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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 19, 2019 6:00pm-7:00pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 6. the prime minister has described the killing of journalist lyra mckee in londonderry as ‘shocking and truly senseless‘. it's also been condemned by political leaders in northern ireland and the irish taoiseach. hundreds of police have begun removing climate change protesters who've been blocking london's main shopping street all week. officers have been moving activists from a pink yacht that forms the centrepiece of the demonstration at oxford circus. councils, schools and community centres are increasing their support over easter for disadvantaged families — as figures show a record number of children with working parents are living on the poverty line.
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a vigil has been taking place in londonderry in memory of the journalist, lyra mckee who was shot dead last night. police have blamed dissident republicans. up to ten shots were fired at officers during a riot in the creggan area of the city. the killing has been widely condemned by politicians and community leaders. andy moore's report contains some flash photography. police say they went into the creggan area of the city to search for firearms. they were met with rioting. more than 50 fire bombs were thrown and two cars set on fire. during the disturbance, a man crouched in the street with a handgun and fired up to ten times towards police lines.
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ms mckee was hit as she stood beside a police land rover. the 29—year—old freelance journalist died in hospitalfrom her wounds. just before she was shot, ms mckee tweeted a photo of the scene with the caption, "absolute madness." a fellow journalist described what happened. no other distinguishable sound, the pop, pop, pop of a gun. when i heard that, i took cover behind a wall. but directly in my line of sight, i saw the police land rover right in front of me. and i saw a woman lying on the ground. police said they believe the murder was the work of dissident republicans in the new ira. this is a horrendous act. it's unnecessary, it's uncalled for, it's totally unjustified. but not only is it the murder of a young woman, it's an attack again upon the people of this city. you know, when i left religious education at 16...
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ms mckee has been described as a rising star ofjournalism, who had onlyjust moved to derry. here she was two years ago arguing for lgbt rights. we need to have conversations, difficult conversations, and fight for the hearts and minds of those who oppose us. this was the message to the men of ireland from the priest who anointed lyra in her hospital bed. stop, i would say what you're doing is... today is good friday. the good friday agreement. this is the day when christians celebrate jesus's conquering of sin, death and evil. and you are actually adding to that today. what you're doing is insulting to christians. from across the political divide, there's been condemnation of the murder. those people who carried out this attack do not have any support. attack have attacked all of us. they have attacked the community, they have attacked the people of derry, they have attacked the peace process, and they've attacked the good friday agreement. this was an attack on everybody
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in northern ireland. it doesn't matter if you are catholic or protestant, british or irish, this is an attack on democracy. police have called the murder calculated and callous. they are now appealing for calm. lyra mckee‘s partner sara canning said she had lost the love of her life to a "senseless act". the senseless murder of lyra mckee has left a family without a beloved daughter, a sister, an aunt, and a great aunt, has left so many friends without their confidant. victims of the lgbtqa community are left without a tireless advocate and activist. it has left me without the love of my life, the woman that i was planning to grow old with. we are all poorer for the loss of lyra. our hopes and dreams, and all of her amazing potential, was snuffed out by a single barbaric act. this cannot stand. lyra's death must not be in vain, because her life was a shining light in everyone else‘s life.
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and her legacy will live on in the light that she has left behind. thank you. police officials and community leaders have united to condemn the murder. the mayor of derry, john boyle said local people were appalled by what had happened. this dreadful murder was heinous in the extreme, and threatened the lives of many more. i just want to reflect on the fact that i personally knew lyra mckee. i've known her since she was 16 years old. she was bright, she was warm, she was witty. but, most of all, she was an outstanding individual, a great friend to so, so many people in this city in the short time she was with us. and we are brokenhearted for her family at their loss. again, ijust want to extend our
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deepest sympathies to them. there is an awful lot of anger in the city today. it has to be said, again, this was not done in the name of the people of the city. those responsible need to understand that. i can't put it any stronger than that. not only that, but the people of creggan absolutely abhor what happened last night. lyra was one of us. deputy chief constable, stephen martin asked for people to come forward with information to help police investigate the murder. so as well as making an appeal today for people to come forward with what they know to assist the investigation, i have another appeal today. there are people in this city who will know that the people they love are involved in organisations like the new ira.
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i would urge those people to have conversations in their home, in their family space, in lyra's memory, and to urge the people they love to step away from such violence, to step away from such organisations, and to recognise how out of step they are with the wishes, not only of the people of this city, but of the people of this island. we all want to live in peace, we all want a better future for our children. and last night's actions are just so out of step with what all of us want. so i would urge people in lyra's memory to have those conversations. let's return something good from last night's appalling events. hundreds of police officers have arrived in central london, stopping anyone they think is a protestorfrom getting down to oxford circus.
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the area has been the focus of a climate change protest, for the past five days. activists have also gathered at heathrow airport. so far, nearly 700 people have been arrested. sarah walton has the story. through the day to move people from here, it's just we have seen the police coming and periodically right through the day to move people from here, it's just calmed down at the moment, we're having some songs there's been some speeches made on the microphone that has been set up your. but in the last half an hour or so, there's been another four or five protesters taken away from police. you can see where people are sat down, lying on the road, the police were coming in groups of four orfive. they'll ask the protesters to move and then were protesting, saying no, they will literally lift them up and carried them down the bridge to take them to the waiting police vans. as i say, things have calmed down a little bit now,
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the police to seem to be hanging back in monitoring the situation. if ijust bring your around, you can see there is a constant police presence here but there does monitoring the situation just seeing what's happened that the police have said they have built up a good relationship of the protesters in earlier today the protesters were saying, they want people to be friendly to the police officers, not to give them any personal information but to remain on good terms. what they're finding is as fast as people are being taken away, more people are arriving to replace them. a very big crowd here now, several hundred people on the bridge and many others that have been arrested are returning here, i spoke to one woman who said she spent several hours at a police station, having been arrested at oxford circus. police gave her a cup of tea and then she was released and came straight back to the protest site. also very high—profile support today from celebrities, celebrity support. the actress, emma thompson, has flown to the uk from america and she has been taking part and the devastation and the demonstration of oxford circus. and she spoke to the
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crowds there earlier. i'm sure everyone feels the same, that to inconvenience people disrupt their lives is not desirable. but, sometimes as the suffragettes would have said when they're fighting for the vote on let us not forget, they disrupted an awful lot of peoples lives in order to get what we now take for granted. and what about the drain on police resources? that is up to the police, that is not our decision. we did not ask for police resources, it is not like we are burning things down, the police turned up because they were asked to turn up and that is not our responsibility. you ask the government about that or you ask westminster about that. they decided to spend their money in this way, which i think personally is a waste of our taxpayers money. we are not doing anything violent. now police have been criticised for not taking stronger action to remove the protesters but the scotland yard says more than 500 arrests have been made since these protests started in central london on monday and although today is a very public holiday for many people,
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the police have cancelled their rest days, they now have a thousand officers on the streets of central london. what the police are hoping for is that at some point, the protesters here at the oxford circus in parliament square will move and all form one central protest at marble arch, we have been speaking to protesters here today and they say they have no intention yet of leaving the site and they will stay as long as they can. live in oxford circus. the pink yacht which was the centrepiece of the demonstration at this particular site, that has now been removed by police. that is the latest from central london. a californian couple who pleaded guilty to severe child abuse charges — are due to be sentenced today. david and louise turpin beat, starved and shackled 12 of their 13 children in the family home. the children were rescued after one
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of the siblings managed to escape and contact police. the couple originally pleaded not guilty but later accepted a plea deal for charges of torture, child abuse and false imprisonment which will see them face a sentence of 25 years to life in prison. councils, schools and community centres in parts of the country are increasing their support over the easter holidays for disadvantaged families. figures show almost three million children with working parents — were living on the poverty line last year in the uk, a record number. the government says tackling disadvantage is priority, and is investing £9 million to give more access to holiday clubs. frankie mccamley has been to a youth centre in manchester — that has opened its doors for the first time this easter. school's out. and it's time for some good old fashioned fun. after a morning of pretty
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impressive activities, everyone at this youth centre in east manchester is working up an appetite. i'm eating mash, beans and sausage. and how is it, is it good? yeah. in the holidays, i'm so bored. but now it feels amazing to be here. how does being here compare to being at home? it's better here, because you get some fresh air. the scheme is in an area where almost half of families live below the poverty line. food is free today and throughout the school holidays, but in term time, even though meals only cost a pound, some parents can't always afford to pay. what's it like when you see those young children and you can see that they clearly can't afford to buy that food? it's heartbreaking. they sort of walk up and down, and they're watching other children, what they've got. they think we're just behind there, serving, but we're not. we're eyes all over, watching for that hungry child or,
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something's not right. and nobody will go hungry here. no. no one will go hungry. with the support of a government grant and money from the private sector, it's the first time they've opened for easter, and it's a lifeline for some working parents. in school holidays, i know they can come in, they can have breakfast and i know they'll get dinner. it's helped me out, or i'd have been really, really stuck this last 12 months, 18 months. really. manchester has one of the highest levels of child poverty in the uk. every week, around 1000 children and teenagers come to this youth centre. and it's notjust here. smaller schemes are being set up across the country over easter in schools, churches and community centres. around half the food served here is delivered by volunteers from a localfood bank. a few miles away, at the busy depot, despite quadrupling the numbers of meals they provide in the last three years, staff say there still aren't enough schemes
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open at this time of year to feed those who need it. our partners and charity members, theyjust don't have the resources to provide school holiday food in the summer, six weeks, as well as easter, so they are making hard choices. we would like to see more funding at easter time so we can work with more charities who want to do the easter holidays. lining up, ready, in position. and it's during the holidays when money can be tight. although children's clubs do relieve a bit of tension, council budgets are stretched, so it will be a struggle to provide resources like this everywhere. the bbc evening news is coming up after sportsday.
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at the expense of the saints go marching on in the lead as saint evans beats wigan and the good friday derby. knocked out of the masters at the quarterfinal stage. a big afternoon in the championships, they kept the pressure on their rivals with a vital victory over nottingham forest. failed to create much in the
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first half, but after he was sent off market, they took advantage with that curving strike, they had to wait though until the last ten minutes for him to sealed the win for them and moves them into the top two ongoing difference. they are ahead of leads who missed out on regaining second spot as he came from a goal down to beat them to— one. at elland road// earlier play off chasing bristol city were held at home by reading meaning middlebrough now sit in the final play—off spot, with their win over stoke city. bolton wanderers were relegated to league one after defeat to aston villa. leaders norwich play sheffield wednesday at 7.45 this evening. tomorrow, manchester city and tottenham meet for the third time in11 days, with both sets of players and fans still recovering from the most remarkable of champions league matches, which saw spurs make it to the semi—finals. for now the attention is back to the premier league.
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city can't afford any slip ups as they try to retain the trophy with tottenham still hoping to secure a top four spot. patrick gearey has more. you really how do you get up and go again after that? seven goals, to match turning decisions, thousands of hearts soaring or breaking one way or another. until the three days later, manchester city and tottenham meet again, thrown together by the roster. the champions league quarterfinals give way to premier league title rains, wednesday night to fuel them. the show must go on. looking backwards, looking behind,
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it is not going to help us to move forward. the day after, we have to get up and move forward. this kind of play stop i revenge might provide one motivation for the spurs, the league table is another. having played the same number of games. one hurdle cleared, one more strike towards the finish. tottenham are running a separate race further back on the track, they have their own challenge to finish in the top four and not let their journey challenge to finish in the top four and not let theirjourney in this league affect qualifications for next season. it is so difficult to tell them to think about last night and the possibility to play in the semifinals, but the possibility did it together and try and make sure that we are going to be there on saturday with the capacity to fight and to challenge them again. on
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wednesday night, it was hard to keep up, let alone forget. i know you're very disappointed. why? we were victorious. it comes along once in a generation but it comes along twice a week. footballers across england and wales are currently leading a 24—hour social media strike, in protest at how racism has been dealth with by football authorities and social media companies. among those taking part is tottenham defender danny rose, who was abused during england's euro 2020 qualifier in montenegro in march. the boycott kicks off the professional footballers‘ association‘s anti—racism campaign, entitled #enough. i think it is great that players are coming together to make it stand it a big statement as a group and i think that is a very powerful thing andi think that is a very powerful thing and i hope that does change mindsets and i hope that does change mindsets
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and beliefs. iam not a and i hope that does change mindsets and beliefs. i am not a great user of social media myself, i try to stay clear of all forms of it but thatis stay clear of all forms of it but that is just my personal preference. bannerfor players, that is just my personal preference. banner for players, it is an important part of their lives these days. so certainly i think it can make a difference. good friday has been a great one for super league leaders st helens. they beat bitter rivals wigan by 36 points to ten at the dw stadium. regan grace scored the pick of the saints‘ six tries to secure the first hat—trick of his career. hull fc took the derby bragging in style against their city rivals hull kingston rovers, winning 56—12 at the kcom stadium, running in nine tries in the process. this superb try from jack logan sealed his hat—trick and a record derby victory. elsewehere, bottom of the table leeds rhinos beat huddersfield giants 38—18, and the salford red devils won 36—12 at warrington wolves. scotland all—rounder con de
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lange has died aged 38. he was being treated for a brain tumour. born in south africa, he played 13 one—day internationals and eight twenty 20s for scotland between 2015 and 2017, and spent two seasons with northamptonshire in 2012 and 2013. let‘s round up some of the day‘s other sport now. and two—time winner and top seed novak djokovic has been knocked out of the quarter finals of the monte carlo masters by world number 1a daniil medvedev. medvedev will play another serb — dusan lajovic — next. reigning champion rafa nadal‘s hopes of an unprecedented 12th monte carlo title are still alive. he‘s through to the semi—finals after beating argentina‘s guido pella in straight sets. england centre ben te‘o is to leave the worcester warriors at the end of the season. the rugby league convert
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became warriors‘ best—paid player when he signed from leinster in 2016. england all rounder moeen ali smashed 66 off 28 balls as royal challengers bangalore set kolkata knight riders a target of 214 in the indian premier league. you can listen on the bbc sport website and app, as bangalore hope to secure just a second win in nine matches. amir khan is preparing himself mentally for the huge challenge of facing a man considered one of the world‘s best — terence crawford for the american‘s welterweight world titles. the weigh—in is to come a little bit later in new york, which is where we find our correspndent ade adedoyin. we expect khan to have the weight advantage, but will it count for much?
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yes, the city that never sleeps, he can see the hustle and bustle of midtown manhattan, does not get much more new york than this. taxis outside madison square garden, where that will take place in the next few hours. a lot riding on this spout, and f tomorrow night‘s fight, but they‘ll make a significance, it turns out that he is a very formidable champion. he has won titles in different weight classes, unify the welterweight title, undefeated in his professional career and he is looking for that signature victory that will give them that recognition. this may be his last chance to win a career title, at the age 17, a world champion by the age of 22, but on the way he suffered four defeats, three of them were knockouts and ones that people remember and it raises questions about his vulnerability. you have to ask him if he still has what it takes to
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compete with the best in the world. this is a fight that neither man can afford to lose in the atmosphere in new york really is building. i have to say that the majority of journalists that i have spoken to are predicting a terrence crawford when, but you cannot question a mirror, if he gets momentum earlier it will be a huge task for him. it could be the end of what is perhaps a tumultuous career. thank you for joining us on sports day. the world snooker championship gets under way at the crucible theatre in sheffield tomorrow. ronnie o‘sullivan is the bookmakers favourite to win the tournament, and the 43—year—old says he has taken inspiration from tiger woods‘s triumph at the masters as he chases a sixth world title. my my inspiration to watching them do that, i mean, all the degeneration
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players, draw inspiration from that. if you can do it, i suppose you can believe in yourself. british number one johanna konta is hoping for more of the home—crowd energy as great britain aim for fed cup promotion. britain face kazakhstan in their play—off at london‘s copper box arena this weekend, hoping to end a 26—year wait to reach world group ii. our tennis correspondent russell fuller has more. they have earned this opportunity on the back of four winds, in february, and for the fifth time in eight yea rs, and for the fifth time in eight years, they have a chance to win a playoff that would take them into the elite 16 team world group. the previous opportunities were away from home, this time finally, they have home soil as their advantage and will be a very noisy 5800 people
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inside the arena come saturday and sunday. britain‘s number one against the number two, and which they played foot tennis with the west hand ladies football. all of us are looking forward to the opportunity will come away we will come away with but we are all very much excited to have another opportunity to get to that world group two which we have x he had a lot of opportunities and that is a real feat in itself and we are looking forward to getting started. the second of saturday singles is katie who won all of her singles matches and kazakhstan‘s number one. on sunday, it will be the reverse singles if necessary the all important and decisive doubles rubber. the teams were evenly matched. that‘s all from sportsday.
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we seen plenty of sunshine and that helped to give temperatures an extra boost in fact all four nations have recorded their highest temperatures of the year so far and there‘s more to come for most of us as we head into the weekend. i see most of us, we have leather that is approaching from the atlantic that is producing more and to ireland and scotland overnight and i‘ll linger for much of the weekend. elsewhere under clear skies, we may see the return of some low cloud, mist and fog from places like lincoln share. temperatures should not trouble way too far even though there will be one 01’ too far even though there will be one or two cool spots, mist and fog will clear quite quickly but there will clear quite quickly but there will be that cloud draped through northern ireland and up at the westi n northern ireland and up at the westin scotland, quite breezy as
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well and we could see some outbreaks of rain on this but elsewhere, let your winds, lengthy spells of sunshine and that he‘d really building down towards the south of the uk we could see highs of 25 celsius.
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politicians from all sides take part in a vigil forjournalist lyra mckee, shot dead last night in rioting in londonderry. petrol bombs were thrown at police, with vehicles set alight and a gunman opened fire, hitting the 29—year—old. lyra mckee was described as one of the most promising journalists in northern ireland. her partner paid her this tribute. it‘s left me without the love of my life, the woman i was planning to grow old with. we are all poorer for the loss of lyra. her hopes and dreams and all of her amazing potential were snuffed out by a single barbaric act. we‘ll bring you the latest and be examining the causes of this outbreak of violence in londonderry. also tonight: police step up their tactics against climate change protesters in london,
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as arrests rise to nearly 700. dishing up during the easter holidays — why schools and youth centres in poorer areas are feeding local children outside of term time. whispering: let's all experience something... and the internet sensory sensation called asmr — and how it‘s gone mainstream. good evening. in londonderry, a vigil for the murdered journalist lyra mckee has been attended by politicians on both sides of the community. the 29—year—old was struck by a bullet as she was observing an outbreak of violence in the creggan district last night. at the vigil, her partner sara canning, paid tribute
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to her as a tireless advocate and activist, and described her death as senseless. police have started a murder inquiry and have blamed dissident republicans for her death. here‘s our ireland correspondent emma va rdy. shots ring out, a frightening throwback as violence erupts in derry. here, you see a gunman firing at police lines. then, they appear to try to remove the evidence. more than 50 petrol bombs were thrown, say police, and officers were shot at up to ten times. journalist lyra mckee was hit as she stood beside an armoured police vehicle. a reporter nearby tried to help. i could see a land rover and there was a young woman lying on the ground beside the land rover, unconscious, and her friends were beside her. they hadn‘t realised what had happened. someone turned around
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and saw her on the ground and theyjust started screaming. it‘s a sound i‘ll never forget. described as a rising star, lyra mckee was a gay rights activist and freelance journalist. within the lgbt community we have a saying that we tell people. we tell them "it gets better". and what i realised that day is it gets better for some of us. it gets better for those of us who live long enough to see it get better. just after 11 o‘clock, lyra mckee was taken to hospital in a police vehicle, but died of her wound. officers are treating her death as a terrorist incident and say a murder inquiry has started. this morning, there was dismay that tensions continue to resurface. this city already harbours many memories from northern ireland‘s bloody past. it‘s terrible. i felt ashamed to be a derry man. those sort of things should be long gone, should not be happening now. and we need people like lyra i‘m sorry.
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i couldn't believe it. itjust feels to me like we've gone ten steps back again, you know? so, just that type of violence in this town and the loss of a young life... it's very sad and i'm very sad because this is a lovely town. police believe the violence was orchestrated by the group known as the new ira. police say dissident republicans have been planning to attack officers over the easter weekend. yesterday, they carried out raids here on derry‘s creggan estate, looking for firearms. the response was the violence which led to lyra mckee‘s death. this is an horrendous act, it‘s unnecessary, it‘s uncalled for, it‘s totally unjustified. but not only is it the murder of a young woman, it‘s an attack, again, upon the people of this city. hundreds lined the streets as political leaders from all the main parties and both
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sides of the political divide came together in a show of unity. we are political leaders, religious leaders, civic society and we all stand shoulder to shoulder to say we do not want to see this, we‘re not going backwards. we all have to stand against theirs. this is an attack on democracy, it's an attack on everybody that standing here today. lyra mckee‘s partner publicly grieved. it‘s left me without the love of my life, the woman that i was planning to grow old with. we are all poorer for the loss of lyra. despite the gains derry has made, today there is a deep sense of loss. many hope to see a renewed stand against those who threaten to take the city back to its violent past. and we can talk to emma now. it is over 20 years on from the good friday agreement, how is violence still happening? derry has been a focus of dissident activity for a very long time. of
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course, today, paramilitary groups have mass lurch is capacity to carry out the kind of attacks they once did during the troubles but nonetheless, is a much smaller groups do still exist. dissident groups do still exist. dissident groups who believe in using violence to try and bring about a united ireland and police here are trying to counter that threat every single day. police say that it is the so—called new ira who pose the greatest threat here in derry. one of the biggest problems for communities is the attempt by these groups to try and influence young people to come out onto the streets and to take part in their activities. last year, we saw a week of writing here in derry. in january, we saw a car bomb detonated outside the city‘s court house. for people who call this city their home, they are somewhat accustomed to knowing that violence will occasionally spill out onto the streets but even during the darkest day of northern ireland because my troubles, only one journalist was ever killed, so what happened last night has provoked a great sense of
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shock. there is a sense the death of a journalist will have further damaged these dissident groups, the image of these dissident groups in peoples eyes. emma, many thanks. emma vardy, there. hundreds of police officers have closed in on protesters in central london, as demonstrations entered a fifth day. so far, nearly 700 people have been arrested. protestors want to raise awareness of climate change, and are demanding a drastic speeding up of the government‘s plan to cut carbon emissions. but many argue their target is unrealistic. sangita myska reports. following five days of disruption, the police began the work of removing the pink boat. the rallying point for climate change protesters in the heart of the uk‘s biggest shopping district, oxford circus. earlier today, 1000 police officers had poured onto london‘s streets, drafted in to end the climate change
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protests that had brought parts of the capital to a standstill. the home secretary says he expects the police to use the full force of the law to end that disruption. it‘s certainly different from the sort of protest we are used to and we are an organisation that learns and we will debrief this operation once it is finished and we will learn what works and what didn‘t work, so if groups choose to take this approach again in future, we will be better placed to deal with it more swiftly. at waterloo bridge, a stone‘s throw from parliament, it‘s a game of cat and mouse. campaigners are lifted and removed by officers, some to return hours later, to do the same again. in five days, nearly 700 arrests and no end in sight. i've come out to do my bit and we are going to come back on monday and we'll be getting arrested again and may be locking on here again, doing what's necessary until the government is prepared to speak with us. today in france, officers used
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very different tactics. at the french bank, societe generale, police used pepper spray to remove climate change protesters who‘d blocked employees from getting into work. back at oxford street, retailers claim the disruption has cost them millions of pounds in lost trade, but campaigners say it is a price worth paying until their calls for radical government action to combat climate change are acted on. sangita myska, bbc news. two women, aged 22 and 36, have died after they got into difficulties in the water off aberdeen beach. the emergency services were sent to the scene at around quarter to one this morning after reports of two women in the water. they were picked up by the lifeboat service and taken to hospital but both later died. police scotland say that the two women, who were foreign nationals, lived in the city. a court in california has been hearing from some of the 12 children who were imprisoned, shackled and abused for years by their own parents —
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david and louise turpin. both pleaded guilty in february and within the last half hour have been sentenced. our north america correspondent sophie long was in court. that sentencing hearing hasjust drawn to a close. david and louise turpin were sentenced to life in prison for the abuse they inflicted upon 12 of their 13 children. they we re upon 12 of their 13 children. they were hugely emotional scenes in that courtroom as you can imagine. two of their children read written testa m e nts, their children read written testaments, they sat crying as they watched and listened. one of their daughters visibly fail approached the podium. she said, my parents took my whole life but i‘m taking it back. i am a fighter and i am strong. next, one of their sons read a statement from one of his sisters and in his own words he said, i cannot describe in words what we went through. he said he still has nightmares about his siblings being chained up. he said, that is the past and this is now he talked about how much he learned since january
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when they were freed. he said he had learnt to ride a bike and swim. another of the children said she loved her parents wanted to be able to visit them and talk to them on the phone. they believed that everything they did was to protect us. everything they did was to protect us. after we had from the children, louise turpin spoke from her seat. she said that she was sorry for everything that they had done, they are very proud of their children and they love the more that they can imagine. thejudge said the only they love the more that they can imagine. the judge said the only a good thing they had done was plead guilty so that children didn‘t have to relive the trauma they had suffered. it‘s likely both of them will spend the rest of their lives in prison. sophie, thank you. a 74—year—old man in north wales has suffered "life—changing injuries" after being shot with a crossbow. the man, who said he was trying to fix a faulty satellite dish outside his home when he was hit, managed to make his way back into his home on the outskirts of holyhead and raise the alarm shortly after midnight. he is in critical condition in hospital, and police are investigating. tens of thousands of people in ukraine have gathered in the olympic stadium in kiev for a debate between the country‘s
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two presidential candidates. the current president, petro poroshenko, is taking on his challenger, the comedian, volodymyr zelensky, before sunday‘s run—off vote of the presidential election. mr zelensky has a commanding lead in the opinion polls, despite having no political experience. schools and community centres in parts of the country are increasing support over the easter holidays for poorerfamilies. figures show almost three million children with working parents were living on the poverty line last year in the uk — a record number. the government says it‘s investing £9 million for more access to holiday clubs. frankie mccamley has been to a youth centre in manchester that‘s opening its doors at easter for the first time. school‘s out. and it‘s time for some good old—fashioned fun. after a morning of pretty impressive activities, everyone at this youth centre in east manchester is
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working up an appetite. i‘m eating mash, beans and sausage. and how is it? is it good? yeah. in the holidays, i'm so bored. but now, it feels amazing to be here. how does being here compare to being at home? it's better here, because you get some fresh air. the scheme is in an area where almost half of families live below the poverty line. food is free today and throughout school holidays, but in term time, even though meals only cost £1, some parents can‘t always afford to pay. what‘s it like when you see those young children and you can see that they clearly can‘t afford to buy that food? it‘s heartbreaking. they sort of walk up and down, and they‘re watching other children, what they‘ve got. they think we‘re just behind there, serving, but we‘re not. we‘re eyes all over, watching for that hungry child or something‘s not right. and nobody will go hungry here. no. no-one will go hungry.
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with the support of a government grant and money from the private sector, it‘s the first time they‘ve opened for easter, and it‘s a lifeline for some working parents. in school holidays, i know they can come in, they can have breakfast and i know they‘ll get dinner. it's helped me out, i'd have been really, really stuck this last 12 months, 18 months, really. manchester has one of the highest levels of child poverty in the uk. every week, around 1000 children and teenagers come to this youth centre. and it‘s notjust here. smaller schemes are being set up across the country over easter, in schools, churches and community centres. around half the food served here is delivered by volunteers from a localfood bank. a few miles away, at the busy depot, despite quadrupling the numbers of meals they‘ve provided in the last three years, staff say there still aren‘t enough schemes open at this time of year to feed those who need it. our partners and charity members,
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theyjust don‘t have the resources to provide school holiday food in the summer, the six weeks, as well as easter, so they‘re making hard choices. we would like to see more funding at easter time so we could work with more charities who want to do the easter holidays. lining up, ready, in position. and it‘s during the holidays when money can be tight. although children‘s clubs do relieve a bit of tension, council budgets are stretched, so it will be a struggle to provide resources like this everywhere. frankie mccamley, bbc news, in manchester. this month, the singer—songwriter billie eilish became the youngest person to reach number one in the uk album charts. the video of her single bad guy uses one of the fastest growing trends on the web. known as asmr, it involves sounds and whispers recorded into a microphone — which stimulate tingling feelings in many users. earlier this year, an asmr advert played during the super bowl — more proof the trend has gone mainstream. our media editor,
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amol rajan, is all ears. whispering: let's all experience something... ..together. nearly 17 million people have seen this ad on youtube since it was first played during the us super bowl injanuary. it‘s the marketing world tapping into the biggest internet phenomenon you might not have heard of — it‘s called asmr. asmr stands for autonomous sensory mmeridian response and it‘s a tingling sensation that generally starts at the top of the head and moves back down the neck and across the shoulders. scraping toast. dr tom hostler is one of a small number of academics researching the intense and calming effect certain intimate sounds have on many of us. there are over 10 million asmr videos on youtube alone, along with so—called satisfying videos, such as this one.
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crunching. so, we asked members of a dance academy to explain the appeal. very tingly, very like... ahh! i think itjust relaxes me, like, i‘m able to watch it. i've been given a massage in my brain. there's just too much stress, so when you find some free time, you just like to listen to a calming or relaxing sound. for some, asmr is a career. emma smith, known as whispersred, makes asmr videos for a living in what she calls her tingle shed. whispering: what are you setting out to do? whispering: calm the viewer. water cascading. whispering: i am definitely an amsa experiencer. because that was like there was a waterfall in my head. asmr has entered popular culture. earlier this month, 17—year—old american billie eilish topped the uk charts. as go magazine put it, "get your pop and asmr fix all in one place."
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whispering: sensual rather than sexual. intimate rather than erotic. asmr could revolutionise advertising, because these videos are a zone in which you‘re relaxed, focused and highly receptive to what you see and hear. scissors snipping. through asmr, the internet provides a soothing antidote to the age of overload. the distinction between the online and off—line worlds is collapsing, one whisper at a time. whispering: amol rajan, bbc news. there‘s more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. we‘re back with the late news at 10pm. now on bbc one, it‘s time for the news where you are. goodbye.
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hello, this is bbc news with lu kwesa burak. a 1a—month—old boy has survived a dingo attack that
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took place on a popular australian tourist island. the toddler suffered a fractured skull and deep cuts to his neck and head. he‘s recovering in hospital. from sydney, phil mercer reports. the child was rescued from the dingo‘s jaws by his father, who was awoken by loud screams. the toddler had been dragged several metres in the darkness from the family‘s camper van on fraser island, north of brisbane. he was badly hurt, but paramedics say it could have been much worse. the dingoes made their way into the trailer and grabbed the boy and dragged him away from the camper. and the parents woke up to the baby screaming and chased after him, having to fight the dingoes off to take the boy away from the dingoes. he was apparently grabbed around the neck area and dragged away. so if it wasn‘t for the parents fighting off the dingoes, there would probably
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be severe injuries. fraser island is home to several packs of dingoes. attacks are uncommon, but earlier this year, a six—year—old boy was bitten. in 2001, another boy was killed on the island after being mauled. dingoes were at the heart of one of your‘s most infamous court cases. —— australia‘s most infamous court cases. in 1980, a nine—week—old baby went missing at uluru, or ayres rock, in central australia. she was taken by a wild dog, but suspicion fell on her parents. the child‘s mother was jailed for life for murder and her father convicted of being an accessory. it would take years for them to be exonerated. what occurred on 17 august, 1980 was that shortly after mrs chamberlain placed the baby in the tent,
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a dingo or dingoes entered the tent, took azaria, and carried and dragged her from the immediate area. on fraser island, specialist rangers have been brought in to warn tourists to stay away from wild dogs. if the animals responsible for the attack on the toddler can be identified, they could be put down. phil mercer, bbc news. for more than two million people in england, the blue badge is essential — allowing people with disabilities to park close to their destinations, including on yellow lines. now it could be extended to those with hidden conditions, such as autism or mental health issues, in the biggest change to the system in a0 years. graham satchell reports. hold on to me, please. just going out to the park can be a challenge for hayley. her five—year—old son, noah, has autism. he often has his own agenda and ideas about what he‘d like me to be doing. he knows he needs to walk on the pavements but he doesn‘t always follow those rules.
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hayley wants to find a space as close as possible to the park so she doesn‘t have to cross too many roads. ok, so we‘re just driving around and i can see a couple of blue badge spaces that are empty. otherwise there aren‘t any spaces so... i need to get out of the car. we‘re going to go and park now, ok? as the tension starts to rise, hayley ends up in a supermarket car park. having a blue badge would make a huge difference to us. it would give noah much more freedom, much more independence. if the risk is too high then without the blue badge we wouldn‘t be able to go out. so i think it would make a huge difference. the blue badge scheme has already changed in scotland and wales to include people with so—called hidden disabilities. when england follows suit later this year, the criteria for getting one will also change. as well as physical disability, badges will be issued to someone who can show they can‘t make a journey without it causing very
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considerable psychological distress. some, like alan norton, are worried. he has been a wheelchair user since he contracted polio as a three—year—old and says finding a blue badge space now can be a challenge. i really have some concerns about expanding the scheme even further. we are already having to... i might have to wait for an hour to get parked. i think we have to go back to the basics of the blue badge. it is there about lack of mobility and i think we should stick to that and keep to that criteria is the main kind of criteria that needs to be applied. alan eventually finds a space. it will be up to local authorities to administer and issue the extended blue badge scheme. it is also up to them how many parking spaces there will be. i would hope that if there are pressures in certain areas and in certain parts of the country, that local authorities
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would look at that. but you cannot discriminate against certain types of disability and you certainly shouldn‘t discriminate against those with a hidden disability. noah has finally made it to the park and, after some more negotiation, he finds his way to the swings tojoin his sister and grandparents. the government in westminster says extending the blue badge scheme will ensure even more people can go about their daily lives without worrying about how they will get from one place to another. that is certainly hayley‘s hope. whether it works in practice is less clear. graham satchell, bbc news. a small bone in the knee that had been disappearing from the human body is making an unexpected return. the purpose of the fabella, in a tendon behind the knee, is not clear and its return is a bit of a pain because it‘s linked to arthritis. researchers say the resurgence of the may be down to better nutrition.
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the uk‘s first ever guide horse has taken a ride on a train — to see how well he‘d fare with public transport. this is digby, a 20—month—old miniature horse. he‘s training to assist people with visual impairments. he travelled on newcastle‘s metro train to prepare for life in london. digby is described by his owner as affectionate and loves to be petted. time for a look at the weather with mel coles. good evening. we‘ve seen plenty of sunshine across the board through the day today. and temperatures have responded. not times that sunshine turned hazy, but not spoiled the feel of the day. while that sunshine has given our temperatures and extra boost. all four nations have recorded their highest temperatures so recorded their highest temperatures so far, and warmth is to come for most of us as we head to the weekend. we have an area of
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high—pressure sitting over scandinavia, a settled story but we have this weather front working its way in from the atlantic that will make some progress, introducing more cloud and the parts of northern ireland in western fringes of scotla nd ireland in western fringes of scotland overnight, turning a bit more breezy here. elsewhere, lighter winds, clear skies and the return of low cloud, mist and fog into lincolnshire and yorkshire. while temperatures shouldn‘t drop away too far, there will be 1—2 cool spots in northern and eastern england. early morning mist and fog will clear quickly, but we still have that band of cloud draped across northern ireland up to scotland and northern ireland up to scotland and northern ireland is where it will be a blustery day. —— northern isles. the heat is building towards the southern half of the uk, and we could see highs of up to 25 celsius here, cooler underneath that clad with outbreaks of rain. heading into saturday night, we have high pressure in charred tobacco charge,
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parts of scotland introducing outbreaks of rain sometime. some mist and fog anywhere on easter sunday that will clear quite quickly. we still have that cloud producing some rain, and underneath that cloud it will be quite blustery at times for northern ireland and scotland. but elsewhere, rather like saturday, lengthy spells of sunshine and feeling warm with highs of around 23—24dc. heading into easter monday, it looks as though pressure will be building further. as a result, it will push this weather front back out towards the west. it looks as though it starts to retreat, and will linger out towards the west. so we will all have a fine, dry day with lengthy spells of sunshine. quite a noticeable breeze bubbling up as the day goes on, but it will be another warm day for many places, looking at temperatures reaching 23—24dc.
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this is bbc news, i‘m lukwesa burak. the headlines at 7. police investigating the murder ofjournalist leera mckee in londonderry last night release cctv footage of the gunman and call for the public‘s help lyra mckee was described as one of the most promising journalists in northern ireland. her partner paid her this tribute it's it‘s left me without the love of my life, the woman i was planning to grow old with. we are all heard for the loss of. our hopes and all of her amazing potential was snuffed out by a single barbaric act. police step up their tactics against climate change protesters in london, as arrests rise to nearly 700 an american couple, who tortured 13 children

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