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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  April 18, 2019 7:00pm-8:00pm BST

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you are watching beyond 100 days. 23 months and 400 pages. the mueller report is finally published. donald trump declares it is over as the long—awaited investigation into the president, the russian and 2016 campaign is made public. some chunks are blacked out but we know that robert mueller concluded he could not clear donald trump of the charges of obstructing justice. the president says that is still not true. i'm having a good day too. it is called no collusion, no obstruction. the report also says
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the trump campaign knew it would benefit from russia's illegal actions but did not take criminal steps to help moscow. the russian operatives who perpetrated these schemes did not have the cooperation of president trump or the trump campaign. also democrats want to hear directly from robert mueller. he has been asked to testify publicly in the next month. the trump campaign says the tables have turned and it is now to investigate the people who instigated this report. hello. when president trump was told that a special council had been appointed to investigate his campaign's dealings with russia, he slumped into his chair, swore and declared, this is the end of my presidency. that is one of the
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things we have learned in this massive document, the 448 pages of the mueller report released just three hours ago. despite his initial horror, donald trump was optimistic about the report's findings, declaring in a dramatic tweet, game over. no collusion, no obstruction. the white house as the investigation has exonerated the president, cleared him and his associates of all suspicion and now they say he can get on and do hisjob all suspicion and now they say he can get on and do his job and focus on being re—elected. can get on and do his job and focus on being re-elected. but this actual report even with some of it blacked out for security, pages like this are throughout, is a lot more nuanced than that. we start with this report from john sobel. a watershed moment for this president and maybe the presidency itself. donald trump was at the white house meeting wounded warriors. but from his two—year long battle with robert merrill he feels
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he has emerged unscathed, his reputation intact. he said his guests were having a good time. —— robert mueller. i'm having a good day too, it was called no collusion, no obstruction. applause before publication of this long—awaited report, the president tweeted this with its game of thrones styling and his team put out this video. no collusion. there was no collusion. no collusion. his attorney general weighed into what amounted to a pre—rebuttal of the report as at this stage had not been published, defending his anger and behaviour that some saw as an attempt to obstruct justice. as the special counsel's report acknowledges, there is substantial evidence to show that the president was frustrated and angered by his sincere belief that the investigation was undermining his presidency, propelled by his political opponents, and fuelled
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by illegal leaks. but for all that, mueller identified ten occasions when the president may have obstructed, nothing that pass the criminal threshold, though. and on the other question of whether there was collusion between the trump campaign and the russians, a clean bill of health. thanks to the special counsel's thorough investigation, we now know that the russian operatives who perpetrated these schemes did not have the cooperation of the trump campaign, or the knowing assistance of any other american, for that matter. that is something that all americans can and should be grateful to have confirmed. the mueller report is being devoured on capitol hill, debated online. democrats are not buying the argument that the president did nothing wrong. they think there is plenty to go out and the one person who is going to be receiving more invitations to congress than a hollywood a—lister will be robert mueller. jon sopel, bbc news, washington.
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let's get more and speak to george washington university law professor jonathan turley. washington university law professor jonathan tu rley. thank washington university law professor jonathan turley. thank you for joining us. i have not yet read all 448 pages, but i want to bring up one little bit. in the report, he says, if we had confidence after a thorough investigation of the fact that the president did not commit obstruction of justice, that the president did not commit obstruction ofjustice, we would so staid. based on the facts and the applicable legal standards we are unable to reach thatjudgment. what do you make of that it does show that this was a close call for some of the people in this investigation. it is important to note that the attorney general and the deputy did resolve that question and say that there is not obstruction ofjustice. but what makes this a wicked
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question is that the report talks about acts that some people would view as obstruction that did not occui’. view as obstruction that did not occur. but not for any lack of effort by the president. he instructed his white house counsel to fire robert mueller not once but multiple times and don mcgann refused. so it creates a zen —like question if someone orders obstruction and nobody listens to him, is there still obstruction? that is something that congress may have to look at. what would that mean for congress? if mueller‘s implication and we have bits of it on page 58 are some of those insta nces on page 58 are some of those instances where the president tried to o bstru ct instances where the president tried to obstruct justice, if instances where the president tried to obstructjustice, if the president intended to obstruct justice but did not succeed because those around him did not follow his orders, what does congress do with
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that quiz cyan if you are going to impeach a president. you are going to have something that is unassailable. you also need time i was the last lead counsel in the la st was the last lead counsel in the last impeachment which was considered a relatively straightforward case. my opposing counsel was adam schiff who is now one of the chairman investigating trump but that took 17 months before we finish that trial so they are losing one way if they want to take this off. that would put them right before the 2020 election so most of us before the 2020 election so most of us do not expect an impeachment to come from this. can i ask you a question on donald trump's relationship with his various attorney generals. the report tells us attorney generals. the report tells us that as far as jeff sessions recollects, the president said to him, you were supposed to protect me. we have the controversy that
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some see it as in the way that the current attorney general william barr has approached this whole release of the report. let's play you a little part from his press conference earlier today. you have remarks that are quite generous to the president, including acknowledging his feelings and emotions so what do you say to those concerned that you are trying to protect the president? it is recognising that there was substantial evidence for the president's believes. i do not understand your basis for saying i am being generous to the president. it seems a lot of effort to go out of your way... it is an accurate description. the question is, is the president right to expect loyalty and protection from his attorney
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generals? know he is not. one thing that comes out of this report is not necessarily obstruction but obsession. the president was obsessed with this investigation and he had this weird idea that the attorney general was his attorney. that was quickly contradicted when sessions recused himself which through the president into a rage. in defence of william barr, he was trying to respond to why this comes down to a question of contempt. the special counsel repeatedly says that the president seemed motivated not by an effort to stop the investigation but for other reasons, for example, mueller says the president was upset that james comey, the former white house, the former fbi director had refused to say publicly what he was saying privately that trump was not a target of the investigation and
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mueller gives great credence to that motivation. 0n the other hand he also says that some of trump's actions did create substantial evidence towards obstruction. people oi'i evidence towards obstruction. people on both sides have a lot here that they can take for their view. professor, thank you very much for joining us. let's talk about the politics. 0ur north american editor joins us now. where does this leave the president? i suspect if you are a twit—macro supporter you will say there was no action of illegality, there was no action of illegality, the president was right all along —— trump supporter. some believe trump was unfit to hold office, you were rear formed in that view. was the bar being set at a level where
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nothing illegal happened, that's all right then. i think congress will wa nt right then. i think congress will want to look much further at this. i think there are all sorts of things about the politics of the white house at the time that come out and oi'i house at the time that come out and on this key question on obstruction ofjustice, the quote i think is key to it is donald trump 's interference was mostly unsuccessful but that is largely because the persons surrounding the president declined to accede to his request. it looks like the team that said, i am ignoring you, mr president, saved him from himself. now the democrats have already said they want to hear from the man at the centre of all of this, robert mueller. he will be called to testify before the house and before the senate. what more light can he shed on the central question of whether the president intended to obstructjustice and
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intended to obstructjustice and intended to obstructjustice and intended to commit a crime? he might face some tough questions when he goes before that committee. he has said that the written answers provided by donald trump were inadequate. if that is the case, why didn't he use his subpoena powers to demand the president come before his investigating committee and answer questions directly and that was an arm wrestle that robert mueller chose not to get into with the president for fear it might lead to the ending of the mueller investigation and so he ducked that one. again on the question of if you thought there was a level of obstruction, why didn't you say they should be an indictment? what he has doneis should be an indictment? what he has done is he has taken the baseball bat, put it on the plate and he is leaving it for other people to hit. he is sent to congress, i have looked at it, i did not resolve this
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question but if you want to have a go, that's a different thing. there are different legal thresholds for indictment, a criminal charge and an impeachment which is a largely political process that would have to be done via congress. i think willey will face some tough questions when he goes before that committee because there will be those who read the report and say, you ducked it in the report and say, you ducked it in the end and you didn't resolve what you are meant to resolve. on that question of impeachment, the democrat leadership has suggested that he doesn't want to go down that route certainly for now, so the question is, if congress decides to pick up that baseball bat from the plate, what do they do with it? what can they do with it? i think the widergain can they do with it? i think the wider gain may be gain is too glib a word to use, i think the wider
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strategy for the democrats is they would like to see a president going into 2020 a bit wounded, a bit weakened, his name tarnished by the mueller investigation who will be easier to pick off in a presidential election. the danger of going down the impeachment route, is that what it results in is it unites the republican party, it leads to a good many independents thinking, this is ghastly, political, mean minded, mean—spirited and is all about political point scoring and for that reason i think the democratic leadership would rather see a weakened president than going down an impeachment route that might end in failure. john sobel, thank you very much forjoining us. in this massive report then, matthew, there area massive report then, matthew, there are a few key phrases that caused the president a whole host of problems but also potentially cause
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the democrats a whole host of problems. this particular phrase, while this report does not conclude that the president committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him, puts the ball now in nancy pelosi's court. she has to decide, do we go for impeachment, do i try and take the democratic party down that path or do i resist calls for impeachment, carry on investigations and weaken the president? how party is split on this. you have younger element saying, we need to impeach the president. you have others', more moderate democrats, those democrats who won the house of representatives, saying we need to leave this alone, move on from it. a new poll showing 54% of the country, democrats say it is time for us to move on and start doing other things and get back to business as usual.
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it has put the president in a tricky position and democrats in a tricky position and democrats in a tricky position as well. that poll is fascinating because it suggests that it will be very difficult, even if you call robert mueller in front of a committee hearing and get him to testify on the hill, even if you do that, he is a career civil servant, a man of great experience, he will not be led into any traps. he has written that report, every single page of it, he knows the detail of it and he would handle presumably any committee hearing with a great deal of sobriety and seriousness. they are not going to get a smoking gun from him so the question is, where does this go, when that poll suggests even democrats are beginning to tire of this whole thing. the tickly those in more conservative states. they now have
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to decide what they want to do with it when they come back from recess in ten days. jane 0'brien is outside the white house for us and has more on the reaction from there. the president, whatever is in that 448 pa g es the president, whatever is in that 448 pages very clearly saying today no collusion, no obstruction. the white house is performing a victory lap right now and kellyanne conway, his chief adviser has just been talking to us all and answering those very questions about obstruction. this issue that a lot of people say is not clear. she was asked about donald trump apparently ordering the firing of robert miller and she said in his defence that that was fine because he was not asking don mcgahn, his chief counsel, to break the law. the president had every right to fire robert miller if he wished. and in asking his administration to do so was absolutely within his rights to do. the fact they didn't was neither
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here nor there, he wasn't asking them to break the law, therefore he could not be held to be obstructing justice. she also said that if he asked her to do anything that was against the law, she would walk out of the room. she makes the point that intent matters. there was no intent. i also get the impression that she felt there was nothing more to explain now, you've got the report, there are 400 pages, this is it. in her words, report, there are 400 pages, this is it. in herwords, "nothing to report, there are 400 pages, this is it. in her words, "nothing to see". is there any early indication as to what the democrats do with this? we are seeing this already. they wa nt we are seeing this already. they want to listen to robert miller himself. they want to get him to testify. you've just been talking about that —— robert mueller. but there is a big dilemma. the fundamental question of collusion has been answered. the president did not collude, that's his headline and he has already shaped the narrative at this point. the white house is
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aware of this, if the democrats push this too far, they could end up being the beneficiaries. because it will start to look like a political witchhunt, now that the big report, this 400 plus page report, has been delivered, most of those answers have been given. what more can be democrats do with this? jane o'brien in front of a white house that is, like the rest of washington, calming down ahead of the easter weekend. thanks. today's report made it clear the russian government did interfere in the 2016 presidential election. in a " and systematic fashion." for more, i am joined now by former cia officer lindsay moran. thanks very much forjoining us. what more have we learnt about what russia did? well, we haven't learnt a lot more about the specifics of what russia did. it's pretty much what russia did. it's pretty much what we've already known. but, in some ways, we are a country that is
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like a frog in water that's been slowly warmed up and now we are at a rapid boil. 0ne slowly warmed up and now we are at a rapid boil. one thing that's been lost in the discussion today is that we are looking at it from an internal us political optic. we need to look at this from a geopolitical optic and consider how today's news is playing out in the kremlin. take aside the question of deliberate collusion or conspiracy. certainly, there was conspiracy on the part of there was conspiracy on the part of the russians. this systematic effort on the part of russia to disrupt and influence us elections in favour of a particular candidate who they could easily manipulate and control, mission accomplished. the effort of russia to sow the seeds of distrust and make us feel insecure about our institutions, mission accomplished. the goal of russia to my cars in political debate and distract us from the larger issue that a foreign
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entity, foreign intelligence, interfered with our elections. that's the thread that we have to be thinking about more than anything else. russia is in it for the long game, they been doing this for a long time and i think they've found their man in president man, they found their guy. that's fascinating. of course, it's not the united states that believes that there has been russian interference in the election processes. the same thing has been said about the brexit referendum here in the uk and other countries around europe have been concerned about possible outside interference in votes and elections in those countries. i wonder, from your cia day's perspective, whether your cia day's perspective, whether you think that countries the united united states are anywhere closer to controlling that interference —— countries like the united states was that we are nowhere near closer. the first step on the road to recovery is admitting there is a problem. one
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thing we have failed to do as a country is admit there is a problem. because we have an administration who has discredited our own intelligence community. that is very much part of the russian effort that was part. of their aim as well, to discredit our intel community and lose faith in the cia and the justice department. you can see that happening. we are not as prepared as we should be. this should be a huge wake—up call to us, beyond the culpability within this country. there is culpability from outside intelligence services. that is something we have to be aware of and proactively fighting against and preparing for in the next election and every election. lindsay, if we had known nothing about and had no discussion about what was in the mueller report, in a way, the release of this report ought to do one thing, it ought to unite all americans around the principle of not letting other countries
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interfere in america's democratic processes . interfere in america's democratic processes. we know that russia's aim is exactly the opposite and it seems to me that with the mueller report, they've succeeded even more in dividing the country. they have. another thing they can chalk up to mission accomplished is sowing rancorous partisanship, arguments within the united states so we are fighting amongst ourselves. as an american, i believe that corrupt officials should be held accountable and that no one is above the law. i think there is merit to figuring out if there was deliberate collusion and conspiracy. beyond that, there is the need to recognise, admit and confront the effort on the part of russia to disrupt our elections. what will they go after next? the power grids? a different part of our infrastructure? they've a different part of our infrastructure ? they've got a different part of our infrastructure? they've got to be feeling pretty good in russia
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because they have succeeded tremendously at our expense and our country's expense. i'm not suggesting no one should be held accountable and that there needs to be an investigation, causing a bit further signs of division that there is in the country and that can be sown. that investigation can be turned against america and can be used to exacerbate divisions. do you think that now that the mueller report is out, they will be a more concerted effort in the intelligence community in wherever it takes to make sure this doesn't happen again? there has been a concerted effort in the intel community, certainly behind the scenes. unfortunately, the intel community is swimming upstream because they are basically fighting against an administration that has publicly discredited them. internationally discredited them, he mitigated the intelligence community. it presents us as a country as a weakened state ——
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humiliated the intelligence community. while the democrats might wa nt community. while the democrats might want a weakened president and we can administration and vice versa, there are entities, to include russia, which is very powerful and skilful at what it does, what they want is a weakened america and we can't let them succeed. former cia analyst and a proactive, thank you forjoining us. a proactive, thank you forjoining us. lindsay. it is worth, when this report has come out, matthew, taking that big picture look. this is not about trump versus democrats versus congress versus the white house, this is about outside interference in democratic election processes and what a democratic processes and countries will do about that and try to stop it happening again? absolutely. more on that in the programme. this is beyond 100 days. more fallout from the publication of the mueller report. we will hear from a democratic member of the
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house intelligence committee. and the view across the political aisle, donald trump is my legal team says the report is a total victory for the report is a total victory for the president, reaction from the republican national committee. that is still to come. 0ur weather has undergone a transformation in recent days. not only are we seeing lots of sunshine but we also have had warmth, some spots in south—east england have seen highs of 23 celsius making it the warmest day of the year so far. there is more that to come over the next few days. for most of us, a fine end to the day, clear skies over night and a bit of mist and low cloud and perhaps eastern parts of scotland and england. for most of us, frost free night with some spots holding on to double digit temperatures. the long bank holiday weekend, this is the setup with high pressure anchored over scandinavia and we are drawing in that warmth from central europe,
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giving those temperatures a boost. there may be low cloud, mist and fog are about to start the day but that should burn back quickly and then a fine —looking day for all of us with lots of sunshine, blue skies will rule and the wind will be a bit lighterfor the north rule and the wind will be a bit lighter for the north sea and channel posts. it should feel noticeably warmer. widely, looking at highs of 22, possibly 23 celsius —— channel posts. each building on the weekend. 0n —— channel posts. each building on the weekend. on saturday, some spots in southern england could see highs of around 25. let's see how that co m pa res of around 25. let's see how that compares with some of our favourite european and eastern mediterranean resorts. it's cooler and more u nsettled resorts. it's cooler and more unsettled here. 10 celsius in istanbul on saturday. back home, lots of fine and dry weather once again. this strip of cloud, weather front are pushing into parts of northern ireland, western fringes of scotla nd northern ireland, western fringes of scotland and a mostly dry story, with one or two light showers but away from that, lots of sunshine on
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offer once again. we've got the warmth, highs, 24, possibly 25 celsius in some spots. easter sunday, the weather front may work its way further south into northern england before it retreats back up to north—west scotland. it may affect parts of northern ireland. mostly dry and it may produce one or two light showers before much of the uk, neverfine two light showers before much of the uk, never fine looking two light showers before much of the uk, neverfine looking day two light showers before much of the uk, never fine looking day with lengthy spells of sunshine and highs of around 23 celsius. easter monday, rain will try to edge its way in from the west but it doesn't look as though it makes any progress at the moment. anotherfine day though it makes any progress at the moment. another fine day with sunny spells.
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this is beyond one hundred days with me katty kay in new york, matthew price is in london. our top stories: the mueller report into russian interference in the 2016 us election campaign has been published, and president trump's team declare "total victory". i'm having a good day too. it was called no collusion, no obstruction. cheering and applause the report shows that president trump says his presidency was over when robert mueller was appointed, and he tried to get him fired. coming up in the next half hour: democrats say they
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want robert mueller to testify and congress could continue the investigation. while republicans say it's time to start investigating the people who were behind the mueller report. more on that story. the key question that remains, even after the redacted mueller report has now been published, is whether the president himself sought to obstruct justice. the attorney general william barr today said that the evidence developed by the special counsel is not sufficient to establish that the president "committed an obstruction—of—justice offense". he went on to argue that the president's behaviour through—out exonerates him. and it's because of that that the president say‘s it's now game over. they are having a good day. i am having a good day too. it is called ano having a good day too. it is called a no collusion, no obstruction. cheering and applause
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there never was, by the way, and there never will be. we do have to get to the bottom of these things, i will say. this should never happen. i say this in front of my friends, their wounded warriors. i just i say this in front of my friends, their wounded warriors. ijust call them warriors. wejust their wounded warriors. ijust call them warriors. we just shook hands and they look great. they look so good, so beautiful. i say it in front of my friends, they should never happen to another president again. this hoax, it should never happen to another president again. here is a reminder. this is what the president is causing a hoax. some of the pages look like this. there is sensitive information in it. the investigation itself took 23 months, and the scope of it was huge. it involved nearly 3,000 subpoenas, 500 witnesses and 500 search warrants.
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that led to nearly 200 individual criminal counts obtained against more than 30 people. and admissions of guilt by six people. one of the most high—profile cases was paul manafort, president trump's former campaign chief. he's beenjailed for charges stemming from the russia investigation and fraud. michael cohen has been sentenced to three years in prison and other key members of trump's campaign inner circle are all awaiting sentencing. let's cross now to washington and bring in republican national committee spokeperson liz harrington. thank you very much forjoining the programme. the president very clearly saying today no collusion, no obstruction, but let's quote the report again. the report does not conclude that the president committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him. this report is not as conclusive as the president is saying it is. i would have to disagree with that. it is a complete and total exoneration because what
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was the purpose of this investigation? it was to find collusion. in every single account that mueller looked into, there was no collusion, no conspiracy and no evidence of obstruction either. because the president duly won the election. he did not need russia's help. the democrats have been living ina help. the democrats have been living in a fantasy world ever since trying to say this presidency was somehow tainted by russia, that he was a russian asset even by these conspiracy theories reported by the democrats and placed in the media. now we know the truth. there was never any conspiracy, there was no collusion and there was no obstruction. but that is just collusion and there was no obstruction. but that isjust not what the report says. i am reading from it right now. the present‘s effo rts from it right now. the present‘s efforts to influence their election was largely... people around the
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president refused to carry out orders. it says the president did things to obstruct the investigation. no, it says maybe he suggested to engage, he vented frustration publicly and privately, we knew how he thought about this investigation. let's not pretend that the president wasn't in charge here. if he wanted to fire robert mueller, he had every right to come in my opinion. he would have done that. he did not need an aid to stop him from doing that. the president decided to stay out of the way of this investigation, this very sprawling investigation that cost is $39 million, issued 500 search warrants. he knew the truth. there was nothing there. they knew they didn't have any evidence of collusion and yet they continued this partisan witch hunt anyway. less, this isn't overfor the
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president, is it? it is right that congress should have oversight and it looks like they are going to exercise that oversight. you are right. the democrats are definitely going to keep pursuing this because they have nothing left. they can't argue on the issues, they can't argue on the issues, they can't argue on the economy, they can't argue on the economy, they can't argue on the results of no collusion and no obstruction so they are going to continue to subpoena bank records and try to start another political fishing expedition because they can't run on the record and they can't run on the record and they can't run on all the reasons why president trump won the 2016 election in the first place which was on the promises he made that he has keeping. the economy is growing, wages are up, has keeping. the economy is growing, wages are up, up 3.5%. they can't argue with the facts of what is actually going on in this country so they are going to have to distract with another political agenda. and
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yet they can point to several large sections in this redacted report which pointed to how the president operates, points to the fact that he said to his attorney general at the time, jeff sessions, you were supposed to protect me, when legally thatis supposed to protect me, when legally that is not the case, points to his distorted vision of his executive power, and that is pretty dangerous for a president who is already... his critics already say he is operating the presidency in a way thatis operating the presidency in a way that is illegal and immoral. operating the presidency in a way that is illegal and immorallj couldn't disagree more. if he wanted to get in the way of the truth and not to be transparent, why didn't he exert executive privilege which was his right to do. he let the complete report come out because he is a very transparent president and he didn't wa nt to transparent president and he didn't want to muddy the waters. he wanted the truth to be out there. the truth is out there and it says president
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trump was not willing to pay for opposition research. you know who was willing to pay? hillary clinton, the dn that and the fbi paid for a dirty dozier that was full of russian information and use it to spy russian information and use it to spy on the trump campaign and started this whole hoax in the first place. ok. national spokesperson for the republican committee. thank you. we can now talk to democrat congresswoman jackie speier who sits on the intelligence committee. she joins us from california. i don't know where to begin. the president has over and over again attempted to obstruct justice. president has over and over again attempted to obstructjustice. he wa nted attempted to obstructjustice. he wanted to make sure that the meeting that took place that was providing dirt on hillary clinton was changed
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ina dirt on hillary clinton was changed in a press release to indicate it was an adoption. he was trying to get michael cohen to talk about the deal at the moscow tower in a matter that made it seem like it wasn't going on during the election. this isa going on during the election. this is a president who has over and over again that i don't know if you can hear me. i can hear you find. we will try and get back in just a second and sort out these technical issues. congress is in recess at the moment. as soon as we get back up again, we shall talk to her. one of the things this report does is put all of this to democrats in congress. mueller has effectively said here is what i have found, this is what i haven't found, i will not draw a conclusion on this. congrats, it is now up to you. as we were
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saying, for democrats that is a double edged sword. do they go down the route of impeaching the president based on some of the things that mueller has said or do they decide that that is a stretch too far in terms of the legality of this and that they do not have a strong enough case and are now heading into a 2020 election and it could backfire against democrats who are seen as could backfire against democrats who are seen as overreaching and just carry on with other investigations? i think this puts democrats and conquest in a pretty tricky position. exactly. when you hear the republicans talk about it, there has been a two year investigation by a man, robert mueller who is accepted across the board as being somebody who you can trust. maybe president trump hasn't been particularly keen on him but broadly speaking there is bipartisan support for that man. two yea rs of bipartisan support for that man. two years of investigation, you have shown is the size of the report there. he has gone into detail. at there. he has gone into detail. at the end of that, he has not said
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something dodgy is going on. the end of that, he has not said something dodgy is going onlj the end of that, he has not said something dodgy is going on. i think we have fixed the technical issues. what do you do with this report now? well, with the report dealt up what the report did and how clear robert mueller was, his hands were tied. legal counsel has guidelines that says you cannot indict a sitting president. he tossed the ball to congress and said you need to pursue obstruction of justice congress and said you need to pursue obstruction ofjustice here. what is really important for all of your listeners to be aware of, attempting to edge obstruct justice listeners to be aware of, attempting to edge obstructjustice is a crime. there is no question that the president had tempted to obstruct justice. when the special cancer was appointed and he said my presidency is over, but speaks —— make the special counsel was appointed. he
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knows he is guilty and was afraid the connections would be unearthed between him and russian intermediaries. the bar for impeachment is high crimes and misdemeanours. do you think that this report and the phrases that you have had a chance to see in this report... it is hard to have read it all but i am sure you have read some of it. do the phrases that you read on this issue of obstructing justice now make you feel that the party should be inclined to pursue the option of impeaching the president? it isa option of impeaching the president? it is a very tough decision to be made now. on the one hand, if we do what i believe we must do as an institution to protect the congress of the united states and the presidency generally, we have an obligation to explore them. in so
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doing, politically, we could be creating an environment where the president can use it politically to when we election. it is that hopson choice really for their congress right now. the speaker of the house basically doesn't want to pursue this unless there are republicans on the senate side who willjoin with democrats to create a two thirds majority to convict the president. the house has the ability to impeach him because we need a majority and there is probably a majority of house democrats who would support impeachment. but then the question becomes is that the ability to convict? bill clinton who was impeached... go ahead. in the case of bill clinton, he was impeached by the house and then was not convicted by the senate. then the democrats
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gained seats the following year. if we are going to look at this from a political perspective, maybe we would not impeach but i don't think our obligation is to look at this politically. if a sitting president is not going to ever be indicted by the department ofjustice because they have this guidance, then it really becomes incumbent on congress to look very deeply and to recognise that if these are criminal acts and attempting to obstruct justice that if these are criminal acts and attempting to obstructjustice is a criminal act, i think we have an obligation to investigate further. 0k. thank you very much forjoining us. jackie speer has laid out the problem by democrats. there is enough that should lead them to look at the possibility that the president committed the crime. that could keep the bar of high crimes and misdemeanours. but also
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politically that could be very difficult for the democrats as they head into their 2020 election and they are trying to get donald trump out of the white house. she was marvellously frank there. on the challenge facing the democrats. nancy pelosi is reluctant to go down that path. absolutely. any investigation that they might choose to undertake would take a long time, certainly beyond next year's collection. this is beyond 100 days. still to come: we'll have the latest on the climate change protests in london as they continue into a fourth day. an education think—tank, in the uk estimates around 55,000 students ‘disappeared' from secondary school records without explanation in the five years to 2017. the education policy institute says it raises concerns about off—rolling where schools try to remove pupils with challenging behaviour,
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or whose poor exam results might damage league table performances. bra nwen jeffreys reports. this is bailey, he went missing from the system until this teacher gave him a second chance. for bailey it is the end of the journey. he started at one secondary but struggled. he then moved to another. they dissuaded bailey to go to home education. taking them off their school well into two years of wilderness. i feel like it really took away my ability to learn. this research says that as a year group moves through secondary, there are 55,000 unexplained moves. 22% are peoples moving from just 330 schools. they lose an average of 30 pupils from each age group. these
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types of moves, they are unregulated. there is no transparency or data and we don't really know what is going on with them. as a head teacher, jason took a big risk. the school will be held responsible for bailey's results.|j think we have got to reward inclusivity and we have got to recognise the schools who are picking up the pieces and giving the stu d e nts picking up the pieces and giving the students second, third, fourth, fifth chances. bailey has rebuilt his confidence with boxing. he became head boy and is predicted to pass seven gcses. bailey is on track to bea pass seven gcses. bailey is on track to be a successful amateur boxer but plans to go on studying too. let's have a look at some of the news now. the french president emmanuel macron has paid tribute to the hundreds of firefighters who saved notre dame cathedral.
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600 firefighters worked throughout monday night to put out the fire. emmanuel macron speaking on maundy thursday, as our paris correspondent lucy williamson reports. today france saw the faces of its heroes. the firefighters who on monday night pitted their bravery against a vast inferno and won. now filing into the gilded rooms of the elysee palace, the secular cathedral of the french state. translation: it's a great joy, a great honour. the paris firefighters are a humble and discrete unit and we are here as a community to honour the individual and collective efforts of my comrades. 0ne firefighter described emerging from a bell tower and seeing the roof engulfed in flames. it was only later we understood the risks we had taken, she said. the hardest thing was that we were so small compared to it. investigators have interviewed 40 people and forensic teams have begun to gather evidence at the site. but the structure of notre dame
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is still fragile, damaged by both the fire and the operation to save it. the threat to notre dame didn't die with the fire. several areas of the building have been badly weakened. some of the gables have already been given extra support. scaffolding is being brought in to secure the stonework and a tarpaulin is urgently needed to protect the vaulted ceiling from rain. across the riverfrom notre dame outside the town hall, crowds gathered this afternoon for a service of thanks. translation: i feel gratitude to the fire brigade. by risking your lives you saved part of ours. after the service, the crowd walked down to notre dame just as thousands did on monday night. standing with the cathedral in its hour of need, the mayor explained, as notre dame has for centuries stood with us. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris.
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well, as if there wasn't enough attention on the white house right now, today one of the key foreign policy initiatives of president trump's administration looks sha key. north korea has threatened to end nuclear talks with the united states unless secretary of state mike pompeo is removed as negotiator. pyongyang has accused mr pompeo of "talking nonsense" — of being "reckless" — they've asked that he be replaced by someone "more careful". the statement came just as north korea said it had tested a new tactical guided weapon — the first test since a failed summit between kimjong un and us president donald trump in vietnam in february. i can't ican't imagine i can't imagine donald trump paid much attention to this today. he was in bullish mood after the publication of the mueller report. i
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would have thought he headed down to mara largo its resort in florida for the weekend with a spring in his step. i would have thought he would have a nice break away from all of this politics and perhaps only start engaging on the north korea thought process when he returns from his easter break. yes. look at what the north koreans actually said. they have said that it was a tactical weapon, there is a lot of discussion here at the moment in intercommunity circles about what that means. most people don't seem to think that it represents something that is potentially nuclear would breach conditions of those talks continuing. it looks more like north korea trying to get attention and push back against the americans than it does something serious in terms of the negotiations. clearly things not going as swimmingly as they could have done. climate change activists have occupied sites across central london for the fourth day in a row.
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extinction rebellion are calling for the government to reduce the uk's greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2025. and in a documentary due to be broadcast tonight, sir david attenborough says climate change could cause "irreversible damage to the natural world and the collapse of our societies". rebecca morelle reports, and a warning — this report contains some distressing images. cheering blocking the streets, protesters from around the country descending on central london. rebellion! extinction rebellion leading another day of disruption. an attempt to force urgent action on climate change. this is the new wave of eco activism. it's giving climate change attention, but will it bring action? the campaigners here want greenhouse gas emissions to be reduced to zero by 2025. scientists say it's a target that's virtually impossible to achieve. the united nations agrees that we need to get to zero
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carbon emissions but over a much longer timescale by 2050. the uk government is aiming to reduce emissions by 80% by then. but they're considering going further. in any scenario, it will mean radical changes to how we live. it's perfectly achievable for us to get to zero emissions but it is a big challenge that we will have to grasp. it involves us using technologies that we know about and which we have been developing and which have been falling in cost actually quite remarkably in recent years. adding to these warnings is sir david attenborough‘s latest documentary. it reveals a rapidly changing landscape. in his starkest statement yet, the broadcaster says that climate change is the biggest threat we face. it may sound frightening, but the scientific evidence is that if we have not taken dramatic action within the next decade, we could face irreversible damage to the natural world and the collapse
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of our societies. last year saw record—breaking heat waves. in australia, as temperatures rose above 42 celsius, fruit bats were unable to survive. it's estimated that more than 10,000 of the animals died. scientists say the impacts of climate change are becoming clear, as is the new movement it sparked. joining the campaign is the next generation. students on strike around the world. with scientists warning that the time to act is running out, they say the fate of the planet is in their hands. rebecca morelle, bbc news. it is interesting what you are saying early in the week about how extension rebellion hasn't made it stateside. they have certainly made a mark over the last four days or so. a mark over the last four days or so. they have been camped in central london and other places. what is interesting within the group is we
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are now hearing how there is discussion within their numbers about what they do next. there is talk, a press release even how they wa nt to talk, a press release even how they want to shut down heathrow airport tomorrow, good friday, a busy travelling day. and discussion among their members whether that is wise. are they getting more support from the public to bring about this mass movement that they want? or would they be in danger of alienating that if they carry out mass disruption is like that at one of the world's busiest airports. a busy weekend. you meant it easter. we will bring you a bunny story. no, we are not. we are going to bring you a dog story. they may be man's best friend, but did you know that dogs can also help children learn to read? well, it's true. these four legged friends are being enrolled to help kids
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with their reading in primary schools. a charity in south wales sends trained dogs and their carers into the classroom to help children to relax when they're reading aloud.. maybe it would help people with their mother report. our weather has undergone a transformation in recent days. we are seeing lots of sunshine and warmth as well. in south—east england today have seen highs of 23 celsius making it the warmest day of the year so far. there is more of that took over the next few days. a fine end to the day this evening. clear skies overnight. a little bit of mist and cloud may return to eastern scotland and england but for most of us a frost free night. some spots holding on to double digits temperatures. this is the set up over the weekend, high pressure over scandinavia and we are drawing in the warmth from central europe giving temperatures a boost. to start the day, there may be low
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cloud, mist and fog around but that should bend back quite quickly. then there is a fine —looking day. lots of sunshine, blue skies ruling and there is lighter winds. widely, we are looking at how of around 22, possibly 23 celsius. that heat really building as we head into the weekend. saturday, some spots in southern england could see highs of around 25 celsius. let's see how that compares with some of our favourite european and eastern mediterranean results. here, it is cooler and more unsettled. 10 celsius in istanbul on saturday. back home, a lot of fine, dry weather to be had once again. there will be a strip of cloud pushing into parts of northern ireland and western fringes of scotland as well. it could produce light showers. away from that, lots of sunshine on offer once again and we have got the one.
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as of 24, possibly 25 celsius in some spots. easter sunday, our weather front might work its way further southwards into northern england before it retreats back up to north—west scotland. it might affect parts of northern ireland as well. a message row story but it may produce one or showers. for of the day, a fine looking day, lengthy sunshine with highs of around 23 celsius. easter monday, rainbow try to edge its way in from the west but at the it doesn't look as if it will make progress. another fine at the it doesn't look as if it will make progress. anotherfine day at the it doesn't look as if it will make progress. another fine day with sunny spells.
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this is bbc news i'm martine croxall. the headlines at eight. president trump has been cleared of colluding with the russians — but it's not all good news for the president, as questions still remain over whether he attempted to obstruct the investigation. ‘this is terrible. it's the end of my presidency‘, president trump's response the moment he found out about the mueller investigation. he then tried to get him fired, today donald trump was more upbeat. having a good day, i'm having a good day too. it was called... no collusion, no obstruction. will have more of that reaction to the report. facebook bans 12 far—right individuals and organisations in britain, saying they have no

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