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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 11, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. this is business live from bbc you may want an extra news with victoria fritz layer on this morning. and maryam moshiri. it is a noticeably chilly start. some spots dipped below freezing last night. a hallowe'en brexit — quite cold for a time this morning. the eu gives the uk a new deadline similar to yesterday but not as much sunshine. of october the 31st. still some bright and sunny spells. live from london, that's our top story still a chilly north—easterly wind. on thursday the 11th of april. blowing in more cloud from the north sea. good morning, welcome the best of the sunshine out to breakfast with naga towards western home counties. munchetty in westminster. top temperatures today up to 11. brexit delayed again — the eu grants an extension up to the end of october after late night talks in brussels. the uk should have left the eu this evening, more cloud around than last night but clearer spells. by now and i sincerely regret in clear spells, temperatures could dip below freezing. again, a cool and frosty firms say they're relieved a no deal the fact that i have not yet been start to the day. able to persuade parliament more cloud tomorrow brexit has been averted and the risk of showers to approve a deal. particularly in eastern areas. we'll also be getting but mostly dry, for now but one business group says quite a bit of cloud. frustration with the political a european view from brussels, the best of the brightness process is palpable. where there was disagreement over in the west. also in the programme voting begins in india's elections — how much to offer the uk. temperatures take a dip we'll be live in mumbai — through the weekend, just nine on sunday. finding out what it all means then warmer next week. for the world's fastest growing the brexit delay does not bring major economy. certainty for business. the brexit delay does not bring certainty for businessli the brexit delay does not bring certainty for business. i am in blackburn, which voted i'm back with the latest overwhelmingly to leave, to find out from the bbc london what the delay could mean for newsroom in half—an—hour.
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business. also on the programme. jack shepherd who went on the run after being convicted of the manslaughter of charlotte brown in a speedboat crash will appear in court. good morning. a missed opportunity welcome to breakfast with for manchester united. naga munchetty in westminster. they battle, but are beaten by brexit delayed again — a below—par barcelona in the first leg of their champions league the eu grants an extension up to the end of october quarterfinal at old trafford. after late—night talks in brussels. the uk should have good morning, a cold start, a left the eu by now, and i sincerely regret the fact that i have not yet been able to persuade parliament widespread frost. clear skies means to approve a deal. sunshine. it will be cool through we'll have reaction from westminster and brussels, the day and some cloud producing where there was disagreement drizzle. i will tell you where in 15 minutes. it's thursday the 11th of april. our top story. over how much to offer the uk. brexit will be delayed again good morning, that breaks the delay after eu leaders agreed made by the politicians in an extention up to october 31st. westminster, it does not bring any the uk could leave sooner certainty for businesses, in but only if parliament passes the withdrawal agreement. blackburn, which overwhelmingly voted to leave the european union, as things currently stand, we will be taking part ata voted to leave the european union, in european elections in may, at a wallpaper factory, i am finding although the prime minister says out what the delay could mean for she still hopes her deal can be passed before then. business.
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speaking in the early hours also on the programme: of the morning in brussels, jack shepherd, who went on the run she called on mps to pull together after being convicted of the manslaughter of charlotte in the national interest. brown in a speedboat crash, will appear in court. i have just met with a missed opportunity donald tusk, the president for manchester united. they battle but are beaten by of the european council, a below—par barcelona in the where i agreed an extension first leg of their champions league to the brexit process to the end of october at the latest. quarterfinal at old trafford. i continue to believe we need to leave the eu with a deal # too much can never be enough... # as soon as possible. and, vitally, the eu have agreed that the extension can be terminated and spicing up the breakfast sofa, emma bunton is on the sofa with her first solo album when the withdrawal agreement has been ratified, which was my key request of my fellow leaders. in over a decade. for example, this means that if we are able to pass a deal good morning, a cold and frosty in the first three weeks of may, start to the day, but for many blue we will not have to take part in european elections skies, like in this weather watchers and will officially leave the eu on saturday, the ist ofjune. picture, but some cloud around producing some spots of drizzle, i during the course of the extension, the european council is clear will tell you where in 15 minutes. that the uk will continue to hold full membership rights, as well as its obligations. it's thursday 11th of the uk should have left the eu april, our top story: by now and i sincerely regret brexit will be delayed again after the fact that i have not yet been able to persuade parliament eu leaders agreed to approve a deal that would allow an extension up to october 31st. the uk to leave in a smooth
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and orderly way. the uk could leave sooner, but the choices we now face are but only if parliament passes the withdrawal agreement. stark and the timetable is clear. as things currently stand, we will be taking part so we must now press on at pace in european elections in may, with our efforts to reach although the prime minister says a consensus on a deal she still hopes her deal can be passed before then. speaking in the early hours that is in the national interest. of the morning in brussels, she called on mps to pull together the talks between the 27 in the national interest. other european leaders i know that there is huge frustration from many people were fractious, with france pushing that i had to request for a shorter extension. the european council president, this extension. donald tusk, delivered this warning to the uk. the uk should have left the eu by now, and i sincerely regret the fact let me finish with a message that i have not yet been able to persuade parliament to our british friends. this extension is as flexible to approve a deal that would allow the uk to leave as i expected and a in a smooth and orderly way. little bit shorter than i expected. but the choices we now face are stark, and the timetable is clear. so we must now press on at pace but it is still enough. with our efforts to reach a consensus on the deal but it is still enough to find that is in the national interest. the best possible solution. please do not waste this time. the talks between the 27 other european leaders were fractious, with france pushing for a shorter extension. let's get the reaction from brussels the european council president, donald tusk, delivered this warning to the uk. with our reporter adam fleming. it seems the mood was amicable.
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let me finish with a message to our british friends. it seems the mood was amicableli it seems the mood was amicable.” think that is putting it too far, this extension is as flexible as i expected there were lots of disagreements and a little bit shorter behind—the—scenes, although nobody left and a half or stormed out and than i expected. this halloween date, the new but it is still enough to deadline for the brexit process, find the best possible solution. halloween of all days, is shorter please do not waste this time. than some wanted. the dutch wanted it to be a year, and it is longer let's get the reaction from brussels than some expected, for example the with our reporter, adam fleming. french and austrians. also in the written statement there are words adam, good morning to you. so we have had a late night, we have had talking about how the uk will have to behave well as a member in the some fractious discussions between the 27 leaders, and an ejector seat. extension and notjeopardise the functioning of the eu, but no yeah, so the fractious discussions official mechanism to make that we re over yeah, so the fractious discussions were over two things, first of all happen. some people were looking for the length of the extension, some that, as well. the fact is the uk is countries, like the netherlands, wa nted countries, like the netherlands, wanted it to be up to a year long so that the deadline would be next still faced as donald tusk said with spring and the uk would have loads the same choices, past the deal, of time. other countries, led by come up with a new brexit strategy, probably a closer future france, wanted the extension to be relationship than the one the much shorter, so they have ended up with what they always end up with, a
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government has pursued, or cancel brexit altogether and revoke the compromise that pleases and annoys request to leave. all that has eve ryo ne compromise that pleases and annoys everyone equally, the halloween end point for the brexit process. the happened is there are six extra other argument was over whether months for the uk to make that choice rather than to —— two days. there could be a mechanism to ensure that the uk behaves properly for the period that it was in the eu for a bit longer and didn't jeopardise any eu decision—making. it turns out if we get to october and the uk there is no mechanism for that, so all we have got is a word to say in the uk will behave, that has been request more time and the eu says forged a little bit. we are left with the same options — does the uk past that heal, pursue a closer future relationship than until now, yes, there is nothing technically or or does it have a massive change of legally to stop brexit being delayed another time. mind and cancel brexit altogether? donald tusk‘s attitude to the uk seemed fairly generous but there is an ejector seat issue with the those have always been the options, elections. yes, if the uk has not they now have six months to decide passed the withdrawal agreement by which one to pick, rather than a the 22nd of may and does not take couple of days. ok, adam, thanks pa rt the 22nd of may and does not take part in the european parliament elections the next day on the 23rd very much. political correspondent iain watson is here, today theresa of may, it will automatically have to leave on the ist ofjune. i have may comes back, more talks with the been calling that the ejector seat labour party, what is going to because it is an insurance policy on happen? if we talk about the ejector
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the eu side to protect the integrity seat, theresa may will be of the european parliament because concentrating on whether somebody they do not want a situation where will try to push the eject button on her leadership of her party. they do not want a situation where the european parliament sits, the uk is still in but has not sent any certainly, i think she would be concentrating, when she addresses mps. theresa may interprets as the mps at westminster, on her short—term survival. there will be a new target date, the earliest point at which the uk could be out. thank lot of criticism that we have heard you. from the guy shouting about revoking i'm joined now by our political article 50, and she has had to correspondent, iain watson. extend article 50, may, june, theresa may is due back today, what possibly october, so she will be trying to emphasise we can leave is her plan? her plan is from day to sooner, and if people are worried about her leadership, she will be saying again, if you want to get rid of me, get behind me and back of my day at the moment but to address mps deal, and then i will stand down. she will also be sent to labour, if and tell them what happened you want to avoid the spectacle of contesting european elections, come over to my site, compromise a bit, overnight. from her point of view let's get ideal. that will be incredibly difficult for two reasons. not so much that she had jeremy corbyn, bizarrely enough are also to secure her short—term not that far apart, booked because the parties are. many in labour want
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to see a referendum, something she has ruled out. on his side, if she survival, making it clear she will go before the next election and made compromises on the customs union or it clear to her mps she would go something like it, she could lose once a deal is secured. i think she will emphasise that point. to tell members of her cabinet, in turn shortening her life span in number people not to jump the gun and put additional pressure on her because ten. we will be talking to sarah she wants to deliver a deal. also there will be scepticism on the conservative benches about a further wollaston mp, of the independent delay till the end of october and group, and anne—marie morris, a she will emphasise the idea that it could come quicker if people back conservative erg member, in a little her deal or a revised form of it, while, to get their views on what they think theresa may will be doing saying you can get before the crucial and frankly embarrassing in terms of leadership in the coming european elections as long as you get onside. and this is dependent on months. let's get back to charlie, the talks with the labour party and although it seems amicable, nothing is shifting when it comes to red morning. let's bring you up to date with the lines. i am not entirely sure. talks rest of the day's news now. jack shepherd, the british man with labour will resume. the fastest who spent ten months on the run route to getting out of the eu if after a speedboat crash they succeed. you would have to say in which a woman died, they succeed. you would have to say the chances are they will not is now back in custody in the uk, succeed, not because theresa may and and will appear in court later. jeremy corbyn do not agree, they shepherd jumped bail last summer and fled to georgia. might come together about a plan to in his absence, he was found guilty leave, they have to bring their of the manslaughter of charlotte brown, who was 24, and sentenced to six years in jail. parties on board and many in labour our correspondent sarah rainsford has more. demanding any deal is tied to a referendum which is something she this was the flight carrying jack shepherd does not want to do. on the other back to britain from georgia
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to face justice. and we got on board. side, sceptics in the cabinet, never after months on the run, he was here in handcuffs, mind the back benches, or what she escorted by metropolitan police can compromise on, such as a officers. mind the back benches, or what she can compromise on, such as a customs union. can compromise on, such as a customs union. she could face resignations he has never spoken publicly before, if she goes too far. arlene foster so i asked what he had to say to the family of charlotte brown, of the dup is going to the eu today. killed in a crash on his speedboat. i'm terribly sorry for my involvement in charlotte's death and furthermore, and iain duncan smith has questioned my subsequent actions, which i see have only served to, you know, make things worse, whether theresa may can hang on at and i would like to all. what they will say is there are make amends for that. alternatives to the issue and how to it's over three years avoid the backstop. what the eu have since jack shepherd's boat was found capsized in the thames emphasised is they do not want to reopen this withdrawal agreement with the backstop in it. they have a after a first date ended in tragedy. mountain to climb with the eu. a lot this footage was filmed by charlotte brown going on here in westminster. we shortly before the crash that killed her. will keep you up—to—date throughout at some point, jack shepherd the day. charlie is in the studio. handed her the controls. the boat hit an obstacle at high speed and overturned. back with you later. let's bring you charlotte brown was discovered in the icy water. she died later in hospital.
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up—to—date. it was not untiljanuary people in india are heading that he turned himself in to the polls to vote in the first to georgian police, after securing the right phase of a general election. with 900 million eligible voters, to appeal against his conviction. it's the largest election the world has ever seen. in court here, jack shepherd yogita limaye is at one of polling described charlotte's death as his greatest regret. stations in hyderabad this morning. the scale of the selection process is staggering? but he has since made clear that is right and behind me you can he does not believe he is solely responsible for the crash. his georgian lawyer told me he fled before his trial see a crowd of people checking on a because he was depressed, even suicidal. now he knows the fact that his case is in the appeal court. if he will be running, he will lose his case. list to see which polling station his last chance to prove his innocence. they are meant to vote out. at the polling station there is a voting machine that is electronic and they but charlotte brown's family enter their choice and when that is want jack shepherd done there fingers are marked with to take responsibility ink to make sure nobody tries to for charlotte's death, saying his appeal will only prolong cast a vote a second time. the biggest election in the world. the their pain and their suffering. prime minister narendra modi and his party hoping they can win a second sarah rainsford, bbc news. term. the prime minister campaigning on national security. tensions
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between india and pakistan were high people in india a few months ago with india claiming are heading to the polls it launched air strikes in the to vote in the first phase country and that is a factor for of a general election. people here. i spoke to people who with 900 million eligible voters, voted and they say it is a big it's the largest election the world has ever seen. factor. they also say rising yogita limaye is at one of the polling stations in hyderabad this morning. unemployment, and auroral distress. those are the big factors for the election here. thank you. it has been fascinating talking to jack shepherd, the british man you this morning voting is under who spent ten months way, that is one of the poles we can on the run after a speedboat crash in which a woman died, see behind you there. that is right, is now back in custody in the uk, and will appear in court later. the crowd has been debate, and we shepherd jumped bail last summer are not seeing the queue that we did and fled to georgia. before, but voting does continue for in his absence, he was found guilty of the manslaughter four more hours, so we are expecting of charlotte brown, who was 2a, and sentenced to six years in jail. an aboutan our correspondent sarah rainsford four more hours, so we are expecting an about an hour there will be has more. people out here again. it also the this was the flight carrying jack sheppard back to britain from georgia to face justice. peak of summer, it is nearly 40 degrees here, but nevertheless we this was the flight carrying are expecting more people to come jack sheppard back to britain out and cast their vote. inside and we got on board. there are electronic machines where jack sheppard back to britain after months on the run, he was here in handcuffs, escorted they enter their choice, their by metropolitan police officers. fingers are marked with ink to he has never spoken publicly before, ensure that no—one tries to vote for so i asked what he had to say
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a second time. narendra modi and his to the family of charlotte brown, killed in a crash on his speedboat. bj p a second time. narendra modi and his bjp party are hoping to win a second term in power, one of the main i'm terribly sorry for my rivals is the congress party, involvement in charlotte's death and furthermore, india's oldest political party, the first prime minister of the party was from that party, but they my subsequent actions, suffered a humiliating defeat in which i see have only served to, 2014, their president, rahul gandhi, has been trying to regain influence. you know, make things worse and i would like to but it is actually a regional party make amends for that. it's over three years since jack shepherd's boat was found thatis but it is actually a regional party that is extremely popular, and that capsized in the thames after a first is why indian elections are so hard date ended in tragedy. to call, because regional players this footage was filmed by charlotte brown shortly before the crash that killed her. can eventually be kingmakers, and we will find that out on the 23rd of may, when the results are counted. there will be six more days of counting spread across april and may at some point, jack shepherd handed her the controls. the boat hit an obstacle at high after race. we get a real sense of speed and overturned. charlotte brown was the noise and atmosphere talking to discovered in the icy water. you this morning, but i know earlier she died later in hospital. you this morning, but i know earlier you made reference to the large it was not untiljanuary that he turned himself number of women turning out, use saw into georgian police, the queues yourself this morning. after securing the right to appeal against his conviction. that is right, in fact this time
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in court here, jack shepherd described charlotte's death around there are slightly more women as his greatest regret. voters eligible to vote than men. i but he has since made clear he does mean, women in india have had the not believe he is solely responsible for the crash. right to vote ever since 1947, since his georgian lawyer told me he fled before his trial when the country became independent. because he was depressed, there are lots of issues on peoples even suicidal. minds, some parties have been now he knows the fact that his case talking about a women's resolution is in the appeal court. bill in parliament, despite so many if he will be running, women voters, and despite india being one of the first countries to he will lose his case. have a female prime minister, his last chance to participation in the indian prove his innocence. but charlotte brown's family want parliament, female participation in jack shepherd to take responsibility india's parliament is extremely low. for charlotte's death, saying his appeal will only prolong their pain and their suffering. but ever stomach other issues our sarah rainsford, bbc news. national security, because of tensions with pakistan, rural distress as well as rising a fifth of new childhood asthma cases in the uk could be linked unemployment. —— but other issues to traffic pollution, our national security. according to a major new study. a fifth of new childhood asthma researchers from leading american cases in the uk could be and canadian universities suggest linked to traffic pollution, according to a major new study. fumes could be to blame for up researchers from leading american to four million new cases and canadian universities suggest fumes could be to blame across the globe each year.
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they're calling for for up to four million new cases international guidelines on air across the globe each year. quality to be reviewed. they're calling for international guidelines on air quality to be reviewed. i think it is very difficult to know what the policy solutions will be dame darcey bussell has that solve this problem. announced she's leaving quite difficult to do local, strictly come dancing very local initiatives, because pollution travels over long periods. after seven years on the show. so i think what the government really need to do is commit to who levels of air she's says she's decided to step pollution and indeed look at whether those down from the judging panel are the right levels, because clearly these problems to focus on other commitments. are still happening, it's not been announced even in areas where pollution who will replace her. is within who levels. those are the main stories. let's go back to our main story this morning, if you're just waking up, just dame darcey bussell has announced she's leaving strictly come dancing listening to the news for the first time, in the early hours of the after seven years on the show. she's morning, a new date has been says she's decided to step down from the judging panel to focus announced for the brexit departure, on other commitments. it's not been announced and naga can bring us up to date, a long evening in brussels, a long who will replace her. time to wait, and finally we got the doubt. it really was, talking to yogita right now, the sport. good morning. limaye, talking about how it is 40 take us through what happened last night. we are at that point in the degrees in hyderabad, if you saw the crew behind the cameras, and my champions league, quarter final shivering guests, only dreaming up
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stage, first leg, and with this tie, temperatures like that! i suppose many are hoping it will warm up in manchester united and barcelona at parliament in terms of the negotiations now! i can hear the old trafford, old rivals, we expected fireworks and it one moment laughterfrom my negotiations now! i can hear the laughter from my guests, negotiations now! i can hear the laughterfrom my guests, let's introduce them. sarah wollaston of we thought we had it, particularly the first goal, an own goal from the independent group, and manchester united but after that it anne—marie morris, conservative mp turned into a damp squib, very and erg member. let's get your reaction, charlie was saying that we disappointing. and paul pogba kind have seen brexit extended now to of sums up the reaction behind you. october the 31st, all hallows eve, barcelona were not up to the standard we are used to and timely and away, what is your manchester united failed to take reaction to that? not surprised, advantage so a frustrating night for clearly not happy, i would rather we them. had come out, but effectively what they battled against it has done is kicked the can down a barcelona side who were well the road, delayed the reality is we below par, but lost 1—0. a luke shaw own goal the only goal of the game. will not get theresa may's deal united now need to win in the second through the house of commons. it leg at the nou camp on tuesday. seems that right now the beauty of this time period, albeit is kicking the night's other quarterfinal the can down the road is that we finished i—i — have time to change it, and that is cristiano ronaldo's header giving the only thing that will unblock juventus what could prove to be this. your reaction? i am very a very important away goal against ajax in amsterdam.
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the first major of the golfing year — the masters — gets under way today. relieved we are not crushing out england's matt wallace tomorrow with no deal at all, that would have been a disaster, and this was the winner of the traditional isjust long would have been a disaster, and this is just long enough, would have been a disaster, and this isjust long enough, provided parliament gets its guides on, to par—three contest that happens on the eve of the tournament. put this back to the people, because his round even included this is where we need to go next, to a hole in one. ta ke this is where we need to go next, to take this deal, warts and all, and and the durham cricket captain, ask the people whether this is what cameron bancroft, said he thought they want to know whether you would about quitting cricket during his ban for ball—tampering. rather remain in the european union. he'll lead his new county nicola sturgeon, the scottish first out for the first time today against sussex, minister, said the uk must not waste and says he would love to play for australia again. time, she is relieved that the uk will not be crashing out of the eu tomorrow, and allowing people to decide if they want to leave is now imperative. do you agree that people should be given that you are no, i don't, it would be an abrogation of every year, the children of the democracy. we have already had a golfers come out and we see a referendum, we decided to give different side of them. they have a people the choice, they said, we wa nt to people the choice, they said, we want to leave, and that is what we go. it has turned into, and should be delivering. just like traditionally, the winner of the these gentlemen shouting remain... he is paid to do that! regardless of contest has never won the masters itself. not a contest you want to whether he is or isn't, people do
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win! an opportunity for people to not believe the choice they were given is the choice they have now. see the golfers in a different at the end of the day, no decision context. you will be staying on for a look at the papers. because perfect information, and here's carol with a look there was not information about what at this morning's weather. remain meant either, because remain good morning. this morning, it is a cold start to the day, a widespread is becoming ever closer political frost. where we have the frost we union with very significant changes to the uk and how it runs itself. have clear skies which will translate into sunny spells through you left the conservative party, you the day. but some of us will see are part of the independent group, anne marie was saying that she some cloud. high pressure is firmly believes changes needed. people will in charge. things are settled but believes changes needed. people will be saying that this is a complete the air is from the east, a chilly shambles, the problem is that they could have voted for brexit, they direction. along the north sea coast line, wrap up warmly. where we have could have voted for brexit, they could have voted for brexit, they could have got this deal through, but even the brexiteers do not like the deal that we have, so it would the yellow tinge, that is where we end up pleasing nobody, leavers or have some cloud coming over northern remainers, and that is why we have to put it back to the people, ireland, and established across northern and eastern scotland, thick because if we just railroaded it through at this point, cobbled enough for drizzle and cloud. across
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together brexit, i am afraid we will the south—east and eastern parts of be fighting over this for years, and england, even here, it will tend to certainly the future framework will break. if the sun breaks through, be two more years of wrangling, just voting it through will not settle the reaction. well, one thing that that could spark off showers in the highlands and grampians. generally we agree on is that this deal is not light winds. it will feel nippy, good, but the difference is that sarah good, but the difference is that sara h wa nts good, but the difference is that sarah wants to take it back to the people, and i want to make sure that temperatures at best up to nine. the parliament delivers. who is the best of the sunshine is further person to deliver it? i think west, up to 13. heading on through somebody like dominic rab, i do not think the old beasts, dare i say it, the evening, there will still be anyone sitting in the current cabinet would be credible, but we need somebody who can bring the cloud, more than last night. some party together and do what the country asked us to do, and that is frost but not as extensive as this entirely possible. lows can be morning. these are the temperature values you can expect. a bit lower changed so that we can have a proper than that in rural areas. we start election of a leader. —— the laws. the 1922 committee met yesterday, tomorrow with some clear skies and sunshine. the cloud will build and it was reported that a leadership discussion did not take through the day. tomorrow we will place, that it was more about the
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see more cloud. nonetheless there will be some holes in it and we will logistics of what happens next, so i do not think they are on board with you. that was a public meeting of see sunny spells. temperatures the 22 with the conservative party, continuing to fall. still quite cold along the north sea coastline. not the committee, who are looking at this, and frankly that would be the responsible thing to do. time further inland, although temperatures are higher, not as high frame, then? i would like to see us as today. having elections and a new leader in place by may, june. i can't see it saturday, high pressure dominates. being quick enough to avoid the european elections. sierra? the low pressure in the atlantic. in membership of the conservative party between, something milder but still has shifted to the right, and this in clear conditions. isa very has shifted to the right, and this is a very tiny percentage of people in this country choosing the next leader and shifting us to the right, trying to force through a brexit saturday, we we —— we will see sunny that nobody voted for, it is time to go back to the people, it would be spells. but temperatures will fall extraordinary if it was not allowed with a fair bit of cloud. to happen. anne marie, is it true that you would not vote in those elections? no, if the conservative
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party put out a proper brexit ma nifesto party put out a proper brexit manifesto and we have candidates of we will have a look at some of the a brexit orientation, i would vote for them. trouble we are seeing the problem with the original papers. you are looking at the sporting headlines. referendum, so many different versions of leave, and this is the the times, you can't avoid the problem, they tried to boil it down toa simple problem, they tried to boil it down to a simple question, leave or brexit issue either. referring to remain, and we now know what the brexit reality looks like, now is that defeat last night and a the time to go back to the people, not to just leave it to a right—wing significant role in that own goal. faction within the conservative party. sarah wollaston, anne marie morris, thank you both very much for and here the express newspaper. joining us on this very chilly morning in westminster. but the sun, united have lost, but lionel messi, the sun is shining here this morning! that is the view over you got hit accidentally by chris westminster, glorious, hazy blue sky, what is it like for the rest of smalling, not on purpose, with his the country? the woman to tell us is arm, and you ended up with a bloody carol kirkwood. eye. a little bit graphic for this if you did not see naga with her
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time of the day, not too pleasant. gloves earlier, they were like boxing gloves, terrific! there is and what you think of the return some frost under the clear skies, but where we fixture? it has got to be barcelona. the have got clear skies, of course, thatis have got clear skies, of course, that is where we have got sunshine. general feeling is that it was the today, once again, high pressure opportunity for united last night. firmly in charge of our weather, and moving around it in a clockwise bearing in mind they have the away direction, called in scandinavia, coming across the cold north sea, goal advantage. but thinking back to paris st germain as well. bringing cold airto coming across the cold north sea, bringing cold air to our shores. when you see the yellow tinge is, thatis when you see the yellow tinge is, that is where we have more cloud, so the masters starts today. we are getting very excited. i mentioned temperatures have held up. so across north—east scotland this morning, quite a bit of cloud around producing patchy light rain or the par—3 contest. the children come drizzle, clear skies in northern ireland replaced by cloud from the along, like caddies for the golfers. west, the odd shower in the west this afternoon, cloud drifting in what tends to happen is they allow the children to take a couple of from the north sea. now, through the day, some of that will break and we shots. some brilliant videos being will see sunny skies, but for the lion's share of the uk, it is going shared on social media. some slightly more successful than to bea lion's share of the uk, it is going to be a sunny day with gentle others. very cute. that is the caddy breezes. however, if you are down this north sea coastline, with the
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outfit at the masters. a great shot onshore breeze, feeling cold, 7—9 degrees. as we move inland, 11 to yesterday of francesco molinari who about 13, down a degree or so from caddied for his brother several yesterday's highs. through this yea rs caddied for his brother several years ago, he was in the outfit, and evening and overnight, we start with clear skies, so it will be chilly, now, he is there contesting. cloud developing for some of us thank you for that. some of the overnight, not as cold generally is the nightjust gone, but where the cloud remains broken we are likely front pages. you can imagine after to see some localised frost. the early hours, papers rushing to tomorrow morning we start with some keep up. the daily telegraph have sunshine come about through the course of the day you will find more looked at what this means for cloud will develop. now, having said theresa may, and this is the that, still some sunny breaks headline. the suggestion they say developing as well, and still down this north sea coastline, which she theresa may must quit next month to onshore breeze, feeling nippy, colder than today, temperatures of give her success at a fresh start. more on that this morning. on the 7-9. colder than today, temperatures of 7—9. inland, no great shakes, front page of the daily mail, you temperatures down on today, 8—10, charlie. are probably catching up this morning, the new leave date is thank you very much, see you later. october 31 which has been agreed, trained to make life—or—death decisions in stressful situations, armed police officers
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have an enormous responsibility. thatis october 31 which has been agreed, now, researchers at nottingham and aston universities that is halloween. a fewjokes are using virtual reality to see knocking around in connection with how they cope with the pressure, in the hope it could help that. to train new recruits. tim muffett went to a police and in the times newspaper. that is training centre to find out more. confusing. the telegraph newspaper saying she has one month to go, but to shoot or not to shoot. some decisions are a matter here something different. that is of life and death. the nature of things, it is pretty this is the police tactical training centre in stockton—on—tees, where armed officers and academics febrile. are teaming up. morning, naga. we hope the project will help us as scientists understand how the brain functions in these we got the deal at 2:30am. stressful and critical times. keep your hands i had one of those nights trying to where i can see them. figure out what was going on. our step off the bus! stand still. european correspondence had very armed—officer training typically late night. the uk and eu have involves scenarios like this. stand still. you will not be harmed. agreed to delay brexit until 31st durham constabulary and cleveland police both train here. october. but inside, teams from nottingham speaking after hours of talks and aston university have created at an emergency summit in brussels, the president virtual worlds so brain function
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of the european council, donald tusk, urged the uk not can be monitored. to waste any more time. lots of speculation on the front put the weapon down! shots fired, man down. pages over theresa may's leadership. so, what happens now? the main idea is to support the here to help us make sense of what's police in their really difficult going on isjill rutter, task, measure their brain activity from the institute for government. to inform them about how we have october 31, and this review good or bad decisions look like. split second, when you decide injune, how to shoot or not, we have october 31, and this review in june, how does we have october 31, and this review injune, how does this work? thejune you are looking for a specific injune, how does this work? the june review injune, how does this work? thejune review is a sop to the french president to make sure we are type of brain pattern? yes. not misbehaving and to make sure we go ahead and hold those european officers wear a virtual reality headset and have electrodes attached to their scalp. parliament elections. president and as in the real world, is keen on having a shorter they have to decide whether someone poses a genuine threat. we know the experts are experts extension. playing to his domestic and are better than someone audience. he was worried about the who hasn't had this training. but what has changed in the brain fa ct, audience. he was worried about the fact, we saw those tweets from jacob and made that happen? rees mark saying if we stay in the we can measure the activity caused by many neurons firing at once. uk could be a pain in the neck in put the weapon down! in total, 26 armed officers the eu. they want us to hold those are being analysed. it's impossible to fully replicate the stress of a real scenario, european parliament elections. the
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but it is hoped these drills will come as close as possible. government set that in training last show yourself, it is the police. it is intensive. week,. we have that first date of june one. in october 31. and a i've been in firearms situations, provision saying if theresa may gets her withdrawal agreement through, we to be fair, as they say, the training does take over, the adrenaline. you don't really think about your brain activity. can leave on the first day of the it is early stages, but initial findings show that when correct decisions are made, month after we passed the withdrawal a particular pattern of brain activity is recorded. agreement. brexit could be any day, you can see this more orange, red blob in the middle, any first of the month until 31st this is what we are looking for. october. a specific brain rhythm lots of speculation about theresa that will be an indicator may's leadership and other of a very good decision—making process. questions. the general election, a ultimately, is it something that is innate, some people have this, some don't? second referendum, is there time for potentially. most likely it is a question of training. either? sometimes, you need more time second referendum, if we follow the to make the right decision. strict processes with consultations, a very different approach to traditional training drills designation of who fights, then we like this. but it is hoped studying brain could just about squeak it in. we activity in a virtual environment will help armed officers in the real world. need to make up our mind pretty tim muffett, bbc news.
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soon. people reckon 22 weeks a minimum to hold a good referendum. a you're watching breakfast. general election that takes up to still to come this morning: eight weeks, we could squeak one of emma bunton those in. would we make any will be here to talk about releasing her first solo album in 12 years progress? a bigger question. tory and going back on the road leadership election, another ten with the spice girls. weeks or so. we have the if you have got questions for her about what she has been up to, conservative party conference at the end of september. looking ahead to the spice girls tour, maybe you have got tickets, a theresa may said the deal she lot of excitement in that, a lot of chatter about the dynamic between offered was you passed my withdrawal them, we will be talking about that agreement, then i will stand down a little later on. also this for the second phase. she seems to morning, prue leith will bejoining be saying now, you haven't passed my us, she most recently of the bake withdrawal agreement, that part of off, you can see how there with paul the deal has gone, i am staying. she hollywood. she is an author in her can't be challenged under normal own right, she is coming in to talk conservative rules until december about her latest book as well. one, anniversary of the failed looking forward to that, all coming
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up looking forward to that, all coming challenge last year. if the tory up on the sofa a little later this party and labour party agree a deal, morning. and we are keeping you up and the leadership changes, what to date on everything to do with brexit after the announcement last happens in terms of power for the night about the delay coming from new conservative leader, picking a brussels. time now to get the news, deal that has been agreed? travel and weather where you are. if we ratified the withdrawal agreement, we are still bound. like the irish backstop, it would be breaking international law to say we reject that. a big thing to do. then the question of the prime minister appears to be offering to put lots good morning. a chilly morning. of commitments into uk law. she says temperatures got down to minus 2——5d i have got two introduce the dual in parts of england, wales and central and southern areas of agreement build to get the treaty ratified and i want to add scotland. for most of us it will be provisions. if she does that come a bright and sunny day. temperatures new tory leader could get out of are still below the average for the there is but only with a majority to time of year. high pressure toward repeal. scandinavia bringing as an easterly so much to talk about. thank you. wind. the high pressure making things settled at the moment, not a
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there is a delay to brexit until great deal of changing conditions from the last few days. you can see october 31. businesses have been by the blue colour today, feeling affected by the uncertainty. we have been taking a look and today he is quite cold once again. we have some cloud affecting the north and east in blackburn. of scotland. the chance of perhaps welcome to blackburn, which voted one or two showers developing this afternoon. some cloud at times in overwhelmingly to leave, 68% in east yorkshire, lincolnshire, towards norfolk and suffolk but we favour of leave. whilst that have the east or north—west easterly wind for many of us, that's what's extension may be good news for some, bringing colder air. that's what's giving politicians more time to come up giving politicians more time to come up with a deal for business, it bringing colder air. that's what's bringing temperatures 8—12d, perhaps means more uncertainty. we are at a 13 in the west. perhaps chillier in wallpaper factory in blackburn. north sea coasts. overnight we means more uncertainty. we are at a wallpaperfactory in blackburn. this is the start of the process, 16 continue with cloud affecting the million rolls of wallpaper here north—east of scotland. still some every year. each stage adds a showers mainly staying offshore. not quite as cold as tonight. different colour, they sell these around the world. clearly they need temperatures largely above freezing but in the north—east of england, parts, machines, inc imported from through parts of central scotland, overseas. they have been temperatures dropping below stockpiling. first they had their freezing. on friday, cloud building
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day at the end of march in mind for during the morning. a cloudy stockpiling. now we are talking afternoon compared to today. later about the end of october. this on, some brighter skies developing morning i will meet the boss here across eastern areas of england. and staff to find out what that again, temperatures are struggling, extension means. one word we should 8-10d again, temperatures are struggling, 8—10d or perhaps 11. as we go into get used to hearing is uncertainty. the weekend, temperatures very similar, some sunny spells during saturday, quite a breeze around on saturday. by sunday, their amount of good morning from bbc cloud, should be dry, temperatures london news, i'm geeta pendse. remaining 8—10d. goodbye. hammersmith bridge remains closed this morning after safety checks revealed "critical faults and cracks". the bridge was closed yesterday evenning, with the local council blaming government cuts for not addressing urgent repairs which were exclusively revealed by bbc london several years ago. at the moment, we understand it will remain closed indefinitely. a new, 21st—century—style youth centre, which has reduced youth crime by up to 70% outside london, is to open in barking
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and dagenham today. the youth zone will provide young people with sports and activities, as well as offering counselling and advice about education and training. it's funded by local businesses and newham council and more centres are planned in other london boroughs. the young people we see now — 15, 16 — they were young five, ten years ago when we had a few services. and now those services are cut, unfortunately, what we are seeing on the streets is a result of that. young people need somewhere to go, they need something to do, and, most importantly, they definitely need someone to talk to. let's take a look at the travel situation now. )on the tube there are severe delays on the circle line and on the hammersmith & city following a broken—down train at hammersmith. there are also delays on the district line due to signal failure.
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on the a13, westbound traffic is building from dagenham into barking is closed. in rainham, the westbound exit slip from the a13 into marsh way is closed. good morning, it is a noticeably chilly start. quite cold for a time. similarto chilly start. quite cold for a time. similar to yesterday but not as much sunshine. still some bright and sunny spells. a chilly north easterly wind. the best of the sunshine out towards western home counties. top temperatures up to 11. more cloud around than last night
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but clearer spells. temperatures could dip below freezing. a cool and frosty start to the day. wall cloud tomorrow and the risk of showers particularly in eastern areas. mostly dry, quite a bit of cloud. temperatures take a dip through the weekend, just nine on sunday. then warmer next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast. it's 6.30am, on thursday the 11th of april. we'll have the latest news and sport injust a moment. also coming up today.
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a big part of the programme coming from westminster after the early hours announcement of october the sist, hours announcement of october the 31st, the new brexit today, coming out of europe. and we will be in westminster analysing what that means. also on the programme... i'll be joined by great british bake off judge prue leith, who's been "cooking up" romance in her eighth novel. # please don't stop. emma "baby spice" bunton will be here to talk about releasing her first solo album in 12 years, and going back on the road with the spice girls. and, after 9am, winter is coming. the wait for the final series of blockbuster show game of thrones is nearly over. samwell tarly, played byjohn bradley, will be here to tell us all about it. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. brexit will be delayed again after eu leaders agreed an extention up to october 31st.
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the uk could leave sooner but only if parliament passes the withdrawal agreement. as things currently stand, we will be taking part in european elections in may, although the prime minister says she still hopes her deal can be passed before then. speaking in the early hours of the morning in brussels, she called on mps to pull together in the national interest. i know that there is huge frustration from many people that i had to request this extension. the uk should have left the eu by now and i sincerely regret the fact that i have not yet been able to persuade parliament to approve a deal that would allow the uk to leave in a smooth and orderly way. but the choices we now face are stark and the timetable is clear. so we must now press on at pace with our efforts to reach a consensus on the deal that is in the national interest. the largest political vote the world has ever seen is getting underway in india, as up to 900 million people head to the polls in the first phase
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of a general election. the process is staged over several weeks and the military has been deployed to ensure voting goes smoothly. the country's current prime minster is hoping for a second term, but faces challenges from a resurgent congress party. jack shepherd, the british man who spent 10 months on the run after a speedboat crash in which a woman died is now back in custody in the uk, and will appear in court later. the 31—year—old jumped bail last summer and fled to georgia. in his absence, he was found guilty of the manslaughter of charlotte brown, who was 2a, and sentenced to six years in jail. a fifth of new childhood asthma cases in the uk could be linked to traffic pollution, according to a major new study. researchers from leading american and canadian universities suggest fumes could be to blame for up to four million new cases across the globe each year. they're calling for international guidelines on air quality to be reviewed. psychological therapy is better at alleviating symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome than drugs, a study has found. researchers led by the university of southampton
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carried out a trial involving more than 500 patients and looked at how changes in mindset improved ibs. they found that even telephone and web—based therapy had a major impact. doctors in greece and spain say they have produced a baby using dna from three people. the experimental form of ivf uses an egg from the mother, sperm from the father and another egg from a donor woman. the technique was developed to help families affected by hereditary diseases, but some doctors believe the technology could help patients with fertility problems too. however, some experts in the uk have expressed concern about the unknown risks. astronomers have taken the first ever image of a black hole. it's three million times the size of earth and has been described by scientists as a monster. the black hole is 500 million trillion kilometres away and it was photographed by a network
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of eight telescopes across the world. ifi if i had been asked what a black hole would look like i do not think i would have said that. i would have said that. i would have said that. i would have probably said exactly that. it isa that. it is a big black hole. with lights around it? ok, i had not given it too much thought but we we re given it too much thought but we were talking about this the last couple of days in the build—up. i created an image of what it would look like. and it was that? am i the only one a bit disappointed? if you thought it did look like that, you are right. then i could havejust told them. save them a lot of bother. tell us about last night. a lot of people think the champions league
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hopes that manchester united have disappeared down a black hole. a tie between manchester united and barcelona, the old rivalry, quarterfinal, champions league. some of the best players in the world on the pitch. we have lionel messi and paul pogba. in the end it was a damp squib, disappointing, certainly for manchester united fans, left frustrated in the first leg. they just couldn't take advantage of a below par barcelona. nights like this have become all too rare at old trafford, plenty of change since these european heavyweights contested the final eight years ago. belief may have been restored recently, now the revival would face the ultimate test. few teams have contained the genius of lionel messi and sure enough his deft pass to luis suarez unlocked the united defence. initially ruled offside, var ensured barcelona opener
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var ensured barcelona's opener stood albeit with an own goal. the visitors were showing why they dominated la liga again, this david de gea stretched leg keeping his team in it. diego wasting a rare united chance. despite enjoying plenty of possession after the restart, in truth, united were fortunate not to fall behind. suarez squandering a golden opportunity. and try as they might, the hosts, without a shot on target, rarely looked like finding the equaliser they craved, even against their below—par opponents. barcelona with the crucial away goal, united are still in it but with it all to do next week at the nou camp. dan roan, bbc news, old trafford. in the night's other quarterfinal, cristiano ronaldo scored his 125th champions league goal against ajax. the dutch side equalised to set up a fascinating decider in turin next week. the new durham captain cameron bancroft says he thought about quitting cricket during his ban for ball—tampering. the australian returned
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from a nine—month suspension in december and will lead his new county out for the first time today against sussex. he also says he would love to play for his country again. another australian rugby player israel falou is in trouble again over a social medial post which said that "hell awaits" gay people. he's a devout christian and made similar comments last year but wasn't punished. rugby australia said his posts are "unacceptable". the first major championship of the golfing season — the masters — starts later today. rory mcilroy is the bookies' favourite to win the one major title he's missing from his collection. andy swiss reports from augusta. ready for another shot at golfing greatness. rory mcilroy has already lifted three of the four major titles. the open championship, the us open and the us pga. can he finally complete the full set? he begins here the masters
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favourite, and after embracing meditation, he is pretty relaxed. i keep saying, i would dearly love to win this tournament one day. if it doesn't happen this week, that is totally fine, i'll come back next year and have another crack at it. but i'm happy with how everything is — body, mind, game. if rory mcilroy triumphs here he'll become only the sixth man to win every major. but fair to say other big names have other ideas. including tiger woods. some 22 years after his first win here, could he do it again? how about justin rose? he's the world number one. he knows that won't count for much. i don't see the ranking per se. i know i am one of the guys who can win and has the opportunity to win. i feel like i'm very confident being in that position. but certainly not an extra pressure. before the serious stuff, a bit of fun. the traditional eve of the masters
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par—3 contest and victory for england's matt wallace, including this hole in one. how the rest will now be hoping for some of his magic. andy swiss, bbc news, augusta. and he mentioned the par three contest. but arguably the most entertaining aspect of that contest. what steals the show every year are the adorable child caddies whojoin their parents on the course. reigning champion patrick reed. keegan bradley and son logan. they are absolutely adorable. we we re they are absolutely adorable. we were discussing their outfits. the traditional masters caddie overalls. and you get to see the golfers as family men and notjust serious golfers. look at them. a future champion right there.
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he does not even know the rules. go easy, he is one and a half! may be a football world cup winner, instead. he has the right idea, just pick it i let's return to our top story now. the uk and the eu have agreed a "flexible extension" of brexit until the 31st of october. the agreement was reached after five hours of talks at an emergency summit in brussels, where it was reported eu leaders had been split over what the length of the delay should be. one country that was in favour of a longer extension was germany. let's speak now to german mep, elmar brok. good morning. thank you for your time this morning. can you tell us what you make of that date, the 31st of october. i make nothing, you have to make something in the united kingdom. we wait for the house of
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commons. we can do nothing about that. the eu decided on this date, that. the eu decided on this date, that was an eu decision. do you approve of it being six months ahead? it is a long time. you should have delivered already half a year, but it is important that the decisions are taken as fast as possible and there is still a chance to avoid european elections and that is the way, the 31st of october is the longest date, but you can also deliver before and hopefully now, the house of commons. can you give an insight into some of the arguments raging about whether there should have been a longer delay or more conditions? tell us about those discussions. look, the date was the
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29th of march. now we are already ahead of that. i think we cannot prolong that for ever, we need certainty. the conditions are clearly there is no parallel on the future relationship. i hope on the ratification of this withdrawal agreement, we need now a decision in the house of commons. you are free to have more clarification on the political declaration, for example the customs union is possible. that might bea the customs union is possible. that might be a compromise between the prime minister and leader of the opposition. there are some openers. and here we wait for your proposals. do you think it is in any way sensible for the uk to be involved
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in european elections for mbps, given that everyone wants the decision to be made for us to leave? why does it make sense for us to be pa rt why does it make sense for us to be part of those european elections? why does it make sense for us to be part of those european elections7m does not make sense therefore it would be good if britain delivered before an election is not needed but it it is longer than the 23rd of may, then they have to take part in the european elections. legally. and for sure, it does not make sense to leave on the 31st of october therefore i would advise that you use the time, that it will be possible to leave it such a way that you do not have to take part in european elections. if we do send meps to brussels, could that be divisive for europe?
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i think there should be behaviour, that someone who wants to leave a few weeks later should not vote in important questions of the european union because they do not have to carry the burden of that afterwards. i think that would be passed —— that would be best not to take part in the european elections. thank you very for your time this morning. probably the closest camera shot we have had so far this morning! carol? can you get a camera any closer for your weather? here's carol with a look at this morning's weather.
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a few haven't stepped out, it is a cold start. quite widespread frost. where we have crossed, we have clear skies are translating into a lot of sunshine first thing. the weather is settled as high dominates. around this high—pressure from an easterly direction, it is coming across the cold north sea. where we have yellow, that is where we have more cloud keeping the temperature up. a lot of sunshine after that frosty start. areas of cloud across northern ireland. and across north—eastern scotland and parts of eastern england. the cloud in the eastern england. the cloud in the east will break at times giving sunny spells. building in northern ireland. you could see some drizzle. where the sun comes out that could
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spark off showers. always colder along the north sea coast line. temperatures struggling up to nine. inland, up to 13. into the evening, there will be more cloud. some of us will see clear skies. the cloud will build. temperatures, where it remains broken, cold enough in rural areas for frost. generally not as close —— generally not as cold as the nightjust gone. friday, we start with sunshine. the cloud will continue to build. tomorrow will turn out to be cloudier than today. nonetheless, there will be some breaks. temperatures down on today. feeling cool along the north sea coastline. heading into the weekend, we have
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high pressure over scandinavia. low pressure in the atlantic. between them, it will be pretty windy across western scotland and northern ireland. on saturday, up to 45 miles an hour. a lot of dry and settled conditions, sunny intervals, temperatures below average, dropping even more as we head into sunday. fairly cloudy and breezy. this is the weekend forecast. dry for most, sunny spells, windier but feeling chilly. next week, temperatures will start to climb again. that is good news. you are always welcome here with good news. on complicated days we welcome that. the battle to preserve historic churches is a constant and expensive one, so, in an attempt to raise money for repairs, some are opening their doors
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to campers, or "champers", as they're known. john maguire has been to find out more. st edmund's has stood on this site in rochdale for almost 150 years. but time and weather is no respecter of age or beauty. the emergency repair bill here is £165,000. it looks pretty good from first impressions, but, when you start looking closely, the church is actually in quite a dire state, particularly when we have a rain storm. the emergency repair bill here is £165,000. it looks pretty good from first impressions, but, when you start looking closely, the church is actually in quite a dire state, particularly when we have a rain storm. it's a case of running around with buckets deciding which area gets the bucket first, because there is rain pouring in. i am going to bagsie this. so, here's a fundraising idea —
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turn hallowed ground into a camping ground. you have heard of glamping, well, they are calling this champing. arriving this evening, as the sun was setting, it was really beautiful to see the sun coming in glass windows. and what i'm most excited about is the waking up in the morning to the natural light and the fact we have moved one of the beds so that when my daughter wakes up, that is the first thing she will see when she wakes up. so that is going to be a unique experience. how many blankets do i need? these happy campers are spending the night in the church on saddleworth moor. it is different because it is inside somewhere, instead of being outside in the open. and it is not cold. well, it is quite cold, because i am in a blanket. the churches can still be used for weddings, funerals or christenings, but there are not regular services. the doors here closed 1970. but for those who believe these are places of solemnity, is this an appropriate use? they are sites that humans have set aside for hundreds of years for something special, for a purpose. i think as long as you are respectful of that
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and understand that, you have to find uses for the building. if worship isn't drawing in people to use and love the building and they are certainly not providing the economy, the money that is needed to keep them in place, we have to find other ways that balance the two things. a family of four can spend the night from around £100. the trust has 18 champing properties, so the chances are there will always be room at the inn. john maguire, bbc news, oldham. as we've been hearing, last night, eu leaders agreed a "flexible extension" of brexit until the 31st of october. so, what does this mean for businesses? ben's at a wallpaper factory in blackburn this morning. iam i am always fascinated by big pieces of machinery. those rolls of paper i am assuming will become wallpaper. there is the uncertainty for
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essences, i am there is the uncertainty for essences, iam not there is the uncertainty for essences, i am not sure if there is any solace for businesses. waiting for answers. this is part of the 16 million rolls of wallpaper they produce here every year. brexit means a lock for them but they had to stockpile ink, paper, machinery from overseas, they have to make sure they know what is happening. the delay means politicians have more time, but for business, it does not bring them any certainty. they have been crying out for some certainty in negotiations. andrew is the boss. hello. what we heard overnight, the end of october, what does that mean view in real terms? ideally, we'd like the certainty of knowing where we are going. another extension, it is better than no deal, we don't want to crash out of
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europe, but we would like to get this moving forward and have a withdrawal agreement. how confident are you that you will get answers? you need to prepare for dates that keep moving. you are stockpiling. it was doubtful, now october. what does it mean? we have built up stocks of raw materials and ink which has a cash flow implication. we aren't seeing a problem with consumer demand or selling into europe. my concern is the longer it goes on, consumer demand might fall away which will be difficult for us. something like wallpaper is a discretionary purchase. if people spend less, that might be one thing. people spend on shopping, food, but they might wallpaper to take their mind off brexit! it will affect us if consumer confidence falls. we
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need certainty now if we can get it, within the next couple of months. good to see you. we will talk a little more later. let me show you around. 500 staff are employed. 16 million rolls of wallpaper every year. they had the colours at each stage, so lots to think about to get what they need to make sure it is at the right place at the right time. good morning, you have been advising businesses on what they need to do to get ready, what do you tell them? again, it has been pushed back further. a big temptation this morning for people to shelve plans, not the right thing to do. brexit is still there. we are not sure when. three focus areas we are advising people on, cash, which is critical. people
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are stockpiling, they have tied up cash. make sure you understand your cash. make sure you understand your cash flows over the coming weeks. compliance, understand the different regulatory requirements. contractual arrangements. and communication, make sure you are telling employees and stakeholders what is happening, evenif and stakeholders what is happening, even if there is little to report. there is an upside, businesses had been looking at where there supply chain is, where they sell to, to make plans. business is resilient, they just want answers. that is right. in doing that analysis, most of my clients have learnt a lot about their business, they have understood exposures they hadn't realised, thought differently about supply arrangements. that has been a benefit, examining your business in that way. perhaps brexit has been a reason to do it but it has been a reason to do it but it has brought benefit in the wider
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business. that is the view of this place, and in blackburn, which overwhelmingly voted to leave, 68% in favour. we will talk more about that later, the implications for business. good morning from bbc london news, i'm geeta pendse. hammersmith bridge remains closed this morning after safety checks revealed "critical faults" and "cracks". the bridge was closed yesterday evening, with the local council blaming government cuts for not addressing urgent repairs — which were exclusively revealed by bbc london several years ago. at the moment, we understand it will remain closed indefinitely. a new, 21—century—style "youth centre", which has reduced youth crime by up to 70% outside london, is to open in barking
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and dagenham today. the youth zone will provide young people with sports and activities, as well as offering counselling and advice about education and training. it's funded by local businesses and newham council — and more centres are planned in other london boroughs. the young people we see now — 15, 16 — they were young five, ten years ago, when we had a few services. and now those services are cut, unfortunately, what we are seeing on the streets is a result of that. young people need somewhere to go, they need somewhere to do, and, most importantly, they definitely need someone to talk to. there's to be a clampdown on illegal street traders operating on tower bridge. a legal quirk meant authorities were often powerless to stop the practice: the city of london's bridge house estate owns the bridge, but city officers had no jurisdiction over the bridge's northern side which is controlled by tower hamlets. the two parties have now reached a legal agreement and the city is hoping to crackdown on the activity. let's take a look at
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the travel situation now. on the tube, there are minor delays on the district line and the overground is part suspended between gospel oak and upper holloway following a points failure. northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel is slow from the woolwich road flyover. in rainham, the westbound exit slip from the a13 into marsh way is closed because of a collision. now, the weather, with elizabeth rizzinni. good morning. you may want an extra layer on this morning. it is a noticeably chilly start. some spots dip below freezing last night. quite cold for a time. similar to yesterday but not as much sunshine. still some bright and sunny spells. still a chilly north easterly wind. blowing in more cloud from the north sea. the best of the sunshine out towards western home counties.
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top temperatures today up to 11. this evneing, more cloud around than last night but clearer spells. in clear spells, temperatures could dip below freezing. again, a cool and frosty start to the day. more cloud tomorrow and the risk of showers particularly in eastern areas. but mostly dry, quite a bit of cloud. the best of the brightness in the west. temperatures take a dip through the weekend, just nine on sunday. then warmer next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. should go should od morning welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty in westminster. brexit delayed again — the eu grants an extension up
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to the end of october after late night talks in brussels. the uk should have left the eu by now and i sincerely regret parliament has not been able to approve a deal. i am at a wallpaper factory in a city that voted overwhelmingly to leave the european union to find out what this means for business. also on the programme... jack shepherd who went on the run after being convicted of the manslaughter of charlotte brown in a speedboat crash will appear in court. a missed opportunity for manchester united. they battled, but are beaten by a below par barcelona in the first leg of their champions league quarter final at old trafford.
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it isa it is a cold and frosty start for many, but that means there will be sunny spells but there is cloud in the forecast and some drizzle and i will tell you where in 15 minutes. it's thursday the 11th of april. our top story. brexit will be delayed again after eu leaders agreed an extension up to october 31st. the uk could leave sooner but only if parliament passes the withdrawal agreement. as things currently stand we will be taking part in european elections in may, although the prime minister says she still hopes her deal can be passed before then. speaking in the early hours of the morning in brussels, she called on mps to pull together in the national interest. i know that there is huge frustration from many people that i had to request this extension. the uk should have left the eu by now and i sincerely regret the fact that i have not yet been able to persuade
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parliament to approve a deal that would allow the uk to leave in a smooth and orderly way. but the choices we now face are stark and the timetable is clear. so we must now press on at pace with our efforts to reach a consensus on the deal that is in the national interest. the talks between the 27 other european leaders were fractious, with france pushing for a shorter extension. the european council president, donald tusk, delivered this warning to the uk. let me finish with a message to our british friends. this extension is as flexible as i expected and a little bit shorter than i expected. but it is still enough to find the best possible solution. please do not waste this time. let's get the reaction from brussels with our reporter adam fleming. it was a late—night. the reaction
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came through pretty early this morning, around three o'clock. fractious among the eu 27, but it feels as if the sentiment towards the uk was a little bit more generous. as donald tusk the president of the european council said again, the eu has left all options on the table of the uk can approve the deal and leave in an orderly way, it could change its brexit strategy and pursue a closer future relationship with the eu and it could change the bit of the brexit deal that sketches out the future relationship as a result, or the uk could have a change of mind and cancel brexit. what the eu has done is given the uk six months to decide which option it wants rather than two and a bit days which is how it looked earlier this week. the reason it went so late last night was there were two big disagreements between groups of countries. the first about how long the extension
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should be. you had a big bunch of countries who wanted may be a year and up till next spring, they thought that was the best way. you had a smaller group vocal and led by france who thought the extension should be short and just until the summer. but compromise is halloween, the 31st of october. the other argument was over could you create a mechanism that would make sure the uk behaved well and did not muck up any of the eu's big future business. it turns out they could not find a mechanism to do that because you are either in the eu or out. they could not decide on a mechanism to force the uk to behave which is why they ended up with the 31st of october, because that is the day before the
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new european commission president and new commissioners take their seats and that is a new chapter in the eu's future and the idea being the eu's future and the idea being the uk has left before it can have influence on that chapter. you have found an ejector seat? that is my word for it, not donald tusk, president macron, angela merkel‘s but it might catch on! the idea that if the uk has not taken part in the european parliament elections on the 23rd of may and parliament has not voted for the deal, it would automatically have to leave on the 1st ofjune. there is an extra cliff edgein 1st ofjune. there is an extra cliff edge in there of the 1st ofjune. theresa may points to the 1st of june as the first possible point the uk could leave and she thinks that isa uk could leave and she thinks that is a good thing. i'm joined now by our political correspondent, iain watson. for the moment, it does not seem an ejector seat would be sparked off
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just yet. what theresa may will say when she talks to mps today is please ensure my short—term survival. she said she wanted to carry through the first phase of negotiations and if people want to get rid of herfor agreeing the extension, the way to do that in effect, if you like the message to them is to agree my deal and then we perhaps can have an orderly transition, not out of the eu but inside the conservative party. i think she will say that. she faces the lesser of two evils when it comes to fighting european elections. her message would be we can avoid this and she will be saying to the labour party we can avoid this. the embarrassment of the european elections, so long as you can reach an agreement. she will be reaching out across the benches in parliament trying to get labour on side but i think that will be
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difficult because they also have their own membership to think about and many of them will say any deal she agrees withjeremy corbyn should be put to a referendum, something she only yesterday refused to do. we will be talking throughout the morning. a lot going on here. there is frustration about this other extension. that is until halloween and we will talk about that. charlie, back to you. the sun is shining, iam pleased charlie, back to you. the sun is shining, i am pleased to say. the other news this morning... jack shepherd, the british man who spent 10 months on the run after a speedboat crash in which a woman died, is now back in custody in the uk, and will appear in court later. shepherd jumped bail last summer and fled to georgia. in his absence he was found guilty of the manslaughter of charlotte brown, who was 2a, and sentenced to six years in jail. our correspondent sarah rainsford has more. this was the flight carrying
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jack shepherd back to britain from georgia to face justice. and we got on board. after months on the run, he was here in handcuffs, escorted by metropolitan police officers. he has never spoken publicly before, so i asked what he had to say to the family of charlotte brown, killed in a crash on his speedboat. i'm terribly sorry for my involvement in charlotte's death and furthermore, my subsequent actions, which i see have only served to, you know, make things worse and i would like to make amends for that. it's over three years since jack shepherd's boat was found capsized in the thames after a first date ended in tragedy. this footage was filmed by charlotte brown shortly before the crash that killed her. at some point, jack shepherd handed her the controls. the boat hit an obstacle at high speed and overturned. charlotte brown was discovered in the icy water.
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she died later in hospital. it was not untiljanuary that he turned himself into georgian police, after securing the right to appeal against his conviction. in court here, jack shepherd described charlotte's death as his greatest regret. but he has since made clear he does not believe he is solely responsible for the crash. his georgian lawyer told me he fled before his trial because he was depressed, even suicidal. now he knows the fact that his case is in the appeal court. if he will be running, he will lose his case. his last chance to prove his innocence. but charlotte brown's family want jack shepherd to take responsibility for charlotte's death, saying his appeal will only prolong their pain and their suffering. sarah rainsford, bbc news.
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people in india are heading to the polls to vote in the first phase of a general election. with 900 million eligible voters, it's the largest election the world has ever seen. yogita limaye is at one of the polling stations in hyderabad this morning. we get a sense of the numbers in the people behind you. voting has begun. that is right and in the past hour, one thing we have seen as more women voters coming out. that behind me is a public school which has been converted into a polling station and inside there are electronic machines where people will enter their choice and when that is done there fingers are marked with ink to ensure nobody tries to cast their vote a second
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time. the prime minister narendra modi and his hindu nationalist party will hope to win a second term. a big issue they have campaigned on is national security. a few months ago tensions between india and pakistan had escalated and india claim to have conducted air strikes in pakistan. that is a big factor here but the prime minister's time has been marked by high employment and rural distress and people are saying jobs are a big issue. thank you. a fifth of new childhood asthma cases in the uk could be linked to traffic pollution, according to a major new study. researchers from leading american and canadian universities suggest fumes could be to blame for up to four million new cases across the globe each year. they're calling for international guidelines on air quality to be reviewed. i think it is very difficult to know what the policy solutions will be that solve this problem. quite difficult to do local, very local initiatives, because pollution travels over long periods. so i think
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what the government really need to do is commit to who levels of air pollution and indeed look at whether those are the right levels, because clearly these problems are still happening, even in areas where pollution is within who levels. dame darcey bussell has announced she's leaving strictly come dancing after seven years on the show. she says she's decided to step down from the judging panel to focus on other commitments. it's not been announced who will replace her. those are the main stories. let's return to our top story now. with brexit delayed once again. we can give you the scene in westminster. a little bit of sunshine for the first time. we had that moment. in brussels things happen slowly in these meetings that it was 2:30am when finally the
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information began to trickle out after that dinner and their negotiations? it was a late—night for correspondence and those negotiating this extension so a new extension, 31st of october. halloween. and now the question is whether it will be a trick or treat. will theresa may be around deliver it. we're joined now by brexit minister lord callanan. thank you forjoining me. and good morning to you. what is your expectation now of how this extension pans out? my hope is that we will be able to persuade parliament to agree a withdrawal agreement before the 22nd of may, before we are forced to hold european elections, and we can leave it as smooth and orderly manner which is what everybody wants. it is certainly what business wants but we
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need to persuade parliament to vote for that deal. what will persuade parliament? the deal has been voted down three times. the majorities are getting smaller but we have not created a majority yet. we will speak to the labour party who want to see brexit delivered, they say. we will talk about possible changes to the political declaration. the withdrawal agreement cannot be changed but lets see if they will deliver on their commitment to deliver on their commitment to deliver brexit. labour says the red lines haven't changed. we will have further meetings today. it requires compromise on both sides. we really need to get this over the line.
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you need to deliver to make sure you don't get hurt in local elections. what compromises will be made? give me something concrete. i don't wa nt to give me something concrete. i don't want to predict what might happen in the room. both sides need to give and take. i will leave those details to those who are participating. is theresa may going to be leader by october 31? the prime minister has said she wa nts to the prime minister has said she wants to see this phase of negotiations completed, see brexit delivered, she has worked tenaciously. she has said once it is through the line she will step down after that. you are expecting her not to be leader by october 31? let us wait and see. she has spent a massive effort getting brexit over
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the line, she promised the country that. what do you one to? i want to see brexit delivered as well, i voted to leave, but we need to get that withdrawal agreement through parliament to deliver it in a smooth and orderly manner. who will be the next best leader of the conservative party? we have a range of experienced and qualified candidates, i don't want to predict anything. we need somebody to bring the country together. leave won the referendum but it was 52—48. we need to come together as a country, we need someone who can unify both factions come and move forward in negotiations to organise a good future with the eu working together in peace and harmony. let us say you get a deal by 22nd
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may. a leadership contest is put in place. when should we expect to see that happen? i would hope, let's see if that comes about, we have a leader in place before the party conference in october. the timetabling is down to the 1922 committee. the committee met yesterday, no talk of leadership change at the moment, but what is the feeling now? you already have a prime minister in office who wants to get this deal through. with all respect, she is not delivering, is she? we now have an extension to october 31 when we were expected to leave at the end of march. she is doing her best to deliver but we have a logjam in parliament, the majority are not persuaded that the best way to leave is through this deal. parliament say they don't want
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a no—deal, they voted against this deal, against all the alternatives on offer. it is about time they made up on offer. it is about time they made up their mind what they do want. iam up their mind what they do want. i am sitting here, a up their mind what they do want. iam sitting here, a man up their mind what they do want. i am sitting here, a man over there is shouting a bad brexit. people are angry, unsure where brexit is going. what should theresa may say today? she is making a statement at 11am. what will she be ten —— saying to reassure the country? i hope she will relay the conversations she has had with other european leaders, outlining what the details of the arrangements are to the maximum of 31st december, but appealing to the mps to look at the deal on offer. the deal has been painfully negotiated, the eu has said it will not be changed. that is
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the legal basis for which we will withdraw in a smooth and orderly manner. thank you forjoining me this morning. you can see the sun dappled lin dan. it is cold. those mitts are enormous, but you need them, it is a cold start to the day. where the sunshine comes through, it is a beautiful start. we have this lovely picture first thing. today, a frosty start, sunny spells, but a today, a frosty start, sunny spells, butafair today, a frosty start, sunny spells, but a fair bit of cloud for some parts of the uk. high pressure is dominating, the air is coming from scandinavia. the blue colours indicate that chilly feel. the yellow tinge is indicate more cloud
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which has maintained temperature levels overnight. over northern scotland, some patchy and light rain. through the day, that will break and give sunny spells giving showers. the cloud building over northern ireland, some showers in the west. down the east coast, cloud drifting in from the north sea by breaking in parts. for the rest of the uk, some sunshine. temperatures are down on yesterday by a degree. temperatures up to nine. peaking at 12 or 13. through the evening, you will notice more cloud around. that means temperatures won't fall quite as low as last night. starting with clear skies. as the cloud comes in, temperatures will go up. we could
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still see some frost. tomorrow, clear skies to start, sunshine, tomorrow is likely to be claudia. nonetheless, still some sunny spells, feeling cool down the north sea coastline with an easterly breeze. temperatures are down yet again, ten is well below average. into the weekend, high pressure is anchored over scandinavia, low pressure in the atlantic. where they meet, gusty winds will affect northern ireland and northern scotland, up to 45 miles an hour. on saturday, fairly dry, with some sunny spells. on sunday, still breezy. a lot more cloud around, the temperature goes down. next week, starting on an unsettled note but temperatures will start to rise. by
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wednesday, we will see higher temperatures. that is good news. would you like a cup of tea or coffee? a cup of milky, weak tea. that sounds horrible! it is on its way. trained to make life or death decisions in stressful situations, armed police officers have an enormous responsibility. now, researchers at nottingham and aston universities are using virtual reality to see how they cope with the pressure, in the hope it could help to train new recruits. trained to make life or death decisions in stressful situations, gunfire. to shoot or not to shoot. some decisions are a matter of life and death. this is the police tactical training centre in stockton—on—tees where armed officers and academics are teaming up. we hope the project will help us as scientists understand how
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the brain functions in these stressful and critical times. armed officer training typically involves scenarios like this. stand still. do as i say and you will not be harmed. durham constabulary and cleveland police both train here. but inside, teams from nottingham and aston universities have created virtual worlds so brain function can be monitored. put the weapon down. shots fired, man down. the main idea is to support the police in their really difficult task, to measure their brain activity to inform them about how good or bad decisions look like. theh split second, when you decide to shoot or not, you are looking for a specific type of brain pattern? yes.
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officers wear a virtual reality headset, and with electrodes attached to their scalp. as in the real world, they have to decide whether someone poses a genuine threat. we know the experts are experts and are better than someone who hasn't had this training. what has changed in the brain and made that happen, if we can measure the activity caused by many neurons firing at once. put the weapon down. in total, 26 armed officers are being analysed. it is impossible to fully replicate the stress of a real scenario but it is hoped these drills will come as close as possible. show yourself, it is the police. it is intensive. real firearms situations. to be fair, as they say, the training does take over, the adrenaline. you don't really think about your brain activity. it is early stages but initial findings show that when correct decisions are made, a particular pattern of brain activity is recorded. you can see this more orange, red blob in the middle, this is what we are looking for.
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a specific brain rhythm that will be an indicator of a very good decision—making process. ultimately, is it something that is innate, some people have this, some don't? potentially. most likely it is a question of training. sometimes, you need more time to make the right decision. a very different approach to traditional training drills like this. but it is hoped studying brain activity in a virtual environment will help armed officers in the real world. tim muffett, bbc news. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning. emma bunton will be here to talk about releasing her first solo album in 12 years, and going back on the road with the spice girls. if you have any questions for her, do let us know.
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time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm geeta pendse. hammersmith bridge remains closed this morning after safety checks revealed "critical faults" and "cracks". the bridge was closed yesterday evening, with the local council blaming government cuts for not addressing urgent repairs which were exclusively revealed by bbc london several years ago. at the moment, we understand it will remain closed indefinately. a new, 21—century—style youth centre which has reduced youth crime by up to 70% outside london, is to open in barking and dagenham today. the youth zone will provide young people with sports and activities, as well as offering counselling and advice about education and training. it's funded by local businesses and newham council, and more centres are planned in other london boroughs.
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the young people we see now — 15, 16 — they were young five, ten years ago, when we had a few services. and now those services are cut, unfortunately, what we are seeing on the streets is a result of that. young people need somewhere to go, they need somewhere to do, and, most importantly, they definitely need someone to talk to. there's to be a clampdown on illegal street traders operating on tower bridge. a legal quirk meant authorities were often powerless to stop the practice: the city of london's bridge house estate owns the bridge, but city officers had no jurisdiction over the bridge's northern side, which is controlled by tower hamlets. the two parties have now reached a legal agreement and the city is hoping to crackdown on the activity. let's take a look at the travel situation now.
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now, the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. good morning. you may want an extra layer on this morning. it is a noticeably chilly start. some spots dipped below freezing last night. quite cold for a time this morning. similar to yesterday but not as much sunshine. still some bright and sunny spells. still a chilly north—easterly wind. blowing in more cloud from the north sea. the best of the sunshine out towards western home counties. top temperatures today up to 11. this evening, more cloud around than last night but clearer spells. in clear spells, temperatures could dip below freezing. again, a cool and frosty start to the day.
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more cloud tomorrow and the risk of showers particularly in eastern areas. but mostly dry, quite a bit of cloud. the best of the brightness in the west. temperatures take a dip through the weekend, just nine on sunday. then warmer next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with me in westminster. with charlie in salford here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. brexit will be delayed again after eu leaders agreed an extention up to october 31st. the uk could leave sooner but only if parliament passes the withdrawal agreement. as things currently stand we will be taking part
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in european elections in may, although the prime minister says she still hopes her deal can be passed before then. later today, the leader of northern ireland's democratic unionist party, arelene foster, will head to brussels to discuss her opposition to theresa may's withdrawal agreement with the eu's chief negotiator. let's get more on this from our ireland correspondent, chris page, who's in belfast. it is quite stark, the differences between arlene foster and theresa may. that is right, this part of the uk has been the centre of the brexit process in many ways because of the land border with the irish republic and the main barrier to a deal is the idea of an arrangement that would keep the border open and almost invisible, even if there is not a big free trade agreement between the uk and eu, which would mean northern ireland would continue to follow some eu rules which is why
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the dup opposed the backstop, saying it would leave northern ireland more tied to brussels and less to london. arlene foster will meet with the chief negotiator michelle barnier and she has issued a stinging statement with criticism of theresa may becoming stronger and 56% of people in northern ireland voted to remain. the dup wanted to leave. the biggest prey remain party sinn fein said the british government should use the delay to get the withdrawal agreement through parliament and protect the backstop at all costs. for people living on the border for whom memories of the conflict here are strong, trade across the border ona are strong, trade across the border on a daily basis and contrasting feelings. they will be relieved
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there is not a no—deal brexit coming on friday but on the other they will be frustrated at ongoing uncertainty. here in westminster more talks are scheduled to take place between labour and the conservatives, in an attempt to break the brexit deadlock. we're joined now by shadow justice secretary richard burgon. are you pleased with the extension the eu has granted? the extension is necessary because theresa may has wasted a long time, almost three yea rs. wasted a long time, almost three years. trying to treat the negotiations. what she needs to do now is carry on engaging in these discussions with the opposition and she has to now make clear which of her red lines she will move. we should concentrate now on trying to break the impasse and bring people together and being we are not in the
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same position in a few months when the next deadline comes up. which red lines need to move? she needs to move on the permanent customs union. she needs to do more to reassure us about workers rights. she has to recognise the reality she has made it clear she will not be around and not for much longer as prime minister, so we need to have certainty that anything positive agreed is not going to be ripped up by whoever comes after her, whether it is boris johnson, jacob rees—mogg, michael gove or anyone else. she needs to propose a binding arrangement or safeguard so anything positive for greed in these important talks is notjust thrown in the rubbish bin by whoever comes after her. what compromises will you make if you want theresa may to shift on the red lines? we have been up shift on the red lines? we have been upfor shift on the red lines? we have been up for these discussions for a long time. it was the labour party conference thatjeremy corbyn said he was prepared to discuss with theresa may. it is a shame she has
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left it until the 11th hour. what compromises you going to make? we are prepared to consider all different options to break this impasse. that is why in parliament we voted for things that are not exactly labour policy, such as a common market 2.0, in order to show we are willing to consider every practical option to get out of this mess theresa may has caused. you said, market 2.0. give me another one. we voted for the common market 2.0, a norway plus model, and we voted for a people's voting wider circumstances. our strict policy makes provision for in the votes. it shows we are open—minded about this. we are going into discussions with good faith, in the national interest, to bring people together who voted leave and remain. it is
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serious these discussions continue and in the way that ensures we are not in the same position at the end of the extended deadline. i think we would be in a better position if the prime minister agreed back in the conference season to jeremy corbyn's proposals to have discussions with him then. further discussions between officials from labour and the government taking place today and they are important. if you do not reach a compromise, what is the plan next? when you push for another referendum? plan next? when you push for another referendum ? that plan next? when you push for another referendum? that motion was passed at the last labour conference. that might be necessary. some sort of people's vote may be necessary as a way out of the impasse. now the deadline has been extended, in the first instance we are trying to see ifa first instance we are trying to see if a compromise can be sorted, if a decent agreement can become too but
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if that cannot be achieved and the prime minister will not move on red lines ina prime minister will not move on red lines in a significant way, of course, a public vote of some description may be needed as a way out of this mess, caused by the government. what timeline do you have on that? you have been talking for a few days, what is the timeline before you say enough is enough, it is time to push for a referendum? let's see. there is a further meeting today between officials from the opposition and government. and also lets see what the prime minister says. when you say let's see, it reflects the whole issue people have with theresa may extending these discussions and more indicative votes. if you say you are offering an alternative and clearer
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leadership, rather than let see, give mea leadership, rather than let see, give me a timeline. when will enough be enough? with respect it would be strange since there is a meeting today between officials of the opposition government, it would be strange not to say let's see. we are entering negotiations in good faith. ifi entering negotiations in good faith. if i could say now what the outcome of the discussions would be, there would be no point in taking part. let's see what comes out of the discussions. we are taking part in good faith to put an end to the impasse, which is frustrating people whether they voted to leave or to remain. people want politicians to work together cross—party to see if the crisis can be ended but if that does not come off, through for example the prime minister's intransigence, a public vote may be needed to sort out the mess the government has cause. thank you for talking to me. let's get back to charlie. good morning. thank you. we
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can pick up with the rest of the day's news. theresa may, on the brexit theme, she is expected to address the house of commons this morning around 11am. that is when she will pass on what she has managed to achieve in brussels. the rest of the news. the largest political vote the world has ever seen is getting under way in india, as up to 900 million people head to the polls in the first phase of a general election. the process is staged over several weeks and the military has been deployed to ensure voting goes smoothly. the country's current prime minster is hoping for a second term, but faces challenges from a resurgent congress party. a british man who was convicted in his absence of killing a woman in a speedboat crash on the thames has been returned to britain from georgia. jack shepherd, who was on the run for several months, was found guilty of the manslaughter of 24—year—old charlotte brown. he will appear before the old bailey this morning.
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a fifth of new childhood asthma cases in the uk could be linked to traffic pollution, according to a major new study. researchers from leading american and canadian universities suggest fumes could be to blame for up to four million new cases across the globe each year. they're calling for international guidelines on air quality to be reviewed. psychological therapy is better at alleviating symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome than drugs, a study has found. researchers led by the university of southampton carried out a trial involving more than 500 patients and looked at how changes in mindset improved ibs. they found that even telephone and web—based therapy had a major impact. doctors in greece and spain have successfully helped a woman with fertility problems have a baby — using dna from the mother, father and another woman. this is the second baby born as a result
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of a three—parent method — the first was undertaken to prevent a child inheriting a fatal disease. some uk experts have expressed concern about the potential risks of the proceedure. risks of the procedure. astronomers have taken the first ever image of a black hole. it's three million times the size of earth and has been described by scientists as "a monster". the black hole is 500 million trillion kilometres away and it was photographed by a network of eight telescopes across the world. now we know what it looks like. as i said earlier i think i could have guessed. and i am no astrophysicist. a big black hole. but scientists say it is important to see it. i appreciate it is important. we were talking about
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this, the iconic image, the first time we have seen a black hole. i was a little bit disappointed. iam was a little bit disappointed. i am sorry. paint is a different image. a majorfootball occasion with some of the biggest stars on what happened ? may disappear down a black hole. well, manchester united's hopes for the first leg. it was billed as an exciting game with barcelona and so much history between the sides and it did not live up to expectations. the only goal an own goal so a frustrating night for manchester united. they just couldn't take advantage of a below par barcelona. our sports editor dan roan was watching. nights like this have become all too rare at old trafford, plenty of change since these european heavyweights contested the final eight years ago. belief may have been restored recently, now the revival would face the ultimate test. few teams have contained the genius of lionel messi and sure enough his deft pass to luis suarez
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unlocked the united defence. initially ruled offside, var ensured barcelona's opener stood albeit with luke shaw's own goal. the visitors were showing why they dominated la liga again, david de gea's stretched leg keeping his team in it. diego wasting a rare chance. despite enjoying plenty of possession after the restart, in truth, united were fortunate not to fall behind. suarez squandering a golden opportunity. and try as they might, the hosts, without a shot on target, rarely looked like finding the equaliser they craved, even against their below—par opponents. barcelona with the crucial away goal, united are still in it but with it all to do next week at the nou camp. dan roan, bbc news, old trafford. in the night's other quarter final cristiano ronaldo scored his 125th champions league goal against ajax. the dutch side equalised to set up a fascinating decider in turin next week.
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the new durham captain cameron bancroft says he thought about quitting cricket during his ban for ball—tampering the australian returned from a nine—month suspension in december and will lead his new county out for the first time today against sussex. he also says he would love to play for his country again. another australian — rugby player, israel falou — is in trouble again over a social media post which said that "hell awaits" gay people. he's a devout christian and made similar comments last year but wasn't punished. rugby australia said his posts are unacceptable. the first major championship of the golfing season — the masters — starts later today. rory mcilroy is the bookies' favourite to win the one major title he's missing from his collection. andy swiss reports from augusta. ready for another shot at golfing greatness. rory mcilroy has already lifted three of the four major titles.
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the open championship, the us open and the us pga. can he finally complete the full set? he begins here the masters favourite, and after embracing meditation, he is pretty relaxed. i keep saying, i would dearly love to win this tournament one day. if it doesn't happen this week, that is totally fine, i'll come back next year and have another crack at it. but i'm happy with where everything is — body, mind, game. if rory mcilroy triumphs here he'll become only the sixth man to win every major. but fair to say other big names have other ideas. including tiger woods. some 22 years after his first win here, could he do it again? how about justin rose? he's the world number one. he knows that won't count for much. i don't see the ranking per se.
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i know i am one of the guys who can win and has a great opportunity to win. i feel like i'm very confident being in that position. but certainly not an extra pressure. before the serious stuff, a bit of fun. the traditional eve of the masters par—3 contest and victory for england's matt wallace, including this hole in one. how the rest will now be hoping for some of his magic. andy swiss, bbc news, augusta. well done to him. with the par three contest, nobody has ever won it and gone on to win the masters so that might be the only success he will enjoy this weekend. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. iam seeing i am seeing frost on the ground. a cold and frosty start as
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demonstrated by our lovely weather watchers picture. some lovely blue skies. the forecast today, starting with a widespread frost. clear skies have allowed temperatures to fold this low allowing frost to form, so sunshine as well. high pressure is firmly in charge. the air is from scandinavia, so you can see the blue colours indicating how cold it is. the yellow tinge is where we have more cloud continuing through the day, attempt is not as low here. cloud producing patchy light rain and drizzle in scotland. cloud drifting in from the north sea, breaking at times to allow sunny spells. under clear skies, more cloud developing in the west. in
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between, a lot of sunshine. temperatures today lower than yesterday. these are the wind directions and speeds. we have an onshore breeze over the north coast. further west, up to 13. this evening, we start with clear skies. as we go through the night, cloud will develop. not as cold as just gone. where the cloud remains broken, under clear skies, we will see once again localised patches of frost. tomorrow, we start under clear skies with sunshine. tomorrow will be claudia. nonetheless, some brea ks will be claudia. nonetheless, some breaks in the cloud with sunny spells cloudier. temperatures will be pegged back to
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eight. further west, temperatures will be lower than today. quite a bit below average. into the weekend, high pressure dominates. low pressure is on the atlantic. in between, this squeeze on isobars means on saturday it will be particularly windy, 45 miles an hour. on saturday generally, some sunny spells. sunday, breezy again and feeling cooler. it looks like it will turn warmer next week. "we're not happy but we're satisfied" — that's how president of the european council, donald tusk, summed up how eu leaders feel about the uk being offered a new brexit extension, until the 31st of october. the agreement was reached in the early hours, after five hours of talks in brussels.
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but with all the serious weighty matters discussed, there was still some time for laughter. here are theresa may and angela merkel sharing a joke about their similar outfits. there we go, would you like to have a look, pass it around the table. one of those odd moments amongst a fairly odd story. now we can speak to two european journalists who were at the talks last night, barbara wesel of germany's dw news, and ole ryborg from denmark's dk news. good morning, thank you for your
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time. barbara, start us off with a thought about what this 31st october means and how things are being received. what does it mean? it is another cliff edge that britain has now to head up to. we have seen dates come and go, theresa may say brexit means brexit and then it didn't quite so much. everyone has got used to it. we journalists thrive on it, we love late—night drama to a certain extent. if it ends before three o'clock we are contented. five o'clock we are contented. five o'clock in the morning we get testy because we have seen this before. we are heading to another summit like the one last night, but nobody knows. everyone in brussels says this is what european leaders think. it is in the hands of britain as it a lwa ys it is in the hands of britain as it
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always has. they need to make up their minds what they want and when they want it. you are from a danish organisation, what do you make of what the british are doing? i think you could hear it when the danish prime minister came to the doorstep last night when he was leaving the summit. he came whistling towards journalists whistling, we will meet again, don't know where, don't know when. because, actually, that is the flavour of what they think. i asked him, do you believe, can you say when we meet a danish panellist in october there will not be another demand for another extension for brexit. he said he cannot guarantee that. we have left this to the uk to come up with a solution. but if you look at what has been happening in
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britain, british history, you have been the country which has been the masters of dividing and ruling in europe. right now you have succeeded in uniting the eu 27 when we europeans look at britain, you have a divided country, a divided parliament, problems ruling. it has become the opposite world. even though this is a serious, it is also a bit to the bemusement of european leaders. barbara, tell us about how theresa may herself, what people are thinking of her now. there is a lot of respect for her trying, the hard work she is putting in. is she necessarily now seen as a liability when she comes to the european parliament? if she is a liability, she is britain's liability. europeans have got used to her, they have been
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dealing with herfor got used to her, they have been dealing with her for three years now after she came into office. last night, her performance, diplomats said, wasa night, her performance, diplomats said, was a bit more concise than the one at the summit before when everybody else was said she has been so nebulous, what is really going on, what does she want from us? how can we get another step towards brexit? she has worked on her performance a bit in front of european leaders. of course, they know if they say, we respect her, they do because they respect all their colleagues at least until the doors are closed. because they also think this is self inflicted pain. she has made so many mistakes throughout this process that other eu leaders have pointed out that she has put down those red lines in the sand on brexit without being sure of her majority in parliament. which experienced leader would do that?
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everybody knows this. of course, there is an amount of pity. she is steadfast. but they are thinking, why is she doing this? why hasn't she found a way out earlier? they don't see her as a victim. she is an actor in this. our time is up, thank you. enjoy what remains of the rest of the brexit business. thank you. one thing we have been talking about is how all that is affecting business. ben's at a wallpaper factory in blackburn this morning. good morning. good morning. this is the next stop on our brexit road show. looking at how that delay effects business. we are in a wallpaper factory making 16 million roles every year. they buy parts from overseas, they sell overseas.
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clearly, those events have an impact here. andrew, good morning, you have been stockpiling, getting ready for different dates, end of march, middle of april, end of october, what does it mean? it is uncertainty which is not helpful. we could do with knowing where we are going. an extension is better than no deal but we could do with getting a withdrawal agreement through so business can plan. it is the idea of planning. thank you. let us see what workers make of all of this. we will pass by the one metric tonnes of glitter. good morning. let me interact. we are in blackburn which voted overwhelmingly to leave. you both voted to leave. another delay now until the end of october.
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it isa until the end of october. it is a travesty. we were promised to leave, it has not happened, another date comes up. we were moving so far into the future it will get forgotten about. how frustrating is it for you? you wa nt to how frustrating is it for you? you want to leave but it is pushed back again. people in blackburn did vote to leave but they can't really decide what is going on. rather than listening to the people of blackburn. they should listen to what the people want. you didn't vote at all, you didn't agree with the question. asa agree with the question. as a company, we invest very heavily in our business in ourfuture. politicians can't decide what they wa nt politicians can't decide what they want or what we want. even with the extension, we are going into a situation where we will have no
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decisions made by the end of it. it isa decisions made by the end of it. it is a case of wait and see what happens and i don't think there will be one, personally. thank you. i will let you get on. blackburn overwhelmingly voted to leave. a lot of frustration. but bosses say give as a deal so we can leave. we will talk more about that after 8am. time now for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm geeta pendse. hammersmith bridge remains closed this morning after safety checks revealed "critical faults" and "cracks". the bridge was closed yesterday evening, with the local council blaming government cuts for not addressing urgent repairs. at the moment, we understand it will remain closed indefinitely. the council have apologised for the inconvenience but say they have to put safety first.
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the uncertainty of brexit is continuing to have a major affect on the capital's housing market. prices are expected to fall across london and the south east over the coming year. the royal institution of chartered surveyors also says that housing stock levels on estate agents' books were close to a record low. a new, 21st—century—style youth centre, which has reduced youth crime by up to 70% outside london, is to open in barking and dagenham today. the youth zone will provide young people with sports and activities, as well as offering counselling and advice about education and training. it's funded by local businesses and newham council, and more centres are planned in other london boroughs. the young people we see now — 15, 16 — they were young five, ten years ago, when we had a few services. and now those services are cut, unfortunately, what we are seeing on the streets is a result of that. young people need somewhere to go, they need somewhere to do, and, most importantly, they definitely need someone to talk to.
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let's take a look at the travel situation now.
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