because overnight, we could see a return of these across southern areas. the mildest weather will be
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in the south tonight, fresher in the north. it will dry out across most of the uk by wednesday, though there will be a few showers tomorrow. hello, this is bbc newsroom live with lu kwesa burak. the headlines: theresa may will meet french president emmanuel macron and german chancellor angela merkel tomorrow for brexit talks, five days before the uk is due to leave the eu without a deal. under new online regulations, tech companies could be fined or blocked if they fail to protect children — campaigners say the plans would make britain a ‘world pioneer‘. the ultra low emission zone — a new pollution charge comes into force in central london to tackle the capital‘s toxic air. a british woman is facing two years in prison in dubai for a facebook post insulting her ex—husband‘s new wife.
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a fatal accident inquiry into the clutha helicopter crash has opened in glasgow — ten people died when a police helicopter crashed onto the roof of a bar. more now on online safety, and specifically the news that apps and websites that do not protect their users could be fined or blocked under new internet safety rules. under government proposals, bosses could be held responsible for sites failing to tackle terrorist propaganda and child abuse. the children‘s commissioner for england, anne longfield, joins me now. thank you for speaking to us. your reaction to this white paper? i'm really pleased. these are issues i have been raising for a number of yea rs have been raising for a number of years now, and i have been putting forward the idea of having a duty of
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care. it would really make it clear that, with the power that we know social media is now having all our lives, there comes responsibility, and especially so for the most vulnerable, children. it is something i have been urging government to be decisive and bold about, and whilst i haven‘t seen all the detail yet, at this stage, i think it is something that is tourists that is be welcomed. for a lot of people, it doesn‘t happen to them but to other people‘s children. just how bad it is —— how bad is it? there is a gradation. 0n just how bad it is —— how bad is it? there is a gradation. on a day—to—day level, any child that goes on there could see the kind of content that pops up that you wouldn‘t want them to see, but then there are some very serious insta nces there are some very serious instances where those who are seeking out children can find places to do it. the internet wasn‘t designed for children, but they are
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some of the biggest users. for the last ten years, it has been largely unregulated, it has happened fast, and children are at the forefront of that. this is an opportunity to pause, look at how to make it a place that children and their pa rents place that children and their pa re nts ca n place that children and their parents can be more confident in. place that children and their parents can be more confident inlj wa nt to parents can be more confident inlj want to go on to the penalties in a moment, but we are hearing that the uk could be a world pioneer if this scheme is implemented, but like you say, kids are operating within an aduu say, kids are operating within an adult environment. what will it take to ensure that this scheme is successful? i think the first point is, of course, i want to be kind of very kind of decisive, penalties here, i want them to be meaningful and for the regulator to have teeth — all of those things. at the first thing is to understand that built into the design of so many platforms is this addictive quality, and that is this addictive quality, and that is something that is part of the
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business model to keep us online. we all find ourselves doing that, but as adults, we are old enough and hopefully have enough experience to be able to notice when that is happening. for children, that is not the case, and we know that very young children are now spending hours and hours online. so there is something about changing the design and putting safety as a core within the design in a way that overrides any concern about possible kind of damage to profits. it is about who is in control. it has been the companies but now it has to be the user. what about the argument that this will amount to censorship and freedom of speech — what is your reaction? we have a duty of care. we are the adults and we have to take responsibility. you wouldn‘t think twice about newspapers that showed graphic images about self—harm and the like, being able to go into a
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supermarket and give those away, the place would be closed down overnight. it is time to rebalance so that we can all be confident in this new entity in all our lives. the children‘s commissioner for england, thank you very much indeed. more now on a new scheme to reduce air pollution in london. from today, drivers of older, more polluting cars, vans and motorcycles will have to pay a daily fee of 12 pounds 50, on top of the congestion charge. the ultra—low emission zone will operate round the clock. katie nield is a clean air lawyer for client earth and joins me now. your reaction to this, first? london‘s air pollution is filthy, and we know it is harming our health. it is impacting children and the elderly most, so the ultra low emission zone is an important first step in cleaning up the air in
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london, but more needs to be done. step in cleaning up the air in london, but more needs to be donelj wa nt to london, but more needs to be donelj want to go straight ahead to the case of lr, whose mum was hoping that the original findings of an inquest would be overturned and that the cause of her death would indeed be put down to illegal levels of air pollution around her home in lewisham. how likely is that to happen? it is difficult to say at this stage, but we do know that air pollution across london is impacting many people‘s hell. ella‘s health is —— case many people‘s hell. ella‘s health is —— case is so tragic, but we know that it —— case is so tragic, but we know thatitis —— case is so tragic, but we know that it is impacting people across the capital. legally, can you take on the government over air pollution levels in a city? we have taken the
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government to court three times and have been successful three times. the courts agree the government hasn‘t been doing enough to address illegal levels of air pollution across the country. in the latest plan, the government has passed the buck of decision—making down to local authorities. what government needs to do is to make sure that local authorities are making the right decisions to protect people‘s health urgently, and if government don‘t do that, they will be vulnerable to legal challenge. so they have to do this? yes, absolutely. thank you very much indeed. some breaking news concerning brexit events. we understand, from our correspondent laura kuenssberg, on the screen for
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you, three key points — labour is expecting an updated proposal from the government, hoping for more concessions on customs, and more formal talks are possible this afternoon. we did hear something from theresa may‘s spokesperson saying that hopefully that would ta ke saying that hopefully that would take place. there is also a mini cabinet expected to convene at one o‘clock this afternoon, london time. and the third point that laura is making is that tory brexit here mps are trying to organise an indicative vote of no confidence in the prime minister. —— brexiteer mps. i‘m sure we‘ll will —— we will hear more from laura herself on the three points. you can have a look at her timeline on twitter if you like. this is bbc news.
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more than half of britons surveyed think the uk ‘needs a strong ruler willing to break the rules‘. that‘s according to research by the hansard society, a charity that promotes parliamentary democracy. their latest survey of attitudes to politics shows the highest level of dissatisfaction with britain‘s political system in 15 years. the charity says nearly three—quarters of people feel the uk‘s system of governing needed improving and, only one in four have confidence in the way brexit is being handled. well, joining us now to discuss this in more detail is brigid fowler, senior researcher at the hansa rd society. so, why these unprecedented levels of dissatisfaction in britain? well, i think of dissatisfaction in britain? well, ithinka of dissatisfaction in britain? well, i think a lot of what we are seeing is some long—term trends, so for
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example, people‘s satisfaction with britain‘s system of governing has been on a long—term downward trend over the 15 years that we‘ve been doing the audit survey. but what we‘ve seen compared to last year, so in the last 12 months, we have seen a sharpjump in some of the indicators of the strongest feelings of powerlessness and disengagement. so, though strong feelings are intensifying. that is what the survey has picked up over the last year. and we‘ve also asked people whether or not brexit, the handling of brexit, is making them more or less confident in the ability of various political actors to act in the public interest, and quite large numbers are saying that the handling of brexit by mps and by the government is making them less confident in those actors‘ ability to act in the public interest. some people have said that what is going
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on now with brexit is the perfect environment, it isjust ripe, for a lot of politicking to take place, and the british public are witnessing this, and could this also be part of what you are describing in terms of dissatisfaction? yes, we are picking up a lot of frustration because brexit itself hasn‘t yet been delivered, but also i think because of the extent to which it‘s distracting politicians‘ attention and the political class‘s attention, so people are feeling that they voted for change when they voted for brexit. that was at least a share of what was going on. but in fa ct, a share of what was going on. but in fact, some of the things that were causing them to be dissatisfied have, if anything, causing them to be dissatisfied have, ifanything, got causing them to be dissatisfied have, if anything, got worse, and they feel that the government is, if anything, less likely to be dealing
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with some of the problem is that people would like to see them dealing with. this idea of radical political solutions, a leader who is willing to break the rules, could we see a lot of this reflecting what‘s happening across in america? is this the direction we are likely to be going on? i think, with a question like that, quite a lot of the time, if you ask people, would you like a strong leader, quite a large share of people would say yes. i think the fa ct of people would say yes. i think the fact that people aren‘t put off by the idea that a leader might break the idea that a leader might break the rules, i think that is a little bit of a warning sign, a sign that people are more willing to at least entertain the idea of some quite radical political change, or radical political action. and yes, it seems similarto political action. and yes, it seems similar to what is going on in other countries, yes. thank you very much.
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the headlines on bbc news: theresa may will meet french president emmanuel macron and german chancellor angela merkel tomorrow for talks, and the uk is due to leave the eu without a deal in five days. new online regulations mean tech companies could be fined or blocked if they fail to protect children — campaigners say the plans would make britain a ‘world pioneer‘. a new pollution charge comes into force in central london to tackle the capital‘s toxic air. a campaign is being launched to raise awareness of a system to help people alert the police if they‘re in danger but unable to speak. the silent solution system, prompts the caller on a mobile to press 5—5 if they call 999 and can‘t talk to the call handler. peter cooke reports.
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just one of the 20,000 silent calls made to 999 in the uk every day. but many callers using a mobile are unaware of a system to inform police, without speaking, that they might be in danger. it enables someone who is too scared to make a noise or speak to press 55 when prompted. the system has been operating in the uk since 2002, but officials say it‘s not widely known to the public. the prompts, the questions and the automated system allow that filter to take place, to make sure that when you do press 55, it‘s when you‘re in danger, when you‘ve got a real need, that you will get that response that you need as a priority. today‘s campaign is being launched during national stalking awareness week. it is being supported by the family of murder victim kerry power.
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she was strangled by her former partner david wilder at her home in plymouth in 2013. her death led to calls for the system to be reviewed, as she may have been misinformed about what happened during a silent call. hello, metropolitan police, what‘s your emergency? it‘s hoped a wider understanding of how the system works could potentially save lives in the future. another update for brexit. we have a copy here of the letter that was written by mark francois, a prominent member of the european research group. just to give you a flavour of the letter he wrote to other conservative brexit supporters, trying to get an indicative vote of no confidence in prime minister reza mae. if she goes
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by wednesday, we can leave on friday. i am writing to you in a camper —— personal capacity. if she does not do this, i must ask that you and your colleagues on the executive 1922 committee established an informal indicative vote of confidence in the prime minister immediately prior to this wednesday‘s meeting of the committee so that colleagues have an opportunity to demonstrate that they have lost faith in her leadership. wednesday, of course, is when mrs may is expected to travel to brussels. the us secretary of homeland security, kirstjen nielsen, who enforced some of president trump‘s controversial border policies, has resigned. ms nielsen was responsible for implementing the proposed border wall and the separation of migrant families. her departure follows growing anger in the white house at the failure to reduce the number of migrants entering the us illegally across the southern border. my colleague, the cbs correspondent
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laura podesta, said it wasn‘t clear what prompted kirstjen nielsen‘s exit from the trump administration. there are still several questions behind the motorfor her departure. we know there has been mounting pressure on the department of homeland security to secure the borders. president trump said he would close the border at one point, then he said he would not but would impose tariffs on american ——but would impose tariffs on mexican goods if the border wasn‘t secured within the next year. so the removal of ms neilsen could be another tactic to get the situation under control. a source tells cbs news that stephen miller is behind the move and it is part of a broader overhaul within the department. what about reaction from president trump himself? he confirmed the shuffle on twitter. he thanked secretary nielsen for her service,
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and said he would name kevin mcaleenan as her replacement. as for ms nielsen, she thanked employees of the department, told them to keep up the good fight and she will remain as secretary until wednesday to help with the transition. it should be noted that with her departure there will be acting heads running the department of homeland security, the department of defense, the pentagon, and the us department of the interior. as indians head to the polls this week, one of the election pledges by prime minister narendra modi was to clean the ganges by 2020. it has been a priority for the government, but the deadline has been extended and the costs have gone up. bbc hindi‘s nitin srivastav travelled thousands of kilometres to take stock of the efforts so far.
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iglesia in the himalayas, the origin of the ganges, a source of life for millions. —— a glacier. this industrial city was used by the british in the 19th century. waste and sewage has flowed into the river unchecked since then, affecting thousands of people who live on the river‘s banks. translation: thousands of people who live on the river's banks. translation: there isn‘t a single soul in this village who isn‘t suffering from skin disease due to water contamination. the problem is, we can‘t survive without water. hundreds of leather factories in this region have either been relocated or shut down to stop
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chemical waste entering the river. but it‘s not been enough. you can see freshly cleaned washed height skin that was cleaned overnight in the tanneries in the area, and then the tanneries in the area, and then the chemical finds its way into the river ganges via this drain. there isa river ganges via this drain. there is a massive stench in the area. our next stop. the ganges is considered holy by millions of hindus. india‘s prime minister modi promised to clea n prime minister modi promised to clean it when he was elected. in 2015, he committed $3 billion to a five year project to clean the ganges by 2020. however, locals here aren‘t optimistic. translation: people spit wherever they want and throw garbage in the river. i don‘t think pollution will ever be tackled
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properly. government efforts to clea n properly. government efforts to clean the river are visible all along this stretch, but clearly more needs to be done. the story is the same as everywhere. dozens of such drains coming out of a city of millions and merging into the river. of course, along with ideas of hindus gods and goddesses, liquor bottles a nd hindus gods and goddesses, liquor bottles and plastic bottles. by the time it reaches west bengal, which borders bangladesh, huge deposits of silt and waste have entered the river. we met a family who recently lost a member due to contaminated river water. translation: my daughter—in—law was on medication for two years but daughter—in—law was on medication for two yea rs but lost daughter—in—law was on medication for two years but lost the battle.
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there was a high amount of arsenic in the river and ground and damage to her skin and body was immense. there is no denying cleaning up this river is a monumental task. as india heads into another election, this issue will continue to dominate the campaign. now, what‘s cuter than a great dane puppy? the answer: 17 great dane puppies, in a single litter. vets in arizona helped this great dane, called cleo, deliver 19 pups via caesarean section. all but two survived, and in just a few weeks, they will weigh more than 20 pounds, and a fully grown male can weigh as much as 14 stone. look at them — they are so cute! in a moment, it‘s time for the one o‘clock news with reeta chakrabarti, but first, it‘s time for a look at the weather.
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in some parts of the country, the weather is absolutely beautiful today — blue skies. but in other areas, particularly further south and in england, it overcast. we have had some rain, and showers are in the forecast. wherever you are, the chances are it will brighten up. the clear skies are across many parts of scotland, northern england, east anglia, they noticed this cloutier across parts of the midlands, the south and the south—west. these are rain bearing clouds and it has been raining on and off so far today. this afternoon, we could see further heavy showers. there could be thunderstorms around as well, and downpours developing across the midlands, probably away from the coast itself. many northern areas should keep the sunshine. it is all or nothing today, really. tonight, showers continue across southern areas, very showers continue across southern areas, very hit and miss. one city gets hit but another 20 miles away gets hit but another 20 miles away
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gets nothing. dry weather in place across northern england, northern ireland and scotland. nippy tonight, temperatures in city centres around four celsius. on tuesday, we are looking at the big picture here, and you can see the jet stream, driving all the weather systems to the south of us. that is why we are seeing some of that wet weather here. normally, weather fronts suite to the north—west of us, but because the north—west of us, but because the jet stream is to the south, the weather is going further south. on tuesday, there could be some heavy rain across the south for a time, whereas the rest of the country gets lots of sunshine, but it will be cooler. temperatures are expected to drop as we go through the second half of the week. in the north—east, we are seeing cold winds blowing out of scandinavia, so it will be particularly cold or north sea coast. hall, norwich and newcastle
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will feel particularly cool. temperatures probably at best around 12 celsius, but it will feel colder than that on the north sea coast, temperatures are struggling to single figures. beyond that, we keep the easterly winds, but also a lot of dry weather. by friday, it will feel quite nippy. goodbye.
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