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tv   The Papers  BBC News  April 10, 2019 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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i'm kasia madera in ofthe london — the headlines: of the extensive. they about is of the extensive. they haven't got your to the conditions donald tusk confirms there will be that may be attached because i think another delay to brexit until the end of october — we'll be live in brussels there is some surprise from other members emmanuel macron has taken with the latest. perhaps a hard line in the room and the british pm will now hear the terms set by the eu — they were expecting. it is a but will it be enough suggestion, one potential to calm her critics back home? compromise. somewhere in the middle seems like a pretty good place to i'm sharanjit leyl in singapore — start. it doesn't necessarily mean also on the programme: thatis the world's biggest election is set start. it doesn't necessarily mean that is where we will end up. my to begin in india with nearly 900 million people expected to vote. heart was jumping for joy that is where we will end up. my heart was jumping forjoy you know you are telling me there will go backin you are telling me there will go back in the room to talk about her condition. i have been to enough of the semester know it is never white and america's attorney general says smoke until i hear somebody say it us intelligence agencies spied on donald trump's presidential publicly. and until all the countries in the room agree it has to be unanimous, it is not a done campaign. deal but it does seem an obvious live from our studios in london, and potential place to end up although there are those who say it is still not enough time, it would make more sense because even if you have the president of the commission and place you have to have to get the other commissioners approved in the european parliament, and all of that down, the end of the year might seem
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more sensible to many people but if mr macron is holding out, something has to give. in reality, there's not much business you can do at european level. until the ist of november. nobody is really in office. there is an element of term and imported to remember that those two appointments, the president of the commission and the council, are made bya commission and the council, are made by a qualified majority. you don't have to have a complete unanimous decision to approve them, so for example if you had a british government and play saying we will block this, they cannot block those appointments because the other countries can put it there are many majority. it is not like britain could start blocking those appointments. the commissioners look who made this pretty carefully at the next 12 months and they say they are not actually that many big decisions that a single country couldn't block. if the concern is a britain and the eu could basically
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stuff up the whole business of government, i'm not sure that really hold water. somebody also said to me that even if the uk was this partner and try to get in the wake of the eu budget or the selection of the next european commission president, the latter is more difficult but suddenly with the budget, legally speaking, you could wait until the end of this extension and then pass it at 27 later on. you don't really need a clause in the document you put limits on the uk control. need a clause in the document you put limits on the uk controllj think in realistic terms, you are probably down. the new long—term seven year budget is from the beginning of 2021. —— you probably don't. the vital bolts on that, the la st don't. the vital bolts on that, the last crossing teas and darting eyes don't come until the summer of next year. real over a year away from where we are and even though the pessimistic people in this building assume that one way or another brexit will be done by then. of course the european commission president a very powerful. it is highly possible the uk has selected
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meps, still a member of the european council, what we are looking at is conditions that are put on the uk side as to the selection of that commission. they won't want the uk playing at a role in that. when they are leaving. they won't. and theresa may has already said and repeated that in the room today that as long as that it is a member state, and she is my minister, the uk will act asa she is my minister, the uk will act as a responsible and cooperative memberof the as a responsible and cooperative member of the you get. otherwise it will not go out of its way. but we know some backbench tory mps, jacob rees—mogg among them have said we should be obstructive. and... it has beena should be obstructive. and... it has been a feature of the last couple years there has been mild bemusement sometimes that things they get said either in the house of parliament and social media in the united kingdom do get read and embassies and official buildings, so it does
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have an impact and yet they know i backbench mp on its own, perhaps so but i think they all know that backbench mps have their role in the syste m backbench mps have their role in the system but it is a government that counts. the real fear would be this prime minister has made a solemn promise if there where to be end of the prime minister relatively soon, who would perhaps be pushing for a harder pure form by brexit as they we re harder pure form by brexit as they were sick with a play by the same rules? politically, for theresa may. —— would they play by the same rules. a large part of theresa may's pa rtey not happy rules. a large part of theresa may's partey not happy about it. it's october good for them? that i have much option. october 31, after the conservative party conference. —— they do not have much option. what role that my play, we don't really know. i think both major parties in the uk, they have been talking to each other behind the scenes about is there some sort of accommodation that the conservatives and labourers can gather around to get this
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withdrawal agreement through parliament. but for both of them ever raises difficult questions. if there were to be an accommodation, pa rt of there were to be an accommodation, part of the conservative party would be set against it and part of the labour party would be set against it as well. if it did include, a key point for many labour mps if they did include the option of putting any deal to a second public vote. we should presume, but it probably goes without saying there will be a guillotine clause and this. if and when that withdrawal agreement is passed. that is a big if at the moment was up from the first of the next month, the uk would be out and presumably at that point, the transition would kick in. if we didn't take part in the elections towards the end of may, june one would be deal or no deal. then if a deal it was past come if you look at the whee article 50 is written, it pretty much says once a dealer stand, you can leave, the idea that there would be a guillotine class
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would confirm that but that is pretty much what article 50 says already. if there withdrawal agreement was passed as part of this agreement, thena agreement was passed as part of this agreement, then a transition period would begin and that if you are member means all of the rules and regulations say the same and gives more time to business, and at the moment, it is written and that transition will be up until the end of 2020, with the option to renew it for one or possibly two years and at that time, we haven't finished yet, that time, we haven't finished yet, thatis that time, we haven't finished yet, that is when the negotiations on the future trade deal in the future relationship will take place. which is the major difference. they have made it abundantly clear that and this extension pair there would be no withdrawal agreement. and there would be no in—depth discussion of the future relationships. only when the future relationships. only when the transition kicks in, will we start talking about what this is supposed to be about. under the law it is very clear. the eu can only talk to the uk when it has become a third country for some only about the future trading relationship when
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their relationship is already fundamentally trained was the uk has left. they have been talks from the great day of the referendum and would trigger article 50 about why can't we talk about trade already. the eu has sought to his guns. you can say it has been difficult, whatever you want to say, it has stuck to his guns and changed his position. it will not change now. this is been a pretty blunt example tonight. of any leverage they have. we made the point earlier theresa may has been out of the building now forfour may has been out of the building now for four or five may has been out of the building now forfour orfive hours. with her own team. sitting on her hands. that is a pretty humbling experience prime minister. if you want to leave, you will not be in the room with the eu makes its big decision. that is part of what leaving means. if you want a close relationship, you have to operate in the lobby in a different way. take the example of norway. it
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isa way. take the example of norway. it is a rich country. but it is not in the eu. had they had a big embassy. they lobby furiously. one of the ironies if we end up leaving the british embassy here, it is part of the eu ecosystem, it would get bigger, not smaller because breading will need to lobby hard in this town for years to come. they still need to be our biggest partner. theresa may is coming back here and give a press conference to a large contingency of the british press. they will ask her in the first question is three weeks ago you told the house of commons you didn't want to delay brexit beyond june the 30th. now we have a day of october 31. potentially october 31. 30th. now we have a day of october 31. potentially october31. let's wait and see what finally emerges. it will be interesting to see how she gets around that. she said she wouldn't want to lead a government. we know there is pressure. she has
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also said and you can take this both ways i want to be the prime minister that takes us out. clearly what she thinks her duty is. to reach a point where the uk has left the european union. she may seek to argue that to bear with me. the justice secretary was seen today when he was asked about how much longer he was going to tolerate theresa may, he actually said, "she could be here until october" which ta kes could be here until october" which takes us to the tory party conference and maybe the coronation ofa conference and maybe the coronation of a new leader. and does a new leader want to be the leader that actually takes out? we don't know what how that will end up. if that ends up as a triumph, then maybe you do. if it ends up as a difficult process be if you want the new leader, you want to be the one that comes in afterward and say "new era,
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new start, i am in charge so it's move forward from here". plenty of tories who would say let's leave it with theresa may trying do this but we still do not know to be honest if that will succeed. a bit of a victory tonight for the irish council and donald tusk the european council president who wants to go along and harbours post that —— hope that put winds will blow so that article 50 will be revoked, a second referendum. and he will probably say that there is still time if that is the way you want to go. the longer extension does keep those things in play. if you look at the talks of the electoral commission who said how quick would it be to organise a referendum, people would say four or five months. if you had an arc —— extension to a tovar, no one in the government will turn around and announces. but it would give time for those types of options to be in play. the european countries who have been arguing for that extension say it is not because they want to
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reduce the pressure on tory brexiteers, we want to increase it because they need to understand that if we agree on a long extension, then it's possible that the for everything they want, brexodus, may never happen because it keeps all those other options and announces. but it would give time for those types of options to be in play. the european countries who had been arguing for that extension say it is not because they want to reduce the pressure on tory brexiteers, we want to increase it because they need to understand that if we agree on a long extension, then it's possible that the for everything they want, brexodus, may never happen because it keeps all those other options in play. i talked to one german correspond tonight who took a very interesting way about how angela merkel sees this. he says she sees this as a political cooperation in the put up a system that you have to let the long game play out in order to get through this process. so, she said just a few weeks ago that this isa said just a few weeks ago that this is a moment in history we have to be careful with. she is looking at it ina careful with. she is looking at it in a macro sense. you have emmanuel macron looking at and marina pen looking at it from a different way ina looking at it from a different way in a domestic point view, and of course the man in charge of european reform stopper we heard from some french officials behind the scenes saying that they would take
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responsibility. and they would take that case forward. are they bluffing? we that case forward. are they bluffing ? we are that case forward. are they bluffing? we are not sure but there are other countries think that it would be damaging to both sides and more damaging to the uk but it would be damaging to both sides and would be damaging to both sides and would bea be damaging to both sides and would be a failure of statecraft, it would damage notjust be a failure of statecraft, it would damage not just the be a failure of statecraft, it would damage notjust the uk in the few but the european union's reputation around the world for a geopolitical block that knows ago about its business. most of them do not want what they believe would be an ugly breaking down of things. they think it would be much better for the eu's image and for the individual countries involved if some kind of negotiated agreement comes out of this. before we head back to clients, we will have the press conference from donald tusk, jean—claude juncker, we are conference from donald tusk, jean—claudejuncker, we are putting up jean—claudejuncker, we are putting up time on it? because it was so be looking at these conclusions?, the lawyers at the pour over at? we have
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had to end a half hours of talks and thatis had to end a half hours of talks and that isjust each of had to end a half hours of talks and that is just each of the had to end a half hours of talks and that isjust each of the countries. in 28 countries, that's a lot of countries, 27 in the room at the moment. they talk to each other and that takes two and half hours and they come up with eight potential problem i solutions. then as you say, the lawyers need to look into it. notjust the lawyers say, the lawyers need to look into it. not just the lawyers from the council but each of the member states have their lawyers who want to ask if they're happy with the text. is there anything if they take it home tomorrow and they will think "why do we agree to that?" and lawyers are not people who are going to be rushed. i think it will be a long night. it will not wrap up in ten minutes. such are european summits. we will come back to you shortly. that is the situation if you're just joining shortly. that is the situation if you'rejustjoining us shortly. that is the situation if you're justjoining us and shortly. that is the situation if you'rejustjoining us and not heard the news, it looks like they have agreed an extension until the 3ist of october with a review injune towards the end ofjune which was the date that theresa may requested in the letter she sent to donald
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tusk. christian, i thinkl in the letter she sent to donald tusk. christian, i think i told in the letter she sent to donald tusk. christian, ithink i told you the news, didn't i? we have heard the news, didn't i? we have heard the news! it is a long night. use they there, christian. you beat me to it. stay there mage. we are in the studio here with stephen bush and katie. iwant the studio here with stephen bush and katie. i want to bring you all in this conversation. the suggestion is that emmanuel macron is not that happy about october 31, we are just hearing that now. but it doesn't sound as if that date has been walked down with the other 27 countries. it does not come as much a surprise if that is the day that the french president will not be pleased. we have talked about how no deal could still happen, and no one should presume the uk will get this extension and even if it was granted, the french president did suggest it could be a short one. it doesn't seem as though that argument has not won the room and it was
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angela merkel who said "let's give the uk some more time and try to work out a way to break the precedent walk, half went out at least for the next few hours". stephen, there is a review injune. theresa may had asked for an extension to june 30. theresa may had asked for an extension tojune 30. but it could be that is she has sort of one or got what you wanted? the thing she was asking for under the terms of the article 50 process when you parse a withdrawal agreement as a member, the article 50 process and. she was always going to get what she wanted from a strict form. i think it is mostly about face—saving for her, emmanuel macron, but we know that the reality is that it is hard to see how this department will reach a resolution by the end of
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june, perhaps not even by the end of october. we are just hearing now from the wires that theresa may has been called back to the european council summit been called back to the european councilsummit in been called back to the european council summit in brussels and remember, she had to leave the room while the other 27 decided on whether or not to get for that extension. but she has been called back to the european council summit in brussels amid reports that the other 27 had agreed on a brexit extension up october 31 with a review in june. it extension up october 31 with a review injune. it could be that we get some kind of press conference or news co nfe re nce get some kind of press conference or news conference outlining exactly the methodology in coming to october the methodology in coming to october the 3ist and what it means. but katy we still have the conditions that may be placed on the possibility of this extension actually happening. there has been some talk for example that it would be written in that it cannot reopen the withdrawal agreement or try to renegotiate it in that extension period. and that stands to eu worries from the eu
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leaders that someone other than theresa may will lead the tory party, that you will have time for a tory leadership concepts and you could have someone like boris johnson who want to make a more hard—line approach on what happens with that. so that is one thing they are accounted for. there are other reports about whether or not the uk would try to misbehave or cause trouble on the eu site at that and we will see the conditions. but the problem here is that theresa may doesn't have a negotiating position. she does not have anything to offer. she does not have anything to offer. she is in a position where she is going to the eu and saying "what can you me?" so whatever they try and attach, it is likely that she will accept it at this point. attach, it is likely that she will accept it at this pointlj attach, it is likely that she will accept it at this point. i should say that we are also hearing that the chair of the eu summit donald tusk says that... which we all assume is october 31. and will now
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meet the prime minister theresa may and! meet the prime minister theresa may and i think she is now heading back to talk to those leaders who have just made that decision. christian? yeah, she is coming back from a bilateral meeting with donald tusk we are hearing. that should take place in the next few minutes and i presume he will be talking about some of the conditions that might be attached to this extension which ta kes attached to this extension which takes us to halloween. surely not but october the 31st, i'm also hearing thatjean—claude juncker‘s tea m hearing thatjean—claude juncker‘s team is pretty unhappy with emmanuel macron this evening and think that he has gone against european unity and really dug his heel in this evening and by accounts, he is unhappy about this date of october 31 but he was in the minority tonight. 17 of them spoke as they went around the table about a long extension and the need to just take a breather, some time out from the bricks debate. emmanuel macron of course very much focused on the mess up course very much focused on the mess up politics and how this plays out at home and didn't wanted to go
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beyond june. so interesting to see in the press conference if what they make if amanda david gauke was pulled into the debate. stephen here in the suitor, why is emmanuel back —— why is emmanuel david gauke making the bad cop play in this? why is he the holdout in offering the extension that theresa may would be hoping for? there are two reasons. he sees this as the long—term defeat of the french national front now national rally, this far right you're a sceptic movement in his country. so —— you're a sceptic. it's partially to disprove them. and it is also he has a ambitious european reform programme. and briefly under david cameron and theresa may, the united kingdom said that "we are leaving, you are having a conversation about the future, we will not use our veto and sit in the corridor as a departing member". the
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fear that the corona and some of his allies have is that you have a situation where the uk says "we are leaving but we're going to be as difficult as we can until we leave so we will veto things, we will prevent you from doing things, this would dominate the eu atmosphere". and there is of course people like david davis who thought it was helpful and clever and played well with a chunk of the british electorate of michel barnier is very french, there is an element of the french, there is an element of the french electorate which emmanuel macron likes to appear too but then place idea of a strong president sticking it to the brits. we will be bringing in alex forsyth in a few minutes but katie if i canjust bringing in alex forsyth in a few minutes but katie if i can just turn to you, we have some of the front pages of tomorrow morning's papers and they were talking about theresa may wanting to stay on to dig in her heels and not disappear as quickly as some in her party would like. the idea that this extension now is october 31, she's going well into
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winter here, no question. and i think the length of the extension raises more questions than it a nswe rs raises more questions than it answers when it comes to theresa may's future because in that time period, she could have a leadership contest period, she could have a leadership co ntest a nd period, she could have a leadership contest and you could use that time where you can renegotiate, you can use that time to try and get a new leader and have that debate about what the conservative party wants to do in this situation, something that has been very divisive. however, all the signs especially in the papers tonight that those rent theresa may sait this is not hers, she said that she would step aside only if she passed the withdrawal agreement and if she doesn't do that, she is not going anywhere, she wants to be the aduu going anywhere, she wants to be the adult and steer the country on words. i think there will be some difficult scenes in the weeks to file because there are watts of conservative mps and ministers who really feel that if we get to a point where the uk isn't about to leave and can't do much in that period, that is a time for reflection of where maybe it is time
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for her to step aside and pave the way for a successor. katy thanks auntie stephen as well. what's go to alex forsyth at westminster now. alex, how do you think this will go down with those in her own party?|j think there was an expectation that we we re think there was an expectation that we were looking at something of a longer extension than the one that the prime minister was seeking and i am not sure that in in of itself is at this point in going to encourage at this point in going to encourage a lot of people to come out in fairy. you had the people who are a lwa ys fairy. you had the people who are always angry at the concept of any delay to brexit and people that are more resigned to it. but the point is now what is that extension for and what does that mean for theresa may's leadership? and i think what is it for, i think downing street at this point will attempt to put fresh impetus behind the idea of having to getan impetus behind the idea of having to get an agreement to parliament because if they can now say that you are looking at them long extension staying in the eu for months to come where there is still a chance that we can get an agreement through and get out before the european
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parliamentary elections, i think the ambition in number ten will be to try to push that part and hopefully focuses people parts of minds and encourages them who have been up till now very reluctant to get behind the prime minister pounds ideal. however there is a prospect that fails entirely and that the other debate that happens in the conservative party is that is she the right person to play in power? and intech and smith, john winning dale, former cabinet say that this could be the moment in which theresa may steps aside and some in a season through if there is a long extension period. —— iain duncan smith. they could have another go at either trying to get a compromise with labour or bring the prime minister pounds ideal back to parliament but that will not placate those who are frustrated with her and agree that we are at this point who are starting to call pretty publicly for someone to reconsider her position. does the fact that there is now an
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extension and a fixed date, does this perhaps give added spice to the talks that are taking place between the governments and labour? labour would see it in that way but i think that will be number ten's hope that if they could bring something back which is palatable to a majority of mps rather than a long extension, we come to the least worst of options, i think that is what they are attempting to present. i think number ten will hope that will give some sort of impetus to the proceeds at this point. we've also heard that he is saying that he has major concerns about the discussions with with the government. and what type of relationship that uk would of the eu but also how they could trust that any future conservative prime minister conservative party leader after theresa may will go by whatever they are discussing now. number ten my hope this focuses much but there is a long way to go before
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we reach a compromise. and they will be meeting tomorrow again, both sides? talks are scheduled to meet for tomorrow butjohn mcdonald has had a chance and said tonight that he thought it would be at official level rather than between ministerial teams with a possibility of further ministerial talks on friday although we haven't had confirmation on that fact yet. the sticking point is the issue of a customs union and whether or not there should be another public vote on any prosody of that parliament agrees. so far, it seems there is no real common ground between the two on that. and remember that labour as well as theresa may both under huge pressure from their party members who are not happy with some of the discussions that are taking place in that room. things are still looking very difficult for the prime minister and what's happening in brussels, how that is perceived in westminster and crucially how she responds to whatever the eu says to her tonight in that press conference will be absently vital. alex, thank you. alex forsyth at westminster for subjust to you. alex forsyth at westminster for sub just to reiterate that breaking news. eu leaders, the 27 have agreed
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to an extension to article 50 until october the 3ist. theresa may wanted it untiljune but it will say it will be longer. you are watching bbc news. now, it is time for all the weather news. no sign of spring warmth into the forecast. it's looking a little cold there. i'm talking about cold weather as there is a begins, a widespread frost but i find a head for most places with the video sunshine on the cards as well. it's settled with high—pressure close by. keeping atla ntic high—pressure close by. keeping atlantic weather systems and milder airat atlantic weather systems and milder air at bay. so whilst the high—pressure holds on, a poor round at that keeps us in the blue as our air comes at that keeps us in the blue as our aircomes in at that keeps us in the blue as our air comes in from the east. strong wind from the east over the weekend will make it feel colder. a lot of blue showing up as thursday begins, thatis blue showing up as thursday begins, that is the widespread frost away from northern scotland and the north sea coast side of the breeze and cloud to keep temperatures above freezing. the cloud holds on in
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northern scotland but apache rain is possible here and heavy showers later and cloud increasing in northern ireland. more clout on the eastern side of england compared on most other places. most ways is not just shy but the winds now coming in from the east yes but are mainly bright. —— mainly white. will the temperature is holddown elsewhere? if you have the sunshine it doesn't feel too bad. strong sunshine at this time of year. on through thursday night and into friday morning, there is more cloud around. not as clear or going to be as quote. the frost is widespread but still some of that toward parts of northeast england away from the coasts and areas from scotland as well. for friday, we are expecting a mainly dry day but more on the way of cloud around. may produce a few showers towards northeast scotland and maybe into easing the and southeast england later in the day. the breeze picks up later in the day. the breeze picks upa later in the day. the breeze picks up a little bit and
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temperatures go back a little further along the coast and more of us have a degree or show —— so shaved off our temperature. this is the picture for the weekend. a battle taking place between low pressure in the atlantic trying to move in with unsettled milder weather and high—pressure fronts can any of the keep it at bay and a stronger fold —— colder for. any of the keep it at bay and a strongerfold —— colderfor. a windy picture of the weekend with most places looking drive for some more cloud by the time to get the sunday. a mainly dry we can become, some sunshine, quality for all by sunday and eight winter picture. the wind is picking up across western areas, chilly wind, milder though next week.
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