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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 10, 2019 6:00am-8:30am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: the prime minister heads to brussels in her quest for a short delay to brexit. but an emergency summit of eu leaders will consider an extension of up to 12 months. a warning that thousands of people could be missing out on council tax discounts — because the application process is too confusing. we've a special report on the debilitating condition thought to affect 1 in 20 women around the world. my gp would say it's like pmt on steroids.
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debenhams inadministration. mike ashley calls the saga a ‘national scandal‘ but what next for the 165 chain of stores? i'll have the details. son gives spurs the advantage as tottenham take a slight lead against manchester city in their champions league quarterfinal first leg, while liverpool beat porto at anfield. as hit tv series game of throwns returns to our screens we look at how the show has boosted tourism in northern ireland. good morning. a cold start to the day but for many of us it will be dry with some sunshine when we lose the rain from the far south of england. i will have more in 15 minutes. it's wednesday the 10th of april. our top story. eu leaders will hold an emergency summit in brussels today, to consider the prime minister's request for a delay to brexit. theresa may wants a short postponement to the end ofjune, but the european council president, donald tusk, has written to eu leaders suggesting a flexible extension of up to a year
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— with conditions. our political correspondent, alex forsyth, has more. it was first stop berlin yesterday as the prime minister tried to win support for her latest brexit plan, then the diplomatic push continued in paris. theresa may trying to convince eu leaders to sign up to a short delay to brexit ofjust a few months. later tonight, all the eu countries will gather here in brussels to discuss her request and what will happen is far from certain. a draft version of what they might agree suggests they will back an extension to the brexit process to stop the uk leaving without a deal on friday but for how long? so far that part has been left blank. last night, donald tusk, the president of the european council, published a letter he had written to eu letters ahead of today's meeting. he said, i believe we should also discuss an alternative longer extension of up to one year with the option
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for the uk to leave earlier if a brexit deal can be agreed. in westminster, talks between labour and the government are continuing to try to find an agreement parliament can back but so far there has been no breakthrough. here, most mps have made clear they will not support the idea of leaving the eu without a deal in place so pause now seems highly likely. the question is how long and what for? we'll get the latest from westminster with our correspondent iain watson in a moment, but first let's speak to our brussels reporter adam fleming. simple question, when is brexit going to happen? the latest end date for the process is x x, x x, x x x x. that is because the document the leaders will sign tonight the date has been left lying. some people will see this extension will go
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until christmas time, others say spring 2020. the decision will be taken tonight. if parliament gets the deal through earlier, brexit could happen earlier than that. there is some small print in there as well. while the uk is in the eu for a longer, it will promise to behave well and notjeopardise the running of the eu, that is because some of the eu countries is worried in the uk interfering in bay conditions —— right decisions. and there is also another get out clause which is if the uk does not hold the european parliament elections on the 23rd of may, then it will be objected automatically on the 1st of june. that is the plan, that is the d raft june. that is the plan, that is the draft document leaders will have in front of them tonight. in the last
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summit when leaders were presented with a date presented to them, they go through it with pens and highlighters and come up with ideas but that does not mean that will be the end product. so stay tuned. we will. thank you adam. let's go to our political correspondent, iain watson, who's in westminister this morning. how will it go through here? there will be mixed reviews. the prime minister said she could not look for an extension for on june minister said she could not look for an extension for onjune the 30th. the way she will try and keep the long—standing brexiteers on her side, we are being offered an early out. if we can agree a withdrawal then we can leave as soon as possible. the only week we can leave early is to get some kind of deal with the opposition, the labour party. things are looking were
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positive for spain the scenes. —— mike behind the scenes. jeremy corbyn is worried there will be a backlash from remainers if he does not i any deal to a referendum. from theresa may's perspective, she has got liam fox denouncing this idea about a customs union with the eu which is something labour wants to see a compromise on. whether she can manage our party, whetherjeremy corbyn can get his mps on his side is an open question. she may have to return to parliament and ask mps to vote for a whole range of different options whilst trying to keep a rebellious party onside for an extension that goes beyond the end ofjune and perhaps into the autumn 01’ even ofjune and perhaps into the autumn or even the end of the year. we shall be discussing this throughout the morning for you. the result of the general election in israel is likely to be a tie as both main competitors
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are on course to win 35 seats each, the serving prime minister benjamin netanyahu and the main challenger benny gantz have claimed victory. but the outcome puts mr netanyahu in a stronger position to form a right—wing coalition government. he told his supporters there would be difficulties ahead. i want to tell you that we face great challenges in our economy, our security, our international relationships and challenges to achieve normalisation and peace with are arab neighbours. this is happening as we speak, great challenges in all areas. children battling mental health problems in england are facing a postcode lottery when it comes to accessing the help they need according to a new report. a study by the children's commissioner anne longfield says
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spending on services for children with anxiety or depression has fallen by a third in some parts of england. the government said investing in children's mental health is a priority, but charities have called the situation "deeply concerning". what kind of treatment you can get depends on where you live. if you live in london and the north—east, you have much was spent on treatment in the early stages. that means children and parents cannot rely on what is there. there is something there centrally but it is being left to local authorities on how much we spend. i want much more scrutiny nationally to make sure there is consistency wherever you live around the country. thousands of people with conditions like dementia and parkinson's disease could be missing out on council tax discounts. people with severe mental impairments shouldn't have to pay council tax, but campaigners say differences in how local authorities handle the process is too confusing. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith reports.
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hi, thomas. thomas is doing more to help us mum out at home at the moment because she is doing more to help her mum. is that the salad? her mum has dementia which means they have to be in charge of her finances. following her diagnosis we had an appointment with the memory clinic and they said, what are you doing about benefits. he told me about the council tax exemption that i had no idea existed. it is thought tens of thousands of people across the uk do not realise they should not be paying council tax. that is why he had a denbigh and wales they have advertised the exemption more to have one standardised form and to give people their money back right up give people their money back right up to the point when they were first diagnosed. she managed to get help here at our mum's local citizens advice. they say a lot of people are
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put off by the term severe mental impairment. that is something we discussed with people when we are talking about whether they qualify or may be eligible. under the new system, she should be no able to claim three years of council tax payments that her misfits and she was first diagnosed. by having those extra funds available, it will be easier to get the extra help if she needs it. scientists are expected to reveal the first ever images of a black hole later today. up to now we've only been able to see an artist's impression, because taking a picture of them is so difficult as they don't emit or reflect any light. but a network of telescopes around the world have been pointed at two black holes — and it's hoped they can produce a clear image which will be unveiled later today.
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it is very precise. it is seven minutes past two. i do not know the significance of the seven minutes. we have somebody involved later. they might disapprove one of einstein's series. which would be devastating. he had a few. the actress who'll play princess diana in the latest series of the crown has been announced. netflix have given the part to newcomer emma corrin who they've described as a "brilliant talent". the actress said she was "beyond excited" to be joining the show. she looks like she could be very good. based on that photograph. 0livia colman is playing queen elizabeth. they do it around christmas time. that is when it
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comes out. the first one came out in november and then december. they have had a break to get the new cast together. game of thrones is back as well which has a lot of excitement around it. we are like a walking radio times this morning! iam very i am very excited. yes, all the drama from last night. a big night for what we are calling... 0ne nil factory. 0ver manchester city last night which gives them the advantage going into the second leg. a win for liverpool. tottenham will take a 1—0 lead to the etihad stadium for the second leg of their champions league quarterfinal against manchester city.
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son heung—min‘s late goal gave spurs a crucial advantage after city missed a penalty in the first half. harry kane though who limped off with a leg injury. liverpool beat porto 2—0 in theirfirst leg. the goals came from naby keita and roberto firmino. england women's world cup preparations are back on track after they beat spain 2—1 in a friendly last night. it's theirfinal warm up game before the squad is announced ahead of the tournament in france. and rory mcilroy‘s is eyeing a career grand slam — as his quest to win a first master title at augusta national gets under way tomorrow. already getting very excited about that. forget game of thrones, the master is coming up this weekend.
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you seem to be able to work on no sleep. even today, i need to not have... because 2016, there was no sleep. you will watch anyway. i do not believe you. carol also has that. it looks glorious there. good morning. it is a glorious picture. it tells the story for the next couple of days. it will be cooler than it has been and we will also have some overnight frost as well. this lovely picture percent in yesterday from hastings. it has been bleak, wet and it has been like that for a couple of days. but today things are changing. this is all the cloud associated with that rain. what has happened is the whole
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weather front is thinking south. currently it is producing some showers across south—west england heading across the channel islands. this is showing you the cold air for the next couple of days crossing our shores. first thing this morning it is cold if you are stepping out. temperatures around minus macro 5.6. temperatures around minus macro 5.6. temperatures are low around the midlands they are hovering around freezing. a lot of dry weather. gusty winds in the south—eastern quarter today, cloud moving in from the north—east of england. unlike yesterday, this cloud will break up and at times you will see sunny spells. temperatures are down on yesterday, an easterly breeze coming in from the north sea making it feel cooler. 0ur in from the north sea making it feel cooler. our top temperatures out towards the west. yesterday in the highlands reached around 16 degrees. we are not expecting that today.
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through this evening and overnight, we hold onto the cloud. it will be thick enough here and there with the odd spot of drizzle, equally there will be cloud moving in from the west. where we have cloud cover, temperatures will not be as low were we have clear skies. tonight we are looking at a widespread frost, as you can see from the temperatures on the chart. that is how we start the day tomorrow. as we head through the rest of the week, high pressure still in charge, it will remain settled but low pressure trying to come in from the west. it will not succeed. we start off on thursday with frost around, beautiful blue skies and then you can see how the cloud develops and there will be more cloud around than today. 0nce again some of this cloud will be thick enough for some drizzle here and there. cloud coming in from the atla ntic to and there. cloud coming in from the atlantic to produce the odd spot of drizzle, the odd shower. the
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brightest rates, parts of england and wales. as we head into friday, it isa and wales. as we head into friday, it is a frosty start. a fair bit of sunshine to start the the day, cloud developing. behind me here, you can see the area of low pressure. there isa see the area of low pressure. there is a chance this could come away on sunday. the jury is still out on that. let's take a look at today's papers. the telegraph leads on the prime minister's meeting with the french president for brexit talks in paris. the paper says eu leaders feel mrs may's plan for an extension until the end ofjune is too much of a risk. the mail describes the prospect of a delay as humiliating. the picture is of the duchess of sussex, meghan markle — who it reports is planning a home birth. the mirror is one of the few with a different front page, reporting its own investigation
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into the profits mps have made from selling the homes they'd claimed expenses for. and bbc news online is reporting the story of newcomer emma corrin who has been cast as princess diana in the fourth season of the crown. and let's take a look at some of the inside pages. yes. i want to talk about food being fresh or not. debenhams is the news oi'i fresh or not. debenhams is the news on the business pages. i have spoken about it a few times. the news as it has gone into administration. it is important to point out that this does not mean the stores will suddenly close. they will trade still as normal while the lenders who have ta ken still as normal while the lenders who have taken charge will try and find a buyer for that. who have taken charge will try and find a buyerforthat. mike who have taken charge will try and find a buyer for that. mike ashley's picture already related to the story as the biggest shareholder. he has
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lost that stake in the company no. he bought house of fraser when he bought that last year. lots to talk about that. i will be talking about that later in the show, what it means for the people working there and what it means if you are a customer. the back pages are dominated by spurs and manchester city. none of them went with my suggestion. we have got sunny and scare, relating to that mist penalty. talking about the masters again, they could finish this year ona again, they could finish this year on a monday for the very first time because of storms. they are saying it could be horrible weather over the next few days. it will be the first time it has happened since 1939 if it is delayed until monday.
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it will cause issues for tuesday as well. it might finish a little bit earlier. that is a good teeing up. yesterday we were talking about 720 million eggs needlessly bend every year. this is from the sun newspaper. it is a useful piece of writing. it tells you when foods are off. this is how you can check weather your egg is ok. if an cracked egg floats it goes off. 0ther cracked egg floats it goes off. other interesting things, jam and honey. scrape off mould from the jam. underneath that it is fine to eat. i tell my kids it is ok. how many have you baked a cake and it does not work? it could be did you does not work? it could be did you do with the baking powder. it goes.
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you stir have teaspoon in a mug of boiling water. powder that is ok to use wolf and release carbon dioxide. if your olive oil spells like glue. replace it. does it? tinned food. cans can appearto replace it. does it? tinned food. cans can appear to last for ever but they can deteriorate over time. you can get botulism from them. a bulging lid could indicate a build—up of toxic gases. if you hear a hissing noise, put it in the bin. i have an issue with dodgy tinned food at university. i eat a tin of soup that was past its sell by date. it was the week i was doing my final dissertation at university. i spent a lot of time in the toilet that
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week. too much information! what top are you going to wear? it is too difficult. what about that dinosaur jumper? the stegosaurus?” difficult. what about that dinosaur jumper? the stegosaurus? i like that. maybe i should have a vote on twitter. you had a terrible nightmare last night? you know when you have a bad nightmare it is a relief to wake up. do you feel 0k? it was lots of really bad stories mixed together in one. it's like every morning at six o'clock! thanks for reminding me. it is 6:22am. lots of women suffer cramps or mood swings in the run up to their period,
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but for around one in 20 people these symptoms are so severe, they're unable to live a normal life. it's called premenstrual dysphoric disorder or pmdd, and could be affecting women without them even realising it. jayne mccubbin reports. pmdd. four letters experts say there is far too little understanding of, even though the cost of those four letters can be huge. lisa, what did it cost you? friendships, relationships. you think it cost you your marriage? yeah. now i do. now i know what it was, i do believe that it cost me my marriage. because of my anger. my irritability. lisa had a miscarriage in 2016 and from then on the pmt she had always suffered spiralled into something far darker. aiden my gp would say it's like pmt on steroids. it's just... there is no comparison. there is no comparison at all. and the worst of it is
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the suicidal thoughts? yeah. i used a plan it in my head all the time because i didn't think that i was worthy of living and being with my children and having a family. these are four letters which cost lives. for lisa this was written off as clinical depression until her gp had a light bulb moment. whenever lisa's periods and monthly hormonal changes were stopped by a birth control coil, so too did the depression. five months ago, she took the most extreme action. a hysterectomy to stop those hormonal ebbs and flows for good. and i think if we didn't have that light bulb moment, i don't know where i would have been today. i think probably my children would have been taken off me, maybe. how do you feel today? amazing. absolutely amazing. i've got my life back,
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the kids are no longer eating takeaway food. i'm no longer in my bed 2a hours a day, crying. are you happy? happy, yes. yes. the condition was first fully recognised in america in 2014 and awareness is spreading to the uk with the first pmdd conference held in bournemouth this weekend. it's awareness that lisa knows can save lives. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. later in the programme we'll be speaking to two women who've been campaigning to raise awareness of pmdd. if you have any questions, please send them in. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. we're looking this morning at how the tv show game of thrones is helping northern ireland attract tourists from all over the world. chris page is at an exhibition celebrating the series. morning, chris.
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good morning. welcome to the crypt of winter fell, it is tuc belfast, where many of the interior scenes we re where many of the interior scenes were filmed. this big hole has been turned into a corner of westeros. what is amazing looking at theirs is the craftsmanship and detail that has gone into them. we have one of the main character is here behind as year. it started ten years ago. another key member of the stark family. we will be alive throughout the exhibition this morning. we will beat looking at the big impact that the game of thrones has had to bringing tourism to northern ireland.
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time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. there are serious concerns about the safety of using the hard shoulder of motorways as an extra lane. known as smart motorways, a number of routes around the capital — including parts of the m1 and m25 — have already been converted to increase the number of driving lanes. but emergency services say in some cases it's taking them longer to reach accidents. the former transport minister who brought in the change is also concerned. at the moment it's clearly not safe using smart motorways. the wives and children of people that have been killed rescuing us off the motorways, and smart motorways, that cannot be right in the 21st century. but the department for transport says evidence shows smart motorways are just as safe
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as conventional ones and that they are continuing to make emergency areas more frequent and visible. with schools off for easter holidays, the mayor and the police are attempting to tackle youth violence by providing activities for at risk londoners. hackney, brixton, and camden are just some of the boroughs taking part. there'll be football, basketball, coding clubs and music sessions. there will also be an increased police presence around public areas and transport stations. the latest piece of art on the underground will be unveiled at the entrance of brixton tube station this morning. it's a mural by mexican—born artist aliza nisenbaum and depicts 15 transport for london employees who work from brixton station and on the victoria line. let's take a look at the travel situation now. first the tubes — a trespasser on the track at finsbury park earlier means there's minor delays on the piccadily line arnos grove to acton town,
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and severe delays on the victoria line. in central london, baker street is closed between dorset street and blandford street for resurfacing. greenwich church street is closed for emergency electricity work at creek road. and in leyton, there are tempoary traffic lights on lea bridge road at belvedere road, and that's for water works. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday it was wet but today we're all set to see some sunshine. now, it's a bit of a cloudy start but that cloud will continue to clear its way southwards as we head through the morning. lots of sunshine getting going. it will stay dry and it will feel a bit cooler, as well, with quite a chilly north—easterly wind blowing, too. we are starting off on quite a cool note, that cloud clearing its way southwards through the morning. lots of sunshine emerging with a bit more cloud bubbling up here and there through the afternoon, but staying dry. a chilly north—easterly wind, feeling quite blustery at times. top temperatures between nine and 11 celsius. now, through this evening and overnight, with lighter winds,
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clear skies, temperatures are likely to drop below freezing in rural spots, so there will be a touch of frost into tomorrow morning. little bit more cloud out towards the east, perhaps. as we head through the rest of the week, well, temperatures are set to take a bit of a dip. always a bit cloudier towards the east, sunnier in the west. by the time we get to friday and saturday, we are looking at temperatures really struggling to get into double figures. but it is staying dry and it will turn warmer next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye— bye. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. to exactly 6:30am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning... the money saving expert martin lewis will be here to explain how people with severe mental impairments might be missing out on council tax discounts. scientists are going to reveal the first ever real photo of a black hole —
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we're looking at how they captured it. and nick knowles will be here to talk about his new programme home is where the art is, which sets out to show that art can be affordable for everyone. first, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. eu leaders will hold a summit today to consider to raise a's delight brexit. the eu council president has written to eu leaders suggesting a flexible extension for up to a year. there will also be conditions including the reopening of negotiations on the withdrawal agreement. the result of the general election in israel is likely to be a tie as both main competitors are on course to win 35 seats each, with nearly all votes counted. the serving prime minister benjamin netanyahu
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and the main challenger benny gantz have claimed victory. but the outcome puts mr netanyahu in a stronger position to form a right—wing coalition government. he told his supporters there would be difficulties ahead. translation: but i want to tell you that we face great challenges, in oui’ that we face great challenges, in our economy, our security, our international relationships, and challenges to achieve normalisation with our arab neighbours. this is happening as we speak. great challenges in all areas. children battling mental health problems in england are facing a postcode lottery when it comes to accessing the help they need, according to a new report. a study by the children's commissioner anne longfield says spending on services for children with anxiety or depression has fallen by a third in some parts of england. the government said investing in children's mental health is a priority, but charities have called the situation "deeply concerning".
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what kind of treatment you can get actually depends on where you live. so if you live in london or the north—east, much more is being spent on treatment at the earlier stages thanif on treatment at the earlier stages than if you live in the midlands or the south—west. that means children andindeed the south—west. that means children and indeed parents can't rely on what's there, so there is funding available centrally, but it has been left to local authorities and local health ccgs to decide how much is spent. i want much more scrutiny nationally to ensure that there is absolute consistency wherever you live around the country. the mayor of new york has declared a public health emergency in brooklyn to fight an outbreak of measles there. bill de blasio says residents who don't get vaccinated will be fined. the outbreak is concentrated in communities with large populations of ultra—0rthodoxjews. some of them oppose vaccines on religious grounds. thousands of people with conditions like dementia and parkinson's disease could be
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missing out on council tax discounts. people with severe mental impairments shouldn't have to pay council tax, but campaigners say differences in how local authorities handle the process is too confusing. so from today, the welsh government is making it easierfor those affected to get discounts and even rebates on their past payments. they're small, they weigh as much as a tennis ball and zookeepers can't tell if they're boys or girls. they're baby ring—tailed lemurs. this lot have just been born at chester zoo. there are six in total — including two sets of twins and a really unusual black lemur. there you go! they'll spend the next few weeks piggy—backing their mothers until they‘ re strong enough to jump around on their own. they are absolutely gorgeous! lemurs were in the papers last week. they were the ones doing that yoga class. oh, yes, i remember. you have a very
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extraordinary memory. how can you remember the good news stories and i remember the good news stories and i remember the good news stories and i remember the bad ones? was brexit involved in that one? no, amazingly! lets move on from your nightmares. there is nothing worse than you reliving it. i had one last night, a harry kane injury for spurs, and manchester united missing a penalty. it was a lwa ys united missing a penalty. it was always going to be tensed when you get two english clubs together at this stage of the competition. you will always get some drama, and an incredible night for him. he is certainly a fan of this new stadium. he keeps scoring there, so he is happy at the new tottenham stadium. 1-0 happy at the new tottenham stadium. 1—0 whenever manchester city, gives them the advantage in the second light. and for liverpool, a victory over porto, so a good night for them. also a good night for spurs, but that may have come at a cost. harry kane looks like he has may be picked up a serious injury. adam has more details.
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this is spurs' new home, and this is the kind of event they hoped would develop. manchester city the familiar opposition, but plenty felt new. modern technology provided the first hour of talking point. raheem sterling's shot was blocked. the ref called for help from a video replay, which showed the block was with an arm. a penalty, the decision, eventually. no one has scored more for manchester city than sergio aguero, but this was a development few predicted. chances for either side were scarce. missed penalties, missed shots, and for spurs, a player who will be missed. their england captain harry kane forced to hobble from the field. but then came this first leg decisive moment. song again left with plenty to do and did it quite brilliantly. the ty‘s only goal, spurs already making themselves at home.
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anfield has seen many such occasions. the pride and the passion a lwa ys occasions. the pride and the passion always loud. some things in football never change. against porto, liverpool were ahead within five minutes thanks to a deflected shot. the lead was doubled by firminho. 2-0, the lead was doubled by firminho. 2—0, and the reds on their way. spurs may be taking that 1—0 lead to the etihad next week, but how serious is that leg injury for harry kane? lets hear from serious is that leg injury for harry kane? lets hearfrom their manager. maybe he twisted his ankle, may be that much the ligament... we need to checkin that much the ligament... we need to check in the next few days. it is impossible now only to look forward, that it impossible now only to look forward, thatitis impossible now only to look forward, that it is not a big issue and try to recovery as soon as that it is not a big issue and try to recovery as soon as possible, but it doesn't look good. more champions league action tonight
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with manchester united and barcelona renewing an old rivalry. lionel messi has undone united the last two times the teams have met in this competition, scoring the winner in both the 2009 and 2011 finals. so how do you stop him? what kind of plan can you have to stop one of the best players in the world ? stop one of the best players in the world? i think we are looking forward to relish the opportunity, but this season, we played against juventus with ronaldo, and psg. the better the opponents... suarez as well, suarez and coutinho and me will keep our defenders on their toes. england women's world cup preparations are back on track after they beat spain last night in a warm—up friendly. beth mead and ellen white got the lionesses' two goals, responding well to last friday's defeat by canada in manchester. their 2—1 win comes in theirfinal game before the squad is announced for the tournament in france. i was disappointed a little bit with our composure in the second half. i
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think we had one movement where we got our rhythm, but apart from that, it is the end of the road, the end ofa it is the end of the road, the end of a long journey where we can concentrate on going to france. i think i have rotated and given eve ryo ne think i have rotated and given everyone a chance now. it is time to get into world cup mode. the players have been unbelievable the last 1a months and they deserve to end in a win. the masters gets under way at augusta national tomorrow afternoon. rory mcilroy is the bookies favourite to win his first green jacket after having a great start to the season. if he wins, he will become the first european to win all of golf‘s major tournaments. but with all the talk of a career grand slam, he is content with his preparation. i'm ina i'm in a good place with it. you know, again, i keep saying this, i would dearly love to win this tournament one day. if it doesn't happen this week, that is totally fine. i'll come back next year and have another crack at it. but i am happy with where everything is,
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body, mind, game. we talk about this every year, rory michael roy, we get hyped up and excited about him, and this year as well, tiger woods, a lot of talk about him coming back and taking another green jacket, about him coming back and taking another greenjacket, but about him coming back and taking another green jacket, but who about him coming back and taking another greenjacket, but who knows? justin rose. is that who you are back in? paul casey, justin rose, rory mcilroy. it is hard to predict golf. it is basically impossible! i had a dream aboutjustin basically impossible! i had a dream about justin rose. basically impossible! i had a dream aboutjustin rose. did you?! know! good morning, carol. some lovely sunshine around, but also quite chilly? that's right, good morning everyone. temperatures will be colder today. temperatures will be colder today. temperatures got to 16 degrees in parts of the highlands yesterday. today, though, more sunshine, where yesterday we saw a fair bit of rain. causing all that is this where the front. it has now sunk further
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south, with showers still across parts of cornwall, and we will see them in the channel islands, but they will clear through the day, so it will brighten up with some sunshine. afternoon sunshine in the channel. for the rest of us, it is a cold start with some frost around, but some beautiful sunrises this morning. there is also more cloud across the north and east of scotla nd across the north and east of scotland and north—west england, but away from those areas, gusty winds across the south—eastern quarter, and a lot more sunshine. as we push north, this cloud coming in from the north sea will tend to break up, so we will have sunny spells across yorkshire, for example, northumberland, and sunshine in northern ireland and much of scotland. still, this lower cloud across the northern isles and the north of mainland scotland. temperatures today cooler in the easterly breeze down the north sea coastline. further west, we could see 12s and indeed 13s. through the evening and overnight, we still have all this cloud across the north—east of scotland, coming in across eastern parts of england. some of it
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will be thick enough for the odd spot of drizzle, may be the shower. in ireland, this weatherfront spot of drizzle, may be the shower. in ireland, this weather front comes m, in ireland, this weather front comes in, introducing a bit of clout and the odd spot. where temperatures are this low, you can expect frost. we are looking at a widespread frost tonight. that leads us into tomorrow and the next few days. we pull in this colder air, and you can see northern europe is also cold. southern europe, mild, but that will change, because the colder air will push down towards the mediterranean where it is quite unsettled. for us on thursday, a cold and frosty stout, fair bit of dry weather, variable cloud, still thick enough here and therefore the odd spot of drizzle and the odd shower, but many of us will miss those, and temperatures, 9—12. from thursday into friday, you can see high pressure a cross into friday, you can see high pressure across scandinavia still very much pressure across scandinavia still very much across our pressure across scandinavia still very much across our shores. not particularly windy, but this next system waiting in the wings might
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bring some rain into northern ireland and cornwall on sunday. the jury ireland and cornwall on sunday. the jury is out at the moment. friday itself, chilly and sunny start. then we will see cloud developed through the day. the temperatures take a tumble. we look at eight in the know to highs of tens, 11s and maybe 12s in parts of scotland. for the weekend, more cloud around, and it will also be breezy, and the risk of rain coming in from the west on that low pressure, but just rain coming in from the west on that low pressure, butjust a risk at this stage. thank you, carol. i like the rain behind you. let's return to our top story this morning. theresa may will face her fellow eu leaders in brussels later, to formally ask them for an extension to brexit. she'd like a short postponement to the end ofjune, but the european council president, donald tusk, has suggested a flexible extension of up to a year. let's speak to our correspondent adam fleming, who's in brussels.
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he knows everything about all of this. apart from when brexit is going to happen! so what will happen today, adam ? going to happen! so what will happen today, adam? to reason may well turn up today, adam? to reason may well turn up late afternoon, she will have a private meeting with donald tusk, and all the 27 leaders and the presidents of the european parliament will go into the summit room. theresa may will do a presentation and answer some questions, and then we'll leave. the other 27 leaders will have dinner and make their distaste there were a decision about the extension. theresa may then has to agree to it, and we will get press conferences from all the big names, telling us what they think. before that, they think. before that, there will be a mini summit in brussels of some of the countries most affected by brexit, so the netherlands, belgium, france and germany. i must say, there is a bit of fom0, because some countries that think they will be affected by brexit have not been invited. so there is a fear of missing out on that one! it is
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interesting, she had a tough time last time. will it be any better?|j think last time. will it be any better?” think the uk has learned the lesson of these summits, that you have to put in lots of ground work, so last friday, theresa may wrote her letter requesting the extension. compare that to last time when the letter arrived just a few hours before the summitand arrived just a few hours before the summit and everyone here in brussels was panicking because it happened at the last minute, and then she went to berlin yesterday and paris to speak to angela merkel and president macron and theresa may also called lots of other leaders as well. so, really setting the groundwork so that nothing comes as a surprise, and we saw the ambassadors to the eu member states looking at this draft as what the leaders will decide tonight. the whole eu brussels machine is geared up to consider this rather than it being a last—minute scramble. having said that, these leaders seem to quite like getting into the room, getting out the highlighter pens and working on the document themselves when it
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comes to big things about brexit. so we may see a couple of hours of deliberation by leaders tonight, and this document could look quite different after dinner time. and there is something missing in the document, an actual date? yes, at the moment, it says the ultimate end date for the brexit process is xxxxxx, and that is because it is being left blank for the leaders to decide, it is such a big political decision. there is a footnote that says donald tusk has suggested a long extension, theresa may has suggested a short one onjune the 30th. i think we will probably end up 30th. i think we will probably end up with a maximum end date, either this december or next march, but with it being made very, very, very clear that if the uk passes the deal before that, then the uk could leave earlier than that, and i should say, there is also something i am calling there is also something i am calling the "ejector seat", this little line
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that says that if the uk does not ta ke that says that if the uk does not take part in the european parliament elections due on may the 23rd, it would be obliged to leave on the 1st ofjune. so there is a sort of new cliff edge creeping in, a cliff edge in case the european parliament elections do not happen in the uk, and that is designed to protect the integrity of the european parliament. there are worries that when the new european parliament sits for the first time onjuly when the new european parliament sits for the first time on july the 2nd, if there aren't any british meps there and britain is still in, there is a big problem with the integrity and trustworthiness of that institution. oh, my goodness! thank you very much for your analysis. one thing we can be sure of is that adam's podcast brexitcast will continue. if you haven't listened to that, you need to. we could have another year! it could be never ending. let's continue to talk about something steph mentioned yesterday, the business with mike ashley.
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mike ashley has called for an investigation after debenhams rejected his last attempt to rescue the business. you are telling us shares were suspended. yes, and now it has officially gone into administration will stop it has gone into the hands of the lenders, the people it owned money too, so the people it owned money too, so the 25,000 people who work for demo in their 165 stores now work for the banks and a financial services company who are currently in charge of debenhams. it is important to point out they will still trade in this time. it is not like the shutters will be down and the staff will be out of a job. it will continue to trade as normal. but the lenders will be hoping to sell the business as quickly as possible. that leads to the obvious question, who might bite at? you mentioned mike ashley, who has been one of the kind of characters in this debenhams a saga which has been going on for some time, because he is the biggest shareholder through his company sports direct. as you say, dan, he has done various
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attem pts as you say, dan, he has done various atte m pts to as you say, dan, he has done various attempts to put cash into the business to stop it going into administration, because that now makes his share, around 30%, worthless. the shareholders' shares are now totally worthless, and mike ashley has called this a national scandal. someone from his company, chris wootton, the deputy financial officer, said this. even though we believe we have given very achievable, very good solutions for the business, they havejust very achievable, very good solutions for the business, they have just not been interested, now they have com pletely been interested, now they have completely wiped out shareholders, they are planning to shut a lot of stores. thousands of people are going to lose theirjobs, and it didn't need to be that way. mike has personally said he will guarantee at least 90% of the stores will stay open. he is calling on the regulators, all politicians, or anyone willing to stick their neck out to reverse this administration. i'm sure many customers are getting
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in contact with you. if you have ordered something from debenhams, should you be concerned? at the moment, things are trading as normal, so you should still get anything you have ordered. but the advice is, if you have got vouchers, try to spend them as quickly as possible. 0ften try to spend them as quickly as possible. often in those cases, people with money and vouchers are the last to be paid, so try and get them spent. they are still taking them. if you have ordered something that needs to be delivered, just try not to make it a delivery option, just in case something happens in the next few weeks. this is just being cautious, i am not saying it well. and if you can, pay for things on credit cards, because that gives you a bit more protection as well. i will keep you up—to—date with what is happening, other names in the frame for buying it. there is philip day, who owns edinburgh wooden mill, philip green, who owns topshop, his name is being bandied about, and it could be the business is split up into bits and soul. thank you very much, steph.
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game of thrones has become one of the most talked about tv shows of the last decade, and its filming locations are proving to bejust as popular. the last ever series is set to air next week, but the legacy for northern ireland will continue for many years to come. chris pagejoins us from an exhibition in belfast celebrating the show. very good morning to you. hello, yes, game of thrones is an international tv phenomenon, and for the next four months, props, costu mes, the next four months, props, costumes, and much else from this series are on display here in belfast. look at this for example, a couple of swords belonging to one of the main warriors, soldiers, if you like, brienne of tarth. what you don't pick up is the detail, how ornamental the swords are. you can see the diamonds there. so it is a very interesting exhibition. we will hear more about it in a moment, but first, i will look at the huge difference game of thrones has made to northern ireland.
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we wa nt we want to know where melis gave birth, and that is in here. you can see the crashing coasts and how they appeal to the game of thrones locations scouts, and now tourists are coming here to see where so many of the major scenes we re where so many of the major scenes were filmed. it is wonderful to go somewhere like this, where you never would have gone before. this village gets coachloads of visitors every day, from california to china. gets coachloads of visitors every day, from california to chinam gets coachloads of visitors every day, from california to china. it is a fantastic show, and northern ireland is beautiful. one of the most beautiful places i have ever been, and! most beautiful places i have ever been, and i cannot wait to come back. and obviously, game of thrones isa back. and obviously, game of thrones is a huge plus. all sorts of local people have benefited from the thrones effect. an epic show like
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like this requires lots of swords, daggers and arrows. 0ne like this requires lots of swords, daggers and arrows. one of their makers practices his art in the cou nty makers practices his art in the county down countryside. it is the stuff of dreams. i was a fan of the books before i knew the show was ever going to get made, and when you hear the show is getting made, i thought, that's fantastic. when i found it was being made here, it was even better! the show has generated newjobs, career opportunities and an international profile for the tv and film industry. this production agency has more than tripled its staff since the show arrived. agency has more than tripled its staff since the show arrivedm agency has more than tripled its staff since the show arrived. it has persuaded parents in colleges that the cream of industry a very a cce pta ble the cream of industry a very acceptable place to work, it is a very acceptable ambition to work in the creative industries. a government agency invested heavily in the pilot episode ten years ago, but it still felt like a bit of a gamble. it was a point, but we knew
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this was the best opportunity northern ireland would ever get. we will continue to grow, it will get bigger and better in many ways, but i don't think there will ever be anything like game of thrones. the fa ntasy anything like game of thrones. the fantasy show has had a fantastic impact on northern ireland, but the question now is, he will be left standing at the end of the final season? —— who will be left standing? iam standing? i am pleased to say i am joined by emerfrom the i am pleased to say i am joined by emer from the game of thrones exhibition. you will recognise these costu me exhibition. you will recognise these costume straightaway? yes, one of the most iconic events in game of thrones, the purple wedding. you can see the wedding dress of tyr, and all the icons of house tyrell. it really lets fa ns all the icons of house tyrell. it really lets fans immerse themselves a bit further. give us a taste of
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what you can see here. they can explore the different houses, house stark, house targaryen. they can put theirface in the stark, house targaryen. they can put their face in the wall of faces. what impact has having a show like this had on belfast? fans already come from over the world. there are 26 filming locations in the region, but this exhibition is something they can only do until september. it lets them get up close and see the artistry that goes into the costumes and props, and they can see the details they cannot get on screen. and it gives you an idea of the sheer amount of work and people involved in bringing something like this to the screen. yes, the production has been in northern ireland for over ten years, but the amount of work done behind the scenes, the attention to detail that goes into these, is something fans will want to experience. but even if you are not a fan, but are into
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fashion and craftsmanship, this could be for you. thank you very much indeed. so we are live in belfast throughout the morning, hearing more about how northern ireland has been turned into game of thrones for the best part of the last decade. looking brilliant. we shall be back there throughout the morning. right now, time to get the news, travel and whether where you are. good morning. there are serious concerns about the safety of using the hard shoulder of motorways as an extra lane. known as smart motorways, a number of routes around the capital — including parts of the m1 and m25 — have already been converted
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to increase the number of driving lanes. but emergency services say in some cases it's taking them longer to reach accidents. the former transport minister who brought in the change is also concerned. at the moment it's clearly not safe using smart motorways. the wives and children of people that have been killed rescuing us off the motorways, and smart motorways, that cannot be right in the 21st century. but the department for transport says evidence shows smart motorways are just as safe as conventional ones and that they are continuing to make emergency areas more frequent and visible. with schools off for easter holidays, the mayor and the police are attempting to tackle youth violence by providing activities for at risk londoners. there'll be football, basketball, coding clubs and music sessions. there will also be an increased police presence around public areas and transport stations. the latest piece of art on the underground will be unveiled at the entrance of brixton tube station this morning. it's a mural by mexican—born artist aliza nisenbaum and depicts 15 transport for london employees who work from brixton station and on the victoria line.
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let's take a look at the travel situation now. some minor delays on the overground. no other reported problems. as you can see, the m25 is busy clockwise nearjunction fourfor. near junction four greenwich can see, the m25 is busy clockwise near junction four greenwich church street closed for emergency electricity work. and there are temporary traffic lights at belvedere road for water works. and now, the weather. good morning. yesterday was wet, but today, we are all set to see some sunshine. a cloudy start, but that will continue to clear southward through the morning. lots of sunshine getting going. it will stay dry and feel a bit cooler as well, with a chilly, north—easterly wind blowing. starting off on a cool note, that cloud clearing southward through the morning. lots of sunshine emerging
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with a bit more clout bubbling up here and there through the afternoon, but staying dry, a chilly north easterly wind, feeling quite blustery at times. temperatures between 9—11. through this evening and overnight with lighter winds, clear skies, temperatures are likely to drop below freezing in the rural spots, so a touch of frost into the morning. more cloud towards the east, perhaps. through the rest of the week, temperatures will dip. claudia towards the east, sunnier in the west, by friday and saturday we look at temperatures struggling to get into them double figures, but it will turn warmer next week. i will be back with the latest from london and half an hour. until then, plenty on our website. goodbye. good morning welcome
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to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: the prime minister heads to brussels in her quest for a short delay to brexit. an emergency summit of eu leaders will consider an extension of up to 12 months. a warning that thousands of people could be missing out on council tax discounts — because the application process is too confusing. what does a black hole actually look like? astronomers prepare to reveal the first ever close—up images debenhams in administration. mike ashley calls the saga a 'national scandal' but what next for the 165 stores? i'll have the details. son gives spurs the advantage as tottenham take a slight lead against manchester city in their champions league quarterfinal first leg, while liverpool beat porto at anfield.
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as the hit show game of thrones returns to our cities, i am at this exhibition to look at how it has brought thousands of visitors to northern ireland. another cold day today. a lot of sunshine but we have the rain to clear from the far south of england later. i will have the details in 15 minutes. good morning. it's wednesday the 10th of april. our top story. eu leaders will hold an emergency summit in brussels today, to consider the prime minister's request for a delay to brexit. theresa may wants a short postponement to the end ofjune, but the european council president, donald tusk, has written to eu leaders suggesting a flexible extension of up to a year. 0ur political correspondent, alex forsyth, has more.
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it was first stop berlin yesterday as the prime minister tried to win support for her latest brexit plan, then the diplomatic push continued in paris — theresa may trying to convince eu leaders to sign up to a short delay to brexit ofjust a few months. later tonight, all the eu countries will gather here in brussels to discuss her request and what will happen is farfrom certain. a draft version of what they might agree suggests they will back an extension to the brexit process to stop the uk leaving without a deal on friday but for how long? so far that part has been left blank. last night, donald tusk, the president of the european council, published a letter he had written to eu letters ahead of today's meeting. he said, i believe we should also discuss an alternative longer extension of up to one year with the option for the uk to leave earlier if a brexit deal can be agreed. in westminster, talks between labour and the government are continuing to try to find an agreement parliament can back but so far there has been no breakthrough.
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here, most mps have made clear they will not support the idea of leaving the eu without a deal in place so pause now seems highly likely. the question is how long and what for? let's speak to our brussels reporter, adam fleming. when will brexit happen, adam? at the moment it is looking very likely. all the other meetings, the majority of them have been in favour ofan majority of them have been in favour of an extension and they have been in favour of this idea of a flexible, longer extension. what eu leaders will have to do tonight is ta ke leaders will have to do tonight is take a maximum end date for that extension, some say it could be december this year or march next year but it will be made very clear that if the british parliament can approve the deal and get it through,
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then the uk could leave earlier than that. but there will be some small print. in the draft document that leaders will look at today, if the uk do not participate in the eu parliament elections, it could leave automatically. if it stays on for a lot longer, it will have to behave well, it cannot disrupt or jeopardise the eu's upcoming business like the upcoming budget or picking a new president for the european commission. lots of countries worried if a new prime minister or government not sticking to the rules. can you do a light touch version of it or do you need touch version of it or do you need to create a new tough mechanism to do it. none of this is a done deal until after theresa may has sat down with the other leaders, done a
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presentation, answered their questions and then she leaves the room and then the other 27 make a decision and they all have to agree for it to be a done deal. ok, so it will be a busy day ahead. thank you very much. the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu is likely to stay in power after a closely fought general election. almost all of the votes have been counted, and mr netanyahu's likud party is tied with the centrist blue and white alliance. but right wing and religious parties have won enough seats to give the prime minister a clear advantage in forming a government. he told his supporters he'd won a 'colossal victory‘ but warned of difficulties ahead. children battling mental health problems in england are facing a postcode lottery when it comes to accessing the help they need according to a new report. a study by the children's commissioner anne longfield says spending on services for children with anxiety or depression has fallen by a third in some parts of england. the government said investing in children's mental health is a priority, but charities have called
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the situation "deeply concerning". what kind of treatment you can get actually depends on where you live. so if you live in london or the north—east, you have got much more that's being spent on treatment at the earlier stages than of you live in the midlands or indeed in the south west. now that means that children and indeed parents cannot rely on what is there. so there is funding available centrally but it is being left to local authorities and to local health ccgs to decide how much is spent. i want much, much more scrutiny nationally to ensure there is absolute consistency wherever you live around the country the mayor of new york has declared a public health emergency in brooklyn to fight an outbreak of measles there. bill de blasio says residents who don't get vaccinated will be fined. the outbreak is concentrated in communities with large populations of ultra—0rthodoxjews. some of them oppose vaccines on religious grounds. thousands of people with conditions like dementia
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and parkinson's disease could be missing out on council tax discounts. people with severe mental impairments shouldn't have to pay council tax, but campaigners say differences in how local authorities handle the process is too confusing. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith reports. hi, thomas. what's for tea tonight? thomas is doing more to help his mum out at home at the moment. because she's doing more to help her mum. is that the salad? yeah, we just need to add the sweet potato. sian's mum pat has dementia which means sian and her siblings are now in charge of her finances. following her diagnosis, we had a visit with the memory clinic in north wales and they said, what are you doing about benefits? so they told me about the council tax exemption which i had no idea existed. it's thought that tens of thousands of people across the uk don't realise that they shouldn't be paying council tax. that's why, here in denbigh
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and across wales, they've decided to advertise the exemption more, to just have one standardised form, and to give people their money back right up to the point that they were first diagnosed. sian managed to get help here at her mum's local citizens advice. they say a lot of people are put off by the term severe mental impairment. it's not a nice term really and that's something that we discuss with people when we are talking about whether they may qualify, whether they may be eligible to encourage them to make the claim. under the new system, sian should now be able to claim back three years of council tax payments since her mum was first diagnosed. by having extra funds available, that's going to make it so much easier to be able to get the extra help if she needs it. colletta smith, bbc news, in denbigh. scientists are expected to reveal the first ever images of a black hole later today. up to now we've only been able to see an artist's impression, because taking a picture of them
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is so difficult as they don't emit or reflect any light. but a network of telescopes around the world have been pointed at two black holes — and it's hoped they can produce a clear image which will be unveiled later today. there are six news conferences taking place simultaneously around the world. two o'clock our time. but seven minutes passed. they will reveal this picture. seven minutes passed. they will revealthis picture. do seven minutes passed. they will reveal this picture. do you know why that is? i imagine i do not know why. they might do an introduction. it is not for a specific reason or anything? you know how you're always look at the moon and you see it is amazing and you look at it when you ta ke amazing and you look at it when you take it on your phone, it looks horrendous. as far as i understand
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it, because not one telescope can get a clear picture, they have a few around the world all taking the jurors and then they put those pictures altogether to come up with whatever we will see today. the actress who'll play princess diana in the latest series of the crown has been announced. netflix have given the part to newcomer emma corrin who they've described as a "brilliant talent". the actress said she was "beyond excited" to be joining the show. she will be alongside 0livia colman for series three. let's return to our top story now — the prime minister will face herfellow eu leaders later, to formally ask them for an extension to brexit. so what kind of reception can she expect? let's speak to the vice—president of the european parliament, mairead mcguinness, whojoins us now from brussels. good morning to you. good to speak to you. blessed as that first question, what kind of reception will she get this time? good
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morning. i think the prime minister will get an open and warm reception because she is one of the leaders of the 28 member states of the european union. they will look at her request for a short extension. the leaders, when you look at the letter from donald tusk, are looking for reassurance is donald tusk, are looking for reassurance is an donald tusk, are looking for reassurance is an suggesting they are not quite convinced that she can get the withdrawal agreement through the house of commons within the time period she is suggesting, which is due on the 30th. which is why they are suggesting this longer extension. if an agreement can be given for an earlier date, that is when the uk will leave the european union. they will work towards a solution to this very intractable problem because they want to see some certainty. the united kingdom needs to see some certainty around the whole brexit process. what will
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it mean for the european elections, that becomes more important, doesn't it? it is extraordinary, a lot of us are scratching our heads because the referendum was in 2016 and many uk meps thought they were not going to be taking part in this election. i think it is hard to understand. if you stand back a little and see until the uk leaves formally, they are members of the eu. illegally they are obliged to hold elections to the parliament. i suppose no more than in then donald tusk letter. —— and legally. they are keen to move on and deal with the challenges that affect all of us. donald tusk is
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saying they want to ensure that the uk continues to cooperate as a full member until they leave. equally in the parliament we are not sure of the parliament we are not sure of the mix of meps who will return your but we will have to deal with whatever emerges from the elections. and if it comes to pass, these elections will be robust because there are two different views from there are two different views from the united kingdom's future. there are colleagues and citizens who want to leave the european union and there are others who want the united kingdom to remain. i think it is something we had not anticipated but it is something that we will have to deal with. it is concerns obviously but we have to stick with a very clear legal and political dimensions, the united kingdom is a film ever and has to take place in the parliamentary procedures. there is no date at the moment in the
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letter from donald tusk. is no date at the moment in the letterfrom donald tusk. do is no date at the moment in the letter from donald tusk. do you think there might be one in the next few days? i do not expect this to run for few days? i do not expect this to runfora few days? i do not expect this to run for a couple of days but maybe i have got this wrong, leaders want certainty for themselves and the united kingdom. it is a good proposal. they will debate the best date and there will be different views, weather it will be a couple of months or a year. it takes away from the united kingdom and ourselves about an uncertainty of ruling over a cliff edge. the uk prime minister and europe does not wa nt to prime minister and europe does not want to see a crash out of brexit we wa nt want to see a crash out of brexit we wantan want to see a crash out of brexit we want an orderly brexit. if we extend it for a number of months on a year, it for a number of months on a year, it gives the united kingdom certainty and time in which to deal with the ratification process. there is an interesting tweet from donald
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tusk, saying there are times when you need to be able to time time and perhaps that is one of those times when you need to understand the difficult political balance in the house of commons. the prime minister has opened talks with the labour party, it is unlikely they will conclude in the immediate term but i would hope to see conclusion in the next few months. it takes pressure off everybody. it give certainty to europe and the united kingdom. if it isa europe and the united kingdom. if it is a longer extension asked for by the prime minister although i expect the prime minister although i expect the prime minister trying to get things tidied up until the next european parliament sets so we might have a strange scenario where there are elections in the united kingdom. and if our withdrawal agreement is ratified before the end ofjune, and perhaps, this is a strange scenario, those people elected to the european parliament may not take their seats.
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but all of this is speculation and it will be a long day of speculation. as you know it will be late in the evening before the leaders thrash out the final details. thank you very much. i will remember that, give time time. that will be my quote of the day. that strange noise was not sure phone. no, it is on a lifetime ban. you removed it from the studio after yesterday's incident. rightly so. 16 minutes past seven. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. lots of things going on it is a cold start. this was sent in from livingston in west lothian. temperatures hovering around freezing, either just above temperatures hovering around freezing, eitherjust above or below for many. there is a lot of sunshine
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as well. as you can see from this picture. the forecast for today is a cooler one than yesterday but also looking at sunny spells but we still have some rain in the forecast courtesy of this weather front. moving away from the isles of scilly, bringing showery rain into the channel islands. brightening up in the south—west, brightening up in the afternoon, and you can see a lot of sunshine across the board except for north—east scotland and at times north—east england where we are looking at more cloud. this afternoon, it will be a lovely afternoon, it will be a lovely afternoon if you like at sunny across much of england and wales, gusty winds in the south east corner. sunshine across northern ireland and much of scotland. away from the far north and north—east will hang on to temperature wise,
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easterly north—easterly winds so it is taking the edge off the temperatures but it will feel cooler as we drift further west, 11 and 12. maybe a 13 in edinburgh. as we head on through the evening and overnight, we hang onto the cloud. parts of eastern england, cloud will be thick enough drizzle and another band of cloud coming in from the west will introduce more in the way of cloud and drizzle to northern ireland. in the east we will see clearer skies. a widespread frost away from that cloud and that heralds the arrival of all this cold air. across northern europe, milder and warmer in southern europe for no but it will turn colder in the uk. tomorrow we start off without frost, a lot of dry weather and sunshine. here is where we have cloud and drizzle, a keen easterly wind. cloud and drizzle coming in over northern
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ireland. we are looking actually on the east coast, 7—12 or 13. thursday into friday, high—pressure across scandinavia, dominating our weather. this is trying to come away, it might on sunday, on friday it will not. a cold and frosty start, some sunshine around. cloud bubbling up through the day. when changes direction to more southerly and temperature wise, 8 degrees. below for the stage in april to about 11 out in the west. thank you very much, carol. i'm struggling to turn around there. playing squash yesterday. i cannot turn around that way. let's take a look at today's papers... the telegraph leads on the prime minister's meeting
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with the french president for brexit talks in paris. the paper says eu leaders feel mrs may's plan for an extension until the end ofjune is "too much of a risk". the mail describes the prospect of a delay as "humiliating". the picture is of the duchess of sussex, meghan markle — who it reports is planning a home birth. the mirror is one of the few with a different front page, reporting its own investigation into the profits mps have made from selling the homes they'd claimed expenses for. let's have a look at some of the inside pages. from page seven on the telegraph. first baby born in grandmother's worm thanks to robotic surgery. in sweden, there is a surgeon. what they have done is the grandmother of this baby boy donated her womb and that women can be
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removed by making five snips vi keyhole surgery. that grandmother... that baby is born in the grandmother's womb in their daughter. and this baby boy has been born. weighing in atjust over six lbs. it would not have been possible a few years ago. you have to process it through your rain how it works. it is incredible surgery that has taken place for the first time. we we re taken place for the first time. we were talking about eggs yesterday. 720 million eggs are needlessly bend every year. 720 million eggs are needlessly bend every yea r. if 720 million eggs are needlessly bend every year. if an egg floats, you should not be eating it. this one is one of my favourites, both of us telling to us children. if you mould
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—— right if you scrape the mould of the jam, it is ok to eat. you can still use old honey when it crystallises. if you prefer a runny, put it in a bowl of hot water. bananas, to keep them fresh, ripe cling film around the stem and that traps the gas emitted by the third slowing down the ripening process. individual clone —— right clingfilm wrapping of each banana.” individual clone —— right clingfilm wrapping of each banana. i like them in banana bread when they go brown. baking powder. if your kicks are not rising, your baking powder could be out of date. to test it, put it in boiling water, powder that is fine to use will phase and release carbon
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dioxide. when you go into the fridge and hacked off a bit of cheese, do you take off the multi—parts. incredible information this morning. then mouldy soft cheese. and we have information on the champions league. spurs managed to beat manchester city. liverpool 2—0 against porto. this is the worry for fans, harry kane has a dodgy ankle. he limped off. cannot put any weight on it. 7:23am. good morning. lots of women suffer cramps or mood swings in the run up to their period, but for around 1 in 20 people, these symptoms are so severe, they're unable to live a normal life. it's called premenstrual
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dysphoric disorder or pmdd, and could be affecting women without them even realising it. jayne mccubbin reports. pmdd. four letters experts say there is far too little understanding of, even though the cost of those four letters can be huge. lisa, what did it cost you? friendships, relationships. you think it cost you your marriage? yeah. now i do. now i know what it was, i do believe that it cost me my marriage. because of my anger. my irritability. lisa had a miscarriage in 2016 and from then on the pmt she had always suffered spiralled into something far darker. even my gp would say it's like pmt on steroids. it's just... there is no comparison. there is no comparison at all. and the worst of it is the suicidal thoughts? yeah. i used a plan it in my head
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all the time because i didn't think that i was worthy of living and being with my children and having a family. these are four letters which cost lives. for lisa, this was written off as clinical depression until her gp had a light bulb moment. whenever lisa's periods and monthly hormonal changes were stopped by a birth control coil, so too did the depression. five months ago, she took the most extreme action — a hysterectomy to stop those hormonal ebbs and flows for good. and i think if we didn't have that light bulb moment, i don't know where i would have been today. i think probably my children would have been taken off me, maybe. how do you feel today? amazing. absolutely amazing. i've got my life back, the kids are no longer eating takeaway food. i'm no longer in my bed 2a hours a day, crying. are you happy? happy, yes.
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yes. the condition was first fully recognised in america in 2014 and awareness is spreading to the uk with the first pmdd conference held in bournemouth this weekend. it's awareness that lisa knows can save lives. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. later in the programme we'll be speaking to two women who've been campaigning to raise awareness of pmdd. if you have any questions we will try and put it to them. later this morning, nick knowles will be here to talk about his new show which commissions affordable artwork for people's homes. well one of the artists from the show, who'll also be here later, has created some bespoke pieces for us — and here they are. it has been created... the red stuff
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is lipstick. it has been made up out of breakfast ingredients. the blue is toothpaste. she will be worth as a little bit later. you look a little bit like yourself but you also look like someone else as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. 7:27am is the time. i felt a need to explain that. see you in a moment. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. there are serious concerns about the safety of using the hard shoulder of motorways as an extra lane. known as 'smart motorways', a number of routes around the capital — including parts of the m1 and m25 — have already been converted to increase the number of driving lanes.
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but emergency services say in some cases, it's taking them longer to reach accidents. the former transport minister who brought in the change is also concerned. at the moment it's clearly not safe using smart motorways. the wives and children of people that have been killed rescuing us off the motorways, and smart motorways, that cannot be right in the 21st century. but the department for transport says evidence shows smart motorways are just as safe as conventional ones and that they are continuing to make emergency areas more frequent and visible. with schools off for easter holidays, the mayor and the police are hoping providing activities for young londoners will help prevent violence. they range from theatre workshops and sports programmes to coding clubs and cooking classes. meanwhile, there will also be an increased police presence around public areas and transport stations. the latest piece of art on the underground will be unveiled
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at the entrance of brixton tube station this morning. it's a mural by mexican—born artist aliza nisenbaum and depicts 15 transport for london employees who work from brixton station and on the victoria line. let's take a look at the travel situation now. first the tubes — just some minor delays, euston to watford junction on the 0verground. no other reported problems at the moment, though. the m25 has one lane closed anticlockwise at junction 25 for enfield after a van caught fire. it's slow from junction 27 for the m11. greenwich church street has one lane closed at creek road for emergency electricity work. and in leyton, there are tempoary traffic lights on lea bridge road at belvedere road. and that's for water works. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. yesterday was wet, but today, we are all set to see some sunshine. a cloudy start, but that will continue to clear southward through the morning. lots of sunshine getting going. it will stay dry and feel a bit
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cooler as well, with a chilly, north—easterly wind blowing. starting off on a cool note, that cloud clearing southward through the morning. lots of sunshine emerging with a bit more clout bubbling up here and there through the afternoon, but staying dry, a chilly north easterly wind, feeling quite blustery at times. temperatures between 9—11. through this evening and overnight with lighter winds, clear skies, temperatures are likely to drop below freezing in the rural spots, so a touch of frost into the morning. more cloud towards the east, perhaps. through the rest of the week, temperatures will dip. cloudier towards the east, sunnier in the west, by friday and saturday we look at temperatures struggling to get into them double figures, but it will turn warmer next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, here's louise and dan. see you soon.
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very good morning to you. this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. eu leaders will hold an emergency summit in brussels today to consider theresa may's request for a delay to brexit. the prime minister wants a short postponement to the end ofjune, but the european council president, donald tusk, has written to eu leaders suggesting a flexible extension of up to a year. he's also said there would be conditions including no re—opening of negotiations on the withdrawal agreement. let's go to our political correspondent, iain watson, who's in westminister this morning. we are not sure of anything in this process. we just saw that date out asa process. we just saw that date out as a xxxxx, but what is likely to happen today? yes, that is difficult to predict, but what is easier to
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predict as a longer extension, perhaps nine months, maybe a year. from the prime minister'sperspective, she will want to emphasise that this extension comes with a bit of a get out clause. if she can reach agreement at westminster with the opposition and among their own mps, she can come out earlier, if she can get her withdrawal agreement through parliament, it could still possibly be before the european parliament ta kes be before the european parliament takes on seats injuly. that is her hope. nevertheless, the fact she is asking for an extension has upset many of her own mps, and the easiest route to a quick exit from the eu is reaching an agreement at this stage with labour. there were four hours of talks yesterday, more scheduled for tomorrow. but the more she talks to the opposition, the more she seems to alienate some of her own mps. it is not easy for the moment to get rid of the prime minister at this stage. we know she is going at some point. but if she looks like she's giving into brussels' and
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labour's demands, that makes her own position vulnerable, and that must be factored in as well. from the european side, they are keen to avoid what has been called a rolling cliff edge, asking for extension after extension after extension, hence the longer extension, which is easierfor them hence the longer extension, which is easier for them politically and hence the longer extension, which is easierfor them politically and more difficult for theresa may to sell. thank you very much, ian. the result of the general election in israel is likely to be a tie as both main competitors are on course to win 35 seats each, with nearly all votes counted. the serving prime minister benjamin netanyahu and the main challenger benny gantz have claimed victory. but the outcome puts mr netanyahu in a stronger position to form a right—wing coalition government. he told his supporters there would be difficulties ahead. children battling mental health problems in england are facing a postcode lottery when it comes to accessing the help they need, according to a new report. a study by the children's commissioner anne longfield says spending on services for children with anxiety or depression has fallen by a third
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in some parts of england. the government said investing in children's mental health is a priority, but charities have called the situation "deeply concerning". the mayor of new york has declared a public health emergency in brooklyn to fight an outbreak of measles there. bill de blasio says residents who don't get vaccinated will be fined. the outbreak is concentrated in communities with large populations of ultra—0rthodoxjews. some of them oppose vaccines on religious grounds. thousands of people with conditions like dementia and parkinson's disease could be missing out on council tax discounts. people with severe mental impairments shouldn't have to pay council tax, but campaigners say differences in how local authorities handle the process is too confusing. so from today, the welsh government is making it easierfor those affected to get discounts and even rebates on their past payments.
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now, have a look at these. they're small, they weigh as much as a tennis ball, and zookeepers can't tell if they're male or female. they're baby ring—tailed lemurs. this lot have just been born at chester zoo. there are six in total, including two sets of twins and a really unusual black lemur. they'll spend the next few weeks piggy—backing their mothers until they‘ re strong enough to jump around on their own. absolutely lovely! they are super cute, aren't they? 7:35am. loads to come between now and 9:15am, but holly is here at the moment reflecting on a really big night in the champions league. and another one tonight? that's right, a huge night for the english clubs in particular. manchester city facing totte n ha m particular. manchester city facing tottenham hotspur last night. i will say one thing, song likes the new stadium, doesn't he? he has already scored twice and it has only been open for a week! manchester city might have to put the champagne on ice for their bid for the quadruple,
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but it is the first leg, of course. there was also a good night for liverpool, with a 2—0 victory over porto, but spurs' win over manchester city may have come at a cost with harry kane picking up what looked like a serious injury. adam wild has all the details. this is spears' new home, and this is the kind of occasion they dream it would feel it. —— spurs. there was plenty here that felt new, and modern technology provided the first half talking point. raheem sterling's shot was blocked, the referee calling for help from a video replay. that showed the block was with an arm. a penalty, the decision, eventually. no one has scored more goals for manchester city than sergio aguero, but this was one development few predicted. chances for either side were scarce. song went close. missed penalties,
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missed shots, and for spurs, a player who will now be missed. their england captain harry kane forced to hobble from the field. but then came the first lie's decisive moment. song again left with plenty to do, and doing it quite brilliantly. the type is macro only goal, spares already making themselves at home. enfield has seen many such occasions, the pride, the passion a lwa ys occasions, the pride, the passion always loud. —— and field. some things in football never change. against porto, liverpool were ahead in five minutes thanks to naby keita's diverted shot. 2—0, and the reds were on their way. adam mentioned that injury for harry kane there. lots of talk this morning about how serious that could be. let's hear from morning about how serious that could be. let's hearfrom their manager. maybe when he twisted his ankle, it maybe damaged the ligament. we need to check in the next few days.
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it is impossible now to, only to look forward and hope that it's not a big issue and try to recover as soon as possible. but it doesn't look good. more champions league action tonight with manchester united and barcelona renewing an old rivalry. lionel messi has undone united the last two times the teams have met in this competition, scoring the winner in both the 2009 and 2011 finals. so how do you stop him? what kind of plan can you have to stop one of the best players in the world? i think we are looking forward to relishing the opportunity. but this season we've played against juventus, ronaldo, psg with mbappe. the better opponents, suarez as well. suarez and coutinho and messi, they'll keep our defenders on their toes. england women's world cup preparations are back on track after they beat spain last night in a warm—up friendly.
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beth mead and ellen white got the lionesses' two goals, responding well to last friday's defeat by canada in manchester. their 2—1 win comes in theirfinal game before the squad is announced for the tournament in france. the masters gets under way at augusta national tomorrow afternoon. rory mcilroy is the bookies favourite to win his first green jacket after having a great start to the season. if he wins, he will become the first european to win all of golf‘s major tournaments. but with all the talk of a career grand slam, he is content with his preparation. i'm in a good place with it. again, and i keep saying this, i would dearly love to win this tournament one day. if it doesn't happen this week, that's totally fine. i'll come back next year and i'll have another crack at it. but i'm happy with where everything is, body, mind, game.
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and rory tees off at quarter past four tomorrow afternoon. i love what he says about the preparations. he is doing mine training, meditation... and juggling. who knew? it is apparently very good for golfers. we saw a lot of it on the women store recently. he says he can only manage three balls at the minute, so he is quite an amateur. you say an amateur! and the weather is not going to be very good. yes, they are talking about finishing for the first time in one day because of storms. it isa in one day because of storms. it is a bit stormy now, as we look at black holes. yes... black holes are one of the universe's greatest mysteries, partly because it's so difficult to see them — they don't emit or reflect any light, so it's hard to capture them on camera. but today the very first real photo of one could be published, thanks to scientists who have come up with a way to take an image
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using a network of telescopes. joining us professor of astrophysics isobel hook is here with us, and from london, we have dr ziri younsi, who worked on the project. first, doctor younsi, this must be a very exciting day for you. tell us what you have. this has been many yea rs what you have. this has been many years in the making and is a very exciting day. it is the first time we will have a picture of a black hole. peering into the heart of darkness itself, and finally taking a picture of something which for 100 yea rs has a picture of something which for 100 years has been eluding us. there has been so much indirect evidence, and with all this international collaborative effort, we may finally have the first confirmatory picture ofa have the first confirmatory picture of a black hole, so it is an amazing feat of human engineering and collaboration. i feel the need to ask some ignorant questions, isobel. what exactly is a
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black hole? i am just asking that to isobel in the studio. well, it is a place in space where gravity is so strong that nothing can escape, not even light, so itjust appears black. and the reason we cannot take a picture up until now is that it does not give off or reflect any ught? does not give off or reflect any light? that's right, but as we heard just now, we know they are there because of the effect they have on things around them like stars, for example, moving very quickly around black holes. so we know they are there. that is really the only explanation for the motion of some stars moving very fast, but to actually get a picture is a very new level of confirmation. dr ziri. tell us level of confirmation. dr ziri. tell us about the collaboration. it has taken many us about the collaboration. it has ta ken many scientists us about the collaboration. it has taken many scientists all over the world lots of telescopes to do this? that's right, it has taken the best pa rt that's right, it has taken the best part 20 years to get technology going. to take a picture of a black hole would require a camera with a
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resolution so high that here on earth, you could photograph an orange on the surface of the moon stop so there is no one telescope large enough to achieve that kind of resolution. so we have taken a network of eight radio telescopes spread all across the world in six different continents, and we pointed all of them simultaneously at the same black holes, and we have recorded all the data we have come up recorded all the data we have come up vast amounts, and once we have done those measurements, we bring all that data together to a central location and use a special technique to effectively measure the time lags between the different telescopes' data, to create a virtual telescope the size of the earth. with that, we canjust the size of the earth. with that, we can just about resolve the event horizon, which is precisely what the eht horizon, which is precisely what the e ht set out to do and which we will discuss today. it is incredible, isn't it? isobel, we talked about einstein earlier, because i was reading about the fact einstein said that black hole
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stretch the space around them. could it be that these revelations or discussion around this could disprove an einstein theory? how does it work? it could in principle, yes. we are hoping we will see an image of a black hole, the sort of blackness silhouetted against the hot material behind it, and if this warping of space is correct... we may even be able to see behind the black hole, because space has walked so strongly that you may even be able to see what is going on behind it. that would be a sign that this theory, einstein's theory of relativity, is actually correct. it is very interesting that this theory is very interesting that this theory is something we use every day in our gps systems for navigation. the corrections you need from general relativity are actually used in everyday life, so we want to test whether this theory is right. and dr ziri, it whether this theory is right. and drziri, it is whether this theory is right. and dr ziri, it is very difficult to get your head round this. actually,
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a black hole is not empty, it is full, right? well, it is quite a mysterious object, because it has something called an event horizon, a surface where nothing, not even light, can escape, so as isobel has said already, we can't see a black hole directly, but we can infer its presence by looking at how it reacts gravitationally with matter. so all this gas falling onto it, as that gets close to the event horizon, it heats up and gets bright and emits a lot of light. light emitted from this matter minutes before it passes the event horizon is what we see, and that creates this shadow, this silhouette, a backdrop that we hope to detect. and just give us a clue, it is so far away, tell us! well, i'm sworn to secrecy about specific details, but i can say there are two particular black holes we are interested in. one is in our galactic centre, 26,000 light years
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away. another is in another galaxy, the virgo cluster, and it is called m87, and that one is much further away, but is also a thousand times more massive. so both of them have an angular size of the sky which, although it is incredibly small, it is 30 or so million times smaller than the size of the moon in the sky at night. we have the ability to resolve these, and so the e ht has focused all of its telescopes to ta ke focused all of its telescopes to take a picture, a virtual camera, both of these black holes. so hopefully the results today will present a little bit about what we have found. i love the way you are kind of telling us but not telling us! us wa nt to telling us but not telling us! us want to secrecy. it is 2pm, the simultaneous pictures. thank you very much forjoining us, dr ziri thank you very much forjoining us, drziri and thank you very much forjoining us, dr ziri and isobel hook. it is all coordinated, there is a news conference at 2pm bst, and at seven
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minutes passed, the image. so i expect you will see it. looking forward to staring into the heart of darkness! a good way of describing it. i remember heart of darkness. written by? can't remember, sorry. joseph conrad. i remember it because i lost a pub quiz on it years ago. 0bviously a pub quiz on it years ago. obviously i did as well! that was the tie—breaker. 7:47am. i think we will go to the weather now. that looks nice, doesn't it? absolutely beautiful. carol has the rest of the details for all of us. good morning, everyone. a beautiful start to the day in many areas. you can see this lovely weather watchers picture of northern ireland, and another one from london. a different view this time, greater london. the sun is out, as it is across many parts of the uk, and it will be cooler today. we will hang on to the sunshine, with the exception being parts of southern england. that is because we have a
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weather front just along the england. that is because we have a weather frontjust along the isles of scilly, heading along the english channel, bringing some showers. that will clear away, and for both the isles of scilly and the channel islands, it will brighten up, joining the rest of the uk with sunny spells. exceptions across the far north—east of scotland, where there is more cloud around, and at times, more cloud across north—east england. you too will see some sunny intervals. gusty across the south—east quarter today, so you will notice that cool north—easterly wind, but pushing north, you can see how we have all those clear skies until we reach north—east england and north—east scotland. we will hang onto those cloudy skies across north—east scotland for much of the day, but temperature —wise, we are lower than we were yesterday, and if you are exposed to the wind coming in from the north sea, it will feel cooler. temperatures are up to about 12, maybe 13 in edinburgh. through the evening and overnight, we hang
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onto this cloud across the northeast, thick enough spots of drizzle. the same across parts of eastern england, and another band of cloud comes in from the atlantic across northern ireland. in between, under clear skies, a cold night. some of us start with a frost this morning. tomorrow, more widespread, so you might need to leave more time to scrape your car. you can see cold aircoming yourway. at to scrape your car. you can see cold air coming your way. at the moment, across southern parts of europe, it is still warm, but cool air will push further south in the next few days towards the mediterranean. thursday, first thing, cold and frosty. we start with this cloud in the north—east, producing some drizzle. some at times in the south—east and across northern ireland. in between, where we have sunshine, top temperatures up to 12-13, but still sunshine, top temperatures up to 12—13, but still on the north sea coastline, cooler with a breeze. into friday, high pressure firmly in charge of our weather. not much in
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the way of isobars. unsettled conditions, but low pressure trying to come in from the west and not succeeding. it might on sunday, but thejury is succeeding. it might on sunday, but the jury is out. on friday, succeeding. it might on sunday, but thejury is out. on friday, we succeeding. it might on sunday, but the jury is out. on friday, we start cold and frosty. some sunshine, cloud building through the day, temperatures between 9—12. into the weekend, it brazier. it will get cloudier, and for some people, a bit breezy. the chances of rain on sunday, potentially south—west england and northern ireland. the jury england and northern ireland. the jury is out on that one. thank you very much, carol. you might have heard, we were talking about black holes. i wanted to let you know the bbc has been following that project the two years tonight, and you can watch the documentary, how to see a black hole: the universe's greatest mystery, on bbc4 at 9pm. debenhams finally fell
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into administration yesterday after weeks of speculation about the department store's future. steph's looking at what might happen next. so, a difficult question. what happens next? exactly, that is what we will try and cover a bit of this morning. good morning everyone. debenham is now in the hands of its lenders. the 25,000 people who work in the 165 stores will continue as normal, but behind the scenes the new owners will be trying to sell the business. with me now is the editor of retail week george macdonald. good morning. thanks forjoining us. morning. could you remind us how we got to this point? there have been loads of elements to the story. yes, debenhams was really caught in a pincer. 0n the one hand, it is dealing with high costs, high debt, and at the same time, it failed to adapt fast enough to the ways in which people shop and how they are changing. the upshot was, it came to a crunch point and it went into
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administration yesterday. so they tried to make bricks and clicks complement each other, but they were not really fast enough, partly because they did not have enough money, and they lost relevance. they really need to rediscover relevance to shoppers, i think. yes, really need to rediscover relevance to shoppers, ithink. yes, and amongst all this, you have had their biggest shareholder, mike ashley, the owner of sports direct, among other things, and there has been a lot of fighting going on between him and the management. what has that been about? there has. i think he said what happened at debenhams is a national scandal, a national disgrace. to be honest, ithink there is a bit of sour grapes in there. he is a really clever retailer and deal— maker, but there. he is a really clever retailer and deal—maker, but i think he has misplayed his hand, partly for the reasons you have said. there has been a lot of confrontation. he is at odds with the debenhams board. he wanted all of them removed and to
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become chief executive himself, and remember, he already owns one of their rivals, house of fraser, so there has been a lot of push and shove, so i think that in itself would have made the lenders, who held all the cards, quite jittery. yes. so now, we are at the stage where it is in administration and up for sale. who is likely to buy it and what will happen next? ironically, mike ashley might still conceivably end up buying it. he is interested and has formally registered his interest. but he seems to think that a deal will be done with somebody else. 0ne possibility might be philip day, another retail tycoon, who owns edinburgh woollen mill and other well— known brands. he edinburgh woollen mill and other well—known brands. he has been interested in debenhams before, so thatis interested in debenhams before, so that is one possibility, or the other might be that some kind of turnaround company might hope to ta ke turnaround company might hope to
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take charge. and obviously, 25,000 staff will be worried. what are your thoughts there? luckily for them, as part of this prepacked, things will be fairly stable in the short term, but debenhams have already announced plans to shut about 50 stores. 50 stores, yes. so that is likely to happen, so there is short—term stability, but debenhams needs to be restructured further to have a chance of rekindling shoppers' affections. a story we will come back to a lot. thank you very much, george. that is it from me for now. thank you, steph. good news in the short term. game of thrones has become one of the most talked about tv shows of the last decade, and its filming locations
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are proving to bejust as popular. the last ever series is set to air next week — but the legacy for northern ireland will continue for many years to come. chris pagejoins us from an exhibition in belfast celebrating the show. morning, chris. yes, many would say this has been the biggest show in the world over the biggest show in the world over the last four years, and this exhibition in belfast is a masterpiece of craftsmanship. this armour is warned by one of the characters who tries to win the throne, stannis ba ratheon. characters who tries to win the throne, stannis baratheon. another one is worn by the priestess melisandre. if you are fans, you will know these right away. this costu me will know these right away. this costume is worn by the character va rys , costume is worn by the character varys, played by an actor from northern ireland. i am glad to say i am joined by northern ireland. i am glad to say i amjoined bya northern ireland. i am glad to say i am joined by a producer of the show. in television terms, how big a phenomenon has game of thrones been? globally, it is on the air in around 200 countries. it is the biggest
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programme hbo has had as long as original programming has gone.” remember it was announced it was to be made here. did anyone foresee how big a share it would become?” be made here. did anyone foresee how big a share it would become? i don't think anyone did. anyone who says they foresaw it becoming this amazing phenomenon is probably lying about! what i have noticed going around the exhibition is the level of detail and craftsmanship that goes into this. absolutely, and that is one of the most exciting things about this touring exhibition, that you can commencing in person the intense amount of detail involved in the props and costumes, which really reflects the artistry and expertise of the folks that put all this together. thousands of people coming from all over the world to see all the filming locations. what has been the filming locations. what has been the secret of the show‘s global success ? the secret of the show‘s global success? i would say obviously the plots and the writing, it has got drama and intrigue and romance, something for everyone. but in addition, it is really the secret
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detail that you see. it is this incredibly rich world that they have created, and all of that is on display here at the touring exhibition. thank you forjoining us, jeff peters from hbo. back with more in about an hour. as you say, the detail is quite something. much to talk about between now and 9:15am. nick knowles showing that art is affordable to all and sundry. but right now... time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. there are serious concerns about the safety of using the hard shoulder of motorways as an extra lane. known as 'smart motorways', a number of routes around the capital — including parts of the m1 and m25 — have already been converted to increase the number of driving lanes. but emergency services say in some cases it's taking them longer to reach accidents.
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the former transport minister who brought in the change is also concerned. at the moment, it's clearly not safe using smart motorways. i've met the wives and children of people that have been killed rescuing us off the motorways, on smart motorways, that cannot be right in the 21st century. but the department for transport says evidence shows smart motorways are just as safe as conventional ones and that they are continuing to make emergency areas more frequent and visible. with schools off for easter holidays, the mayor and the police are hoping providing activities for young londoners will help prevent violence. they range from sports programmes and theatre workshops to coding clubs and cooking classes. meanwhile, there will also be an increased police presence around public areas and transport stations. the latest piece of art on the underground will be unveiled at the entrance of brixton tube station this morning. it's a mural by mexican—born artist aliza nisenbaum and depicts
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15 transport for london employees who work from brixton station and on the victoria line. let's take a look at the travel situation now. first the tubes — just some minor delays euston to watford junction on the 0verground. minor delays for the victoria line. the m25 has one lane closed anticlockwise at junction 25 for enfield after a van caught fire. it's slow from junction 27 for the m11. greenwich church street has one lane closed at creek road for emergency electricity work. and in leyton: there are tempoary traffic lights on lea bridge road at belvedere road. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday it was wet but today we're all set to see some sunshine. now, it's a bit of a cloudy start but that cloud will continue to clear its way southwards as we head through the morning. lots of sunshine getting going. it will stay dry and it will feel a bit cooler, as well, with quite a chilly north—easterly wind blowing, too. we are starting off on quite a cool note, that cloud clearing its way
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southwards through the morning. lots of sunshine emerging with a bit more cloud bubbling up here and there through the afternoon, but staying dry. a chilly north—easterly wind, feeling quite blustery at times. top temperatures between nine and 11 celsius. now, through this evening and overnight, with lighter winds, clear skies, temperatures are likely to drop below freezing in rural spots, so there will be a touch of frost into tomorrow morning. little bit more cloud out towards the east, perhaps. as we head through the rest of the week, well, temperatures are set to take a bit of a dip. always a bit cloudier towards the east, sunnier in the west. by the time we get to friday and saturday, we are looking at temperatures really struggling to get into double figures. but it is staying dry and it will turn warmer next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. see you soon. good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today...
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the prime minister heads to brussels in her quest for a short delay to brexit. an emergency summit of eu leaders will consider an extension of up to 12 months. a warning that thousands of people could be missing out on council tax discounts — money—saving expert martin lewis tells us why he wants a change to the guidelines. we've a special report on the debilitating condition thought to affect 1 in 20 women around the world. even my gp would say it's like pmt on steroids. debenhams in administration. mike ashley calls the saga a national scandal but what next for the 165 stores? i'll have the details. son gives spurs the advantage as tottenham take a slight lead against manchester city in their champions league quarter—final first leg, while liverpool beat porto at anfield. the tourists are coming. as hit tv series game of thrones returns for a final series we'll
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see how it has boosted the northern ireland economy. a cold and frosty start for some of us, but a lot of sunshine around for most, and rain from the south. i'll have more in 15 minutes. it's wednesday the 10th of april. our top story... eu leaders will hold an emergency summit in brussels today, to consider the prime minister's request for a delay to brexit. theresa may wants a short postponement to the end ofjune, but the european council president, donald tusk, has written to eu leaders suggesting a flexible extension of up to a year. 0ur political correspondent, alex forsyth, has more. it was first stop berlin yesterday as the prime minister tried to win support for her latest brexit plan. the diplomatic push continued in paris, theresa may trying to convince eu leaders to sign up to a short delay to brexit
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ofjust a few months. later tonight, all the eu countries will gather here in brussels to discuss her request. and what will happen is farfrom certain. a draft version of what they might agree suggest they will back an extension to the brexit process to stop the uk leaving without a deal on friday. but for how long? so far, that part has been left blank. last night, donald tusk, the president of the european council, published a letter he'd written to eu leaders ahead of today's meeting. he said, i believe we should also discuss an alternative, longer extension of up to one year with the option for the uk to leave earlier if a brexit deal can be agreed. in westminster, talks between labour and the government are continuing to try and find an agreement parliament can back but so far, there has been no breakthrough. here, most mps have made clear they won't support the idea of leaving the eu
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without a deal in place. so a pause seems highly likely. the question is, how long and what for? let's speak to our brussels reporter, adam fleming. adam, you have proved in recent weeks and months that you know your stuff. so when is brexit happening? at the moment, we don't actually know. the document eu leaders will sign up to tonight, which exists in a d raft sign up to tonight, which exists in a draft form and is being discussed in the corridors of brussels, has the date of the end of the process blank, it actually has six mark to market. the day, month and year has been left to decide tonight. the options that they are tossing around are, do you have it in december of this year, or march of next year? it means that brexit is notjust a co nsta nt means that brexit is notjust a constant thing that eu leaders have to discuss every couple of weeks or months, you give the uk the time to do what it wants with that. it will
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also be made very clear that if parliament can get the deal approved and voted on before december or march, brexit could happen earlier than that. here is another data being thrown around, the 1st of june. that would be the date of the uk would have to leave the eu if it didn't take part in the european parliament elections on the 23rd of may. 0ne parliament elections on the 23rd of may. one more thing they are talking about is how do you make sure that the uk follows the rules and behaves nicely to the other eu countries if it stays in for longer? how can you make sure the uk, perhaps the new prime minister, who is not as friendly as theresa may, does not muck up the big decisions like the budget, and here is the new president of the european commission. again, much to think about. thank you very much. children battling mental health problems in england are facing a postcode lottery when it comes to accessing the help they need according to a new report.
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a study by the children's commissioner anne longfield says spending on services for children with anxiety or depression has fallen by a third in some parts of england. the government said investing in children's mental health is a priority, but charities have called the situation "deeply concerning". what kind of treatment you can get actually depends on where you live. if you live in london or the north—east, you've got much more that is being spent on treatment at the early stages than if you live in the midlands or, indeed, in the south—west. now, that means that children and indeed parents cannot rely on what is there. so, there is funding available, centrally, but it's being left to local authorities and local health ccgs to decide how much is spent. i want much, much more scrutiny nationally to ensure there is absolute consistency, wherever you live around the country. the mayor of new york has declared a public health emergency in brooklyn to fight an outbreak of measles there. bill de blasio says residents who don't get vaccinated will be fined. the outbreak is concentrated in communities with large populations of ultra—0rthodoxjews.
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some of them oppose vaccines on religious grounds. thousands of people with conditions like dementia and parkinson's disease could be missing out on council tax discounts. people with severe mental impairments shouldn't have to pay council tax, but campaigners say differences in how local authorities handle the process is too confusing. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith reports. hi, thomas, what's for tea tonight? thomas is doing more to help his mum out at home at the moment, because she's doing more to help her mum. is that the salad? yeah, ijust need to add the sweet potato and onion to it. sian's mum, pat, has dementia, which means sian and her siblings are now in charge of her finances. following her diagnosis, we had a visit with the memory clinic in ruthin, north wales. they kind of said, well, what are you doing about benefits? they told me about the council tax exemption, which i had no idea existed. it's thought that tens of thousands
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of people across the uk don't realise that they shouldn't be paying council tax. that's why here in denbigh, and across wales, they've decided to advertise the exemption more, to just have one standardised form and give people their money back, right up to the point they were first diagnosed. sian managed to get help here, as her mum's local citizens advice. they say a lot of people are put off by the term severe mental impairment. it's not a nice term, really, and that's something we discussed with people when we are talking about whether they may qualify, whether they may be eligible, to encourage them to make the claim. under the new system, sian should now be able to claim back three years of council tax payments, since her mum was first diagnosed. by having those extra funds available, that's going to make it so much easier to get the extra help if she needs it. and we'll be speaking to martin lewis, the founder
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of moneysavingexpert.com who has been campaigning on this issue since 2017. the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu is likely to stay in power after a closely fought general election. almost all of the votes have been counted, and mr netanyahu's likud party is tied with the centrist blue and white alliance. but right—wing and religious parties have won enough seats to give the prime minister a clear advantage in forming a government. lyse doucet is injerusalem for us this morning good morning. i guess the question is, what happens now? what happens now, went to mcgill leaders who said they won before the clock struck the midnight hour wake they won before the clock struck the midnight hourwake up they won before the clock struck the midnight hour wake up this morning to see that in fact they did both win? it is still a dead heat. benjamin netanyahu's win? it is still a dead heat. benjamin neta nyahu's party win? it is still a dead heat. benjamin netanyahu's party has a 35 seats, benny gantz 0smo alliance also has 35 seats. there are two
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elections, won the day when the people of israel vote, and the next is the weeks of what will be horse trading, and it is at a whole different level in israel, promises that cannot be capped, but will be made, as it looks like benjamin netanyahu, made, as it looks like benjamin neta nyahu, with made, as it looks like benjamin netanyahu, with his support among the right—wing and religious parties, forms the best chance of forming a coalition government. never has one party governed in its own, and it is the same way in this election. it is an extraordinary situation, with them both claiming a victory? well, they both made triumphant declarations not long after the exit polls were announced, which put benny gantz with a very slight margin over benjamin netanyahu. slight margin over benjamin neta nyahu. but even slight margin over benjamin netanyahu. but even if he loses the election and the right to form the government, benny gantz has won, his party didn't exist weeks ago. he is a man with no political experience who has been fighting wars, not fighting political battles. he has shown israel there is another
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alternative to benjamin netanyahu. but if benjamin netanyahu does form the next government, he stands the chance of becoming israel's longest serving prime minister. but he is facing possible indictment on corruption charges and could be gone by the summer. always good to talk to you. thank you very much for your time. scientists are expected to reveal the first ever images of a black hole later today. up to now we've only been able to see an artist's impression, because taking a picture of them is so difficult as they don't emit or reflect any light. but a network of telescopes around the world have been pointed at two black holes — and it's hoped they can produce a clear image which will be unveiled later today. it is going to be unveiled simultaneously around the world just after two o'clock. we were speaking toa after two o'clock. we were speaking to a doctor and he said it would be like staring into the heart of darkness. scientists are incredibly excited about this. there will be a
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lot more coverage on that throughout the day. all of the pictures we have seen the day. all of the pictures we have seen up until this point... the day. all of the pictures we have seen up untilthis point... yes, artist impressions. the actress who'll play princess diana in the latest series of the crown has been announced. netflix have given the part to newcomer emma corrin, who they've described as a "brilliant talent". the actress said she was beyond excited to be joining the show. thanks for being with us on wednesday morning. this is something we have been talking about throughout the day. lots of women suffer from premenstrual syndrome in the days before their period. but many may be living with an extreme form of the condition — known as pmdd — without even realising it. the symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder can include depression, anxiety, or even suicidal thoughts. alice girling and laura murphy have suffered from the condition and now campaign to raise awareness. they are both with us. good morning. let's start, i suppose, with how it used to affect you? i first started
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noticing my symptoms when i hit puberty, at about eight or nine yea rs puberty, at about eight or nine years old. you put it down to teenage angst. but as the years progressed and i went into my 20s, the symptoms got much, much worse. so, it would depend on what part of my cycle i was in. but my moods would sometimes be quite manic. but thenit would sometimes be quite manic. but then it would escalate very quickly into agitation, anger, a lot of anxiety. deep, deep depression. laura, how did it manifest with you? very much the same. at 17 i took the contraceptive pill, and from day 2011 contraceptive pill, and from day 201| crashed and burned. in my 205 i had a lot of rage and anger. i would have to sleep 18 hours a had a lot of rage and anger. i would have to sleep18 hours a day for about three days a month. in my 305, it was a tipping point where it got gradually wor5e, it was a tipping point where it got gradually worse, to the point i was losing about ten days a month, and it felt like going through bereavement every month. it would
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feel like somebody had died and you would have to keep going through that. that sounds really tough. how did you get to have a diagnosis of what was affecting you? sign ago thanks to dr google. ijoined the uk pmdd support group and found they we re pmdd support group and found they were specialists. i got referred to a doctor in london and i got treatment through him.” a doctor in london and i got treatment through him. i am a midwife by background. i was taking pa rt midwife by background. i was taking part ina midwife by background. i was taking part in a family planning research project and i had to track my cycle. i started to notice the similarities every month that was happening. and it actually started to become like clockwork. so i went to my gp with thi5. clockwork. so i went to my gp with this. he was absolutely fantastic, and he diagnosed me. what sort of treatment have you had? i know you had the decision to have a hysterectomy, which is not the only
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option? there are first, second, third line treatment, and fourth line is when surgery is brought in as an option. does medicine make a difference? it can do what a lot of people. they work for 60% or 70% of sufferers, and then it goes on to clinical therapy, sufferers, and then it goes on to clinicaltherapy, hormonal menopause, and then if that is not successful, it is a total hysterectomy with ovary removal. that is not something you take on likely? it was a heartbreaking decision, but, ultimately, ichose my quality of life over my chance to bea my quality of life over my chance to be a mother one day. that is a really tough decision. and what struck me this morning is that i had never heard about this before. i am sort of glad i am not alone in that, but hopefully you're changing things. one in 20 women could be suffering from this. how do people know that it is actually less, rather than normal symptoms? the
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difference is severity. it has to be having an impact in your life, your work life or your relationship life. so, fora work life or your relationship life. so, for a lot of people, the difference is just how much it affects your life. it has to have a big knock effect. it has to be within that phase, a lot of people are diagnosed with bipolar because they are not asked to track their menstrual cycle. it is important to track out and make sure the mood changes are within ovulation, and tell about the time of your period. you detailed how it affected you, alice, was it having an effect on people around you, friends and family, did other people notice the way you were acting? absolutely. i had quite a range of self—destructive behaviour. most of it was taken out and my wife. she really suffered quite a lot. you would put on a mask through your day to get through the day, so you could cope, and then when you got home, it
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had to slip and it came out on your loved ones. i imagine people watching today going, i think i may have this, what is your advice to them? the most important thing to do is to track your cycle. there are resources online to give you tools, and it is important you track it over at least two months, so that you can show that it is cyclical. and it is really important, there is the international association of pre—menstrual disorders, they have so pre—menstrual disorders, they have so much information, and you need to learn to advocate for yourself. many doctors have not heard of it, so you need to educate yourself to push for treatment. how are you both now? really well. really good. thank you very much.
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carroll has been looking at the weather, there are some sunny temperatures and cold areas as well? we have frost around, temperatures have fallen to as low as —7. under clear skies, a lot of sunshine, beautiful star to the day in cheshire, as you can see from this lovely picture. a beautiful sunny started the day. today will be cooler than yesterday. yesterday we had to just over 16 degrees in the highlands. today, top temperatures of about 13, but a lot of sunshine. having said that, since i was last on, the focus has changed slightly. in that, we are pulling on a bit more cloud from the north sea than we were expecting. but we are hopeful a lot of it will thin and break. still a key north—easterly breeze across the south—eastern quarter of the uk. remnants of the
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weather front from yesterday pushing away from the isles of scilly, and eventually the channel islands, taking the showery rain that we have associated with that with it. behind it, it will start to brighten up and we will see some sunshine. across north—east england, the cloud will thin and break and we will see some sunny spells. northern ireland and scotland, some sunny spells. across the far north, we are looking at the cloud hanging around a bit longer. always cooler along the north sea coastline, with the onshore breeze. as we come in land, we are looking at 12 or 13 degrees. moving through the evening and overnight, we hold on to clear skies. still quite breezy. across the eastern scotland, more cloud and drizzle. as we come to the west, for northern ireland, the cloud for you is coming from the atlantic. in between and under those clear skies it is going to be cold. although the northern half of the uk
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this morning has seen some frost, all of us will see some frost that will be more widespread as we go through the course of tomorrow. you can see this cold air represented by the blue, pushing across our shores and across northern europe. if you are going on holiday, it is worth noting that that cold air will sink further south as we go across the weekend. first thing on thursday, cold and frosty. still cloud producing some drizzly outbreaks across north east scotland. a bit more cloud coming from the north sea across eastern england. also cloud coming from the atlantic across northern ireland. again, the cloud, here and there, thick enough for the odd spot of drizzle. temperature —wise, nine to about 13. thousands of people with mental impairments could be missing out on council tax discounts. the money saving expert martin lewis has been campaigning on this issue and hejoins us now from our london newsroom with some news about changes being made in wales to help make it easierfor people
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to claim back. good morning. lovely to speak to you. so, give us a broad brush to start with. what is the issue and why were you looking into this? ok, so, the first thing to say is someone so, the first thing to say is someone who has a severe mental impairment, which is a substantial problem with social functioning that is medically diagnosed, it is common with conditions such as dementia, parkinson's, alzheimer's or a stroke. if they are also on benefits, it is called disregarded from council tax purposes, much like stu d e nts from council tax purposes, much like students and under 18 is. if they are living by themselves, they are entitled to pay no council tax. what is is more common, if they are living with one other adult, he was usually their carer, they are entitled to the equivalent of the single person's 25% off council tax,
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about £400 per year. what also happens in some councils, which is very important for many people watching, is if you claim this, some, not all, it is a postcode lottery, will allow you to backdate the claim from your first diagnosis, which is why since we first started campaigning on this issue and wrote the first guide a couple of years ago, we had many people getting in touch and saying they got £5,000, £7,000 of council tax back. as this is for some of the country's most vulnerable people and that money is meant to be there to try to help people live their lives with a substantial problem, it is crucially important. the problem is, we went m, important. the problem is, we went in, we did a mystery shopping exercise a couple of years ago, 69 out of 100 councils gave the wrong information. five of them said the discount doesn't even exist. there isa discount doesn't even exist. there is a massive take of difference. some places, you are 77 times more likely to be claiming less than elsewhere. that is not sorted out by demographic features. what basically happened is that there has been an
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abominable lack of communication, poor processing, putting people off claiming this crucial discount, which, crucially, over100,000 people should be eligible for and aren't claiming. today in wales it is all changing. you're talking about a substantial sum of money for quite a few people. what are wales getting right that others aren't? they are following all the recommendations we put in our report that we wrote to metro years ago! the first thing they did was proper communication, a decent leaflet, not just councils, doctor surgeries as well, a single website for all councils across wales. i am going to cardiff later today to launch with the finance minister the fact that from now in wales there will be a single application form that will help them apply for this, and a consistent backdating policy. if you are eligible for a discount, because there is a sort of acceptance, the problem is it has not been communicated properly and that is
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why people are not claiming it. you will get it automatically backdated from the first point you are eligible. there is not a postcode lottery. what is fascinating about wales is that the law in wales is identical to the law in england. everything that is being done in wales today could be done across english councils, but isn't. i hope that the minister, james brokenshire, responsible forthis, the local govern to authority association, here we have been talking to, are listening. we need to help these vulnerable people. it is just to help these vulnerable people. it isjust a to help these vulnerable people. it is just a process and communication issue, not a change in the law. it issue, not a change in the law. it is easy to sort out. i'm not supposed to say this, but scotland has given us warm indications that things will be improving there soon. what about the flip side of this? is there a responsibility on individuals that might be in line for these discounts, or those supporting those in line for the discounts, what about the responsibility on us and them to know about this? is itjust
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responsibility on us and them to know about this? is it just a council issue? it is worth saying this is a discount for people whose intellectual and social functioning isa intellectual and social functioning is a problem. so... that is why i mentioned those who are looking after them as well. yes, but carers are already very heavily stretched, are already very heavily stretched, a lot of carers don't know about carer allowance. i go back to the mystery shopping research, which showed five councils, when we asked about it, said you can't get that discount it doesn't exist. incorrectly, 69 out of 100, they gave wrong information, said we were not eligible when we were. you understand that the mystery shoppers we re understand that the mystery shoppers were not really eligible, but that is the test we were doing. lots of people have been put off. people who applied for it in the past, were rejected, they read our information and went back. what wales is doing is right. many people with these conditions live a very tough life.
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under law, they are allowed under given a discount for exactly that reason, and councils should not be putting it off. i don't think it is deliberate and malicious. frankly, i just think it is a bit rubbish. just as wales is a beacon of light, saying that we recognise that the discount is important, we are going to give it to everybody, we need to shine that same light.” to give it to everybody, we need to shine that same light. i know you area shine that same light. i know you are a television professional, can you give us a 22nd answer, what should people do if they are watching this and think it applies to me, a member of my family or a friend of mine? if you are in wales, go to the website in wales that gives you the information. in the uk, there is a full guide on the money saving expert website. when you have read that, because you need to know the rules, get in touch with your counsel. you need a medical diagnosis, talk to them and get the notification for the discount. hopefully they will pay out.
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impeccable timing. we should say, the ministerfor housing impeccable timing. we should say, the minister for housing says anybody who believes they may be entitled to any form of support or discount can check with their local authority. that is the minister for housing in england, we should say. coming up, we are talking to a debut novelist about her great new book. hi, there, good morning. yesterday, we saw quite a bit of cloud and some showery rain affecting southern parts of wales and through southern areas of england. that was from this weather front which is continuing to move away to the south, so things are improving here. high pressure, centred towards scandinavia, dominating the weather over the next few days.
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we lose those showers in the south—west through this morning, the cloud disappearing here. now, there'll be some cloud in the north—east of england, the north and east of scotland through today, but, otherwise, we are looking at a lengthy sunny spells but that wind is still coming in from the east or north—east and that is bringing us that chilly feel so, right across the coast, temperature struggling again at around 7—9 degrees. elsewhere, though, those temperatures getting up to 10—13 celsius. now, through tonight, we will continue with a bit of cloud at times across north—east england, north—eastern scotland. it could just drift its way further inland from time to time but it's going to be a cold night, you can see by the blues here, we've got a widespread frost taking us into thursday morning. temperatures at or below freezing. but it will be a lovely start to the day on thursday, that frost will disappear, there'll be some cloud again across many eastern areas. a bit more cloud, perhaps, for scotland and northern ireland when compared to today, but the best of the sunshine will be always in the west,
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temperatures once again about 9—12 or 13 celsius. high pressure is still with us for the end of the week in this area of high pressure tends to block these weather systems, these rain—bearing fronts, from coming into the uk, so friday is going to be another mostly settled day, lots of sunshine again, always more cloud along those north sea coasts, where you've got that easterly wind just drawing in the moisture and cloud from the north sea, but, even then, there'll be some brighter skies and some sunshine from time to time. certainly the best of the sunshine again, the further west you are and those temperatures, well, very similar to the next few days, about 8—13 celsius.
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this is business live from bbc news with maryam moshiri and ben thompson. the brexit dilemma — what could be months of more what could be of more uncertainty mean for business? live from london, that's our top story on wednesday the 10th of april. prime minister theresa may heads to brussels to request a brief extension, but the eu is expected to offer something much longer. we'll be finding out how it's impacting businesses. also in the programme... boeing's legal battles over the 737 max intensify after shareholders file a lawsuit against the company. european markets are open and they are looking pretty

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