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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 13, 2019 7:00am-8:00am BST

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good morning welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here in paris. reversing crippling pain — there's much more in the full—length doctors use a new type of medicine called gene silencing. version, which you can see experts hope more on iplayer, and you can find us diseases can be treated. all across social media, dozens of mps say if sweden wantsjulian assange over on youtube, instagram, allegations of sexual assault — facebook and twitter, at @bbcclick. hand him over as they call thanks for watching, for the wikileaks and we'll see you soon. founder to facejustice. in sport, tiger woods survives the tricky weather and a tackle from a security guard to be in contention after two rounds of the masters in augusta. will the force be strong with this one? excitement builds as the title and trailer for the latest star wars movie is released. our very own mike bushell causes a ding—dong as he gets to grip with the team sport that involves pulling tonnes of heavy metal.
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good morning, most places will be dry again this weekend, sunshine at times but the wind will be a bit stronger so it will still feel cold. join me laterfor all the details. it's saturday, 13th april. our top story: a new type of medicine called gene silencing has been used to reverse a disease that leaves people in crippling pain. it works by fine—tuning the genetic instructions locked in our dna. experts say it could be used for other conditions including parkinson's disease and alzheimer's. here's our health and science correspondent james gallagher. sue has endured pain few can imagine. she used to take strong painkillers every day thanks to a disease called porphyria, and would need hospital treatment when she had a severe attack. even morphine didn't stop the pain then.
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i have a child, i have done child labour, it just feels like it is never going to end. it is in your legs, in your back, and itjust resonates everywhere. it is really unbearable. but her life has been transformed by a monthly injection of a new type of medicine called gene silencing. here is how it works. inside our cells are genes, and they send out messages containing the instructions for running our body. but in porphyria, an error leads to a buildup of toxic proteins. gene silencing intercept the messenger, disabling it and restoring the correct balance of proteins. the study showed gene silencing reduces attacks by 7a%, and half of patients were completely free from the attacks needing hospital treatment. doctors who took part in the clinical trials said the impact was amazing. these are very difficult patients to treat and they have had a very difficult time, and i'm genuinely surprised about how well it works on this condition and i think it offers hope for the future.
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sue is now enjoying life without pain, but the implications of the study go much further than sue and porphyria. experts say gene silencing is an exciting new area of medicine that has potential to work with conditions that are currently untreatable. just after 9:00 we'll be speaking to a woman with porphyria who took part in the trial. more than 70 mps have signed a letter urging the government to make surejulian assange face authorities in sweden, should they request his extradition. the wikilea ks co—founder, who denies allegations of rape and sexual assault was arrested on thursday after spending years seeking political asylum in ecuador‘s london embassy. our political correspondent, susana mendonca, joins us now from our london newsroom. take us through this step—by—step. it is not directly related to the request from america, but is to do
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with the potential charges he faces but denies from sweden. yes, so america wants him for accusations of hacking, which is a different issue. sweden were trying to get hold of julian assange to deal with accusations against him of rape and molestation. he denies this and says it was an attempt to get him out of the embassy. he didn't leave the embassy, and as a result those charges were dropped because authorities were not able to get a hold of him. authorities are now looking at whether or not they are going to press charges against him. but these mps are saying that if the swedish authorities do decide to press charges, the british government should extradite him to
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sweden to face those accusations rather than sending him to the us. there are a number of mps, mainly labourmps, there are a number of mps, mainly labour mps, but also some from other parties, saying to the home secretary that he should stand with victims of sexual violence. it is important to note thatjulian assange denies the accusations. the general who led a coup in sudan to overthrow long—time leader omar al—bashir has stepped down afterjust21i hours in charge of the country. general awad ibin auf made the announcement after tens of thousands of protesters demanded a civilian—led transition. our correspondent catherine byaruhanga joins us now from nairobi. thank you for speaking to us this morning. what should we know?‘ thank you for speaking to us this morning. what should we know? a key thing to know is that you have thousands of people on the streets of khartoum, the capital city of sudan, and other cities across the country. they are demonstrating peacefully, calling for the military
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leadership that has led the country for much of its independence, much of its life since independence, over the last 60 plus years, they are asking the military to step aside and allow a civilian government to run the country. a lot of people talking about this being an uprising, almost a second arab uprising. what is your view on that? yes, this is what the people in sudan are saying. they are saying that they want to get rid of long—term dictators, military men, who don't run the country properly, don't run the economy properly, and don't run the economy properly, and don't give many of the young people in the country opportunities. but what they also learn from the arab spring is that what happened in egypt, for example, is even though the long—term leader, hosni mubarak, stepped aside, people close to him then took over the country. what
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they want to make sure of is that they want to make sure of is that the army does not maintain control of sudan. the world health organization says the spread of ebola in the democratic republic of congo is not yet a global health emergency, despite being the second biggest outbreak in history. the group says efforts to contain the epidemic have been hindered by a shortfall of funding and a lack of access to rural communities. the virus has already claimed the lives of more than 700 people in the country. thames water has told investors they'll be able to demand their money back if the industry is renationalised by a future labour government. the company made the claim in a statement to the irish stock market. a labour party spokesman said renationalising the water industry would end rip—off prices and excessive dividends for private companies. president trump says he intends to move illegal immigrants into democrat—controlled towns and cities, including new york and chicago. he says it's in retaliation for the party's opposition to his immigration policies.
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0ur washington correspondent, chris buckler, explains the political implications of the president's statement. i call them the illegals. they came across the border illegally, we will bring them to sanctuary city areas and let that particular area take care of it, whether it is a state or whatever it might be. california is always saying it wants more people, and they want more people in their sanctuary cities? we can give them what they want. we can give them an unlimited supply. north korea's leader, kimjong—un, says he's only interested in meeting president trump again if the us comes up with a better deal. he's given the united states until the end of the year to reconsider its offer, saying washington needed to change its attitude or risk an increase in tensions. a second summit between the two leaders collapsed in february. police in algeria say they've made more than 100 arrests after clashing with protesters in the capital, algiers. yesterday, hundreds of thousands people marched demanding the departure of the country's ruling elite, including the new interim president
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abdelkader bensalah. a trial which freed up more than half a million hours for nhs patients is being extended for three years. it involved redirecting patients to healthcare professionals other than gps and reducing paperwork. nhs england said the scheme should be in place in three—quarters of gp practices by 2022. what we have done is for example trained reception staff to get the patient to the right person, because it might not need to be a doctor, it could be a nurse, or a paramedic or a pharmacist. we have trained our admin staff to be able to do paperwork in different so doctors are freed from admin and are free and are free to see patients instead. the name of the next star wars film has been announced.
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episode ix, which is going to be released later this year, will be called the rise of skywalker. it'll feature previously unseen footage of carrie fisher as princess leia, three years after the star's death. earlier we spoke to journalist and star wars super earlier we spoke to journalist and starwars superfan, earlier we spoke to journalist and star wars super fan, jenna anderson, who was at the premiere of the trailer. i am just who was at the premiere of the trailer. i amjust blown who was at the premiere of the trailer. i am just blown away by this teaser. i was able to be in the room of the panel when they showed the trailerfor room of the panel when they showed the trailer for the first time today, and the electricity in the room was absolutely the next level. all of the little teasers and things they had in store, no—one really knew what to expect. experiencing all those surprises at once was amazing. the sport and weather will be coming up for you a little later on. irritable bowel syndrome affects around one in five of us over our lifetimes, but treating the symptoms, which include stomach cramps,
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bloating and constipation, can be difficult. specialists say there are a wide range of remedies available including cognitive behavioural therapy. alison reid, chief executive of the ibs network charity, joins us now. good morning. first of all, just explain a little bit about what we know at the moment about how this therapy can help with the condition. we have known for some time that cbt can help some people with ibs. everyone is different, what works for some people doesn't work for the other. it is exciting about this research is it enables people to be able to access it in their own home and via telephone, and it means maybe can be brought out for more people. cognitive behavioural therapy encompasses a lot of things, just tell us a bit about that. i'm not an expert in cbt, you can ask me
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about ibs. but often ibs can make people feel isolated and alone, and cbt can help people feel differently and deal with it differently. more than traditional help? guidelines recommend cbt file ibs. than traditional help? guidelines recommend cbt file ibsi than traditional help? guidelines recommend cbt file ibs. i don't know what it all comes under, cbt. recommend cbt file ibs. i don't know what it all comes under, cbtw recommend cbt file ibs. i don't know what it all comes under, cbt. it is about talking therapies. we are looking more at that, for instance we are working with sheffield eap, which is easier access for psychological therapies, and that helps people get therapy long—term. because people have flareups. they can feel well one week and terrible the next. tell us more about the condition. you mentioned earlier,
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stomach cramps, constipation, diarrhoea, people know about those. it can be a range of things— headache, backache, dizziness depression, a whole range of things. i think that has been the difficulty, it is so complex that it is about what people eat, how they are eating, the environment in which they eat, the stress. if somebody is ina they eat, the stress. if somebody is in a stressful situation and they eat, they cut can become sensitised. so if they eat something that might bea so if they eat something that might be a bit difficult, for instance onions is a big thing people find difficult eating when they have ibs. they might be able to tolerate a little bit of onion but if they are ina little bit of onion but if they are in a stressful situation and they have something with onions in, they cut doesn't like it because it is sensitised to it, and then they will have a problem. so, with cbt treatment as well, there is also y°93 treatment as well, there is also yoga being offered, lifestyle
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choices — i am assuming not necessarily food base because people with ibs are aware, as you said, of what might irritate them. yes, but if you were told you can't drink your coffee in the morning. you wouldn't want to see my face! exactly, it is very easy to say, stop coffee, stop alcohol, no fizzy drinks, make sure you get enough sleep, don't be stressed. we all know those are things we should do, exercise generally on a regular basis, but doing it can be very different. those of the first lines of advice that a gp will give you. if you have a diagnosis of ibs those of the things they will say. after doing that can be difficult. also, with psychological aspects of it, people take some time to actually accept that they can influence and affect their own health and well—being, so that is why the ibs network are here to give long—term support. good to see you this
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morning, alison. he says it's cold, i say it isn't but he is agreeing with charlie. he says it's cold, i say it isn't but he is agreeing with charliem is cold, it is cold. temperatures are well below what they should be this time of year and this is the reason why. high pressure over scandinavia. it's what we call a blocking area. nothing can move into it logic for the time being. we are drawing down colder air. it is mild to the west of ireland and the mediterranean. we aren't getting any of it just yet mediterranean. we aren't getting any of itjust yet but may be later. this weekend is still going to be cold. dry for many parts of the country. they will be sunshine at times but we will have a stronger wind and thatjill. we have frosty nights and frosty mornings. —— chill. the sun is coming up that most chill. the sun is coming up that m ost pla ces chill. the sun is coming up that most places starting dry and sunny.
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wintry showers across east anglia with some hail and sleet mixed in. it will be a windy day particularly in the south—west of england, west wales, northern ireland and western parts of scotland so it will make you feel colder. in the sunshine, not too bad but in the shade, you will feel it. 7— nine but highest in the north—west of scotland. more cloud coming into northern ireland overnight and into western parts of wales. into the south—west of england which will produce some rain. here, mild up it away from here, it won't be mild at all. — make milder. a widespread frost with temperatures down to “i! in the morning. —— milder. 0ut temperatures down to “i! in the morning. —— milder. out in the west, we have more cloud. a few spots of
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rain in the far south—west but otherwise a dry day. a frosty start but more cloud today which will make it feel cold. as we head into next week, things will change a bit. at the moment our areas coming from the baltic which is why it's so cold. as we head through next week, the air will come from germany, the czech republic which is a warmer direction and we will find that temperatures will be as well. subtle changes and the position of high pressure will change where the air is coming from. the upshot is it will be warming up as we head into easter. this is unusual that we have this weather pattern heading into easter but as you can see from oui’ towns pattern heading into easter but as you can see from our towns and cities forecast there, temperatures could get as high as 19 or 20 and we will all be in our shorts. could get as high as 19 or 20 and we will all be in our shortslj could get as high as 19 or 20 and we will all be in our shorts. i don't know. i think there should be
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another digit after the two. shorts don't come out until about 2k, i think. see you later, darren, thank you. some sport coming up a little later on. today marks the centenary of the amritsar massacre — when hundreds of civilians were killed by a british general in northern india. despite it being one of india's greatest tragedies, there has never been a formal british apology. now, museums from both countries have united to re—examine the brutal events of 1919 as monika plaha reports. today, we are closed into a pen. thousands of people and shot out. he isa thousands of people and shot out. he is a great uncles were just teenagers at the time of the attack. they were out enjoying the seek new
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year. little did they know the horror that was about to hit them. —— sikh. horror that was about to hit them. -- sikh. they managed to get to one of the exits. the youngest was trampled by people running and fell under dead bodies and remained there until the following day. the british indian authorities had earlier declared martial law and band public meat is due to a rise in demonstrations. general reginald dyer with his troops were said to disperse the troops. they blocked the exits and between them, over 1000 shots were fired. allan general dyer staunchly defended what he had done. —— colonel dyer. he was investigated and said he was trying to create a moral effect, that he was trying to strike terror in the people of punjab. since the massacre habit 100 years ago, this is the first time a british museum has joined forces with one in india to
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shine a light on the brutal attack and it's all part of a driving force to educate and create awareness on what's known as one of the greatest scandals of the british raj. theirs isa scandals of the british raj. theirs is a park located in amritsar, holy city in the of punjab. a cultural centre of the sikh religion and home to the golden temple. the british government has been under renewed pressure to apologise for its role in the amritsar massacre. we deeply regret what happened and the suffering caused. but theresa may came under criticism when she stopped short of an apology. allan and apology is a step in the right direction and will make some people feel a sense of catharsis but i think more importantly what needs to be done is the education system needs to be slightly revamped and it needs to be slightly revamped and it needs to be taught in british schools. i wish people had apologised to my aunt has —— a ncestors apologised to my aunt has —— ancestors 100 years ago. i think it is futile now. it led to partition
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in 1947. is futile now. it led to partition in 19117. thousands of miles away and a century on, there was a demand for greater awareness on the massacre and for the events of that day to never be forgotten. that report on the centenary of the amritsar atrocity. a decade ago, they were teetering on the brink of extinction, but since then, sales of lp‘s have been growing sharply with more than four million sold in the uk last year. today, hundreds of independent stores will come together to celebrate the vinyl revival as part of the annual world record store day. here are some top tips for collectors. hello, my name is ailsa and i work ata hello, my name is ailsa and i work at a local independent record store in manchester and these are my top five tips for buying secondhand
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vinyl. check the sleeve, doesn't have tea stains on the back of it? is it ripped the corner? take sure there is a good sleeve if you are looking to keep it as a collector ‘s item. check the vinyl, doesn't have scratches on it? is itjust surface marks? make sure you are looking before you are buying. don't be put off bya before you are buying. don't be put off by a bad condition. it is mildew on mould, you can save it by washing it and the sleeve can always be glued. take a risk, you can listen to stuff in stores but if you are at a car boot sale, be willing to take a car boot sale, be willing to take a risk on something that maybe you like the cover on. have a good time, record digging is a really fun thing to do so enjoy yourself. we're joined now by patrick ryder, manager at manchester's piccadilly records. big picture stuff, why has vinyl come back into the frame? there are a few reasons. the digital media
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thing had happened and people were downloading stuff. some people wa nted downloading stuff. some people wanted to have a physical connection to the music they had and wanted to have something they could hold, you know, there is a ritual thing with vinyl, you take it out of the sleeve, you have the artwork, there isa sleeve, you have the artwork, there is a connection. people went for that. other people became overwhelmed by the digital thing. you have a library of four days worth of music on your itunes that you have never, you haven't heard half of it. it's easier to have something you can see that you know where you were when you bought it. you know the shop you are in, you know the friend who told you about it and how you came to find that record fall in love with it. i think that was an important. the sound is different. is it? yes, there is a big debate over whether it's better or not. what's different about it? oddly, or not. what's different about it? 0ddly, the frequency range is shorter than it is with digital but it means there is a richer sound so
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more of the sounds in the middle so it's kind of warmer and it is with digital stuff. if you want to be a fan of the band, you are going to wa nt to fan of the band, you are going to want to buy their record rather than just stream it. it gave people that tribal thing, you know, ithink just stream it. it gave people that tribal thing, you know, i think they were some of the reasons, really. so you run a record shop. do you think your customers are also in the digital music market? it's not one of the other now, do you think people are mixing it up? sometimes they buy an album, sometimes they just download something?” they buy an album, sometimes they just download something? i think eve ryo ne just download something? i think everyone does both. it would be impossible to buy everything you wa nt impossible to buy everything you want and have everything you want on vinyl. physically owning it. storing it isa vinyl. physically owning it. storing it is a problem. i need less records in my house probably than i have at the moment. how many at your house? about 2500, 3000. there is one room
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that most of them are in and then there is a piles of records and other places in the house. do you organise them really well? not as well as i should. in a jumbled u pstate well as i should. in a jumbled upstate at the moment. well as i should. in a jumbled upstate at the momentlj well as i should. in a jumbled upstate at the moment. i think there is that nostalgia. i love walking into a record shop and just mooching about and someone just offering a bit of advice if they see you picking something up and you just don't, i don't think you can get that online. you know you get suggestions but it's never quite the same. a big challenge for us is trying to replicate. we have people in the shop that have worked there for 30 years, a long time. they have amazing knowledge and the younger staff have amazing knowledge. there are people with interests in all different kinds of music and who are great at telling people about music ina way great at telling people about music in a way that you are not trying to say, oh, you shouldn't buy that, you should buy this. it's more like if you like that, you will like this. it's more just having a chat about
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music, really. trying to convey that online is something that we try and do as well as we can but still nothing beats the experience. you brought a few records in for us here. a few discs. is old—fashioned word there. are they significant? some of them are a bit more expensive collect as‘ things. —— collectors‘ things. ajapanese record and two italian records was not i will hold this one up. what is so special about this? a miniaturised keyboard. it is a very good japanese electronic album. it‘s very fun. it‘s not that easy to come
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across. how much is that one? it varies but in the condition it‘s in, between 100 and £150. we will hand it back over to you. it is easy to damage them, isn‘t it? it back over to you. it is easy to damage them, isn't it?|j it back over to you. it is easy to damage them, isn't it? ithink it back over to you. it is easy to damage them, isn't it? i think you have to live with the fact that everything is transient. take care of them. you take care of it and if something bad happens, you get over it. i mean, iwouldn‘t want something bad happens, you get over it. i mean, i wouldn‘t want anything to happen to my records. anyone who is watching this who has been near me when i put records on will have fanned the fear that they might hit them and my reaction. do you have gloves ? them and my reaction. do you have gloves? no, i don't have as many records that are that expensive. lovely to see you this morning, patrick. thank you. coming up in the
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next half—hour, go up and bring your hands down. so you have got to, no, let go, let go. laughs. mark has been trying his hand at bell ringing. headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. good morning, here‘s a summary of today‘s main stories from bbc news. doctors have used a new type of treatment called gene silencing to reverse a disease that leaves people in crippling pain. the disorder called acute intermittent porphyria
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can also cause paralysis and death in some cases. the treatment works by fine—tuning the genetic instructions locked in our dna. experts say it could be used for a wide range of diseases like alzheimer‘s and parkinson‘s. more than 70 mps have signed a letter urging the government to ensure julian assange faces authorities in sweden, should they request his extradition. the wikilea ks co—founder, who denies allegations of rape and sexual assault was arrested on thursday after spending years seeking political asylum in ecuador‘s london embassy. the prime minister said mr assange‘s arrest demonstrated that nobody was above the law. the general who led a coup in sudan to overthrow long—time leader 0mar al—bashir has stepped down afterjust 2a hours in charge of the country. general awad ibn auf made the announcement after tens of thousands of protesters demanded a civilian—led transition. police say at least 16 people have been killed and 20 injured by stray bullets as unrest continues
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across the country. president trump says he intends to move illegal immigrants into democrat—controlled towns and cities, including new york and chicago. he says it‘s in retaliation for the party‘s opposition to his immigration policies. the democrats have called his rationale "warped". i call them the illegals. they came across the border illegally, we will bring them to sanctuary city areas and let that particular area take care of it, whether it is a state or whatever it might be. california is always saying it wants more people, and they want more people in their sanctuary cities? we can give them what they want. we can give them an unlimited supply. thames water has told investors they‘ll be able to demand their money back if the industry is renationalised by a future labour government. the company made the claim in a statement to the irish stockmarket. a labour party spokesman said renationalising the water industry would end rip—off prices and excessive dividends
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for private companies. a trial which freed up more than half a million hours for nhs patients is being extended for three years. it involved redirecting patients to healthcare professionals other than gps and reducing paperwork. nhs england said the scheme should be in place in three—quarters of gp practices by 2022. what we have done is for example trained reception staff to get the patient to the right person, because it might not need to be a doctor, it could be a nurse, or a paramedic or a pharmacist. we have trained our admin staff to be able to do paperwork in different so doctors are freed from admin and are free to see patients instead.
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there are some people who may have had a late night, and may not even be awake, because they were enthralled with the golf. yes, half the people had a respectable bedtime, and the others stayed up late, even later than usual because they have had terrible weather in augusta and had to come up weather in augusta and had to come upfor weather in augusta and had to come up for some time. tiger woods is part of a masters leaderboard that‘s stacked with superstars. the 1a time major winner is just a shot behind the leaders at augusta, there are five of them and they‘ve all won majors too. tiger‘s in contention on six under par, despite almost being injured by a security guard. andy swiss reports. it was a day that began soggily and was later interrupted by a thunderstorm, but although the weather wasn‘t great, the golf certainly was. most notably tiger woods, as 22 years on from his first masters title, he set about rolling back the years in spectacularfashion.
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after his struggles with fitness, this probably wasn‘t what he needed, a security guard clattering into his ankle. but it hardly seemed to affect him. he stirred the augusta crowd with some stunning golf, just one shot off the lead he will be hoping to complete what would be the most extraordinary of stories. others found life far harder. rory mcilroy hitting it into a golf buggy at one point. seven off the pace, his chances seem very distant. ian poulter‘s aren‘t, another fine display from the englishman leaving him just two shots back. the european challenge is being led by francesco molinari, one of five players at the top of a tightly packed leaderboard. this masters is still very much wide open. at the halfway point, it is intriguingly poised. a big question for many will be — can tiger woods turn his promising position into what would be one
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of golf‘s most remarkable victories? i‘m confused about what that security guard was running. well, as soon as someone hits a shot of the fairways, the crowds are able to go back to where they were before. they run to look at the shot he has taken, and they have to try not to tread on tiger woods, but the problem is that the security guards, in an effort to try to stop that happening, tried on tiger woods. do you think they need some kind of leafleti ng you think they need some kind of leafleting thing that says, please do not tread on tiger woods. they need t—shirts with messages on
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either side, saying please do not tread on... tiger woods. and remember, you can watch live and uninterrupted coverage of the third round of the masters on bbc2 from 7.30 this evening. britain‘s anthony crolla has been knocked out by ukrainian vasyl lomachenko, who retains his wbo and and wba lightweight titles. lomachenko is a double olympic gold medallist lomachenko and one of the best pound for pound fighters in the world. he dominated the fight in los angeles. a right hook in the fourth round ended crolla‘s hopes of becoming a two—time world champion. qualifying is underway for the chinese grand prix, which will be the one thousandth race since the sport started in1950. alexander albon is missing though after crashing his toro rosso towards the end of final practice earlier this morning. he‘s fine, but his car couldn‘t be fixed in time for qualifying. championship leader valtteri bottas clocked the quickest time in the first session ahead of ferrari‘s sharl leclair.
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newcastle united are now ten points clear of the premier league relegation zone after a much needed win over leicester city. the only goal of the game coming from the spanish striker ayoze perez in the first half. that win pushes newcastle up to 13th in the table. we are really pleased with one goal, three points, 13 points in the table, but what you just have to do is enjoy today, look at the next one and try to get three points in the next game. the former liverpool defender tommy smith has died at the age of 7a. smith played 638 games for liverpool over an 18 year career at anfield. the most famous of his goals came in the 1977 european cup final when liverpool beat borussia moenchengladbach. smith also captained the side when they won the uefa cup and league in 1973. leicester tigers have boosted their hopes of staving off relegation in rugby union‘s premiership with a thrilling 27—22 win at newcastle.
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defeat leaves the falcons bottom of the premiership with three games remaining. jonny may‘s early try helped put the tigers 13—0 up but quickfire scores from chris harris and tane takulua cut falcons‘ half—time deficit to just one point. the winning try though coming from the tigers‘ guy thompson. that win lifting them up to ninth, eight points above newcastle. in the pro 1a, ulster secured a play—off spot and dealt edinburgh‘s end—of—season aspirations a huge blow with a bonus—point win at murrayfield. robert balacoon amongst the try scorers there in a 29 points to seven win. 0spreys ran in seven tries as they beat southern kings by 43 points to seven in port elizabeth. dan evans‘ hat—trick keeping the welsh side‘s title play—off bid alive by climbing above cardiff blues in the conference a table. billy vunipola could face disciplinary action after the england international showed his support for controversial social media posts by australia‘s israel folau, who‘s been sacked for saying that ‘hell awaits‘ gay people. vunipola, who‘s also a christian,
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refused to ‘unlike‘ the message and the rfu say they disagree with the number 8‘s views and will meet with him. vunipola‘s club saracens claim they‘ll deal with the matter internally. st helens have gone back to the top of superleague after a 38—12 victory over warrington. the wolves had begun the evening ahead of saints on points difference. but six tries from 6 different scorers did the damage for the home side. mark percival and winger regan grace amongst the scorers. in the night‘s other match, wakefield continued their good form as they beat wigan warriors 30—20. ellie downie missed out on another european all round gymnastics title in poland. she had to settle for silver. downie led going into the floor routine, but was eventually pipped by france‘s melanie dejesus dos santos, who snatched gold. angelina melnikova of russia was third i‘m absolutely ecstatic. coming in yesterday i didn‘t think i would get
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that, and it was so close to first, but honestly it doesn‘t mean much. i was so close, i‘m over the moon. now she was described as an australian icon and the greatest of all time as she crossed the line to win a 33rd straight race. winx is retiring after the record run was completed with her victory in the queen elizabeth stakes at randwick racecourse this morning in sydney. is unbeaten since april 2015 — won the race for the third time the eight year old mare ridden by jockey hugh bowman is unbeaten since april 2015 — won the race for the third time running. an unbelievable achievement from winx, the greatest australian
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racehorse. how do you feel about the debate about what is and isn‘t a sport? i would never offer an opinion on that. what do you think about bell ringing? mike bushell is about bell ringing? mike bushell is a man who knows the difference, what isa a man who knows the difference, what is a sport and what isn‘t? bell ringing may be seen by some as a gentle pastime that‘s the sound of tradition, the peel of church bells echoing far and wide. you may think, that is a lovely sound, but not appreciate the technique and the hours of physical training that goes into creating the sound, but also the fact that many of those bellringers will be competing in championships. this is
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the tower where some bells weigh three quarters of a ton. they can weigh up to five times that, so now think about the ring is in the room below. it is like having a car above you on the end of a rope. i wonder the ring is often claimed they are the ring is often claimed they are the originalform of the ring is often claimed they are the original form of heavy metal. the ring is often claimed they are the original form of heavy metalm isa the original form of heavy metalm is a hidden gem. centuries of tradition. moving a couple of tons of metal to your command to precision of under a second, that is impressive. it is meditative and precise. it is also the ultimate team game. people think it is all about pulling and strength, it is not. it is about feeling what the bell is doing and ringing rhythmically. it could be dangerous
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to leave me loose on the coloured pa rt to leave me loose on the coloured part of the rope, called the sally. look what i‘m doing, you don‘t want to hold onto it. what would you go up to hold onto it. what would you go up there if you held on? you would go off the floor and you would have a big drop. it takes at least 12 hours of training before you can start going solo. this is how far you should be from the rope. keep your hands low at the bottom, let it go up, your hands low at the bottom, let it go up, bring your hands down. so you have got to... let go! several times, jane had to rescue me. it is not just about learning how to control your own bell, you then have to get in sync with the team. here at wokingham they use the latest computer technology to help. at wokingham they use the latest computer technology to helpm at wokingham they use the latest computer technology to help. it is like a computer technology to help. it is likea bug, computer technology to help. it is like a bug, and you need friends to get into it, it is a really good tea m get into it, it is a really good team sport. there are now nearly 40,000 bellringers across the uk,
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some aiming to make the national 12 bell contest. last year, birmingham beat cambridge to the title, and by seeing it as a sport, you‘ve more young people get involved. seeing it as a sport, you‘ve more young people get involvedlj seeing it as a sport, you‘ve more young people get involved. i thought it would be very hard but it is quite easy. it is really enjoyable, more technical than you think. you have to think about where you are going. you can start to learn when you are eight, nine, ten, and you can go on until you well are into your 905, provided you can climb the 5tair5. your 905, provided you can climb the stairs. you do need hours and hours of learning before you can do this on your own, of learning before you can do this on yourown, and of learning before you can do this on your own, and now i am part of a bell ringing ensemble, making this dutiful sound that is ringing out across wokingham. it looks like fun. i have always been a bit scared of ringing bells.
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you know, that cartoon image of going flying up. you know how some people want to know what defines a four —— a sport? in sue‘s house, definition is if you have to change your shoes, a sport. what if you are already wearing trainers? you just had to, didn‘t you? here‘s darren with a look at this morning‘s weather. it could be an awful lot worse and i will show you one part of the world. this is over the other side of the atla ntic this is over the other side of the atlantic in the usa in minnesota. we had a blizzard and snowstorm all the way from denver to the midwest over the last couple of days and it has bring several —— brought several feet of snow at the time you expected to be warming up. the main
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weather system ‘5 pushing away from minneapolis has also been effecting augusta for the gulf. we heard early on about the showers and one or two thunderstorms. that‘s the cloud that moved through but it is linked back to this cloud and this cloud is arguably more significant. there is the cold air coming down to the north and warm air coming up to augusta today. temperatures are going to be 30 degrees or so. this rain is developing and it is developing into heavy rain, potentially severe thunderstorms and that will push its way into augusta are probably on sunday afternoon, just at the time it is getting really, really exciting, they could be thunderstorms. here in the uk, not expecting thunderstorms but cold and quite weather. sunshine at times, dry for many places but the winds will be stronger and it will probably feel colder and many frosty nights as well. it has been cold and frosty this morning. warming up a little bit in the sunshine. patches of cloud and one or two showers coming in across east anglia which will extend their way to the south of england. it could be heavy and there could be a touch of winter
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about them as well. away from here, ourdry about them as well. away from here, our dry day. the south—west of england, wet weight —— west wales, stronger winds along here as well. that will add to the chill. fine in the sunshine but in the shade, these other temperatures. —— these are the temperatures. 0vernight, cloud comes into western parts of wales, northern ireland, the cloud could keep the temperatures up coupled with the stronger winds. elsewhere, the winds eased down and the skies clear. temperatures, like last night, could be down to —4 in places. a sunny start for the most pa rt places. a sunny start for the most part but eastern scotland, generally, cloud increasing on sunday. not as much sunshine as today. more cloud and in the south—west of england, the cloud will build up elsewhere. still, the chilly wind keeps going and going
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and the temperatures are struggling up and the temperatures are struggling up to nine or 10 celsius. cold this weekend, called for the start of the weekend, called for the start of the week but it will get warmer as the week but it will get warmer as the week goes onjust week but it will get warmer as the week goes on just in time for easter. thank you very much, see you later on. we‘ll be back with the headlines at 8:00, but first it‘s time for newswatch with shaun lay. hello, welcome to newswatch with me, shaun ley. 0n the programme today, are the majority of guests on discussion programmes like question time opposed to brexit? a charge leveled by one of its panelists last week. and the perils of presenting life when you think you‘ve muted your mobile. how have i done that? now after wednesday night‘s decision to delay, once again, the uk‘s departure date from the european union, the brexit debate is likely to dominate tv news for a few months yet. question time is one of the bbc‘s main forums for political debate. it‘s promote one of its own for changing the venue for last week‘s programme with only
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a couple days‘ notice. warren spencer bradley was not happy. well, the bbc said the decision to switch locations was so that mps who might have been required for last—minute votes —— well, the bbc said the decision to switch locations was so that mps who might have been required for last—minute votes in parliament on thursday could still make it in time to the question time recording. 0thers interpreted the decision to move from leave—voting bolton to a fee—paying school in remain—voting london as symptomatic, notjust of a metrocentric attitude, but also a bias on the programme — a view articulated by one of last week‘s panelists, the newspaper columnist charles moore. he turned the tables on question time presenter fiona bruce. can i ask you a question, fiona? because here i am, and i‘m delighted and honoured to be here. but there‘s a panel of five and i‘m the only leave supporter. and if you look at the...
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you're the only person who voted leave. the government is supporting leave... i think i‘m the only leave supporter as well, as a matter of fact, but we can argue about that. but i‘m certainly the only person who voted leave. and again and again on this programme, the balance totally fails to reflect the wider country... can iju5t make the point, charles? this is a question to me, to let me answer it. obviously the government supports the leave position. and last week, we had three people who took the leave position and two who took the remain position... i didn't vote! i can't agree with you, but feel free to answer the question... charles moore‘s analysis chimed with the number of viewers. one, john taylor, recorded this for us. week after week, brexit is the main subject on question time. and yet, week after week, there‘s only ever one person who actually wants brexit who‘s on the panel. will there ever be the situation where there‘s only one person who doesn‘t want brexit on the panel, and all the rest do? what‘s the bbc‘s view of that claim?
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"in response to the point made by charles moore," it said in a statement... but question time isn‘t the only programme that‘s faced criticism for what‘s seen as a preponderance of remain voices among its guests. the same point has been made to us about programmes including newsnight and the andrew marr show, and by lynnejones about monday‘s edition of politics live. and nicola smith also thought she detected a wider imbalance. let‘s discuss this now with the bbc‘s chief political adviser ric bailey. ric, thanks very much for coming in to newswatch on what‘s turning out to be a very busy time politically. has question time raised this question of brexit balance with you? —— let‘s discuss this now with the bbc‘s chief political adviser ric bailey. ric, thanks very much for coming in to newswatch on what‘s
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turning out to be a very busy time politically. has question time raised this question of brexit balance with you? the obligation for all bbc programmes, and particularly for political programmes — including question time — is to be impartial — actually, to have due impartiality. and people forget that word due. it means that programmes have got to think about the context in which they are making judgements about impartiality. so if you think of the context of the referendum, june 2016, voters had a very clear choice between remain and leave. it was a very binary moment in british politics, as all referendums are. but particularly so with that one.
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the situation has changed a lot since then. our obligation as journalists after that vote was to hold politicians to account for that decision, to hold the government to account. and don‘t forget, we‘ve had a general election since then as well, in 2017, when people remind us a lot that both the big parties stood on a platform of exiting the european union. so to define people individually on programmes like question time as either remainers or leavers, it‘s not something to ignore. we‘ve got to take it into account. but it‘s not the be—all and the end—all any more, because people who might have been on the remain side in 2016 have stood on a platform saying, "actually, now we‘re going to leave." what you seem to be saying is that there‘s no actually objective measure of due impartiality, that the bbc decides from situation to situation. if that is the case, how do you demonstrate to the audience that you are being impartial if you don‘t have any criteria, objective criteria, against which that can be judged? i don‘t think that it‘s not objective. i think where you‘ve got to be careful is thinking that you can do this by maths and slide rules and stopwatches. .. you do do it during elections. you measure the number of people, the number of contributions from political parties.
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at the moment, you‘re measuring the number of women versus number of men contributors. so you are using those tallies in some circumstances. are you tallying up people who supported brexit and people who opposed brexit? i am not saying the maths is irrelevant. what i‘m saying is it‘s not the be—all and the end—all. so we need to be conscious of how much people are on and what their views are, but we don‘t go back to some arbitrary definition of what remain and leave was which doesn‘t necessarily fit exactly where we are now. if you don‘t have those figures, how can you refute the figures that, for example, charles moore used? he quoted the institute of economic affairs. 18 months, it monitored, from june 2016 to december 2017 — so, after the general election — question time and its radio equivalent any questions, and it suggested 69% of the panelists had been declared remain supporters during the referendum and 32% had voted leave. and even if you included in the leave column the people who had shifted their positions — they had been remain during the referendum but now support leave — it was still split 60—40.
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you‘re still trying to put in those terms of using slide rules and stopwatches, and measures which are not a definition of impartiality. impartiality, in the end, is about good editorialjudgement... that‘s the bbc‘s judgement, not the audience‘s, is what you‘re saying. of course, and that‘s what journalism is. journalism is being asked to make those judgements. and, if you like, one of the tests of that is, what does the audience think of that? and still, the bbc is trusted by more people than any other organisation to be telling the truth and to be giving an impartial account of what‘s been happening in brexit, which after all is an incredibly complicated political situation. what advice, then, have you given to question time into similar programmes about how they construct panels at this very sensitive time politically, when we are still aiming to achieve
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brexit and it hasn‘t been delivered? that question of dual impartiality... obviously, programmes have a whole timescale in which to think about that. it might be over a whole year or over a series of programmes that we make sure that views are represented appropriately. there will be moments where that impartiality needs to be judged on a shorter timescale — as now, in an election period — and it needs to bejudged more carefully run parties as much as brexit, leave and remain. so you‘re talking about different ways of approaching this. that‘s why i am not very keen on the word "balance", because balance implies only two sides, and actually, this is much more complicated than that and there are many different issues you‘ve got to talk about. just before we finish, as we record this interview, we know that there are expected to be european parliament elections. what sort of challenge does that pose for bbc news? it‘s a big challenge for everybody. we don‘t actually know the elections are actually going to take place. we‘re starting an election period without even knowing if people will actually vote. it‘s a pretty unique set of circumstances, and i go back to my word due.
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due impartiality means we‘ve got to think very carefully about this particular context and make sure that we‘re thinking carefully about what impartiality means when we got this european election in some parts of the uk, we‘ve got local elections at the same time. that‘s a really complicated position against that background of brexit. so a lot of thinking to go on over the coming days and weeks. ric bailey, chief political adviser, thanks very much. on thursday, jack shepherd was sent to prison for six years for manslaughter of charlotte brown in a speed boat crash in 2015. he had an extra six months added to his sentence for fleeing the country. he‘d returned to the uk the night before on a flight from georgia, and it was on the plane that reporter sarah rainsford caught up with him. he‘s never spoken publicly before, so i asked what he had to say to the family of charlotte brown — killed in a crash on his speedboat. i‘m terribly sorry for my involvement in charlotte‘s death, and furthermore, my subsequent actions which i see have only served to make things worse, and i‘d like to make amends for that.
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why did you run? fear. juliet shone wondering... peter winteringham asked... finally, newswatch is recorded and so can edit out some —— finally, newswatch is recorded and so can edit out some of the hazards of live television — like me stumbling over my words and tripping over the furniture. on live shows, guests are asked to switch off their mobile phones. it doesn‘t always happen, though. general sir mike jackson was being interviewed by stephanie flanders on the andrew marr show a few years ago. the success... phone rings. ..is costing all of
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these lives and yet... it‘s a bit more embarrassing, though, when it‘s the presenter‘s phone going off — as happened shortly after an interview on breakfast on tuesday morning. good to talk to you. thank you very much. phone rings. that's so embarrassing. how have i done that? it‘s still going! how have i done that? i really do... i genuinely don't know what i did. i apologise profusely. let‘s show you a pretty picture of glasgow. you really are embarrassed, aren‘t you ? louise minchin declared the following morning that she‘d handed her phone over to the breakfast authorities. her co—presenter, dan walker, confirmed that on twitter. there but for the grace of god! thanks for all our comments this week. if you want to share your comments on bbc news or current affairs — or, indeed, appear on the programme — then do e—mail... or you can find us on twitter,
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where we use @newswatchbbc. you can call us on... and do have a look at our website... that‘s all from us. we‘re off on our easter break next weekend. but samira will be back here in a fortnight‘s time. goodbye.
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