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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  April 10, 2019 5:00pm-6:00pm BST

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today at 6pm, we‘re live in brussels, where theresa may is attending the emergency brexit summit, with just two days to the set date for britain‘s departure from the eu. today at 5pm, we're the prime minister arrived live in brussels, where theresa may is attending here a short while ago. the emergency brexit summit, she‘s talking to european leaders, with just 2 days to the set date requesting an extension for britain's departure from the eu. to the brexit process. the prime minister arrived here a short while ago, but it‘s not clear how long ready to request an extension they will grant her. i‘m working to ensure that we can to the brexit process, but it's not leave the european union clear what the response will be. within the timescale that the government wants to see. i want us to have...to be able i want us to be able to leave to leave european union in a smooth the european union in a smooth and orderly way as soon as possible, and orderly way as soon as possible. and that‘s what i‘m going to be working for. and that's what i'm going to be working for. any extension will be met with anger eu leaders are to discuss the request later. by some conservatives back in westminster. it's thought they'll demand a longer, flexible delay of up to a year, with conditions. we‘ll have the latest on events here in brussels, as this crucial summit gets underway. translation: we need to understand today why they are asking for this extension and what is there a clear
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political plan to justify it. we'll have all the latest here in brussels, as the talks get under way, and from westminster, where talks between the government and labour are ongoing. the other main stories on bbc news at 5pm... the speedboat killer, jack shepherd is expected to fly back to britain shortly after his extradition from georgia. israel's prime minister benjamin netenyahu looks set to win an historic fifth term, after elections ended in a dead heat between the two main parties. astronomers take the first ever image of a black hole. it's located in a distant galaxy, and described by scientists as a monster, three million times the size of earth. to be able to get that retraction on each of those kicks... and dame darcey bussell is to step down as a judge on bbc one's strictly come dancing.
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it's 5 o'clock. we're live in brussels, where theresa may has arrived in the last hour, to meet herfellow eu leaders, at today's emergency summit, to decide whether to offer the uk another delay, to the brexit process. mrs may wants to postpone the date the uk leaves the eu, beyond this friday, until 30thjune. but the eu is expected to offer a longer delay, after the european council president donald tusk urged the other 27 leaders, to back a flexible extension, of up to a year, with certain conditions. mr tusk said that ‘neither side should be allowed to feel humiliated'. arriving at the european parliament, theresa may spoke to our political editor laura kuenssberg, and spelled out what she hopes to achieve at today's eu summit. well, first of all, obviously i'm here with fellow leaders to talk
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about a request i've put in for a short extension to article 50. and i know many people will be frustrated that the summit is taking place at all because the uk should have left the eu by now and i greatly regret the fact that parliament has not been able to pass a deal that would enable us to leave in a smooth and orderly way. but i and the government continue to work to find a way forward. we've been talking with the opposition. those have been serious, constructive talks. they will continue tomorrow. the purpose of this summit is to agree an extension which gives us more time to agree a deal to enable us to leave the eu in that smooth and orderly way. and what matters, i think, is that i've asked for an extension to the 30th ofjune, but what is important is that any extension enables us to leave at the point at which we ratify the withdrawal agreement. so we could leave on the 22nd of may and start to build our brighterfuture. what will you do if the eu says there can be an extension but it must be longer? because you have said, as prime minister, you could not countenance staying
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in beyond the end ofjune. well, i've been clear that the uk's request is for an extension until the 30th ofjune. i have been working to make sure that we can leave the european union and, indeed, we could have left the european union by now, but parliament did not pass the withdrawal agreement. so we need that extra time to work to ensure that we can get a deal through parliament that enables us to leave in a smooth and orderly way. that is in everybody‘s interest. i think what matters is that we are able to leave the european union at the point in which we ratify that withdrawal agreement. that would enable us to leave by the 22nd of may. but prime minister, the decision on the length of delay is not in your hands. you've said, as prime minister, you could not countenance a delay beyond june the 30th, so i ask you again, what would you do if the eu insists on a longer delay? i'm working to ensure that we can leave the european union within the timescale that the government wants to see. i want us to have...to be able to leave the european union in a smooth and orderly way as soon as possible. and that's what i'm going to be working for.
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thank you. that was the prime minister a short while ago does not our europe editor katya adler is with me to discuss all of today's main developments. can we take for granted, or is it rather dangerous to do that, that some extension will be granted? is that where we are or not? have we not learnt that in politics, do not ta ke not learnt that in politics, do not take anything for granted. i think it would be hugely unlikely that the eu would come out with the now today. —— come out with a no today. each 27 leaders has a beta in this case. they are being quite coy when they're coming in. no one is saying yes or no. all of them want to avoid a no—deal brexit. even if you grant the uk and extension, there is still the uk and extension, there is still the possibility of a no deal at the
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point of that at the end of that extension. angela merkel summed it up extension. angela merkel summed it up best of all in front of the german parliament, she said we want an extension short enough for us, but long enough that we are not biker every two weeks to discuss at the same thing. all severity will be the same thing. all severity will be the prime minister's performance here. she has not done so well in previous summits and not got the tone quite right. they want to know how these talks are going and how confident she is about the future. that will effect their decision about a length of extension and the conditions around it. we know she has proposed until the 30th ofjune, what would be the logic from the eu's point of view and enforcing a longer extension? as angela merkel's said it would be so that they were
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not back here every two weeks. they don't look at these cross—party talks on the uk and think, oh they're going to come to version any time soon. wejust they're going to come to version any time soon. we just heard from the irish by minister to shockley varadkar, that if theresa may —— leo varadkar, that if theresa may —— leo varadkar that entries which is what the premise to ask for. eu leaders are wary, because they have been watching parliament for very long and see the ongoing diligence. they are thinking how they protect themselves from the chaos in the uk. the flip side is that this is insecurity is costing european citizens and european businesses. they are mindful of those two things. there being a little bit coy as they come in and there are also thinking of that eu image of unity. they are not going to wa nt image of unity. they are not going to want to say different things as they arrive. let us throw in the
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other element of the european elections. their prime importance to this institution. one high level diplomat described to me as a farce. the idea that a leading nation should take part in parliamentary elections, bring in new meps to sit in the european parliament... no one here wants to undermine the workings of the eu as long as the uk as a member. so at the eu as past the 22nd of may, they will have to take pa rt 22nd of may, they will have to take part in those parliamentary elections and that is the end of the story. mr barney has emphasised that once the uk has meps, they set for five years. it could be repeated and repeated up until that five year
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period. is it going to be a late night? if it has i will bring a cup of cocoa. i will hold you to that. mrs may arrived in belgium after her weekly clash with opposition leaderjeremy corbyn at prime minister's questions in the house of commons. that head—to—head follows 5 days of talks between the government and labour officials, aimed at breaking the brexit dealock. let's cross over to westminster and our chief political correspondent vicki young. tell us a little bit about the exchanges today and whether things have moved in at these links between government and labour on the search for some brexit compromise. government and labour on the search for some brexit compromisem government and labour on the search for some brexit compromise. it does not feel that they have, no. there are plans for labour and the government to meet tomorrow and i think it is worth exploring what theresa may would do with this long extension, this along delay to brexit if that is what happens. i
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think it's pretty clear in her mind that maybe 22nd is still a deadline. she is still hoping that those eu elections was not have to be held, because she thinks that a deal can because she thinks that a deal can be done. —— may the 22nd of silly deadline. —— make the 22nd is still a deadline. what she said about along delay, along extension, just three weeks ago. she said the outcome of that would mean endless hours and days of the house of commons are carrying on, contemplating its niggle on europe. the house has indulged itself on europe too long. she may be thinking, bring an ideal back, but others will have other plans. some of those plans involve her not being the leader of the party any
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more. thank you very much for now. we're just more. thank you very much for now. we'rejust going to more. thank you very much for now. we're just going to be looking at the arrivals here as they happen. we're also going to be talking to a few of the participants, including some members of the european parliament. just now i would like to talk to the paris bureau chief of the economist let's go to paris now and speak to sophie pedder, paris bureau chief for the economist, and author of a biography on the french president emanuelle macron. what is your take on this, and president macron‘s nine? and what is it your expectation of the outcome this evening? i believe that macron has changed his tone this evening.
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he has taken the hardest line about an extension than any of the other european leaders. he believes that brexit is a drain on the eu being able to get on with other things... he believes it was a british choice and the people have spoken and brexit needs to stop interfering in european business. he has changed his tone and he has now come with a more open to the idea extension of sorts., but with conditions. he will try to put that to his partners at the council meeting to stop those conditions are effectively that there would be some sort of guarantee that the uk, while it was still in the eu, but under this extended period, would not interfere in eu business. it is very conjugated counties to put in place. but that he wants of the uk, not to be there in a sort of racking possession. and that the eu can get
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on with those kinds of plans. macron does not want any british uk to be taking part in decisions for example, over the european budget or over the next european commission president. it is that kind of deal that he is going to be trying to persuade his partners to back. and he has, at least in some respects, come towards... compiler towards backing an extension at all. what was your analysis of theresa may's visit to macron? he has made it very clear to the prime minister that there has to be a plan. he is now open to an extension if there is a plan, but that plan needs to be put... they all need to be persuaded of that this evening. i think that's the great difficulty, you know, that he wants them to be credible reasons
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foran he wants them to be credible reasons for an extension. it's quite difficult, especially for french public opinion to understand why this is still dragging on. macron has been the one anyway, who has used the threat of a no—deal brexit to focus minds and to try to take that... get things moving in the uk. but now he's come round to the idea ofan but now he's come round to the idea of an extension and he's open to that. he now needs to be a plan. the conversation was very much about, what kind of conditions he would like to put in place, but also what the prime minister... what kind of reassu ra nces the prime minister... what kind of reassurances she can give to both the french and the other europeans. whether it is a plan, a post—partisan plan, whatever the plan, he has not been specific as it is up to the british to provide the plan. but to show that that can win a majority in the house of parliament. very good to talk to you. thank you very much. the paris bureau chief for the economist.
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for more analysis of what's going on at the summit, i'm joined by the ft‘s brussels bureau chief alex barker, and peter foster from the daily telegraph. both experts in the field, i think it is fairto both experts in the field, i think it is fair to say. alex, do we expect some kind of agreement on a much longer delay or is that what you're expecting late at night? the direction of travel is towards the longer end of the scale. you've got to look at notjust longer end of the scale. you've got to look at not just what the leaders say as they arrive at the summit, but what they don't say. you did not see anyone rule out the long extension, even president macron was a very tough, it was clear that he wa nted a very tough, it was clear that he wanted surgeon, was clear that nothing was automatic, but he did nothing was automatic, but he did not say he was against that. i think there are a few pragmatic reasons
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for them to go along. what will be the dynamics of this meeting and how much will depend on the way that theresa may presents her case? quite a lot. resident macron said that he wanted clarity. he said that if you wa nt wanted clarity. he said that if you want a long extension you need to indicate a way forward. this letter sent to jeremy corbyn that we will have a has not caused the leg shown much, especially in paris. in salzburg she really fluffed her lines and gets up the noses of the leaders who really think there is no way forward here. you can see world where macron sucks to push for a much shorter extension, which he prefers. and then mr barnier will also be behind him. you create a dynamic in the room where you have to accommodate french demands, but you have to preserve unity. even
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though angela merkel is in favour of long, she is going to have to accommodate mr macron's demands. then you can see something potentially different emerging. along the lines of what? the 30th of june that theresa may has already asked for? that but they mean she could go back and say she got what she wanted ? could go back and say she got what she wanted? probably a bit earlier, actually. there are quite a lot of opposition to the end ofjune. because then the uk would have to have an election with meps who would never be sent. they do not like that idea. there may be a test point that is earlier. where the uk will make it clear was a radio? can be passed through parliament? or could there bea through parliament? or could there be a general election or a referendum... it is high risk. be a general election or a referendum... it is high riskm be a general election or a referendum... it is high risk. it is high risk. it would be ridiculous to have elections if we are leaving december or march anyway. one of the
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problems here is that they may does have these elections, relative first choices. but we have not made those choices. but we have not made those choices. once we are into those elections, then there is no legal impediment to further and further extensions and you get into this neverendum, which no eu leader once had. but to get an early date and a fourth theresa may to come back with some clarity. notjust that she is talking tojeremy some clarity. notjust that she is talking to jeremy corbyn. there is absolutely no sign that there is any meeting of minds on that or is that it's like there is any prospect of a deal. it breaks raises the question again, what is she going to say in this meeting? apart from the fact that we have had a few nice exchanges? it is a weak case, surely? it is. and it is an uphill
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task convincing the slot around the table. they have seen her come three times to see a bit of this and a bit of that will make all the difference. fundamentally they do not have much faith in that. actually it may well be the thing that pushes them towards the longer end of the extension, and thinking to be really want to be back here with a new morass in westminster any month's time we are judging between ca ns month's time we are judging between cans and what can be done and new deadlines? they may just cans and what can be done and new deadlines? they mayjust think, we need to push the source and leave it to the uk to kinda find own resolution. but, as peter said, the dynamic in the room will be very important to stop they will want to come out of this united. whether thatis come out of this united. whether that is around the macron position oi’ that is around the macron position or the longer end. especially those who are not expected service, underestimate the drive behind that show of unity which the eu and that these readers here normally would be really determined to show? indeed.
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france is not a minor member state. you cannot have a franco german split. if the brits are living and you have a franco german plan to have a big problem on your hands. —— the brits are leaving and you have a franco german split then you have a big problem on your hands. you may find that those who are really in favour of a much shorter deal are more vocal. if the price of unity is ultimately, well, look, give macron his head, let's have a short... don't shut the door to a longer extension, i don't think any of the leaders want to be back here in a few weeks' time. unity is absolutely paramount at the same time. if the french village again, they will have to be accommodated in some way or another. when you expect some smoke? some noises? to think it will be incredibly late or do you expect to hear something within a few hours
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are not? is that unrealistic? and your view? it did not seem to me that there had been a franco german deal beforehand. that would probably be the condition you need before —— need for a quick deal on the table. i agree with that. i don't think that's where we are now. it is clearly a gap between the two mac major european powers. that will need to be resolved and it will be resolved one way or the other. that is going to take time. and all the draughty need to get done. i think it will go late. thank you very much. we were talking about the balance between the german perspective and the french and what i would like to do now is bring in gabriele zimmer, mep for germany's left wing die linke party, and part of the european parliament's brexit steering group. thank you forjoining us. what is
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your take on the and expecting that theresa may is coming to the council and proposing concretely why she is asking for an extension. because i do not believe that it will be possible to find a solution in the house of commons and any government that the uk isn't obliged to take part in the european elections. on the other side, if they have to take part, then we need to have a concrete goal. why do they need a longer extension? because, we have as members of parliament, we also had to take care that the citizens‘ rights in the uk citizens‘ rights in the eu and in ireland and the north of ireland. we especially
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have to care about the dignity of the european election. members of the european election. members of the european election. members of the european parliament are the only direct elected persons on the european union level. and that is why i‘m... play around the european elections. we have to protect the democratic value. i would like to work with the british members and the european parliament, but if they would like to lead in the first two months, three months, or in the summer months, three months, or in the summer break it will make no sense. when we need extension, they can then also influence work in the european parliament and if there is a solution within the uk, how to organise the brexit? or to organise a referendum or anything other. it isa a referendum or anything other. it is a decision by the uk. if they have a decision to do what it is
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based on this decision. but we have to ta ke based on this decision. but we have to take it seriously. we have to go to take it seriously. we have to go to the european elections, we have to the european elections, we have to organised electoral campaigns and you know it‘s not clear if the brits we re you know it‘s not clear if the brits were going or not or take part or not. please look on that. it‘s more than just only to look on the economic interests. it is better to also have, to face and the interests of the citizens‘ rights and in ireland and for the european parliament. when we think about the length of the extension, there is a concern being expressed that if it goes to the longer end of the spectrum, it takes the pressure of theresa may and the westminster parliament to reach a consensus and agreement and a short extension would maintain the pressure. how do you read that? but they did that
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sometime before. did it create pressure on the british governor to find a solution? i couldn‘t understand why theresa may started s0 understand why theresa may started so late with the cross—party talks. to find a solution across all of the political parties. and that is why. .. what is political parties. and that is why... what is the goal of theresa may to get an agreement with corbyn. in this week or when? it is not possible, when you can do it then you cannot go into preparation for the european elections and then say goodbye. we have another decision. you cannot go into european parliament for one month and then we are in the summer break and then he would like to say goodbye, it was only a joke or so? that‘s not good for the british, meps or british
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voters or the voters and the european union at all. thank you very much forjoining us. let‘s talk a little more about that timeframe. we have our reality check corresponded here. voting takes place across europe between the 23rd and the 26th of may and if they do ta ke and the 26th of may and if they do take place in the uk, it will be the 23rd because that is the thursday. and it is very clear that if we are still in the eu at that time, there will be an absolute insistence that we had to take part. the new parliament does not start until the beginning of july, that is when it meets for the first time. it will be a little odd
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if this whole country of meps goes and then possibly leaves a few months later, at theresa may has promised that the uk will be a responsible, cooperative member state as long as it is in the eu, but that does not necessarily bind a future prime minister. perhaps a prime minister who wanted a harder from a brexit. who may or may not to cover rather than sooner summers expecting. and that is what they are worried about. how do we deal with the prospect of political change in the prospect of political change in the uk, which may not respect the deals that have been done at the moment? another factor in all of this is this institution and the fa ct this is this institution and the fact that there are major personnel changes coming up as far as the european union is concerned, which will inevitably have some kind of colour on this process? that is right. the changing of the guide happens every five years. he had the elections and then you new of the institution. on the ist of november,
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a new head of the european commission to replace jean—claude juncker, then someone to replace donald tusk. there are those who say hang on, if the uk wanted to could obstruct those appointments. the important thing to remember is that those appointments can be men made bya those appointments can be men made by a qualified majority. you do not have to have unified support. when it consented, there are not that many big decisions that a bolshie, recalcitrant uk could actually be too, so the threats we have seen from people like jacob rees—mogg on twitter saying that we should block anything, there is one school of thought that says over the next 12 months that were actually quite difficult. are there any other issues? other other areas where the uk would have the potential to throw a spanner
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uk would have the potential to throw a spanner in the works? the big issueis a spanner in the works? the big issue is the next eu budget. negotiation on the next long—term seven—year budget from 2021 to 2027. serious negotiations are going to have to start on that pretty soon, but again, probably a key vote which would have to be a good animus is not going to take place until perhaps the summer of next year. so well over a year away. even the biggest pessimist here presume that when we had another, brexit will be resolved by then. there is a broader issue and that is that theyjust think brexit is taking up too much of their time and attention already. it is not just of their time and attention already. it is notjust in westminster that people are tired of it, they are really tired of it here. they want to get on with other things. so there is a live debate, which is why i agree with peter foster and alex parker, tonight could go on pretty late. because there are people who say that a shorter extension keeps the pressure on the uk to make a decision and other say, no it is the long extension equity pressure because those who want to push for a
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peer from because those who want to push for a peerfrom a brexit because those who want to push for a peer from a brexit are going to have to face the fact that a long extension could mean that they lose the whole thing. thank you very much. taking us through some of the potential issues there and indeed the kind of timescale that we are talking about. this emergency summit is getting under and the prime ministers of course going to be making her case and it is pretty big high six game for the prime minister having to make the case for the extension that she has asked for until the 30th of june extension that she has asked for until the 30th ofjune and this brexit process. it remains to be seen brexit process. it remains to be seen how the other 27 will respond and who will get the upper hand. will it be the group of leaders who think it should be a shorter delay than that, or will it be those led by donald tusk who think that the delay should be much longer? will not know until later on and, indeed with chris and the others are right, we we re with chris and the others are right, we were not know until much later on. we will have to wait and see in the coverage will continue here on bbc news. that us get an update on the weather.
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a good deal of sunshine today but not very warm particularly on the east coast. a look at the satellite from the past few hours. plenty of sunshine around and more cloud on the far north of scotland. we hold onto that tonight. the cloud attending to fill a touch from the west across northern ireland. more cloud for eastern england. a good deal of clear skies. very chilly tonight and a touch of frost to start the day for many tomorrow. a cool but bright start away from the cloud in the far north. cloud filling in from eastern england. the cloud for north—east scotland could be thick enough for drizzle and perhaps a sharp shower in the afternoon. a bit more cloud for northern ireland through the day. temperatures between nine and 13. friday stays fairly chilly. a bit more on the way of cloud. still some sunny spells here and there. stays
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chili into the weekend. bye— bye. bye-bye. here is a look at the sport. we saw tottenham and liverpool win last night in the champions league. the quarterfinals continue this evening. manchester united against barcelona is the standard tie in this round. our sports editor dan roan is at old trafford for the first light. is this all about stopping lionel messi, one of the greatest players we have ever seen? it may well be because manchester united will be all too aware that in the past when these two heavyweight teams have clashed in major european fixtures, he has been the difference. back in 2009 of course when united played barcelona lionel messi was instrumental in that two nil victory. two yea rs instrumental in that two nil victory. two years later when the sides met in wembley in 2011 he was one of the match they are. year after year he produces standout
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seasons and this one is no exception. those who have been observing the argentinian in la liga are saying it could be the greatest season of his career to date. he has scored so many goals this season and be involved with so many assists that united will simply have to be on their guard. as well as him there isa on their guard. as well as him there is a luis suarez and continue as well, sergio biscuits, a heavyweight clash, rats mouthwatering fixture. two of the continent‘s most illustrious and decorated site. both have experienced frustration in recent seasons in have experienced frustration in recent seasons in european competition and the champions league. barcelona going out at the quarterfinal stage in each of the last three seasons. manchester united haven‘t been this far since under david moyes in 2014. probably the biggest champions league match since the final against barcelona in 2011. given the managerial people over the last few season ole gunnar
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solskjaer safely installed on a permanent basis but also because of the prize on offer because after liverpool‘s win over fc porto last night it seems likely they will be the team in the semifinals for whoever prevails over these two legs. imagine how big it would be if united could get through these two legs and face their arch rivals for a place in the final. it would be absolutely monumental but that is for the future. let‘s say it if denied united can get off to a good start and do what they failed to do against psg in the previous round at home when they conceded a 2—0 defeat in the first leg. sounds like a formula 1 race going on behind you. united have had a real wobble in recent weeks after ole gunnar solskjaer was installed full—time. this is going to be a massive test for what he has got as a manager. absolutely, yes. three defeats in four i think for ole gunnar
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solskjaer. despite the revival that united have undoubtedly experienced since he came in, a whole new feeling around old trafford compared to the very toxic reign ofjose mourinho. 11 wins in his first 12 matches for so short. despite all that progress the reality is they still find themselves 21 points behind liverpool in the premier league. that is the reason why barcelona will start as favourites going into this type. yes, of course united managed to pull off that defining memorable victory in the second leg in paris against psg with an injury ravaged side despite having to field all those youngsters, so shah somehow masterminded a famous victory. they will get confidence and inspiration from that but it is fair to say barcelona will start as favourites partly because all the time they have had their disposal a the prom therein but also because united have been struggling for much of the season. perhaps they will feel that in the champions league given what happened in paris in the previous round they do have a chance to progress further. barcelona it has
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to be said in recent seasons, when it comes to knackered matches, they have not done well in away fixtures. united will look at that and think there is perhaps because the optimism and hope. many thanks. we will be chatting again about that at 6:30pm. that is it for now. much more on the bbc sport website. all the build—up to tonight was my champions league matches. ajax taking on cristiano ronaldo‘s juventus as well. for now it is back to clive. thank you. let‘s return to our main story and the eu summit taking place in brussels, where theresa may will ask for a further extension to the date the uk is due to leave the european union. let‘s go to our political correspondent vicki young who was live at westminster for us. it is a waiting game here for mps to see what happens. it is not in reason i‘s gift, she has asked for a short
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delay to brexit. that might not be what she is gutted but we expect her to come back here tomorrow to update mps and a good way some mps on the conservative benches if it looks like they might have to take part in the european elections in may. i am joined by damian green the former conservative cabinet minister. what do you think happens if theresa may comes back. she has got a long extension potentially, some of your party will go pretty wild. we don't know what will happen. you are right that nobody particularly wants to fight european elections from which there would be no preparations, but people not unreasonably will think we voted to leave three years ago why are we electing meps now rhythmic if we can avoid that that is hugely desirable and one of the reasons the prime minister has asked foran reasons the prime minister has asked for an extension only untiljune the 30th because the new parliament doesn't sit until july 30th because the new parliament doesn't sit untiljuly so it seems to me whatever the technicalities, electing meps are never going to
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ta ke electing meps are never going to take up their seats and that would clearly be madness so that would mean we wouldn't need to have the selection is. what is the plan. this theresa may‘s plan still to pursue her deal, is there any chance of this deal with labour? her deal, is there any chance of this dealwith labour? as long her deal, is there any chance of this deal with labour? as long as those talks are going on it must be a possibility that the leadership of the two major parties will agree a cross— party the two major parties will agree a cross—party solution. there is logic in the prime minister has done her best to get a solution that the conservative party and dup will pass, that is now not happening three times. it is i suppose conceivable we can get some changes to the backstop that will allow that original deal to go through, but if not she has worked across the house and he will save those talks succeed, but it is of course very light in the day. what sort of people are talking about theresa may‘s leadership. she has said she will stand down if that first part of brexit is dealt with and her deal we re of brexit is dealt with and her deal were to get through. is there a problem now is that people are already moving on to look towards the next leader and some say she
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should lead by the end of may whatever happens? some people are. looking at the interest of the country, absolutely the last thing the country needs now at this very delicate stage of the negotiations is the conservative party to indulge ina is the conservative party to indulge in a leadership contest. frankly those who want to be the next leader shouldn‘t want it to happen either. both in the country but my point of view but also their own point of view. there will be an obvious point where we get over this stage of the brexit process where it will be possible to hold a leadership election, but it is not at all sensible to do it now. do you think she is being written off too many times and is not too early? always. people have been saying for a long time, every sunday i pick up a sunday paper and it says this is going to be the week may stops being prime minister and it has not been true now and it shouldn‘t be true, until we get a deal that allows us to leave in this smooth and orderly way, because the country is what
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matters in this, this is serious politics and people need to concentrate on it with that degree of seriousness. thank you very much indeed. people are chatting about who the next leader might be but of course, as was said there, there are some who think actually it might not be the perfect job some who think actually it might not be the perfectjob right at the moment. thank you, vicki young there at westminster. jack shepherd, the british man who spent 10 months on the run after a speedboat accident in which a woman died, will return to the uk ahead of an appearance at the old bailey tomorrow. this picture taken a short time ago shows the 31—year—old on a plane bound for london. shepherd skipped bail last summer and fled to georgia. he was found guilty in his absence of the manslaughter of charlotte brown, who was 24 and who died in december 2015. israel‘s prime minister benjamin netanyahu looks set to win a fifth term in office, after the country‘s general election. with nearly all the votes counted, his likud party is neck and neck with a centrist coalition led by the former israeli
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military chief benny gantz. but mr netanyahu appears to be in a strong position to command a parliamentary majority, with the support of smaller right—wing, nationalist and ultra—orthodox religious groups. tom bateman reports from tel aviv. a victorious benjamin netanyahu greeted his supporters, as the vote—counting began. some had called it a referendum on his leadership. to his supporters he is the saviour of israel‘s security, but mired in corruption claims after a decade in power, yet israelis backed him and his right—wing coalition, now set for a record fifth term in office. translation: i am very touched that the people of israel have given me their vote of confidence for the fifth time. i intend to be the prime minister of all the citizens of israel, right, left, jews non—jews, all the citizens of israel. he had faced his toughest challenge
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in years, the former army chief benny gantz. as the exit polls came out, it looked like a tie between his party and mr netanyahu‘s. translation: it's a new morning. we wake up to true election results, results that are developing. we are waiting for the end of the ballots. i reiterate that this is a historical achievement. there‘s never been such a large significant party with so many good people, built in so little time. religious voters and right—wing nationalist parties helped to prop up mr netanyahu‘s chances of building another coalition. it signals a further shift to the right in israeli politics, as the left wing, which historically pursued a peace deal with the palestinians, suffered further losses. mr neta nyahu pledged during the campaign to formally extend israeli sovereignty to jewish settlements in the occupied west bank. they are seen as illegal under international law, although israel disputes this.
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such a move would be strongly opposed by palestinians, who see the area as part of their future state. it could coincide with an plan from president trump to reach a deal between the two sides. as mr netanyahu prepares to govern again, he will have to fight looming corruption charges. his opponents say that amounts to an impossible distraction for the prime minister. already the signs are that they are circling, hoping this latest victory is short lived. astronomers have taken the first ever picture of a supermassive black hole at the heart of a distant galaxy called m—87. it‘s 26,000 light years away and was photographed by a network of eight telescopes across the world. our science correspondent pallab ghosh reports. this is the first ever picture of a black hole. it‘s 40 million kilometres across.
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that‘s more than three million times the size of the earth. it‘s been described as a monster at the heart of a galaxy. telescopes all across the world, in the antarctic, on volcanoes and on the highest mountains, focused on a galaxy 300 million trillion miles away. they scanned it over a period of ten days and, at its centre, they found what they believe to be one of the biggest black holes in the entire universe. astronomers have used a global network of dishes from all across the world and linked them together. no single telescope is powerful enough to see the black hole but, by adding together the information from each of them, the image gradually becomes sharper until it comes into view. this is the nucleus of the galaxy m—87, and this is the first ever image of a black hole.
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the image was unveiled at a news conference this afternoon. it feels like really looking at the gates of hell, at the end of space and time. the event horizon, the point of no return. that is awe—inspiring to me, at least, but it‘s also important for physics. black holes are objects which have such a strong gravitational pull that not even light can escape. the white ring is gas that‘s been superheated. it‘s brighter than all the billions of stars in the galaxy put together. most intriguingly, the picture may reveal what happens to material that falls inside. i think what‘s so exciting is that we are taking our knowledge of black holes, which is really focused on the theory, simulations, simulating how the environment of a black hole looks. now, having the data, seeing this, it turns the black hole into something that you can see,
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and there‘s so much we‘re going to learn from this. researchers now plan to take a picture of another supermassive black hole, this time at the heart of our own galaxy, and so learn how the milky way came into being. dr timothy davis was part of the tea m dr timothy davis was part of the team that produced such damage. —— the image. he‘s an expert on the evolution of galaxies at cardiff university‘s school of physics and astronomy. when you first saw this image, what did you think? it was a really wow moment for me. to be one of the first people to ever see an image of a black hole, a real image and is not an artist impression, that was a wow not an artist impression, that was a wow moment. did you ever think you would see that kind of image in your
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lifetime as a scientist? this is something people have been working very ha rd something people have been working very hard on for the last 20 years s0 very hard on for the last 20 years so we very hard on for the last 20 years so we knew it was in sight and we knew we just had to put up a little harder to get there but it is always inspiring to see the final result. sure. one wonders exactly what a black hole is. now, i‘m an idiot, explain it to me. essentially it is very simple if you boil it down to the nuts and bolts, if you just put enough mass in a small enough region, it becomes very hard to escape that gravitationally, like on earth we have to put things on big rockets in order to escape the earth because my gravity. if you put enough together you get something so dense not even light can escape and that has just called a black hole. so what are we likely to learn from this image? how is it going to help us? this image reveals so much about the black hole itself. it‘s mass, it is about 6 billion times the mass of oui’ is about 6 billion times the mass of our own is about 6 billion times the mass of ourown sun, it is about 6 billion times the mass of our own sun, it shows us the black
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hole itself has to be rotating and the disk of gas around it is also rotating. those are all exciting new discoveries and it really tells us that einstein was right. his theory predicted almost perfectly and that is very exciting to know. so it is good to know that he wasn‘t talking a load of old nonsense, mr einstein! but how could that analysis of this, how cannot help us practically here on earth do you think? this is a technological challenge to do this. the antennas all over the earth had to be synced up one to one using atomic clocks. this pushing the boundaries in technology of always leads to new and unexpected technologies. the wireless internet we all enjoy was originally created by radio astronomers who want advice for their antennas to talk. there is s0 for their antennas to talk. there is so much we can learn from technology here on earth and the value of collaboration. this is an international collaboration of more than 200 scientists across the globe s0 than 200 scientists across the globe so that is always important in this climate to acknowledge that. global
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cooperation. we heard one scientist in that piece described this as looking at the gates of hell, at the end of space and time. that is a lot of hyperbole in there. would you agree with that? it's a very extreme environment and the glowing gas you can see there is 1,000,000,000 celsius and the gravitational pull their would pull us apart very quickly if we were to venture to close. it is definitely a place in the universe i wouldn‘t want to visit personally. i suspect not. good to see you, ten, and congratulations to you and the team involved in this. thank you. dame darcey bussell has decided to step down as a judge on strictly come dancing, releasing a statement this afternoon saying, "it has been a complete privilege "for me to be part of strictly, working with such a talented team. "i have enjoyed every minute of my time and will miss everyone".
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the former ballerina replaced alesha dixon in 2012, and has been part of the programme for seven series. more on brexit. christian fraser is in brussels where the various leaders will missed meeting to discuss whether or not to give theresa may her wish, an extension to article 50. over to you. i am down on the press floor at the moment. you will see over my left shoulder they are replying some of the comments of the leaders of the game into the building and this is normally the case with these council summits you get a full spectrum of the views as they make their way into the meetings. from angler merkel we got the sense that the extension would be as short as possible but as long as necessary to restore some come. the belgian trimester saying whatever extension agreed tonight will be the result of the debate. since there it is
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contingent on what the premise out in this meeting, all the weight of the harder line from the french, from emmanuel macron who says we have a european renaissance to get on with and we don‘t want the eu getting —— uk getting on the way. sense of impatience from the french side which was also reiterated by chief negotiator michel barnier. the prime minister theresa may has requested an extension of article 50. one point it important, any extension has to be useful and serve a purpose. and our common purpose is to get the ratification of the withdrawal agreement. this withdrawal agreement. this withdrawal agreement. this withdrawal agreement is the only way to ensure an orderly withdrawal of the uk, which is our common interest. so now it is for the leader to decide tonight. so we
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think we know what were going to get this evening. probably something like a this evening. probably something likea nine this evening. probably something like a nine month extension with some fairly stringent conditions attached to it, but then we can never really tell at an eu summit like this because the 27 leaders when they are in a round away from the advisers tend to take a harder line on the uk and brexit than many other european diplomats within the commission, so don‘t rule out a panic somewhere through the evening. it has been known before and subtly with the french pushing such a harder line, you can expect there will be quite a vigorous debate but you also get a sense i think an event side that this is going to be contingent on what theresa may tells them. they weren‘t too impressed by what they heard from her last time. she is inscrutable, we all know that, she tends to stick to the script. what they are looking for from the prime minister this time is some detail on where she‘s going to go. it‘s difficult when you look at the logjam in these negotiations
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with labour at the moment to know what she can actually get them past the process and she has set that process out, so if it didn‘t work out with labour in the next few days oi’ out with labour in the next few days or weeks, she is saying she would ta ke or weeks, she is saying she would take all the options to the commons and give them this free boat whatever they decide, then the government would abide by that. well that‘s dotted by the french, hard to say, but certainly some impatience on the side of the french president. having said all that, the various caveats you have pointed out, theresa may having problems in putting out a message that perhaps you will —— michael europe will want to listen to, the fundamental fact isa to listen to, the fundamental fact is a no—deal brexit, are crushing out in two days‘ time, would be not only bad for the united kingdom but terrible for the rest of europe as well, so one wonders if that is really what anyone is going to want, and therefore theresa may is more than likely to get her wish of some kind of extension. well, look, we arejust seeing
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kind of extension. well, look, we are just seeing the round table pictures here. this is the moment where they look into the whites of each other‘s eyes and say do we want to own this no—deal? my hunch is probably tough talk we have seen from emmanuel macron and the french side does he really want to own no—deal and carry out the singular veto within the council and to all the blame for the chaos that might then insert you at his northern ports at calais, does he want to throw the iris under the bus, who we know are not prepared for no—deal either, does he want to create a precedent within this realm of using the veto? does he want to have the italians or the hungarians that they can use veto in the future to hold up can use veto in the future to hold up eu business, i don‘t think so. i think for that reason emmanuel macron eventually reluctantly will probably give the green light to the extension, but they are going to set some pretty stiff conditions. they are going to rule out any reopening
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of the withdrawal agreement during this extension. no in—depth discussion of the future relationship. there may be although like minded how to see how they can do it legally, but they may talk about this review and renewal clause, so every three months they can look at how the uk is behaving almost having like a child in the naughty step, if you don‘t behave we can kick you out of the extension and no—deal straightaway, but will those be three rolling months processes ? those be three rolling months processes? maybe but i think that would be quite difficult because as angler merkel has already said that brings you to the cliff edge every three months and that is what they are trying to get away from. when you look at them all in a room and they start discussing it today, they have to decide amongst themselves what the en pointe as they are trying to get to. the french side and three or four countries beside that want to get it over with so they can get on with the reform process. others like donald tusk and he set out in his eu summit letter last night to the 27 leaders, who keep saying if you want to revoke
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article 50 you can do that at any time, so might feel that a longer extension gives the uk the space to ta ke extension gives the uk the space to take it in a different direction. so is going to be i think the debate that goes on in the room, what we trying achieve here and how best to do that? if we are trying to get what element agreement across then we need to keep pressure on the mps at the time because it is important and that sense. if we try to give space to do something else and let‘s face it the last two years hasn‘t worked out very well, maybe that longer extension is a better way forward. christian fraser, many thanks for that, at that european leaders meeting in brussels. much more on that of course throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. the six o‘clock news is coming up now with reeta chakrabarti is coming up now with reeta chakra barti and huw is coming up now with reeta chakrabarti and huw edwards in brussels, but now time for a look at the with lucy martin. it has been a decent day to day with a fair amount of sunshine. temperature is not particularly warm though despite that blue sky. we have seen some
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beautiful photos. this one sent in bya beautiful photos. this one sent in by a weather watcher, a walking tractor in norfolk. for the last few hours as well you can see there have been a good deal of blue sky. cloud lingering in particularfor the far north of scotland. if we look at the pressure chart for today we have got this area of high pressure sitting over scandinavia and it is extending across the uk and we have seen it pushing those weather fronts away. it is also dragging in this cool air, soa it is also dragging in this cool air, so a real cool field things of the next few days. temperatures a bit below average full time of year. here‘s how it looks through this evening and overnight. more cloud feeding into the north. that could be thick enough for the odd spot of rain or drizzle at times. a bit more cloud feeding into western parts of northern ireland as well, but a good deal of clear skies and with clear spells we are looking at a very cool night. overnight lows dropping below freezing so we could wake up to a culture of trust to start the day. a
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bit more cloud for north—east scotland, and the odd bit of showery rain into the afternoon. cloud tending to increase across northern ireland and the chance of a spot of drizzle. england and wales will remain dry. a bit more cloud feeding into the aged. temperatures between nine and 13. high pressure still in charge overnight. keeping weather fronts at bay. further dry weather into friday. friday is looking like a cloudier day than the same today. some sunny spells around and some brea ks some sunny spells around and some breaks in the cloud at times. it looks like for the most part it will be dry. temperatures between eight and 11. again cooler in the east. at texas towards the weekend. the weekend, we are still in the cool air mass and the area of high pressure sitting across scandinavia
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and influence our weather. it looks like as we move into the weekend there will be some dry weather to be had but also some sunny spells. the best sunny spells for saturday. a fairly chilly weekend with temperatures below where expect them to be for the time of year. when they are in the west as well but it looks like things will warm up into next week.
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