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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  April 16, 2019 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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a hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm rebecca jones. today at 2. hello, you're watching afternoon live — hundreds of millions of euros i'm rebecca jones. are pledged to return the notre dame today at 4. cathedral in paris to its former glory — after fighfighters work hundreds of millions of euros though the night to save it are donated to help rebuild notre dame cathedral — from a devastating fire. after firefighters work though the night, to save it from a devastating fire. the extent of the damage is slowly revealed — a night of shock and despair as french president emmanuel macron vows to reconstruct in the french capital, the historic building. but relief now that the main structure of the building remains intact. officials say they're treating the blaze as an accident, not arson. a night of shock and despair in the french capital — translation: the whole fire is out. but relief now that the main structure of the building remains intact. officials say they're now we are investigating and experts treating the blaze as an accident — not arson. are analysing the structure is to
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establish what we do next to consolidate the building. translation: the whole fire is out. emergency teams managed to rescue valuable artwork now we are investigating and a set and religious items, of experts is analysing including what is said to be the crown of thorns worn byjesus all the structures to establish what we do next to before his crucifixion. consolidate the building. i'm lyse doucet live here in paris, emergency teams rescue priceless a rtefa cts and religious items — where there is a new sense of hope including what's said to be that the cathedral will be the crown of thorns, worn byjesus, reconstructed with offers of help before his crucifixion. pouring in from around the world. here, more than 120 climate change activists are arrested for blocking roads in central london amid protests aimed coming up on afternoon live at shutting down the capital all the sport, hugh ferris. and new research suggests hello. good afternoon. manchester united and they managed to return to cholesterol—lowering "statin" drugs don't work well enough, a famous venue but they might need a in around half of the patients miracle to reach the semifinals of who are prescribed them. the champions league. more later. thanks hugh, and ben rich has all the weather. ben, cloudy today but it's warming up. yes, the cloud isn't going to stick around, sunshine on the way and higher temperatures as well. i'll have all the details later on.
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hello. welcome to paris. in the shadow of hello, thanks for your company. the grand cathedral of notre dame. it still stands. after their shock, welcome to paris, and the banks of the river sign, in the shadow of the the sadness of last night, when notre dame was engulfed by a ball of magnificent cathedral of notre dame, oui’ flames, the crowds are pouring to magnificent cathedral of notre dame, our lady of paris. notre dame no the river bank today in a different longer burns. the fire is out. with mood. some people come to take it comes, today, a huge sense of photographs, some to pray, and relief. so much has been last, and others to look, and marvel, that whilst so much was lost, reports no yet, so much was saved. by the say so much was saved. today the bravery and courage of some 500 firefighters, who battled to interior minister went inside, to preserve what has been nearly nine view what was left, after this centuries of history. here in the massive inferno. still inside, the heart of paris. around the world, precious artefacts, works of art, the shock and sadness at this most and the structure, still solid. this famous monument of the world, could is what he had to say. translation:
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be lost. today pledgers are pouring notre dame is notjust a cathedral. in to try to rebuild this magnificent structure. our first sport comes from richard lister. it isa notre dame is notjust a cathedral. it is a common legacy, our strength, our history. it belongs to roofless, smoke scarred but still standing. everybody. without it, paris does there were times overnight when many feared this ancient cathedral not exist. france, without it, does would not survive the inferno. but those assessing the damage today are now confident the worst is over. translation: the whole fire is out. not exist. france, without it, does not exist. france, without it, does not exist. so notre dame will be rebuilt. now we are investigating and a set the massive fire no longer burns, of experts is analysing all the structures to establish what burns here and around the world what we do next to consolidate the building. isa what burns here and around the world is a determination to rebuild this cathedral of cathedrals. what is it was a cauldron of fire, flames emerging from this tragic moment, racing through the medieval roof, not just for paris, so dense with timber it was known emerging from this tragic moment, notjust for paris, but emerging from this tragic moment, not just for paris, but for the as the forest. world, is how much notre dame the scaffolding in place mattered. it is going to take for renovation work was also hundreds of million pounds to rebuild it, and the money is pouring at risk of collapse. in. pledges have come from around it stayed up but so the world. we have this response much more was lost. crowd: 0h, la la. from richard lister. when the central spire finally
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succumbed to the flames it seemed to rip the heart from the building. roofless, smoke scarred but still standing. the shock on the face of president macron spoke it was a cauldron of fire, flames for all those looking on. racing through the medieval roof, so dense with timber it was known as the forest. for fire crews it was the scaffolding in place a nightmare race against this for renovation work was also all—consuming inferno. at risk of collapse. it stayed up but so much more was lost. the height of the cathedral made it when the central spire finally almost impossible to get enough succumbed to the flames it seemed water where it was needed. to rip the heart from the building. the shock on the face of president macron spoke for all those looking on. some two thirds of the roof was eventually lost. for fire crews it was singing. a nightmare race against this all—consuming inferno. the height of the cathedral made it overnight, parisians kept a vigil, almost impossible to get enough water where it was needed. the streets around notre dame filled with the sounds of mourning. some two thirds of the roof was eventually lost. translation: there are hundreds of people who died to build singing. the cathedrals and in here is their memory too. it hurts to see that. it's sad that a monument overnight, parisians kept a vigil, like this burns. the streets around notre dame filled it's very sad. with the sounds of mourning. it's one of the great
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monuments of france. i studied history and it was translation: there are hundreds very important for me of people who died to build the cathedrals and in here to come and see her. is their memory too. it hurts to see that. maybe for one last time before it's sad that a monument she was no longer there. like this burns. it's very sad. notre dame has been at the heart it's one of the great of french national life monuments of france. for almost six centuries. i studied history and it was very important for me it's where joan of arc to come and see her. was declared a saint and napoleon became an emperor. maybe for one last time before she was no longer there. today, though, it's scorched and rubble strewn, most notre dame has been at the heart of french national life of its treasures were taken to safety, there are years for almost six centuries. of restoration ahead. bells ring. it's where joan of arc was declared a saint at noon, bells rang across europe and napoleon became an emperor. in solidarity with paris. in strasbourg, home of the european parliament, today, though, it's scorched and rubble strewn, most there were also pledges of support. of its treasures were taken to safety, there are years but at stake here is something more of restoration ahead. than just material help. bells ring. the burning of the notre dame cathedral has again made us aware at noon, bells rang across europe
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in solidarity with paris. that we are bound by something more in strasbourg, home important and more of the european parliament, there were also pledges of support. profound than treaties. the french billionaire francois—henri pinault has the french billionaire francois—henri pinault has pledged 100 million euros pledged 100 million euros for the restoration effort, for the restoration effort, oil firm total has done the same. oil firm total has done the same. planning the reconstruction planning the reconstruction began this morning. began this morning. the prime minister edouard philippe the prime minister edouard philippe and his cabinet know and his cabinet know that france be watching. that france be watching. surveys of the building are already under way. surveys of the building it was initially suggested the fire are already under way. it was initially suggested the fire may have been caused by building work at the cathedral. may have been caused by building work at the cathedral. questions remain about that, questions remain about that, though and about why a better plan though and about why a better plan for dealing with a fire on this for dealing with a fire on this scale was not in place. scale was not in place. richard lister, bbc news. richard lister, bbc news. people are coming here today from people keep streaming towards the all walks of life, we will hear from some of them in a moment. first our river's edge, the people of france, paris correspondent looks at what tourists, some come to take
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this fire means to the people of photographs, some to pray, and others just to look. our paris paris. this morning the parisians came to see for themselves. correspondent looked at what this the inferno was felt as a trauma, means to the people of the city. and they needed reassurance that the worst had not come to pass. this morning parisi and is keen to the firemen are heroes. we applaud them. see for themselves. notre dame is the cathedral, for observant and i stayed until the end. non—observant of the inferno was it was important for me felt as a trauma, and the needed reassurance that the worst had not to come this morning come to pass. their firemen are because ijust wanted to see if it was real, you know. heroes. we applaud them. to feel the place, and, like, see the stones. they stayed until the end. it was i wanted to be here, important for me to come this to communicate with the place. morning because ijust wanted to see if it was real, you know. to feel as a christian, i want to be full of hope, we can rebuild this the place, and, like, see the fantastic cathedral. stones. i wanted to be here, to we have to rebuild after this tragic event. a cathedral is a place of worship, communicate with the place. and in the week running up asa communicate with the place. as a christian, i want to be full of to easter catholics have a special hope, we can rebuild this fantastic reason to mourn. cathedral. we have to rebuild after
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but, reason to hope as well. this tragic event. translation: this is a terrible fire that has destroyed this heritage building, a cathedral is a place of worship, and in the week running up to easter but the stones of the church are a living thing. catholics have a special reason to we are not burnt. mourn. but, reason to hope as well. this is despite the recent incidents against churches, we are not burnt. the church is alive. a terrible fire that has destroyed this week we will celebrate the this heritage building, but the passion and resurrection of christ. stones of the church are a living already minds are turning thing. we are not burnt. despite the to what needs to be done, fundraising, reconstruction, recent incidents against churches, the head of the notre dame we are not burnt. the church is foundation, which long before the fire was raising money alive. this week we will celebrate for renovation, told me contributions are already flooding the passion and resurrection of in this morning from around world. christ. already mines are turning to what needs to be done, fundraising, last night i said, ok, reconstruction, the head of the what should we do now? notre dame foundation, which long because the fire was extinguished before the fire was raising money in the middle of the night, and this morning i said, for renovation, told me what do we need to do, contributions are already flooding in this morning from around world. let's tackle it, yes. last night and said, ok, what should we do now because? because the fire it will be saved? yes, yes, it will be saved, was extinguished in the middle of i'm sure it will be saved.
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the night, and this morning i said, overnight the mood has changed what do we need to do, let's tackle from despair and terror to defiance and determination. notre dame will survive. it, yes. it will be saved? yes, yes, it will be saved, i'm sure it will be saved. overnight the mood has changed from despair and tara to defiance and 13 million visitors a year come to determination. notre dame will see this cathedral of cathedrals, survive. they are coming here today. juliana a place of worship, a place of is from chicago, she is a teaching wonder, a place of great worth. assistant, and gavin is from south africa, he has come to run a the cathedral was home to some historical treasures and emergency teams had to rescue many works marathon. you have lived here for many years, was notre dame part of of art and religious items. your life? paul adams reports i moved here this year, and france, on notre dame's treasures. paris especially is a huge part of as the smoke clears, and the shock my life. it's a dream to live here passes, what has been last, and what and notre dame is the centre of it all, it is paris. saved? despite the apocalyptic fears the bulk of notre dame's a why did you come here today? i was here last night, actually, 800—year—old stone structure seems intact. glimpses of the interior looking at it, with everybody. also give cause for hope. above the people were crying, singing, it was
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smouldering wreckage of the walls emotional. to watch it in flames, show little signs of damage. the pulpit, here on the right, but it was nice to have the community come together. unscathed. miraculously, most of the voting above the nave has not come gavin, you came to run, and find yourself doing something else? down. but there are gaping holes. we ran past it on sunday in perfect last night saw a race against time, condition, and to see it up in many of the cathedral‘s treasures we re many of the cathedral‘s treasures were salvaged as the fire took hold. flames was shocking. yes, i came back today just to they are in storage, and some will flames was shocking. yes, i came back todayjust to see that there be transferred to the louvre. they flames were out, to see what it include the holy crown of thorns looks like now. said to be won byjesus at the it isa looks like now. it is a cathedral, a place of crucifixion. a 13th century tunic worship, but it's much more than worn by king louis the ninth, the that, a part of history. what does it mean for you? the most only french kink to be canonised, and a 14th century madonna and amazing thing was the reaction of child. with regard to the treasures, the french people last night. to think that a building could have they will be put in a safe place, that amount of emotion attached to it is amazing. today or tomorrow, but as soon as and for you, the emotion of last possible. with regard to the night? paintings, the big ones, they cannot it's part of history, it's a symbol be retrieved, until friday morning. of parisien culture, the two at as far as be retrieved, until friday morning. as faras i'm be retrieved, until friday morning. as far as i'm concerned, they are tourist come to see it. not damaged. there is a little bit it's really important for all of us. of smoke, we will transfer them to a
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it's really important for all of us. it's nice that you will see it secure place in the louvre museum. everyday. it's on its knees, but but what of notre dame's of three will rise again. thank you very famed rose windows? this morning much. good luck in your running. fire crews were taking a closer look, last night there was talk of people are coming from everywhere, lead melting and glass exploding. and we are now looking at the the west window shows no signs of structure of notre dame, but inside damage, but these are immense and it is home to precious antiquities intricate structures, it will take and works of art. hundreds of time to assess them. the south window was given by louis firefighters battled to save them. as paul adams reports. the ninth around 1260, it contains scenes from the life of christ, as the smoke clears, and the shock passes, what has been lost, and what saved? wonderful 13th century artistry. despite the apocalyptic fears these were among the finest rose the bulk of notre dame's a 800—year—old stone structure seems intact. windows, the finest painted glass, glimpses of the interior also give cause for hope. to survive from high medieval above the smouldering wreckage of the walls show europe. little signs of damage. questions to about the vast 8000 the pulpit, here on the right, unscathed. miraculously, most of the vaulting pipe grand organ, recently restored, dating back to the medieval period. above the nave has not come down. but there are gaping holes. notre dame has been at the centre of last night saw a race against time, friend life for the better part of many of the cathedral‘s treasures were salvaged as the fire took hold. 1000 years, now it must close its
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doors, count the cost, and begin the they are in storage, and some will be transferred to the louvre. long process of restoration. paul they include the holy crown of thorns said to be won adams, bbc news. byjesus at the crucifixion. a 13th century tunic here, on a grey day in paris, there worn by king louis ix, the only french king to be are those shafts of light. all who canonised, and a 14th century madonna and child. come here today can see that while so much has been lost, in this with regard to the treasures, they will be put in a safe magnificent structure, so much has place, today or tomorrow, but as soon as possible. lost, namely nine centuries of with regard to the paintings, history, but so much has been saved. the big ones, they cannot be two gothic towers still stand retrieved, until friday morning. proudly here on the banks of the as far as i'm concerned, river sand, and a magnificent they are not damaged. cathedral, the cathedral of there is a little bit of smoke, cathedrals, which has had such a we will transfer them to a secure rich history, is itself now making place in the louvre museum. history. so many people here, the but what of notre dame's three famed rose windows? people of paris, the people of this morning fire crews france, and people from around the were taking a closer look, last night there was talk of lead world a re reflecting france, and people from around the melting and glass exploding. world are reflecting on the importance of monuments like this, the west window shows no signs one of the most famous structures in of damage, but these are immense and intricate structures, the world. people, of course, it
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matters so much to roman catholics, it will take time to assess them. to christians, and what is one of the most important weeks of the the south rose window was given by louis ix around 1260, christian calendar, it matters so it contains scenes from the life much to people of no faith and other of christ, wonderful faiths around the world. queen 13th century artistry. elizabeth of britain has written to these were among the finest rose emmanuel macron, talking about her windows, the finest painted glass, to survive from high medieval profound sadness, and the pope europe. decided not to tweet, but to send a questions to about the vast 8000 telegram, telling the archbishop of pipe grand organ, recently restored, paris that it is joy that someday dating back to the medieval period. this gift to all humanity would rise again. today, on the banks of the notre dame has been at the centre river sand, we see the help of the of french life for the better part of 1000 years, now it must people of paris rising. after the shark, the sadness of the last close its doors, count the cost, and begin the long night, the ball of fire rose, and process of restoration. paul adams, bbc news. people said unimaginably, that notre dame was burning. today, notre dame still stands. and there is hope that it will be rebuilt again. we will this was the story now, a cathedral have special coverage of the day so full of history, every hour that from paris, but for now, back to you passes more pledges come in to
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in london. we will talk to you rebuild it. the day began with generous pledges from french later. offers of help have been billionaires, we have heard from the flooding in from around the world. ceo of apple, who says he wants to president emmanuel macron wrote that contribute. a commemorative coin the cathedral will be rebuilt. an which had been issued in 2013 to assessment of structural damage are mark the cathedral‘s 850th year, said to be carried out over the next two days. will be re—reissued, and all of the doctor nick webb is a lecturer proceeds will go to notre dame's of in architecture at the university of liverpool who specialises the building. the publishers of the in using technology—based solutions for building restorations. work, the great french writer victor hejoins us now. thank you hugo, who once described notre dame he joins us now. thank you for your asa time. i'd like to start by asking hugo, who once described notre dame as a symphony in stone will see for your reaction to what you've profits going to the rebuilding. seenin this is notre dame, a place of for your reaction to what you've seen in paris. worship, art, heritage and now, a sign of hope that it will rise obviously, it's horrifying what happened. it's very saddening to see again. that's all from us in paris such a magnificent structure now for now. with us now is a lecturer partially destroyed. you say, specialise, as i say, in in early modern history at new technology—based solutions for couege in early modern history at new college of the humanities, she grew building restoration, tell us what up college of the humanities, she grew up in paris. i have to start by that involves, please?
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asking you what has been your reaction to the pictures you've so, we look at how you can use laser seen? scanning, which is a device that i was completely devastated. i think creates thousands and thousands of there isn't a single parisien who pints within a building, and you feels good today. i talked to my create something called a point cloud model, so it's essentially a family who are in paris, and friends very accurate three—dimensional around france, and we are all in model of a space, so a millimetre accurate. if we have one of these shock. notre dame is the heart of models, we can use that as the basis paris. some would say the heart of of restoration. in our case, for europe. and so many of my european friends are reaching out to me as example, in westminster abbey, to investigate the existing structures. well, they are devastated as well. i so tell us about what you are doing realise, you know, it's the most there. we area important place in the world, right? there. we are a small team of researchers interested in how medieval masons it isa important place in the world, right? it is a landmark. and it means so designed and constructed medieval much for any french person. vaulting, which, as you see at notre we are mourning. i can see how much dame, the majority has thankfully survived. so with laser scan data, it means to you. thank you for we can try and establish what the coming in to talk to us. it's been geometry was that masons were using described as a living museum, hasn't backin geometry was that masons were using back in the 14th century. then we it? talk us through what the can predict how they were designing building has seen over the years.
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and building those structures. what have been the highlights? you are using this in westminster abbey, how might it be used to help iaman what have been the highlights? i am an early modern historian, so with the restoration of notre dame? the important event that notre dame has seen over centuries, we have philip the fourth, so medieval ona very with the restoration of notre dame? on a very practical level, i know for certain that there is a laser history, 1302, he brought, for the scan conducted a few years ago by a colleague in america of notre dame, first time, and i get excited, in so on colleague in america of notre dame, soona colleague in america of notre dame, so on a practical level they have an notre dame, something a bit more in accurate interior model of how that space in notre dame was built, my period, probably more of before the fire. they can use that interest, mary stuart, mary queen of to predict and help with the scots, got married to francis the rebuilding process, to put each second of france on the 24th of stone back potentially, in exactly the same place. april, 1558, then we have elizabeth that raises a philosophical question, doesn't it? of can you put of calabar, the eldest daughter of history back? and indeed, should catherine medici, she got married to you? what do you think about that? a king of spain. and on the 22nd of it's difficult. if you look at the june 15 59 we have margaret of cathedrals themselves, they evolve over hundreds of years. take valois, henry iv of france, in 18 of gloucester cathedral, another site we are looking at, that has very august 15 72, all of this, a
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different components, norman elements, gothic elements, 19th—century interventions as well. grounding in notre dame, charles de i think we have to take the fact gaulle, you know, his funeral was at notre dame. it is part of our that these cathedrals are evolving, history, our heritage. and big but, yes, certainly, it is an issue, putting something new back in. there events happened there. are other sites, for example, a talk us through some of the church in germany bombed by the historical objects, the relics allies in the second world war, there were questions about whether inside the cathedral. we've been it should be rebuilt or not. hearing a lot about the crown of thorns, which i think might surprise it's a difficult one. i want to some people, because it's not often solve it, but i suppose the on display, is it? conclusion is whatever happens, it can never be the same, can it? for me, the most important thing, two things, when i was watching it definitely not. but i think the was please, please, the crown of positives we can take from this, are the evolutionary nature of a thorns, definitely. but also the two cathedral. this willjust be the towers. the two towers, you know, next chapter in notre dame's they are medieval, and i was like, history. doctor nick webb, we can see you at please, stay strong. the fact that the university of liverpool because they didn't collapse is a symbol of of what is behind you, but i remind the viewers, thank you for your hope. it's for france, and for notre thoughts and expertise. dame.
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thank you. let's update you with the it is 850 years old, how rare is it headlines. hundreds of millions of in france as an example of great gothic architecture? euros are pledged to return notre dame cathedral in paris to its we have older, you know, but i think former glory. after firefighters worked through the night to save it that you have to realise that notre from a devastating fire. more than dame is at the heart of paris. it's the heart of the city. it's on the 120 climate change activists are arrested for blocking roads in river, it is iconic. central london. amid protests aimed at shutting down the capital. asa river, it is iconic. as a historian, is that how you explain what seems to be many new research suggests cholesterol—lowering statin drugs people's emotional attachment to it? are taken by millions of britons may how do you explain the emotion this not work well enough in about half of those prescribed to them. and in has generated, as a historian? i think it's because of all the sport a huge night for manchester major events that happened there. united in the champions league as it's part of the history. victor they look to overturn a one nil deficit against barcelona, 20 years hugo saved the cathedral with his after their manager clinched the book, let's talk about that. treble with a late goal for united how did he save it? he wrote his in 1999. a formal warning from the book, because it was in very bad shape, and he thought that by writing a book about it would make rfu after liking a controversial the people aware of how important it
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social media post i go about gay was for france, and for paris. but people. and the preliminary world cup squad would be morally wrong asa according to one of the bowl is was for france, and for paris. but as a historian, it's also, you know, hoping to be selected. —— his buildings are our ancestors. our inclusion in the world cup squad a ncestors buildings are our ancestors. our ancestors were surrounded by the would be morally wrong according to same buildings. it's something we one of the other bowlers. more from share. it's like westminster abbey, you imagine all these people there paris soon, but in other news now. before you. maybe you don't, but i cholesterol—lowering "statin" drugs do. it's the same with notre dame. may not work well enough — in about one in two of those you imagine, while, this is the prescribed them — that's according to new research. investigators in the uk found that history of my country. of my people. for around half of the millions of people who take the medication it therefore, when it comes to the had too little effect on so—called bad cholesterol. restoration of it, is the aim to put experts say it may be some patients aren't taking a big enough dose. it back exactly as it was? can our health correspondent rob sissons reports. millions of people in the uk are on statins. it's medication shown to reduce history be restored in that way? the risk of heart disease and stroke should it be? it's difficult, by lowering bad cholesterol. because you are talking to a at the university of nottingham, historian, i work in the past. my they analysed the patient records of more than 165,000 patients heart would say let's try to have it in the uk who didn't have a history back as it was, because i'm very
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of cardiovascular disease. attached to how things were. but, you know, you have to think about the good news — in around half the patients, 49%, the future, and then, you know, what there was a significant benefit is history? it's the ability to move after taking statins. harmful cholesterol levels went forward , is history? it's the ability to move forward, to learn about the past, down by at least a0%. and to be aware and ready for the but the other half, 51%, saw little benefit from statins future. so maybe we need to think about what kind of history we want to their cholesteral levels within two years. to create now. the drama has the researchers say there could be many reasons why some patients don't happened, the tragedy has happened, do as well as others. what's next? we need to think about individuals might not be following the instructions that it as what's next? we need to think about itasa what's next? we need to think about it as a nation, think about it as gps are giving to them. people. the other reason could be that it's great to hear your thoughts, there's some genetic variation thank you for coming to talk to us. that we are certainly learning a lot about now. as you have been talking to us we've the british heart foundation suggests another reason. been watching live pictures of it insists statins are an important proven treatment, but that paris, clearly, the restoration some patients may not be on the optimum dose. work, the repair, the valuation of so we would like to make sure that the damage of notre dame is ongoing. patients are on the best dose possible and getting the maximum from their statins to reduce we will be, for days, weeks, and their risks further. months to come. thank you again, this study is a stepping stone, but much more research is needed. a front—line gp who is involved estelle.
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in the latest study says closer hundreds of millions of euros follow—ups of patients on statins are pledged to return the notre dame may improve results. cathedral in paris to its former our traditional approach is to start glory — after firefighters work statins in a very light monitoring, though the night to save it but clearly some patients need from a devastating fire. closer monitoring and that needs to be taken into account. more than 120 climate change activists are arrested for blocking roads in central london — for patients, this shows amid protests aimed that they need to carry at shutting down the capital on taking the statins. even if are getting less of a response than we'd like, new research suggests they are still benefiting from them cholesterol—lowering "statin" drugs and they will prevent heart attacks. don't work well enough, experts stress statins save lives, in around half of the patients but say if you have any concerns who are prescribed them. about your medication, you should talk and in sport a huge night about it with your gp. for manchester united in the champions league as they look rob sissons, bbc news, nottingham. to overturn a one nil deficit against barcelona, 20 years after their manager, the total number of people in work ole gunnar solskjaer, in the uk has reached clinched the treble with a late goal for united in 1999. a record high. the level of unemployment and the inclusion ofjofra archer has fallen by 27,000 in the preliminary world cup squad in the three months to february, would be morally wrong according to one of the other bowlers meaning 1.34 million people hoping for selection. are out of work. a formal warning for billy vunipola from the rfu after liking meanwhile average pay rose by 1.5 a controversial social media post per cent the highest figure
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since the summer of 2016. about gay people. police in london have arrested more i will have more on those stories after 4:30pm. than 120 people taking part official employment figures show 32.7 million people in the second day of climate protests. in the uk are in work, supporters the highest total since of the group, extinction rebellion, records began in 1971. the number of people remain at a number of locations, including parliament square without a job has fallen and oxford circus having camped overnight at several by 27,000 in the three london locations. months to february, to the met said 122 people had been 1.3 million. arrested by 12:30 midday on tuesday. most were detained on suspicion of public order offences, average pay rose by 1.5%, while five people were held the highest rate since on suspicion of criminal damage the summer of 2016. at shell's headquaters. when you're watching the tv, you'll often hear or see warnings about upcoming flashing images. police in london have arrested more than 120 people taking part it can help prevent those in the second day of with epilepsy from having a seizure. climate change protests. but there's no requirement supporters of the group, to do the same online. extinction rebellion, graham satchell reports. remain at a number of central london locations, including parliament square and oxford circus, having camped out overnight. sophie's seizures are triggered by flashing light. she has photosensitive epilepsy. most of those arrested were detained on suspicion when i'm scrolling through facebook of public order offences, and instagram, i don't while five people were held know what's coming next. on suspicion of criminal damage sometimes there are posts that
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i know will trigger my seizures, at shell's headquarters. and i have no control over when they appear. sophie has complained to both cholesterol—lowering "statin" drugs facebook and instragram may not work well enough — about the lack of warnings on posts. for about half of those using them, according to new research. their response has been, investigators found that for many, you can unfollow that page, the effect on so—called bad or you can unlike that page, cholesterol was too small. but it's a problem when it is a suggested ad for you, experts say some patients may not be or a suggested post. taking a big enough dose. i don't know how they come up our health correspondent rob with those sort of things. how am i meant to control sissons reports. what they show me? ...lizo mzimba was there. his report contains millions of people in flash photography. the uk are on statins. tv programmes regulated by ofcom have to issue warnings when flashing it's medication shown to reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke images are about to appear. by lowering bad cholesterol. ..contains some flash photography. at the university of nottingham, social media is not regulated they analysed the patient records in the same way and there is a growing worry about more of more than 165,000 patients in the uk who didn't have a history sinister posts which deliberately of cardiovascular disease. target people with epilepsy. the good news — in around what some people are doing half the patients, 49%, is creating content designed there was a significant benefit to attract people with epilepsy, and deliberately concealed after taking statins. in the content are images designed harmful cholesterol levels went to provoke a seizure. down by at least 40%. we think that sort of hateful but the other half, 51%,
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and cruel behaviour is actually saw little benefit from statins an assault, and that's why we're to their cholesteral levels calling upon the government to take within two years. strong action by making it the researchers say there could be absolutely explicit that this sort many reasons why some patients don't do as well as others. of behaviour will certainly be individuals might not be illegal in the future. following the instructions that in a statement, facebook, which also gps are giving to them. owns instagram, told us... the other reason could be that there's some genetic variation that we are certainly learning a lot about now. the british heart foundation suggests another reason. it insists statins are an important proven treatment, but that some patients may not be on the optimum dose. but, for sophie, that's not enough. so we would like to make sure that i don't think they're taking patients are on the best dose enough responsibility. possible and getting the maximum from their statins to reduce there is a syndrome called sudep, their risks further. which is sudden unexpected this study is a stepping stone, death in epilepsy, which, but much more research is needed. you can have a seizure a front—line gp who is involved and you can die from it, in the latest study says closer follow—ups of patients on statins so it's really important that people do control their seizures. may improve results. the government is proposing new legislation to regulate social media sites and told us our traditional approach is to start they will consult with statins in a very light monitoring, the epilepsy society. but clearly some patients need sophie, for one, is clear — closer monitoring and that needs more needs to be done to stop to be taken into account. people having seizures. for patients, this shows
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graham satchell, bbc news. that they need to carry on taking the statins. even if are getting less the largest ever survey of a response than we'd like, of the wildlife living in england's they are still benefiting from them forests has got underway. and they will prevent heart attacks. organisers of the big forest find experts stress statins save lives, are asking for volunteers but say if you have any concerns and visitors to gather information about your medication, about the natural beauty they see. you should talk about it with your gp. john maguire reports. rob sissons, bbc news, nottingham. so, you mightjust be out on a dog when you're watching the tv, walk or a bike ride and see you'll often hear or see warnings something interesting. about flashing images. on the ground, in the trees it can help prevent those and in the air, ourforests with epilepsy from having a seizure. and woodlands are teeming but there's no requirement to do the same online. with fauna and flora. graham satchell reports. we are here in an ancient woodland so we've got a particularly nice diverse range of species. sophie's seizures are triggered by flashing light. so we've got primroses, she has photosensitive epilepsy. early dog violet and a lovely wood anemone over there. when i'm scrolling through facebook and instagram, i don't know what's coming next. they are quite sensitive to management so it's really important that we know sometimes there are posts that that they are because if we are i know will trigger my seizures, and i have no control over doing any woodland management, when they appear. we can make sure that's protected. sophie has complained to both so if you go down to the woods these facebook and instragram about the lack of warnings on posts. days the forestry commission has come up with a plan to enlist their response has been, you can unfollow that page, as many of us as possible to act or you can unlike that page,
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as citizen scientists, but it's a problem when it is gathering information a suggested ad for you, about the health of our woods. or a suggested post. i don't know how they come up it's basically to encourage as many with those sort of things. people to get out and enjoy forests how am i meant to control what they show me? and be involved in surveying for us. ...lizo mzimba was there. and there is events going his report contains on in forests all over england flash photography. between now and the end of october. tv programmes regulated by ofcom have to issue warnings when flashing ok, so we're going to take images are about to appear. a photograph of this ..contains some flash photography. there's even a smartphone app called inaturalist so that people can social media is not regulated identify the wildlife, in the same way and there plants and insects they discover. is a growing worry about more research scientists play sinister posts which deliberately a valuable role in telling target people with epilepsy. us about our ecology, what some people are doing our environment and indeed what's is creating content designed to attract people with epilepsy, changing, but by doing and deliberately concealed something like this, in the content are images designed citizen science, the amount of evidence gathered to provoke a seizure. together is absolutely huge. we think that sort of hateful that provides a real snapshot and cruel behaviour is actually of the state of our countryside. an assault, and that's why we're the project continues until october calling upon the government to take and it's hoped will replicate strong action by making it the success of the rspb‘s absolutely explicit that this sort a big garden birdwatch. of behaviour will certainly be
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illegal in the future. but by understanding more about what's happening in a statement, facebook, which also in ourforests now, measuring owns instagram, told us... which species are under threat, decisions can be made on how best to protect them for the future. john maguire, bbc news, gloucestershire. time for a look at the weather. here's ben. but, for sophie, that's not enough. i don't think they're taking enough responsibility. hello, ben. good to see you. it's there is a syndrome called sudep, which is sudden unexpected good to see what is a striking image death in epilepsy, which, you can have a seizure behind you, but i don't know where and you can die from it, it is. this is on the border between so it's really important that people do control their seizures. northern ireland and the republic. the government is proposing new legislation to regulate social the reason i'm showing you this, is media sites and told us they will consult with because you might be surprised to the epilepsy society. see such a great picture when the sophie, for one, is clear — weather story is for things to get a more needs to be done to stop people having seizures. sunny and warm. it hasn't been that graham satchell, bbc news. way over the last 2a hours, particularly in the republic of now it's time for a look ireland. over the last 2a hours, at the weather with ben rich. look at what happened. this is a radar picture. all this heavy rain
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ploughing in, not just good afternoon. a lot of cloud out radar picture. all this heavy rain ploughing in, notjust one bout, particularly across the south of the there today. that's not sticking around for the rest of this week. republic, some places have had their wettest april day on record. i'll increasing amounts of sunshine, and show you some of the figures. 5a it's going to turn considerably warmer as well as we had towards the millimetres of rain at cork airport, easter weekend. as we head to this it doesn't sound like much, but evening and night, cloud and patchy remember that the amount that has rain continued to sit around some been lying all over the ground, if parts of the uk, the rain tends to it were to continue to accumulate. fizzle away. damp across western it's a lot if you step on it! scotland. clear spells, mist fizzle away. damp across western scotland. clearspells, mistand fizzle away. damp across western scotland. clear spells, mist and fog across southern parts of england and particularly in those lovely shoes. you'll notice that amount of rain, south wales, most places avoid a but what's really striking, if we frost. tomorrow, cloudy in places, compare with how dry it's been in the mist and fog break up and we see the uk, particularly in the east, lots of sunshine. a small chance of sheffield and edinburgh didn't have any rain at all for many days now. showers across east anglia. a keen easterly breeze, feeling cool for why the difference? welcome exactly. some of those north sea coast, you might be able to guess, it's inland highs of 18 or 19, may 20 down to the jet stream. that's what degrees. temperatures climb as we i was going to say! so many things head towards the weekend. may to 20 and where the come down to the jet possible in the south by saturday. stream. the jet stream and where the come down to the jet stream. thejet stream races and where the come down to the jet stream. the jet stream races across
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the atlantic bringing weather systems in our direction, and this piece here has dealt a glancing blow to the british isles. that's why they had so much rain in the republic, and the west of the uk. this samejet republic, and the west of the uk. this same jet stream pattern stays to the west of us, but is going to bring warmer air over the next few days. it is all down to the jet stream. i felt like i days. it is all down to the jet stream. ifelt like i was days. it is all down to the jet stream. i felt like i was at school then, when you get asked a question and you think you know the answer but you're not quite sure. that feeling of panic never leaves you. in an hourwe'll feeling of panic never leaves you. in an hour we'll talk about the same thing, so maybe you can put your hand up now. you'll test whether i was listening. over the next few days less of the wet and warm, but lots of cloud today. many of us stuck under a cloud today. not too optimistic if you were hoping for warmer, sunnier weather. don't worry, the cloud isn't going to stick around. the sun will emerge, increasing sunshine over the next
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few days, and, as already advertised, quite a bit warmer. this is the satellite and radar picture today. this stripe of cloud, outbreaks of rain, slung across the this is bbc news — british isles. that rain moves very our latest headlines. hundreds of millions of euros have been pledged to return the notre dame cathedral slowly, petering out in many places. in paris to its former glory after firefighters worked though down because the western side of the night to save it from a devastating fire. scotland. brightness for the extreme east of england and north—east the extent of the scotland. brighter skies for parts damage is revealed — of devon and cornwall. temperatures today about where they were as french president emmanuel macron yesterday. this evening and tonight, vows to reconstruct the historic building. this stripe of cloud and rain continue to break up, fizzle away, staying damp for western scotland. a night of shock and despair most staying damp for western scotland. m ost pla ces staying damp for western scotland. most places dry with clear spells. fog patches were part of wales, the in the french capital, but relief now that midlands, the south—west of england, the main structure of the building remains intact. not particularly cold. almost all of officials say they're treating the blaze as an accident — not arson. us avoid a frost. into tomorrow, early fog, mist, and merck, that cloud breaks up, and tomorrow promises significantly more sunshine across the uk than we had today.
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translation: the whole fire is out you'll notice the strength of the now we are investigating and a team easterly wind, particularly in the of experts is working towards what we can do next north sea coast. temperatures here to consolidate the building. may be pegged back a bit, can emergency teams rescue valuable artifacts — further south, further inland, 19 or including what's said to be the crown of thorns worn byjesus 20 degrees. this isjust the start. before his crucifixion. here, more than 120 climate change as i've shown you, warm air wafts activists are arrested for blocking roads in central its way across the british isles as london amid protests aimed we head deeper into the week, at shutting down the capital. new research suggests cholesterol—lowering "statin" drugs towards the weekend, this is don't work well enough, in around half of the patients who are prescribed them. thursday, patchy cloud, sunny spells. noticeable easterly breeze, perhaps a little cool in the north sea coast, for example. elsewhere, 17 degrees in glasgow, 20 degrees in sport now on afternoon live with hugh ferris. cardiff, and good friday, the start ole gunnar solskjaer takes his of easter weekend, if you like the manchester united team to barcelona, sunshine it looks promising. there may well be barely a cloud, blue where he enjoyed the greatest moment skies overhead, sea breeze is likely around seven coasts in the south, of his playing career. light winds elsewhere, 21 degrees in glasgow, up to 22 down towards the yes, greatest moment and best south, and some way on saturday we
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achievement of his career. it was may get up to 2a or 25 degrees. the one of his where were you moments. further south—east you are, largely that goal was against different dry weather, the further north and opponents, but in doing so he won west it looks like some rain will eventually break its way in. manchester united the treble, 20 yea rs manchester united the treble, 20 years ago. of manchester united the treble, 20 years ago. of course manchester united the treble, 20 years ago. of course with solskjaer returning for the first time, he would no doubt be hoping for something similar tonight. it was pretty miraculous in 1999. they need something of a medical tonight because they trail barcelona by 1—0 and they managed to overcome their 2-0 and they managed to overcome their 2—0 deficit in the last round against psg that will no doubt give them inspiration for this evening. it isa them inspiration for this evening. it is a special place for a lot of people, but particularly for solskjaer. he insists they're not relying on fate to step in. i believe that you get what you deserve in sports, that you put... if you put your life, effort and determination everything out, you get exactly what you deserve, but
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sometimes people have said to me it has to be our year because it is 20 years ago, i used to play in number 20, we are back at camp nou, but to go through we have to perform and we have to deserve it. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: you can find out what happens next hour and you can also listen to the hundreds of millions of euros game on bbc five live which is at are pledged to return 8pm. i was in a bar in greece. where the notre—dame cathedral in paris we re 8pm. i was in a bar in greece. where to its former glory were you? i was also in a bar, which after firefighters work though isa were you? i was also in a bar, which is a little bit shocking. i was in a the night to save it from a devastating fire. bar at university. i went to get a drink because i thought it was going to extra time, and i mist it. tell is about because the palace a night of shock and despair goalkeeper. yes, the fa often in the french capital, but relief now that the main announces its reasons for a decision structure of the building some days after they have announced remains intact. whether another player will be officials say they're treating punished. they have done that with the palace goalkeeper wayne the blaze as an accident, not arson. hennessey. they cleared him earlier this month of giving a nazi salute. translation: the whole fire is out. it was a picture that appeared on
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social media. and i say that the now we are investigating and a set panel but had his case believed his of experts is analysing all the structures to establish what we do next to claim that he did not know what the consolidate the building. salute was. and so they have advised him to at least brush up on his emergency teams rescue valuable artifacts, including what's said history. this is part of the to be the crown of thorns worn statement that they released byjesus before his crucifixion. sport now on afternoon live with hugh ferris. former manchester united and england happy memories for ogs midfielder paul scholes at camp now 20 years has been charged with misconduct since his career—defining moment. in relation to the football scored goal that secured a treble association's betting rules. for manchester united. it is alleged he placed 140 bets that was pretty miraculous. on football matches between august and they might need 2015 and january 2019. something similar tonight. he has until april the 26th united trail barcelona by a goal to nil ahead to respond to the charge. of their champions league saracens boss mark mccall has admitted billy vunipola will be quarterfinal second leg booed by fans at their champions cup
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but will draw inspiriation semi final against munster from their comeback in the last on saturday. round against psg. the england number 8 has been given a formal warning by the rfu for his comments so it's a special place for solskjaer, but he insists in support of australian they're not relying on fate player israel folau, who was sacked for saying that "hell awaits for homosexuals". to step in. vunipola was jeered by supporters during their defeat to bristol in the premiership at the weekend. i believe that you get what you england bowler chris woakes claims deserve in sports. if you put your it wouldn't be morally fair to includejofra archer in england's provisional world cup squad, life and effort and determination, which is named tomorrow. archer has qualified to play everything you have, you get exactly for england thanks to a change what you deserve. but sometimes in the residency rules, as he's originally from barbados. the fast bowler people have said to me, it has to be is currently playing in the ipl for rajasthan royals, our year because 20 years ago i played with number 20 back in camp and he's already taken the wicket of chris gayle this afternoon. new. to go through, we have to it's thought he'll be selected at least for the warm up matches, when he'll be given a chance perform an deserve it. to force his way in to the 15 man squad for this summer's tournament. staying with the champions league, manchester city have a 1—0 deficit to overcome as well. selection is part and parcel of the their second leg against spurs is tomorrow night, by which time pep guardiola will have had fewer game and the job that we do, so fair days to prepare his team for both games. is probably not the right word. it during three seasons here, during
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probably wouldn't be fair, morally, but at the same time it's the nature our press conference, i have never of international sport and if complained. it is their business. my someone wants to miss out, it would be incredibly unlucky. but it is down to the selectors. business is to compete. sometimes ireland's katie taylor has been you have more rest, sometimes you given the chance to become the women's undisputed have less, sometimes you have four lightweight world champion. she'll face belgium's delfine or five days. so the persoon on june the first. it'll be on the undercard of anthony joshua's fight with jarrell miller have less, sometimes you have four orfive days. so the big have less, sometimes you have four or five days. so the big teams never in new york's madison square garden. complain about this. it is rare for taylor possesses three of the lightweight titles while persoon holds the wbc belt. a manager to say that while the the pair will also battle for the ring magazine belt — fixture build—up is tough they will the first time the title has been not complain about it. on the line at lightweight for women. that's all the sport for now. spurs have had six days and four days to prepare. city have had three both times. holly hamilton will be back i have come up in a ballot and i with more in the next hour. will see england australia, if you can believe it! congratulations! you must know the person during the tickets. not at all. a lovely surprise when it came to the letterbox. but am i right that the now on afternoon live, let's go nationwide —
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england squad is announced tomorrow? and see what's happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. today, edward sault in southampton talking about the possibility of this year being the year it's a provisional 15—man squad for the tournament. of more staycations. also for the preceding and robbie meredith is in belfast talking about a canine recruit series against pakistan. at a school in northern ireland. we'll hear more on that in a few minutes. the fast bowlerjofra archer is eligible — from barbados but qualified but first, with temperatures on residency grounds — expected to reach would be a contraversial selection. the 20s this weekend in the south of england, are they expecting an influx england are the world's number one site at the moment. of holiday makers this year? as someone has to be left out, they certainly are. i am looking chris woakes says it forward to the warmer temperatures wouldn't be morally fair — and hoping that we get some sunshine could put the likes of liam plunkett and tom curran at risk. like we did last summer. this has all come after the association of british travel agents and also a i think that the lads that have bournemouth travel company who played with him with franchise specialise in holiday lettings. they cricket have seen his talent. you are talking about butler and stokes say that continued brexit‘s and all these guys who have seen uncertainty is leading to more archer and all report back. they are holidays in places like bournemouth, not stupid. when they see a special
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talent, they will back him, but if you can change for the better, you have got an opportunity, you should christchurch and other places. they say that the gorgeous weather that probably take it. either way, it is we had last year is also leading to a win—win. if they don't pick on, it more people wanting to come and is pretty side anyway. —— it is a holiday town on the south coast. interestingly, last week brittany ferries that operates services from pretty good side. places like portsmouth to the the rugby football union have continent reported a fault of 10% to had their say on billy vuniploa's online conduct. their eastern bookings. we spoke to this comes after the england and saracens forward posted support for israel folau's controversial anti—gay views. a member of the bournemouth travel folau has subsequently been sacked by australia. our correspondent, company earlier on. there is, as we chrisjones, has the latest. the rfu say that vunipola expressed have seen a lot in the press, the regrets and he understood stay—at—home vacation is very the hurt and offence he had caused popular at the moment. people are by his defence of isreal folau looking at that because of and adding, in his own instagram uncertainty with brexit, the weak post, that man was made pound. people are looking at the uk for woman to procreates. asa pound. people are looking at the uk as a destination to stay in for vunipola has also been reminded their annual holidays and then they of his responsibilities are looking out for what the weather as an ambassador for the game is like and how that compares and and for a sport that values they remember back to the heatwave that we had last year and realise that we had last year and realise inclusivity, although he has not yet that actually when you are in a deleted the post which suggests he does stand by his views, destination like bournemouth and the which come from his interpretation weather is as good as it has been, of his christian religion, although he does regret
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expressing these views. it is literally be anywhere in the world and it is somewhere that you can have your annual holiday and come away thinking that you have that's all the sport for now. been to an exotic destination. as you can imagine, hoteliers, shopkeepers, ice cream sellers and all of the tourist attractions on the south coast are rubbing their hands with glee at the start and i historic buildings such have got to be honest with you, i as notre dame are notoriously vulnerable to fire. york minster suffered a similar actually live in bournemouth so i blaze in 1984 but has guess i am a little bit biased. i since been fully restored. david silitto went to york minster have done for the past four and half to talk to the master yea rs. have done for the past four and half years. it is a fantastic place. you mason of the minster, who was there on the night it have the isle of wight and the new happened, 35 years ago. forest and seven miles of golden sand. it really is a fantastic it was one of the first things i place. i must say, one of my remember seeing the flames last night, a memory of 35 years ago, and favourite things is when day—trippers leave at the end of the day—trippers leave at the end of the day and we get the whole beach back york minster in flames. for those of to ourselves. but if you haven't us who were around, similar booked your eastern holiday yet, feelings, and especially the man come on down and i will take you for a cup of tea or even ageing and joining me now, the master mason. you will hear on the night when it tonic. how can i refuse? perhaps you was in flames. yes, i was outside at work for the tourist board. but you are saying that the shopkeepers and the beginning of the fire. i went ice cream sellers, it is good news for them, but what about the people inside to help remove artefacts from
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the minster. we were concerned the who live there like yourself? it is great to see people come down and make the most of what we have got whole building might go up in around us. obviously, when a lot of flames. now, if we look up at the people do come down it can be a bit ofa people do come down it can be a bit of a nightmare getting back in to top there, the great rose window, the town because everyone wants to come down especially if it is good the actual roof collapsed during weather and see what is on offer, that night, much like notre—dame? but i must say it is fantastic when you see everyone getting around the first of all, the fire was actually town centre, always on the beach as in the top part of the roof. you well and making the most of the good could see the lead opening out to a weather. so i think all in all people that live in bournemouth, great big hole. what has happened is christchurch and poole, it is something that they really welcome because at the end of the day they the fire was getting hold, but are three fantastic, beautiful places that we like to show off. ok, fortu nately the fire was getting hold, but fortunately there was a wooden vote we will leave it there for now, but below the outside roof which was also on fire, and to contain the thanks so much for that. now we will fire to stop it spreading to the turn to robbie in belfast. you're rest of the building fireman, going to talk to us about a recruit ata going to talk to us about a recruit at a school in northern ireland, but although it was on fire, they were it is not a teacher, is it? tell is able to drop the roof to floor level so the rest of the actual building more. yes, rebecca. iwill tell you a little bit about the school. saint could be saved. so many similarities gerard's is a special school in west between notre—dame and york minster, belfast. it has over 200 peoples and the fact that today you can
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with a range of special educational barely see any evidence of that fire needs, including over 100 with gives you hope, doesn't it? there is autism. and what they have done is they have become the first school in no concern that notre—dame can be northern ireland to recruit a full—time therapy dog. i was out repaired. there was concern when the seeing him today. eco. he is a fire took hold. there is a stone beautiful black labrador. and what he does in school is that he comes vault and it was very difficult to interest as part of the school contain the fire because they are staff. he started work there a month working on a rooftop level, and the ago and the school say that since he fire went into the north—west tower started there, they have noticed a but they managed to put out. the real difference with a number of the roof affects the structure of the peoples, pupils who had a real walls, doesn't it? the building will difficulty communicating, for instance, wouldn't talk much, will sigh and move. with all that weight talk and communicate with echo, so i went to the school today and when i was there i spoke to 16—year—old off it, there were ongoing repairs to notre—dame already on hand. the darren. there had been an eastern fairat darren. there had been an eastern fair at the school and you will see he was making an eastern bonnet. he really didn't want to take it off question is, the stone vault, which was damaged inside, will the walls and he was very proud of it but he also didn't want to miss his daily time with echo. in the mornings, we keep that bolt together so it can be repaired and consolidated? with go and echo will be down there and
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john's work... it was four years to restore york minster, but it is a we will be petting him before class never ending job, but if you go and we would see him in library and inside to date gives you some hope about the future for notre—dame. we can talk now to neil stevenson, the managing director of nej come and he will come everyone down stevensons and cabinet maker to the queen. and it certainly is a treat for he was involved in the refurbishment after the 1992 windsor castle fire, recreating a number of destroyed everybody that sees echo. it certainly brings a smile to their pieces of furniture. face and it really helps them to come down and all that stuff. and it we are so grateful you have been able tojoin us, thank we are so grateful you have been able to join us, thank you so we are so grateful you have been able tojoin us, thank you so much. definitely helps me to come down. i must ask you first of all what your thoughts are when you see those you can see there, rebecca, his teachers told me that a month ago he pictures of notre—dame cathedral?m would not have had the confidence at all to go in front of a camera and is devastating. any building of that talk to us, but because echo was there, he wanted to do it. he was historic importance, to see a very proud of himself. and that is potentially in utter devastation is just a small example of the effect that echo has had on many peoples in distressing. take us back to 1992 the school. tell is about some other and the fire at windsor castle. what things that he might have done. did you and your team do? we had a well, really, echo lives with one of the teachers in the school so first
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thing in the morning he is there as the people coming to school and he very simple project, in many ways, greets them when they work through the door and then he is really in comparison to the architectural team. the state dining room multipurpose. peoples with medication difficulties, they spent sideboard, the biggest furniture some time with echo and they tell piece in the palace, was boarded in him about their day and their feelings in their lives. he is also when they started the restoration work so when the fire took hold, the trained to be especially come so far sideboard was destroyed, which meant pupils with behavioural difficulties, they spend a bit of that it had to be replicated from time with echo, they come down as scratch, apart from a set of gilt well. but then he is a reading buddy andi well. but then he is a reading buddy and i saw that in action today, both lamps which survived the fire. am i with groups of people signed with peoples in their own, people who are learning to read, learning to talk right it was 19 feet long? 0h, and communicate and they sit and lamps which survived the fire. am i right it was 19 feet long? oh, yes. it was a huge piece, which is why they boxed in. in essence, it was listen to a story and they struck echo at the same time. he is a actually built in parts, which is multipurpose dog and he has been specially trained for this and it how we had to build it to get back took about a year of training but into the room, but at the time it already they say that just having echo in the school, word has got was considered simpler to protect in around other special schools so if situ. how did you go about you will pardon the pun, there are recreating it? i presume you had other schools that are going to access to photographs, for example? follow their lead. you've done
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the biggest problem with any of pretty well, actually. there have these restoration projects, of which been very few puns. i'm impressed. we have done quite a number, is the thank you very much. i know he will have more on that night and thank information is very limited. you to edward in southampton. thanks although there are lots of to both. good to talk to you. and photographs of a room or space, they thatis to both. good to talk to you. and are very rarely taken in relationship to replicating a piece that is nationwide. of furniture so in the case of the sideboard, all the photographs are taken from somebody standing up, so you tend to get lots of pictures of tops and glanced views of the front, but when you have deep recesses and complex tracery, there is no scientists in plymouth have discovered photograph at all. so we have spent the earliest evidence of plastic litter in the ocean — a long time looking for archive a plastic bag that became tangled in a piece of research equipment material. in the end, the most in 1965. the finding is part useful information we found was from of a study that has tracked birmingham museum who had one the entire history of plastic picture of the sideboard face on, in the ocean, revealing just how much more plastic has accumulated which was immensely useful to us. in the sea in recent decades. victoria gill reports. having got those photographs, we
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we re having got those photographs, we were able to extrapolate information from those, we were able to take a mission beneath the waves. for decades, scientists dimensions from the architectural have been measuring drawings we had got in terms of the health of the ocean by collecting plankton, the most important link in the marine food chain. determining the actual size. one of along the way, though, the other problems was that, because almost by accident, they have produced we did not have views of every site a and we knew all the carving elements historical record of our impact we re and we knew all the carving elements were entirely different, there was no repeat, we had to design new on the seas, using a very carvings in keeping with the old carvings in keeping with the old carvings in keeping with the old carvings in the hope they would be correct. and i presume that someone like notre—dame will have very old—fashioned device. the design of this plankton recorder hasn't changed for a specific french carving, for example. are there enough experts in century. it's been towed millions of miles around the ocean. that field to help recreate those but in recent decades, a rtefa cts that what it is finding that field to help recreate those artefacts that might be lost? yes, everywhere it looks is plastic. when plastic gets into the device, it becomes tangled around the instruments inside, and with more fortu nately, artefacts that might be lost? yes, fortunately, france is one of those than half a century of ships logs, the scientists now have an countries which is very keen on its exact record of every time and everywhere on the planet that this happens. artistry and craft. it is unlike the in 1965, we got a plastic bag trapped in the plankton recorder. uk where our craft skills have been that must have been one of the earliest pieces of plastic
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litter, then, to be found decimated by decades of floating in the ocean, rubbish from the land? underinvestment. there are vast exactly. yeah, i mean, the other records numbers of specialist french we have are from ingestion colleges teaching highly complex craft skills. i have no doubt they studies where they look do have the skills required. at sea turtles and sea birds, and the earliest records for those are again in the early u nfortu nately, we do have the skills required. unfortunately, we must leave it 60s and the late 60s, there but really good to talk to so it you, thanks so much. thank you. matches up with those exactly. this project has documented ocean plastic from 1957 to 2016. since 1990, though, the amount of plastic litter in the sea has increased the fire in notre—dame has prompted concern over safety significantly. at the house of commons, withjeremy corbyn warning that the palace of westminster the number of plastic bags found is at risk of a huge fire. has decreased since the millennium, though it's not well, the leader of the house clear if that is linked of commons, andrea leadsom, to campaigns to phase them out. has issued a statement, saying that the fire when one of the 50 recorders was devastating, and events like this are a crucial in the fleet has finished reminder of the importance of preserving our historic buildings. its mission, it is brought the approval of the restoration and renewal programme by both house of commons and lords last year back to plymouth. was a huge step towards the protection of the palace of westminster. last year, a major programme here, researchers continue to add of work was completed to a library samples they have gathered to enhance fire safety and, from all over the world. when construction work starts if you walk across the store, as part of the restoration
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you can pull out a sample from 1951, and renewal programme 1952, and from a particular part in the mid—2020s, fire of the ocean, and people risks will continue to be are applying science to that that constantly assessed. wasn't thought of back in those years, and plastic is a typical example, so i kind of like to think all this effort we are putting in here, some bright sparks going to university or maybe even just being born now will apply ina some amazing science in a moment we will be catching up to what is being caught with all the business news but first as we are speaking now. this mission first dove a look at the headlines. beneath the surface around the time hundreds of millions of euros plastic was invented. now it will continue to provide are pledged to return vital information to help the notre—dame cathedral in paris reduce the impact of our to its former glory after firefighters work though the night to save it letter on the oceans. from a devastating fire. breaking news — that the labour party leader jeremy corbyn has said a labour government would scrap the sats exams or standard assessment tests which are compulsory at the end a night of shock and despair but of a child's primary education in england. relief that the main structure of the government had already announced that from 2023 the building stays intact and seven—year—olds woulds no longer have to take their sats. mr corbyn said labour's policy would relieve pressure on schools and ‘prepare children for life, experts say the main parties intact. not just for exams'.
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here's your business i visit primary schools all over the country and i talk to children about headlines on afternoon live. it as well as on my own community more than 100 climate change activists have been arrested under stress levels are huge. i for blocking roads in central london question the necessity of them. during protests which brought parts other countries don't test to of the capital to a standstill. children as much as we do. we test children as much as we do. we test children more than i think any other a second day of disruption is expected. country in the world and the results are no better because of that. i police have ordered protestors think what we should have is much to keep to the marble arch area. more teacher involvement and teacher unemployment fell by 27,000 in the three months to february — assessment of how children are the figure coming in progressing and take the stress and at 1.34 million. strain of teachers. when a fifth of all teachers say they are ready to average weekly earnings, including bonuses, rose by around 3.5% — quit the profession because of the that's in line with expectations. stress levels in the more cloud they are under, surely that is a warning jd sports has defied the gloom to all of us. on the high street to post record annual profits of almost £340 million. that's up more than 15%. egon is here — in a moment its chairman, peter cowgill, told the bbc the figures have he will be telling been helped by a focus us what's hot and what's not in the business news. on younger customers. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. hundreds of millions of euros are pledged to return the notre dame
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let's chat about jobs. cathedral in paris to its former glory after firefighters let's chat aboutjobs. there are more of them. more of them and fewer work though the night to save it from a devastating fire. the extent of the damage is revealed, people unemployed. unemployment has as french president emmanuel macron vows to reconstruct fallen to 1.34 million, the lowest the historic building. a night of shock and despair it's been since 1975. we have also in the french capital, seen an increase it's been since 1975. we have also seen an increase in the number of but relief now that the main people in employment, that figure structure of the building remains intact. officials say they're treating the blaze as coming in almost 33 million people, an accident — not arson. and that is a record high, so pretty here's your business headlines on afternoon live. robust situation there. the others people and jobs, are they getting more than 120 climate change activists have been arrested for blocking roads in central london paid more? yes, they are. the during protests which brought parts of the capital to a standstill. a second day of disruption is under way. figures for the three months to police have february have shown that average ordered protestors to stick to the marble arch area. wages including bonuses have gone up by 3.5%, higher than inflation, so they should be some easing of unemployment fell by 27,000 in the three months to february — the figure pressure on household budgets. but coming in at 1.34 million. the big question is, we have heard average weekly earnings, including bonuses, rose all about brexit uncertainty, how by around 3.5% — that's can we have such strong and robust in line with expectations.
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jd sports has defied the gloom situation regarding jobs? one a nalyst says situation regarding jobs? one analyst says that the uncertainty on the high street to post record could actually be helping with job annual profits of almost £340 million. that's up more than 15%. its chairman peter cowgill told situation. the bbc the figures have been helped the labour market has shown by a focus on younger customers. little sign of flagging. employment posted another bumper rise of 179,000 in the three months to february, and that was driven largely by employees and full—time workers. and the unemployment rate too remained at its lowest there's been some good since1975 at 3.9%. i think the recent strength news on the jobs front. in the labour market seems to reflect firms opting to hire more workers rather than to invest in more costly investment projects, and that's perhaps not too surprising in uncertain times. so, the unemployment figure has fallen to 1.34 million. that is the lowest it has been since 1975. and the number of people in work, that it's easier to reverse hiring decisions than is to reverse is atan the number of people in work, that spending in plant and machinery, is at an all—time high of 33 million, and tied in with all of which require larger upfront costs. thatis million, and tied in with all of that is news on wages. wage growth so, despite brexit uncertainty, the recent strength in the labour has outstripped inflation to come market appears to have been because of the prolonged period m, has outstripped inflation to come in, if you include bonuses, at 3.5%, of brexit uncertainty.
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soa in, if you include bonuses, at 3.5%, so a pretty robust picture. let's get more on this with... ruth gregory there.|j ruth gregory there. i have not gervais williams, senior executive altered the word brexit in the last director at miton group, is at the london stock exchange. 50 minutes! what a relief! it is a what is causing this? it is interesting when you consider that first in the last few days and we have the brexit uncertainty out there and we have real uncertainty weeks. trouble in the united states? about world growth has well and yet unemployment has actually been pretty good. i think that is really down to perhaps wage growth which a congressional committee, looking has been coming through at fairly low levels and with uncertainty out at the financial and business there people are actually not dealings of donald trump, have investing in the way that they have subpoenaed certain documents from deutsche bank, and the reason they in the past and that is leading people to take on some junior staff are doing that is because deutsche bank have had a business perhaps is one of the reasons that relationship with donald trump for wage growth isn't writing very much quite some time, and that is why at the moment. we were talking to an they have been slapped with this a nalyst order to produce documents. the at the moment. we were talking to an analyst earlier he said that it is trumpfamily as order to produce documents. the trump family as you might imagine relatively cheaper and easier to hire more people if you need to lay have come out fighting. they have them off than it is to make said this is politically motivated and may even try to stop deutsche expenditure in items such as bank from complying with the machinery and plants and that sort subpoena. of thing. yes, it is a pity, really, samira hussain is at because we do need investment and we
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the new york stock exchange. need to dry productivity what is it that these two committees improvement. wage growth is rarely derived from productivity improvement had we really haven't are doing? what they are looking for had any productivity improvement in the uk over the last ten years, not is any evidence of any sort of even worldwide over the last ten russian interference. they are both yea rs even worldwide over the last ten years and this is one of the things that we have to address. do think looking for documents relating to the trump organisation and its this will tell of? at the moment, business dealings and also any personal finances. what they are looking for is to see if there was the market is rising and there is an in fact looking for is to see if there was excitation that world growth will infactany looking for is to see if there was in fact any of this interference, so pick upa excitation that world growth will pick up a bit. chinese figures this whether there were any dealings with week were good so it looks as though week were good so it looks as though we are ok for the time being but clearly we have been in the cycle illicit russian businesses or for a long, almost ten years now and russian individuals. of course, this we are overdue a kind of turndown comes a few days we are meant to see and when that comes, unemployed and a redacted version of the report. probably will pick up along with everything else and there is nothing immediate to say that that is just around the corner. let's look at jd plenty of expectation there. are we going to see any other situation is sports. we are always talking about dragged into this? certainly, it is what a hard time retailers are having on the high street, butjd sport are bucking the trend. they possible we will see other financial institutions wrapped up in this. had very good figures. they exceeded this comes a time when just a few forecasts. the share price was first weeks ago saw that the heads of some thing in the morning, up from about
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of the major us banks actually were __ up thing in the morning, up from about —— up to about 550 on the opening and now it is 572 and they are up 6% testifying on capitol hill and they we re testifying on capitol hill and they were asked by some lawmakers whether on the day. have they got a lesson or not these banks had any ties to to teach the rest of the high street, do you think? they have come illicit businesses or illicit ina street, do you think? they have come in a way. they have been very russian individuals to which many of consistent, very good performers. if them said that was not the case and you are back at what they have done over the last ten years, the share had no evidence of that. but it is price has come from 32p up to five certainly possible that we will see uncertainty and you can see the huge more banks implicated in this. but return and that has been sticking to deutsche bank is of course the big their knitting, outstanding customer service and also the vices which one because it has had such a long attract good retail sales. just standing relationship with president trump. thank you forjoining us. i quickly, card factory, they saw a full and profits, yet their share price has done really well. what is think we should take a selfie as we going on there? they have had a look at the markets, it is clearly tough year but they announced that the done thing! any impact on the they figures this year were ok, they markets from these employment we re they figures this year were ok, they were trading in line. they have 112 figures? we had the ftse. good news stores in the audi supermarket chain and that is going well. i think there was a bit of relief in the share price and that is why it has made that this morning. thank you so onjob creation figures? we had the ftse. good news on job creation and wages. jd much. i have never heard that sports, they have had record results, which is why their share
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phrase, sticking to your knitting. prices are getting a real boost. that is a new one on me as well. you this car factory —— card factory has can't tell me what it means, then. no idea. let's look at the markets. seen a drop in profits but investors are excited by the fact they have icy of green. again, yes. the ftse has been boosted by that news of the seen a big rise in the number of people buying stuff online from them, so there is hope that it might healthy jobs market rebalance their business away from has been boosted by that news of the healthyjobs market the german index the high street and concentrate has done well because of improvements in business sentiment perhaps more online. brent crude, and the us markets have been boosted by positive news on company results. there could be some sort of intervention by o great. are you back tomorrow? i am there could be some sort of intervention by 0 pack to cut not. well, enjoy whatever you are supplies. that had had a boring doing. thank you so much. good to spend the afternoon with you. effect on the price of crude but as we can see there the price of crude thanks. falling back now. more from you in an hour? indeed. look forward to it. now let's return to images from paris — a city still in shock after the devastating fire at notre—dame cathedral. let's return to paris. the news today has been better than many feared but, for parisians, it was a very long night.
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after this devastating fire. the bbc news at five is coming up with lyse doucet in paris — and shaun ley in the studio. in a moment, the weather, but first let's return to images from paris, crowd sings hymn. a city still in shock after the devastating fire at notre dame cathedral. the news today has been better than many feared, but for parisians it was a very long night. they sing
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good afternoon. a lot of cloud across the uk at the moment. there is some rain around as well. but thatis is some rain around as well. but that is not going to last. as we go to the next few days, more in the way of sunshine and higher temperatures as well. so, as we head towards the end of the week, the all—important towards the end of the week, the all—importa nt easter weekend, we towards the end of the week, the all—important easter weekend, we can expect plenty of sunshine and those temperatures eventually getting up into the 20s, but back to the here and now, today, we have the stripe of cloud, outbreaks of rain did afternoon. the forecast is for stretching from the western side of things to warm up. doesn't look like scotla nd stretching from the western side of scotland down towards the south that today for most people today. coast. a lot of the rain fizzling away through the rest of this stop with a lot of cloud but as we afternoon, it will stay damp across go through the next few days we will the western side of scotland, the see increasing amounts of sunshine and it will start to turn much best of the brightness eastern scotla nd best of the brightness eastern warmer, temperatures getting scotland and eastern england in the eventually into the 20s. today, we far south—west but also the odd do have a lot of cloud. the shower. temperature by 5pm 8—15dc. satellite and radar pictures shows into this evening and tonight, we this wet weather running from the south—east towards the north—west, will keep a fair amount of cloud, only slowly staggering eastwards. particularly across the north—west the rain mostly light and patchy of the uk. the parts of south wales, with some heavier bursts through the
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rest of the afternoon. brightness the south west midlands in southern across the far north—east and also england, fog patches developing the far south—west. maybe one or two through the night. elsewhere, some clear spells and the vast majority showers here. temperatures 8—14dc. will in void of frost. into going through this evening and tomorrow, areas of cloud, mist and tonight, the rain will continue to fog but that will break up and fade away. still damp across the western side of scotland. the club tomorrow promises more in the way of sunshine than today. a very small picking up to some extent. you may see some mist and fog patches chance of a shower across east developing across parts of wales, anglia but the vast majority will the midlands, down into southern stay dry. you will notice the england. it will not be particularly strength of the easterly breeze. if you are spending your day along the chilly. most of us should avoid north sea coasts it with you on the frost. into tomorrow, some early mist and fog down towards the south cool side but elsewhere those and south—west. also some cloud and temperatures higher, 13—19, may be some dampness to start across the 20 celsius in the south. and that is far north—west, but that will break just the beginning of a process of up far north—west, but that will break up and then we will cease aplenty of sunshine, much more sunshine than we things warming up. this warm air have today. 18 easterly breeze so it wafts northwards as we head on into will feel a little bit chilly for thursday. a fair amount of sunshine some of these north sea coastal around on thursday, patches of cloud areas. 19, possibly 20 degrees here or there, a noticeable breeze but that breeze coming from a warm inland. this is just place so look at the temperatures, areas. 19, possibly 20 degrees inland. this isjust the areas. 19, possibly 20 degrees inland. this is just the start of a process of thing swimming up as we 17 celsius in glasgow and 19 in head towards the weekend. when coming from the south are the london, 20 in cardiff, and those
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south—east, bringing this warm air temperatures higher still on good friday. this chart bodes very well across the british isles. thursday will be a day of patchy cloud and indeed if you are looking for blue sunny spells. you will still notice skies overhead. sea breeze is likely the strength of the wind so still feeling a little cool for some of to develop around the coast, light these coastal areas in the east but went elsewhere, but 22 celsius in elsewhere the temperatures up into the high teens or even the low 20s. london, in birmingham 21, and the looking ahead to good friday and the warmth continues. we could get to the middle 20s for some, the further start of the eastern weekend, and predominantly blue skies overhead by south and east you are, this stage. very light winds, sea predominantly dry right through the weekend, but further north and west breezes developing down towards the the chance of rain which will creep south, inland areas up to around its way in. about 22 degrees. we might be able to add another degree or two onto those temperatures as we get on into saturday. the further south you are, it should stay dry. further north and west, bit of rain will creep in.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 3. today at 5, i'm lyse hundreds of millions of euros are pledged to return the notre dame doucet live in paris cathedral in paris to its former glory after figerfighters work though the night to save it by the notre dame cathedral, which is damaged but still standing after surviving a massive fire. from a devastating fire. the extent of the damge is slowly revealed as — french president emmanuel macron vows to reconstruct so much lost but so much saved after the historic building. this massive fire. hundreds of millions of euros are pledged to return the cathedral to its former glory — after firefighters worked though the night to save it from being completely destroyed. the extent of the damage is slowly becoming clearer as a night of shock and despair french president emmanuel macron vows to reconstruct the historic building. in the french capital, but relief now that the main structure of the building remains intact. an artefact said to be the crown officials say they're treating the blaze as of thorns, worn byjesus, an accident not arson. before his crucifixion is among the mass of treasures
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translation: the whole fire is out. rescued from notre dame. now we are investigating and a set of experts is analysing all the structures to establish what we do next to consolidate the building. emergency teams managed to rescue valuable artwork and religious items — including what is said to be the crown of thorns worn byjesus before his crucifixion. here, more than 120 climate change activists are arrested for blocking roads in central london amid protests aimed at shutting down the capital new research suggests cholesterol—lowering "statin" drugs taken by millions of britons may not work well enough in about half of those prescribed them. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. good afternoon. manchester united and they managed to return to a famous venue but they might need a miracle to reach the semifinals of
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the champions league. more later. thanks, hugh. and ben has all the weather. cloudy now, but warming up for the weekend? absolutely. temperatures into the middle 20s, notjust yet, today, a lot of cloud, outbreaks of rain, it isn't sticking around. all the details on uk weather plus news ofa the details on uk weather plus news of a wet spell of weather in the republic of ireland on the way. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. the moods of desperation and sadness in paris last night have been replaced this afternoon by those of hope and resolve as france comes to terms with the devastation caused by the fire at notre dame cathedral.
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president emmanuel macron has promised it will be rebuilt the roof of the 850—year—old landmarkmark, as well as the spire, were destroyed. officials in paris say they are treating the fire as an accident, rather than arson. damp to be revealed. the public prosecutor has assigned a team of 50 people to be believes will be a long and complex and that. roofless, smoke scarred but still standing. there were times overnight when many feared this ancient cathedral would not survive the inferno. but those assessing the damage today are now confident the worst is over. translation: the whole fire is out.
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now we are investigating and a set of experts is analysing all the structures to establish what we do next to consolidate the building. it was a cauldron of fire, flames racing through the medieval roof, so dense with timber it was known as the forest. the scaffolding in place for renovation work was also at risk of collapse. it stayed up but so much more was lost. crowd: oh, la la. when the central spire finally succumbed to the flames it seemed to rip the heart from the building. the shock on the face of president macron spoke for all those looking on. for fire crews it was a nightmare race against this all—consuming inferno. the height of the cathedral made it almost impossible to get enough water where it was needed. some two thirds of the roof
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was eventually lost. singing. overnight, parisians kept a vigil, the streets around notre dame filled with the sounds of mourning. translation: there are hundreds of people who died to build the cathedrals and in here is their memory too. it hurts to see that. it's sad that a monument like this burns. it's very sad. it's one of the great monuments of france. i studied history and it was very important for me to come and see her. maybe for one last time before she was no longer there. notre dame has been at the heart of french national life for almost six centuries. it's where joan of arc was declared a saint and napoleon became an emperor.
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today, though, it's scorched and rubble strewn, most of its treasures were taken to safety, there are years of restoration ahead. bells ring. at noon, bells rang across europe in solidarity with paris. in strasbourg, home of the european parliament, there were also pledges of support. but at stake here is something more than just material help. the burning of the notre dame cathedral has again made us aware that we are bound by something more important and more profound than treaties. the french billionaire francois—henri pinault has pledged 100 million euros for the restoration effort, oil firm total has done the same. planning the reconstruction began this morning. the prime minister edouard philippe and his cabinet know that france be watching.
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surveys of the building are already under way. it was initially suggested the fire may have been caused by building work at the cathedral. questions remain about that, though and about why a better plan for dealing with a fire on this scale was not in place. richard lister, bbc news. thousands of people gathered in the streets around the cathedral, some weeping, others singing hymns or saying prayers. our paris correspondent hugh schofield reports now on how the people of paris have reacted to the fire. this morning the parisien scheme to see for themselves, the inferno was felt as a trauma, and the needed reassurance that the worst had not come to pass. the firemen are heroes. we applaud them. they stayed until the end.
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it was important for me to come this morning because ijust wanted to see if it was real, you know. to feel the place, and, like, see the stones. i wanted to be here, to communicate with the place. as a christian, i want to be full of hope, we can rebuild this fantastic cathedral. we have to rebuild after this tragic event. a cathedral is a place of worship, and in the week running up to easter catholics have a special reason to mourn. this heritage building, but the stones of the church are a living thing. we are not burnt. despite the recent incidents against churches, we are not burnt. the church is alive. this week we will celebrate the passion and resurrection of christ. already minds are turning
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to what needs to be done, fundraising, reconstruction, the head of the notre dame foundation, which long before the fire was raising money for renovation, told me contributions are already flooding in this morning from around world. last night i said, ok, what should we do now? because the fire was extinguished in the middle of the night, and this morning i said, what do we need to do, let's tackle it, yes. it will be saved? yes, yes, it will be saved, i'm sure it will be saved. overnight the mood has changed from despair and terror to defiance and determination. notre dame will survive. let's go live to paris now. i want
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to share these pictures with you. the french interior minister and his deputy have been visiting notre dame just now. there they are, in the wa ke just now. there they are, in the wake of the blaze. these are live pictures which is why they are wobbly. one of many government officials who have been to the site today. officials in paris, as we know, are saying they are treating the blaze as an accident, rather than arson. the interior minister and his deputy wanted to see the damage for themselves. we know that the fire was finally extinguished this morning. after burning through the night. it's destroyed to the cathedral ‘s ‘s spire and medieval timber roof. political and religious leaders around the world have been commenting on the tragedy. pope francis was one of many to share his sadness. on twitter he said: "today we unite in prayer with the people
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the cathedral was home to some historical treasures, and emergency teams had to rescue many works of art and religious items. police and others formed a human chain to rescue artefacts. paul adams reports on notre dame's artefacts. as the smoke clears, and the shock passes, what has been lost, and what saved? despite the apocalyptic fears the bulk of notre dame's a 800—year—old stone structure seems intact. glimpses of the interior also give cause for hope. above the smouldering wreckage of the walls show little signs of damage. the pulpit, here on the right, unscathed. miraculously, most of the vaulting above the nave has not come down.
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but there are gaping holes. last night saw a race against time, many of the cathedral‘s treasures were salvaged as the fire took hold. they are in storage, and some will be transferred to the louvre. they include the holy crown of thorns said to be won byjesus at the crucifixion. a 13th century tunic worn by king louis ix, the only french king to be canonised, and a 14th century madonna and child. with regard to the treasures, they will be put in a safe place, today or tomorrow, but as soon as possible. with regard to the paintings, the big ones, they cannot be retrieved, until friday morning. as far as i'm concerned, they are not damaged. there is a little bit of smoke, we will transfer them to a secure place in the louvre museum. but what of notre dame's three famed rose windows? this morning fire crews were taking a closer look,
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last night there was talk of lead melting and glass exploding. the west window shows no signs of damage, but these are immense and intricate structures, it will take time to assess them. the south window was given by louis ix around 1260, it contains scenes from the life of christ, wonderful 13th century artistry. these were among the finest rose windows, the finest painted glass, to survive from high medieval europe. questions too about the vast 8000 pipe grand organ, recently restored, dating back to the medieval period. notre dame has been at the centre of french life for the better part of 1000 years, now it must close its doors, count the cost, and begin the long process of restoration. paul adams, bbc news.
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we speak now to the chiefjoiner of york minster who helped in the restoration of the cathedral after it was gutted by fire in 1984. thank you forjoining us. i wondered how much those images and pictures of notre dame brought back memories for you, of what happened at york? it brought back many memories of the fire. not very nice memories, but, yes, we are all standing with them in notre dame. take us back to 1984, what did you do take us back to 1984, what did you d o exa ctly ? well, my main task was to restore the vaulting, above the roof. that entails, initially, clearing the minster, and then preparing to get new timber in. you make it sound really
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straightforward, i suspect it was rather more challenging than that. tell me a bit more. well, it took a long time to get to the point where we could restart. it took a year to clear the initial building, source timber, get plans, how we were going to do it. before we could actually start renewing the vaulting. i'm interested in that vaulting, because the vaulting in notre dame was unique, these 13,000 oak trees that had been used in the roof frame, which is the equivalent of 52 acres of woodland, i understand. my other understanding is that they just aren't pieces of timber big enough now. to replace them. so what advice might you be able to offer? well, in our case, there wasn't many
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large trees left for what we needed. we needed trees that were about straight 48 foot, we could only get 40 foot. the a—frame is above the vaulting, i suspect they are going to have to try, passably, slightly different construction than the original is that were there. hopefully, still in oak. that raises an interesting question, a philosophical question, if you like, as to where history can be put back, and whether it should be? what are your thoughts? i always say put it back as it was. a lot of people disagree with that, and would go for a more modern construction, but, my sentiments are to put it back as it was, or as near as possible. passably using modern
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construction, but if it was in oak, put it back in oak. presumably now we have much more available to us in terms of say, 3d technology, mapping, than was available to you back in 1984, could that help with the restoration of notre dame? it could certainly help with the planning, we didn't have any of that in the 1980s. so we were pretty stumped. we had little in the way of photographic evidence, so we had to start from scratch, and do reverse engineering. to try and make it up as we went along, basically. is there anything that actually can never be rebuilt? no. i don't think so. given time. given money. but, obviously, if you rebuild the whole thing, then you
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have a replica. so as long as you've got the main structure, which i think they still do, then it can be done. signs of optimism, jeff, i sense you are an optimist. it's really good to talk to you, thank you so much. thank you very much. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines hundreds of millions of euros are pledged to return the notre dame cathedral in paris to its former glory — after firefighters work though the night to save it from a devastating fire. more than 120 climate change activists are arrested for blocking roads in central london — amid protests aimed at shutting down the capital new research suggests cholesterol—lowering "statin" drugs taken by millions of britons — may not work well enough in about half of those prescribed them. and in sport a huge night for manchester united in the champions league as they look to overturn a one nil deficit against barcelona, 20 years after their manager, ole gunnar solskjaer,
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clinched the treble with a late goal for united in 1999. and the inclusion ofjofra archer in the preliminary world cup squad would be morally wrong according to one of the other bowlers hoping for selection. a formal warning for billy vunipola from the rfu after liking a controversial social media post about gay people. more on those stories just after half past three. when you're watching the tv, you'll often hear or see warnings about flashing images. it can help prevent those with epilepsy from having a seizure. but there's no requirement to do the same online. graham satchell reports. sophie's seizures are triggered by flashing light. she has photosensitive epilepsy. when i'm scrolling through facebook and instagram, i don't know what's coming next.
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sometimes there are posts that i know will trigger my seizures, and i have no control over when they appear. sophie has complained to both facebook and instragram about the lack of warnings on posts. their response has been, you can unfollow that page, or you can unlike that page, but it's a problem when it is a suggested ad for you, or a suggested post. i don't know how they come up with those sort of things. how am i meant to control what they show me? ...lizo mzimba was there. his report contains flash photography. tv programmes regulated by ofcom have to issue warnings when flashing images are about to appear. ..contains some flash photography. social media is not regulated in the same way and there is a growing worry about more sinister posts which deliberately target people with epilepsy. what some people are doing is creating content designed to attract people with epilepsy, and deliberately concealed in the content are images designed to provoke a seizure. we think that sort of hateful and cruel behaviour is actually an assault, and that's why we're
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calling upon the government to take strong action by making it absolutely explicit that this sort of behaviour will certainly be illegal in the future. in a statement, facebook, which also owns instagram, told us... but, for sophie, that's not enough. i don't think they're taking enough responsibility. there is a syndrome called sudep, which is sudden unexpected death in epilepsy, which, you can have a seizure and you can die from it, so it's really important that people do control their seizures. the government is proposing new legislation to regulate social media sites and told us they will consult with the epilepsy society. sophie, for one, is clear — more needs to be done to stop people having seizures. graham satchell, bbc news.
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cholesterol—lowering "statin" drugs may not work well enough — for about half of those using them, according to new research. investigators found that for many, the effect on so—called bad cholesterol was too small. experts say some patients may not be taking a big enough dose. our health correspondent rob sissons reports. millions of people in the uk are on statins. it's medication shown to reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke by lowering bad cholesterol. at the university of nottingham, they analysed the patient records of more than 165,000 patients in the uk who didn't have a history of cardiovascular disease. the good news — in around half the patients, 49%, there was a significant benefit after taking statins. harmful cholesterol levels went down by at least 40%. but the other half, 51%, saw little benefit from statins to their cholesteral levels
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within two years. the researchers say there could be many reasons why some patients don't do as well as others. individuals might not be following the instructions that gps are giving to them. the other reason could be that there's some genetic variation that we are certainly learning a lot about now. the british heart foundation suggests another reason. it insists statins are an important proven treatment, but that some patients may not be on the optimum dose. so we would like to make sure that patients are on the best dose possible and getting the maximum from their statins to reduce their risks further. this study is a stepping stone, but much more research is needed. a front—line gp who is involved in the latest study says closer follow—ups of patients on statins may improve results. our traditional approach is to start statins in a very light monitoring, but clearly some patients need closer monitoring and that needs to be taken into account. for patients, this shows that they need to carry
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on taking the statins. even if are getting less of a response than we'd like, they are still benefiting from them and they will prevent heart attacks. experts stress statins save lives, but say if you have any concerns about your medication, you should talk about it with your gp. rob sissons, bbc news, nottingham. official employment figures show 32.7 million people in the uk are in work, the highest total since records began in 1971. the number of people without a job has fallen by 27,000 in the three months to february, to 1.3 million. average pay rose by 1.5 %, the highest rate since the summer of 2016. police in london have arrested more than 120 people taking part in the second day of climate change protests. supporters of the group, extinction rebellion, remain at a number of central london locations, including parliament square and oxford circus, having camped out overnight.
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most of those arrested were detained on suspicion of public order offences, while five people were held on suspicion of criminal damage at shell's headquarters. time for a look at the weather. here's ben. is that a picture of a lark i see behind you? yes, it is a picture of carlingford lough. behind you? yes, it is a picture of ca rlingford lough. this behind you? yes, it is a picture of carlingford lough. this is the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. the weather at the moment goes to show that you don't have to travel very far to get some big contrasts. it's been really dry here in the uk, most of it, anyway, for many days now. parts of the republic of ireland have had their wettest april day on record. you can see from the radar picture yesterday, not one but two areas of
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rain piling in. particularly because southern parts. i'll show you the rainfall statistics over the space of 24 hours. over 50 millimetres of rain in cork airport, that two inches, imagine that falling on the ground everywhere. they would be some big pedals. contrast that with the uk, county down in northern ireland, we've had some rain here yesterday. sheffield, edinburgh, no rain at all. that's how it has been for many days, and how it will be for many days, and how it will be for many days, and how it will be for many days. the question is, why? yes, why? you've been learning from simon mccoy, that's what's happening. heaven forfend! the a nswer to happening. heaven forfend! the answer to that is the answer i give to most of these weather questions, it's the jet stream. the winds above our heads drive where systems around the world. the jet stream mightjust plough its way across the british
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isles, and we all get rain, this time it's giving a glancing blow. that's why we've seen rain across the west, the republic of ireland, but high pressure has kept things dry further east. this where the pattern, with the jet stream to the west, that allows us to bring warm airupfrom the west, that allows us to bring warm air up from the south over the next few days. through that much advertised warmer weather. it's bizarre that the same thing can cause wet and warm weather. it's because all the global weather systems a re because all the global weather systems are all interrelated. the jet stream runs all around the globe, takes areas of rain with it. it's got cooler bits, you can see appear, warmer air to the south—east, that contrast in temperatures drives the jet stream. on the northern flank you get areas of rain, in the south it can tour the warm air in our direction. the whole global system is interconnected. if you think of the jet stream as the river that steers
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it all around the globe. and you are not charging any extra for that! know, that information is free. shall i get on with the forecast? please do. it's going to turn warm over the next few days. a lot of cloud around, at the moment this is how it looks in wales. that cloud is not sticking around. more of this over the next few days. this picture was taken in cornwall today. more of us getting spells of sunshine, with that, yes, turning warmer. here's the satellite picture so far today. quite light and patchy. some damp weather, may be getting into london and the midlands, north—west england the isle of man, and certainly in western parts scotland. writer for eastern england and north—east scotland, sunshine and the art shower. temperatures where they were yesterday. this evening and
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overnight, we continue to see cloud, some patchy rain along this where the frontier. the rain tends to fizzle away. some damp weather across north—west scotland. south wales and the midlands, down into the west country, and most of a mild air is pulled away while temperatures stay above freezing. tomorrow, early fog, early cloud across the north west, but it should break up. through the day it looks like we're going to see quite a lot of sunshine. the small chance for a shower across east anglia, mostly dry. you'll notice the strength of the breeze which makes it feel a little bit chilly, at least cool. further south, 19 degrees in london. that's just the beginning further south, 19 degrees in london. that'sjust the beginning of further south, 19 degrees in london. that's just the beginning of this warming trend. that war may pushes its way up from the south, towards the end of the week, and that all—important the end of the week, and that all—importa nt easter weekend. thursday brings some missed, patchy cloud, good spells of sunshine as
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well. that key breeze at this stage brings temperatures climbing, even further to 19 or 20 degrees. 15 in belfast, 17 in glasgow. this is good friday, and it bodes very well, blue skies and sunshine. may be barely a cloud in the sky. less of a breeze allowing some sea breezes to develop close to the coastal areas. that will feel quite like summer, 21 degrees in glasgow, 22 degrees in south wales. it may well be that on saturday some places get into the mid 20s. the further south and east the better your chances of holding on to dry weather. north and west the chance of the rain making its way in. that's all, goodbye for now.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines.
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hundreds of millions of euros have been pledged to return the notre dame cathedral in paris to its former glory after firefighters worked though the night to save it from a devastating fire. the extent of the damage is slowly revealed, as french president emmanuel macron vows to reconstruct the historic building. a night of shock and despair in the french capital, but relief now that the main structure of the building remains intact. officials say they're treating the blaze as an accident — not arson. translation: the whole fire is out now a team of experts is working towards what we can do next to consolidate the building. emergency teams rescue valuable artifacts — including what's said to be
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the crown of thorns worn byjesus before his crucifixion. here, more than 120 climate change activists are arrested for blocking roads in central london amid protests aimed at shutting down the capital. new research suggests cholesterol—lowering "statin" drugs don't work well enough, in around half of the patients who are prescribed them. sport now on afternoon live with hugh ferris. a big night for manchester united in the champions league and a venue that has happy memories for their manager. that's right. strange to think that it is 20 years since that famous night in may, 1999, when he scored that injury time goal and he is back for a competitive game. he has been visiting on a couple of occasions and scouting as well but now those
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two decades since his career defining moment, he is back with his new club, again manchester united. 1999 was pretty miraculous with those late goals. they might need something similar tonight because they are in a bit of a perilous position because they trail barcelona by 1—0 ahead of their champions league quarterfinal second leg. they will at least draw inspiration for their comeback in the last round which was against psg. a mighty enemy on that occasion as well. a special place first solskjaer, but he says they are not relying on fate to step in.|j believe that you get what you deserve in sports, that you put... if you put your life, effort and determination everything out, you get exa ctly determination everything out, you get exactly what you deserve, but sometimes people have said to me it has to be argued because it is 20 yea rs has to be argued because it is 20 years ago, i used to play in number 20, we are back at camp nou, but to go through we have to perform and we
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have to deserve it. that is an eight o'clock kick—off. the other game is 1-1. crystal palace goalkeeper wayne hennessey recently avoided punishment for an alleged nazi salute and the reasons why, which have been published today, make interesting reading. often, when the fa have a disciplinary issue they will announce that they are doing about it. in this case, nothing. and then if you days later, they will provide the written reasons for doing so. they have cleared the crystal palace goalkeeper wayne hennessey of giving a nazi salute. that came earlier this month. in those written reasons, the panel that heard the case believed that hennessey‘s claimed that he did not know what a nazi salute was was potentially true, simply because they want him
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to brush up on his history because this is a part of the statement released today that makes interesting reading. when cross—examined about this, mr hennessy displayed a very considerable degree of ignorance about anything to do with hitler, fascism and the nazi regime. they went on to say it was regrettable that anyone should be unaware of so important a part of our history. we do not feel we should therefore find he was not telling the truth. about not knowing what a nazi salute was. elsewhere, billy vunipola has given a formal warning about his comments. billy vunipola has been given a formal warning by the rfu for his comments in support of sacked australian player israel folau. the england and saracens forward liked a social media post by folau, who stated that "hell awaits for homosexuals". and has had his contract terminated a as result. vunipola though has escaped a fine or ban after expressing his remove with the rfu when he also said he "understood
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he had caused hurt and offence". england bowler chris woakes claims it wouldn't be morally fair to includejofra archer in england's provisional world cup squad, which is named tomorrow. archer has qualified to play for england thanks to a change in the residency rules as he's originally from barbados, but does hold a uk passport. it's thought the fast bowler will be selected at least for the warm up matches against pakistan adn ireland when he'll be given a chance to force his way in to the 15 man squad for this summer's tournament. selection is part and parcel of the game on the job that we do, so fair is probably not the right word. it probably wouldn't be fair. morally. but at the same time, it is the nature of international sport and if someone wants to miss out, it would be incredibly unlucky, but it is down to the selectors. ireland's katie taylor has been given the chance to become the undisputed lightweight world champion. taylor will face belgium's delfine persoon onjune the first on the undercard of anthonyjoshua's fight with jarrell miller in new york's madison square garden. taylor holds three
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of the lightweight tiles while persoon holds the wbc belt. whoever wins will be only the third professional female fighter to be an updisputed champion. that's all the sport for now. let's return to that new research saying cholesterol—lowering "statin" drugs may not work well enough for about half of those using them. investigators found that for many, the effect on so—called bad cholesterol was too small. we can speak now to one of the report's co—authors, nadeem quereshi — a clinical professor of primary care at the university of nottingham. we are very grateful for your time. just tell us what you have found. good afternoon. what we found that was if patients did not achieve the
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40% improvement from statins, they had a 20% increased risk of stroke and heart attack. actually what that means is if you are not receiving the drop in cholesterol that is needed, you are increasing your risk of heart attacks and strokes. and if you think about it in another way, it is actually that you need to have closer monitoring if you are not achieving those targets. so why do some statins appear to help some people more than others? well, that wasn't part of our research, but it does appear that some people respond better to certain drugs and others. and that could be related to the metabolism. it could be related to their genetics. but that was a direct funding from our research that comes out of experience as a gp and also experience as a researcher that we see variability and responses. in terms of your research on what you found, what you feel the implications are? well, the indications are that we might feel
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co mforta ble indications are that we might feel comfortable when we see a drop in cholesterol from the original one, but if it is not a significant drop, then unfortunately we might have to call the patient in earlier to get a change in the therapy or consider it there are alternative reasons. i ta ke there are alternative reasons. i take statins as well as many other drugs. you sometimes forget to take ta blets drugs. you sometimes forget to take tablets and exploring that with patients might be an important thing to look at. how worried should patients perhaps you are taking statins be if they are listening to you? because they might be thinking, we are taking these drugs and they might be having no effect whatsoever andindeed might be having no effect whatsoever and indeed i think i am right in saying that some of them have side—effects. saying that some of them have side-effects. well, all statins as with many drugs have side—effects. the issue isn't that they don't have an effect. it is that the effect isn't as great as you would expect. what we want to achieve is a 40% drop in the bad cholesterol is. and if it is not achieving that, then it is having a discussion with the gp
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to find out is there an alternative treatment they can have, should they be increasing the dose. there are many things that can be done. it is just a matter of having that conversation to discuss what is the dose. there are many things that can be done. it isjust dose. there are many things that can be done. it is just a matter of having that conversation to discuss what is an extent they want to take. u nfortu nately, we what is an extent they want to take. unfortunately, we must leave it there but thank you some much for bringing us up—to—date with your research. thanks. thank you. let's return to the fire at notre dame cathedral. teams of investigators in paris are trying to assess the damage to notre dame after a fire devastated the medieval cathedral. the spire and two thirds of the roof of the cathedral, one of the world's great religious landmarks, have been destroyed, but the main structure, including the two bell towers, has been saved. drjessica barker is a lecturer in medieval art at the courtauld institute of art in london. and i'm also joined by simon kincaid, a senior lecturer at sheffield hallam university,
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who's an expert in heritage planning and can speak to us about protecting old buildings from fire. doctor barker, as a lecturer in medieval art, what will you miss the most? high, good afternoon. well, thatis most? high, good afternoon. well, that is difficult to say because in a sense, even though we have seen these traumatic videos of the roof of notre dame burning and i am sure many of us have seen the spire collapsing, actually it looks like it has survived pretty much intact and this isn't the first fire that it has survived. it was burnt in the french revolution and rebuilds. so i don't miss notre dame because i think it is going to come through this largely intact and there are reasons to be optimistic like we just heard, that the actual main body of the cathedral has survived remarkably well. reasons to be optimistic, simon. but what are the
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main challenges in protecting historic buildings? well, there is an issue with historic buildings obviously in the sense that there are building conservation issues, so for example things that might effect historic character. you cant go in and put in all of the equipment that you want in the building to detect fire, for example. it is very hard to introduce compartments which would divide the building into separate fire compartments in a historic building. it is particularly different in that my difficult and a big, open structure like notre dame. but it has been done retrospectively in historic buildings. they had been divided up into fire compartments to try to slow down the spread of fire. but i think the main challenge is probably this problem that exists between on the one hand the need for fire protection and on the other hand the needs of building conservation which
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really would be a very, very light touch with not really doing very much to the building at all. obviously, in the context of notre dame, assuming it is rebuilt, which we can assume from every thing we have heard so far, i think they will be able to build in a lot of technical things into the building as they put it back together. doctor barker, we talked about the outside of the building, if you like. let's go inside if you don't mind. what is it that you are most listening out for to find out what has happened to it? iam for to find out what has happened to it? i am thinking particularly of the medieval stained—glass, which i know is one of the finest examples in the world, isn't it? yes. the rose windows and the stained—glass in there are some of the most important examples of gothic stained—glass, and a lot of that is actually 19th—century but there are fragments of the original
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stained—glass, so fire is incredibly concerning in that respect because the glass can blow out. the other great treasure of notre dame cathedral is of course the crown of thorns, and we have been hearing reports that that has been saved but thatis reports that that has been saved but that is one of the most important not just historical but that is one of the most important notjust historical but religious a rtefa cts of notjust historical but religious artefacts of the catholic church. simon, it feels like we have had more of these fires. i am thinking particularly of the fire at the glasgow school of art. is thatjust inevitable as these buildings get older? i don't think it is inevitable. i think we have done a lot to improve fire safety in historic buildings, but unfortunately there are still way too many fires occurring and the problem is, of course, that heritage is finite. once it is gone, it is gone, effectively. so we kind of have to state of fires and then
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hopefully we improve things but then unfortunately i suspect there is a little bit of our icons of the boa little bit of our icons of the boa little bit of our icons of the boa little bit in terms of fires but in terms of positive outcomes, one might be as a wake—up call worldwide, really, of the fact that fire is so destructive and is so quick to do that destruction. hopefully people that are in charge of other very, very important heritage around the world will take note and sit up and make sure they are doing the most that they can do. doctor barker, clearly you are a specialist in medieval art, but i suppose speaking more broadly it has been interesting to see people's response to the fact of how sad they feel, the emotion they feel about a building, isn't it? how do you try to explain that? i know exactly what
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you mean and it is easy in a sense to think how can we have such an emotive response to a building rather than to people but actually a building is people. the building of notre dame is the community of paris, the identity of paris across hundreds of years, and it has been co nsta ntly hundreds of years, and it has been constantly made and remade, built and rebuilt and transformed as paris has transformed, so really to see notre dame burn is to see in a sense a crisis in the identity of paris, andi a crisis in the identity of paris, and i think it shows us all what our built environment means to us even if we don't necessarily pay very much attention to it in our day to day lives. simon, you are nodding vigorously. yes, i agree with all of that, really. notre dame is part of a world heritage site which is the banks of the rivers then —— river seine and it is an integral part of
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central paris i think that answers the question even if we don't know the question even if we don't know the answer, will it be rebuilt, yes, definitely will because it is incredibly important building. but asi incredibly important building. but as i say, unfortunately we keep losing heritage and it is something that i feel we need to address a little bit more rigorously, perhaps. simon and doctor barker, thank you both very much. really fascinating. thank you. in the last few moments, theresa may has issued a statement andi theresa may has issued a statement and i am going to read it to you now. she said, notre dame is one of the most full buildings in the world, a symbol of france and french people and cherished across the globe. the images of destruction we saw last night were truly heart—rending. to underline our solidarity with france and her people, the bells at westminster
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abbey will all at 530 tpn this evening to mark the moment that the fire began yesterday, and later this week bells will ring at cathedrals and churches across england. the french president has pledged to rebuild the cathedral, and i have conveyed to him that the uk will support this endeavour however we can. and the statement goes on to say that when it comes to the task of rebuilding, french craftsmen and women are amongst the finest in the world as they prepare to about upon this daunting tasks. we do stand ready to offer any uk expertise and experience that could be helpful in the work that lies ahead. so bells will be run at churches and cathedrals across england in solidarity with france following the devastating fire at notre dame cathedral. that the prime minister
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has said just in the last few moments. now, egon is here — in a moment he will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. hundreds of millions of euros are pledged to return the notre dame cathedral in paris to its former glory after firefighters work though the night, to save it from a devastating fire. the extent of the damge is slowly revealed as the french president emmanuel macron vows to reconstruct the historic building. a night of shock and despair in the french capital, but relief now that the main structure of the building remains intact. officials say they're treating the blaze as an accident — not arson. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. more than 100 climate change activists have been arrested for blocking roads in central london during protests which brought parts of the capital to a standstill.
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a second day of disruption is expected. police have ordered protestors to stick to the marble arch area. unemployment fell by 27,000 in the three months to february — the figure coming in at1.34 million. average weekly earnings, including bonuses, rose by around 3.5% — that's in line with expectations. jd sports has defied the gloom on the high street to post record annual profits of almost £340 million. that's up more than 15%. its chairman peter cowgill told the bbc the figures have been helped by a focus on younger customers. the latest snapshot of the housing market is out today.
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sometimes these figures all come out at the same time. yes, and they are all linked. what has happened is we have had the latest snapshot on the property market here in the uk from a company called property see a. what they found is it is a pretty mixed picture, so we have got asking prices down by about 5%. we have also got instructions down by a similar percent. but the peculiar thing is that the number of people who are actually buying properties, that has actually gone up slightly. so let's try and find out what is happening. i think we should. let's talk to the property analyst kate faulkner, whojoins us now. what for you is the most troubling aspect of the property market at the moment? well, to be honest, there isn't much thatis well, to be honest, there isn't much that is troubling. the only areas where you're getting a few problems is in london, the south—east and
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east anglia where they kind of had such rapid growth since the credit crunch saw house prices rocket up by 40 having 60% that they are now kind of seeing an overshoot and they are falling by 5—10% because that national averages made up with a very mixed picture. head over to the north—east and you are hardly seeing price changes at all. one of the reasons why price changes at all. one of the reasons why even price changes at all. one of the reasons why even in a slightly odd are not good performing market exchanges can go up, that is because you have more serious buyers and sellers because they are the people who really have got to move so that perhaps explains that statistic a little. do you think that we are going to see a move towards more affordability, particularly for first—time buyers who in many parts of the country have been priced out of the country have been priced out of the country have been priced out of the market? yes, and that really is in those areas of london, the southeast and south anglia. that is why they have stopped growing and they have fallen back because the affordability for the first time
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since about 2000 has got a cap now because of the change in the mortgage rules where you had a limit to what people could lend at four and a half times income and indeed the affordability is based on 6—7% rates, not the 2% of people access at the moment. but what we are seeing around the rest of the country, in nottingham, for example, affordability essentially pretty good year. head back to the north—east and actually properties cost less on average than they did 12 years ago, yet we have got these incredibly low mortgage rates that you can access of 2—2% which for anybody who but in the 90s and will remember 17% mortgage rates, that will seem a phenomenally good value to pit with over your head. you mentioned the uncertainty that brexit has brought about. what impact has not had on the property market? it has definitely had an impact since september last year. we had quite a run of bad news. we were reporting on the fees in much by the fees in the car industry and the high street. and then on top of that there was a little bit of
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misreporting that mark carney had said — prices are going to drop by 30%. my understanding that what he had actually said was that if prices do file by 35%, the banks could cope. that was kind of a good news story but that made everyone think that if they had to move, they were going to wait to see what happens. people were very worried. people are right that if brexit happens that prices wilful. what is interesting is that when you have that uncertainty and those price pills do not really seem to materialise, people start going, well, i am having a baby, getting divorced, getting married, i have found a property and there is a shortage, i may as well get on the ladder. nothing seems to be happening. i think that seems to be happening at the moment because reports for areas such as london and the south—east i that actually they're starting to pick up again, albeit at slightly lower prices. thank you very much indeed. you're welcome.
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lets have a look at the markets. the ftse is up because of that positive news about jobs ftse is up because of that positive news aboutjobs in the uk andjd sports, no mystery, that is because they have had record profits. card factory, that is mystery. their profits have been down. but i think what investors are really liking is the fact that they are seeing a big surge in online sales there. brent crude, that is on the up. there has been lots of talk that opec might slash reduction to cut prices. ok, more from you in an hour. thank you. in a moment the weather — but now let's return to images from paris — a city still in shock after the devastating fire at notre dame cathedral. the news today has been better than many feared, but for parisians it was a very long night. they sing
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good afternoon. there's a lot of cloud out there today but that is not sticking around through the rest of this week. we will see increasing amounts of sunshine and it is going to turn considerably warmer as well as we had towards the issue weekend.
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as we head to this evening and tonight, an area of cloud and patchy rain will sit around some parts of the uk. the rain tending to fizzle away, though still damp across western scotland by the end of the night. elsewhere, some clear spells and semester in fog in southern england and south wales. most places will avoid a frost. tomorrow, little bit cloudy and mucky in places but that cloud come in fog will break up and then we will see lots of sunshine. the very small chance of a shower and east anglia. a keen easterly breeze or it will feel cool for the north seacoast but inland we will see highs of possibly 20 celsius. those temperatures continuing to climb as he had towards the weekend. middle 20s possible in the south by the time we 01:58:44,301 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 get to saturday.
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