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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 14, 2019 3:00pm-3:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm julian worricker. the headlines at 3pm: the cabinet office minister, david lidington, says the government and labour will both have to compromise as they look to break the deadlock over brexit. a leaked recording ofjeremy corbyn reveals that the labour party lost, mislaid or ignored evidence of anti—semitism in the party the labour mp who made the recording says the handling of anti—semitic complaints should be taken away from the party altogether. there is no alternative but to have that independent investigation of complaints, otherwise there will not be an opportunity to start rebuilding the trust that we have lost. teachers say there's increasing evidence that poverty is damaging the education of children in the uk.
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two children have been killed in texas after a tornado caused a tree to hit their family car. and a look at this week on the victoria derbyshire programme, including interviews with members of the climate change protest group extinction rebellion. that's in half an hour here on bbc news. good afternoon. welcome to bbc news. theresa may's deputy says both the conservatives and labour will have to compromise, if their continuing talks over brexit are to end in an agreement. cabinet office minister david lidington insists a deal can get through parliament before elections for the european parliament on may 23rd. it comes as former conservative leader iain duncan smith has warned
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tory activists have little appetite to campaign for those elections. he said holding them would be a disaster for the country. here's our political correspondent, jessica parker. westminster has seen rising tensions in recent times. now, mps have departed parliament for an easter break, urged to reflect on the current deadlock. but cross—party talks between the government and labour are set to continue this week. a man who is very much involved in those discussions, the prime minister's de facto deputy. he says an agreement hinges on both sides giving ground. while we will do our best to try and reach a compromise with the main opposition party, it would mean compromise on both sides. if that doesn't work, then what we will want to move towards is to put before parliament a set of options with a system for making a choice and parliament actually having to come to a preferred option, rather than voting against everything.
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talks have been described as constructive but can a deal really be done when it comes to issues such as how to craft a future customs policy? there are fears in labour, too, that any compromise agreement will only survive as long as theresa may's premiership. people are putting their best endeavours to work. but if come a change in the leadership of the conservative party, that may all count for nothing and that's the worry. my colleagues are trying their very best to find a way through this so they can have those assurances that any progress that is made is embedded and entrenched in that way. theresa may, give us all a final say! a complication, too, for labour on what stance to take on another referendum — some mps clear that such condition must be attached to any agreement. it's clear that there is a mood in the party to accept the deal that emerges, as long as it's put to referendum. that is, in a sense, the compromise.
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theresa may hopes a deal can be done in time to avoid participating in the upcoming european parliamentary elections but if it can't, a warning that the tory grassroots are feeling far from enthusiastic. we simply cannot fight the euro elections. i gather dozens of conservative association members have now written a letter to the prime minister saying they are not going to fight the euro election. it would be a disaster for us and the country. what will you say on the doorstep? "vote for me and i'll be gone in three months?" mps may be on their easter break and brexit may have been further delayed, but the deadlock at many levels remains. a recording of the labour leader jeremy corbyn has been released, in which he suggests the party may have lost, mislaid or ignored evidence of anti—semitism. his comments were secretly taped by dame margaret hodge in february. in the following excerpt, mr corbyn talks about a plan to recruit the former cabinet
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minister lord falconer to review the party's complaints process. he will look at the speed of dealing with cases, the administration of them, the manipulation of the evidence, —— the correlation of the evidence. before it's put before appropriate panels and things. because i was concerned that evidence had either been mislaid, ignored or not used and i think we need a better system on it. 0k. margaret hodge said she made the recording because of what she called "a complete breakdown of trust" between people like herself and mr corbyn, and called for the party to adopt an independent complaints system. i think we have got to such a point now that there is no alternative but to have that independent investigation of complaints, otherwise there will not be an opportunity to start rebuilding the trust that we have lost in the system and in the leadership‘s handling of it. we are nowjoined by the chair ofjewish voice
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for labour, jenny manson. good afternoon and welcome. the coat chair. dame margaret hodge talks breakdown in trust, how do you resolve that? i don't think there is a breakdown of trust betweenjewish members of the party like there is a breakdown of trust between jewish members of the party like those of us members of the party like those of us injewish voice for labour and art leadership. i think the leaking of this conversation is uncomfortable behaviour and i don't understand it. dame margaret says it was an insurance policy because she wasn't convinced what she said would have been portrayed. then she should have been portrayed. then she should have told mr corbyn she wanted to record it. what he seems to be talking about is the discovery when jennie formby took over as general secretary that complaints had not been well handled and a comment by
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the party this morning was that there are too manyjewish activists accused of anti—semitism and not many people were committing it, and there has been a split, which is sad to observe, between members of the jewish community but the main point for me and many of my colleagues is that this is not a labour party problem, anti—semitism, it isn't all political parties. there is a lot of evidence that if any thing anti—semitic views in the party has actually reduced. if it has possibly we re actually reduced. if it has possibly were cases of it been mislaid or ignored, as we heard in that excerpt from jeremy corbyn, is does that not point to something not being taken as seriously as it should? as far as i know the information has been handled carefully since jennie formby came in. in the two years
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since mr mcnicol was general secretary, neither was that shami chakrabarti secretary, neither was that shami chakra barti process put secretary, neither was that shami chakrabarti process put into place to make it fairer, we have a support coordinator and correspondence has been lost but this is whatjennie formby was brought in to resolve. but dame margaret is among seven labour mps to write to the sunday times saying it is still not good enough, we need an independent look at this, that suggests despite the arrival ofjennie formby there is still a problem. when jennie formby published figures she was uncomfortable to do so because it was a confidential matter, other departments and organisations have not wanted to give figures but when the figures were given to the parliamentary labour party it showed very few actual cases of anti—semitism and how much the team had done to deal with previous
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inefficiencies. this was immediately disputed by some members and it seems to me and some colleagues that the parliamentary labour party are not willing to listen to evidence they don't want to hear. what about they don't want to hear. what about the jewish labour movement who they don't want to hear. what about thejewish labour movement who have voted to pass a motion of no confidence in the leadership? that isa confidence in the leadership? that is a small number, more people in that go to the north islington to the truancy party. different groups ta ke the truancy party. different groups take different views on this but the vote of no—confidence injeremy corbyn was a small vote by the jewish labour movement and i'm sorry that i felt that and i think the continuing attack on one individual is inappropriate. we are also being attacked. the suggestion of a fully independent body backed by those seven labour mps, david lammy also spoke about it this morning saying there had been a favour —— like a
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failure of leadership and back that call, what do you have to fear from it? nothing. i would call, what do you have to fear from it? nothing. iwould be perfectly happy except it would waste the money and time and thought put into the labour party process. we have lawyers working for us now, we have experienced people, the process is being improved and it seems when the conservative party hasn't even got a process at all, to say we need another process, we have nothing to fear. thank you. a woman, arrested when a nine—year—old boy died in a holiday park dog attack, has been released while inquiries continue. police were called to the scene in looe in cornwalljust before 5am yesterday morning. the 28—year—old woman was arrested three hours later on suspicion of manslaughter and having a dog dangerously out of control. police have named the boy as frankie mccritchie from plymouth. teachers say there's increasing evidence that poverty is damaging the education of children in the uk. the national education union says
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more pupils are struggling because they come to school hungry or without a good night's sleep. sarah walton reports. overcrowding in homes so children do not have space to do homework. children attending school with no coats, no socks and without other essential items of clothing. "most of my class arrive at a school hungry and thirsty. " some of the quotes from an online survey of more than 8,000 teachers. 91% of them said poverty was a limiting factor in children's capacity to learn. ahead of its annual conference in liverpool this week, the national education union says its members are seeing more families struggling financially. and one school in watford says it's often left to them to help. we've had situations whereby parents have had maybe an oven stop working or a fridge stop working and they literally can't replace it. thankfully, we have quite a good network and find out things like that and then we're able
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to access from various charities, support for them, but it shouldn't be like that. the neu also says that the situation is being made worse by the education funding crisis which means schools and colleges can do less to counter the impact of poverty. the government says tackling disadvantage will always be a priority and it's investing in free school meals for more than a million of the most disadvantaged children. sarah walton, bbc news. joining me now is louisa mcgeehan, director of policy at child poverty action group. good afternoon. when you see what teachers are saying, do they marry with the evidence you see? absolutely, although the findings we re absolutely, although the findings were shocking they are not that surprising. we know we have a child poverty crisis so what they are seeing in schools isjust
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poverty crisis so what they are seeing in schools is just one end of that. some of it is anecdotal but you can point to something more concrete. we now around a third of children are growing up in poverty, 4.1 million children and we know that impacts on many aspects of their lives so they are more likely to do less well in school, more likely to suffer from ill health which stays with them throughout life and more likely to have a shorter life expectancy. this is what the minister, nadim zaha week, says, that the government are investing £9 million into children's after clu bs investing £9 million into children's after clubs which provide free meals and snacks, you would say we need more, what more and how we afford it? there is so much more government can do commit free school meals is great, that should be for all children so when someone is in hospital receiving that public
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service, nobody goes around and find out what they earn before they get lunch, so we should have a free meal for all children in school, extended from infants to primary and aren't secondary, and we published last week a book called living hand to mouth which looked at the experiences of children in london and the southeast and children site although they get a school meal it is often not enough to meet their needs so they are still left hungry from the way these schemes operate. is it right that the eligibility for those meals is going down? that is better news. it is and isn't, while child poverty is going up, eligibility for free child poverty is going up, eligibility forfree meals child poverty is going up, eligibility for free meals is child poverty is going up, eligibility forfree meals is going down, what is good news is that more people are in work but they are not
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well—paid enough to escape poverty, work is insecure, they may get minimum wage but they don't get enough ours so they can still be in poverty but as soon as you are over that threshold your child will not get a free meal, so many kids who are in poverty are not getting that free school meal. clearly you make this case to government, what is the response been? i think it is understood, there is always more that can be done. 0ne understood, there is always more that can be done. one of the things we say to them, we are in the fourth year of the freeze on benefits for children and families which is having a massive impact. we said to them in spring, please end it now but it is going on for another year, so but it is going on for another year, so our but it is going on for another year, so our message but it is going on for another year, so oui’ message is but it is going on for another year, so our message is when we are looking at where we go from here, restore the losses families have suffered, help them into good work
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and it's time to think about the sort of country we want our children to grow up with, so that means a major investment in children and their well—being. major investment in children and their well-being. thank you for coming in. the headlines on bbc news: the cabinet office minister, david lidington, says the government and labour will both have to compromise as they look to break the deadlock over brexit. a leaked recording of jeremy corbyn reveals that the labour party lost, mislaid or ignored evidence of anti—semitism in the party. teachers say there's increasing evidence that poverty is damaging the education of children in the uk. and in sport...the final round at the masters is underway 0pen champion francesco molinari leads byi shot after three holes at augusta national. tiger woods is one off the lead. manchester city can return to the top of the premier league
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if they beat crystal palace at selurst park. they lead i—nil, raheem sterling with the goal, they're into the second half. and lewis hamilton won the 1000th formula one race. he finished ahead of his mercedes temate valterri bottas to win his sixth chinese grand prix in shanghai. it's such a busy day of sport — the scottish cup, the women's cup semi finals, and european gymnastics. follow it all on the bbc sport website but i'll have a full update in an hour. the organisers of street protests in sudan have held meetings with senior military figures to demand civilian rule in the country. president bashir, who led sudan for almost 30 years, was ousted by the military three days ago. generals have promised a transition to democratic government within two years, but protesters have rejected the offer. they are demanding the immediate establishment of a civilian government and the restructuring of the feared intelligence service. joining us now is dr willow berridge, lecturer in sudanese history at newcastle university, and author of the book civil
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uprisings in modern sudan. hello. i mentioned the different demands of interested groups at this stage, how do you see this playing out in the next few days? it's a delicate situation, the military is negotiating with civilian leaders, it is pushing for a degree of representation in the upcoming transitional government for civilians and particularly civilian protesters on the streets, they want this to be many civilian so this is being negotiated. 0ne this to be many civilian so this is being negotiated. one thing the military are demanding is control of the interior ministry, they wanted transitional military council to have control of the interior and defence ministries, this is a complex issue because 0mar al
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bashir‘s regine created this deep security infrastructure, national intelligence and security services, a host of parallel security organs and whether the military take it upon themselves to uproot that and give it to civilians will be a critical issue. the important thing is that the civilian opposition remains united, it has its programme, the declaration of freedom and change, of course it has had three orfour freedom and change, of course it has had three or four months since the uprising broke out to agree that but now that the military, the important thing is they don't play at various factions of the opposition against each other. the civilian opposition need to remain united because if they don't that could affect the protest movement on the streets.
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clearly people have taken part in these demonstrations and done this for a number of weeks and months, they will not look at what they have achieved already and presumably will be galvanised to state demonstrating until they get a further development in theirfavour? until they get a further development in their favour? i'm sorry, i can't hear you perfectly. i was talking about those demonstrating on the streets, they feel they have achieved a lot already so one would imagine they would carry on. sorry, i really cannot hear you. have you got me now? i can hear you but i'm worried you can't hear me. it's about the demonstrators, they feel they have achieved a lot so once you know you have achieved a lot, you carry on demonstrating, don't you?” think they will carry on, we have
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heard a lot about the army siding with the people but that is just a slogan, the army never comprehensively sided with the people, that slogan masks a more complex relationship between civil and military factors that have been negotiating so the pressure has to continue, the negotiations have to continue, the negotiations have to continue, you don't reverse 30 years of military security rule overnight. 0ne of military security rule overnight. one of the major issues in this uprising is that before the uprising happened, the regiment was spending about 70% of its budget on the security and military sector, whereas the uprising would say, the public sector, the education sector, all this will be completely neglected so there's this complex situation where civilian leaders
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have to negotiate a more civilian economy and a more civilian budget with a military regime that still has some ties, it has broken many times but it still has some ties with the old order and there is more that needs to be negotiated. we need to see various groups that have been marginalised by the old regime, especially the groups that were targeted in darfur, they need to be represented in this civilian government, there needs to be more representation of women than in the last regime, i964—i960s at —— 1975. there last regime, 1964—1960s at —— 1975. there needs to be more of a payoff between peace and justice, one of the more controversial elements could be the role of someone who has emerged as the deputy leader of the
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transitional military council, he commands the rapid support force which is seen as growing out of the challenger weighed militia so how his presence will be with that rebel groups will be a contentious issue but the most important thing is that the civilians remain united and don't allow a retrenchment of military rule. we appreciate your thoughts and thank you for bearing with our earpiece issues. i'm sorry about that. thank you for your time. three people have died after the vehicle they were travelling in was hit by a car going the wrong way down a slip road in peterborough. police have arrested a man on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving, and driving while under the influence. he remains in a critical condition in hospital. facebook users around the world are experiencing problems accessing their accounts after an apparent technical glitch. users are unable to log onto facebook, instagram or whatsapp. all three social networks
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are owned by facebook. thousands of users are reporting issues. there's been a sharp rise in the number of crimes involving dating apps and websites across england and wales. an investigation by bbc radio 5 live found that around half the reported offences were sex crimes. the 0nline dating association says its members do all they can to protect users from harm. here's the programme's presenter, adrian goldberg, on why the number of crimes have increased. we've analysed figures from 22 of the 43 police forces across england and wales who responded to a freedom of information request. they showed that, in 2015, there were 329 offences reported to those forces related to online websites or dating apps. now, that 329 by last year had risen to 528 offences. so an exact doubling across those
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22 police force areas. and overall, half of those reported or alleged crimes were sexual in nature. i should say as well... i hesitate to use the phrase "tip of the iceberg" but bear in mind, that is just half of the police forces who responded to our freedom of information request. large police force areas like the metropolitan police in london didn't respond. so i think it is reasonable to assume that the real figure of crimes associated with dating websites and apps would be much, much higher. severe weather in the southern united states has claimed the lives of two children in texas after a tree fell on the family car. tornadoes swept through the town of franklin, causing widespread damage. severe weather has also been affecting communities in neighbouring louisiana and mississippi. we've got about half of texas coming to help us. we've lost about half of the south side of franklin. it was totally destroyed.
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we need all the help we can get. we need somebody to get these people back cleaned up and get them back in their homes. the mayor of texas there on the aftermath of those tornadoes. time for a look at the weather closer to home with tomasz schafernaker. another chilly one today, we have all felt the cold this weekend, even with the sunshine it hasn't felt too great, temperatures on the north sea coast about 6 or 7 degrees, tomorrow will be a bit milder, we will notice that in southern areas and then throughout the week it will warm up. at the moment a lot of cloud across western parts of the uk, a weather front is heading our direction but this high pressure is stopping it and has been sending colder weather in ourdirection, and has been sending colder weather in our direction, sunnier skies, cold air circling this area of high
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pressure and it approaches our shores bringing chilly conditions we have had all weekend, so temperatures by the end of the afternoon just around 10 degrees, single figures elsewhere, clear skies so there will be a frost around whereas in the west we have more southerly winds and it will not be quite so chilly, belfast 6 degrees, seven in plymouth but in the central uk temperatures outside of town will be freezing or below. tomorrow most of the cloud will be in the west of the country, low pressure coming in here so maybe some rain for cornwall, western fringes of wales, a couple of showers in eastern scotland but the central suede of the uk will be fine. 14 degrees in london and throughout the week ahead we say goodbye to colder weather, you see
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those warm currents of air and that will be arising from the south and eventually the south—east. tuesday we have quite a bit of cloud across the country and some blue comp one or two spots of rain, the winds will have switch direction so 15 in london, double figures in central scotland, by wednesday it is all change, sunshine throughout much of the country, just a few clouds here and there, temperatures rising dramatically around wednesday and by wednesday there was temperatures will hit 18 degrees in london, mid teens in central scotland. goodbye. hello this is bbc news with julian worricker. the headlines: the cabinet office minister david lidington says the government and labour will both have to compromise as they look to break the deadlock over brexit. a leaked recording has emerged of the labour leaderjeremy corbyn,
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in which he privately expresses concern that officials have either lost, mislaid or ignored evidence of anti—semitism in the party. teachers across the uk say poverty is harming children's ability to learn, as research suggests some pupils are struggling because they go to school hungry or without enough sleep. figures seen by the bbc suggest there's been a big rise in the number of sexual assaults and stalking cases linked to dating websites and mobile phone apps. severe weather in the southern united states has claimed the lives of two children in texas after a tree fell on the family car. and now on bbc news, victoria derbyshire takes a look back at some of the highlights from her programme this week. hello, and welcome to our programme.
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over the next half an hour, we'll bring you some of the exclusive and original journalism we have broadcast over the last week. extinction rebellion is fighting climate change and has been making headlines over the last few months, very recently by stripping almost naked in the house of commons. and now they are threatening to blockade london. 0ur reporter cathrin nye went behind the scenes. late night in east london and this lot are illegally flyposting. the idea is to really draw attention... the signs are being plastered all over the uk this week by a new protest group called extinction rebellion. so far, they've shut down bridges, poured buckets of blood at downing street, blockaded the bbc, and stripped naked in parliament. controversially, they are fighting climate change by trying to get as many people arrested as possible.
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we've been filming behind—the—scenes with them.

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