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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 21, 2019 8:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning and welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and mega munchetty. our headlines today. there have been several explosions at churches and luxury hotels in sri lanka — more than 100 people have been killed and hundreds more injured. overnight, police remove some climate change protestors from waterloo bridge — it's still closed and demonstrations continue in central london. a message of hope and resurrection — notre dame's easter service finds a new home but there's unrest on the streets during the latest anti—government yellow vest protests in paris. are you one of the millions using these passwords? the national cyber security centre warns they are among the most hacked.
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and we may have seen amir khan fight for the last time. his world title shot at madison square garden was ended by a controversial low blow, terence crawford retaining his welterweight crown. good morning, another very warm and sunny day for most of us as we head into next week, we are looking at a change in the weather. join you later for the change in the weather. join you laterfor the details. change in the weather. join you later for the details. good change in the weather. join you laterfor the details. good morning. it's sunday, 21st april. our top story... more than 100 people are reported to have been killed in a series of explosions in sri lanka. hundreds have been injured after blasts in two churches and a number of hotels. 0ur reporter azzam ameen sent this report from the capital colombo. i am in front of the st anthony's church where the attack took place around 8.45 local time this morning. ijust went inside and it is
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completely destroyed. i can see a lot of devastation inside and the police are not allowing us to go further, but they say that at least 26 dead bodies are inside which have to be removed shortly. so, this is a major shock for the people who are just coming for sunday prayers, easter prayers. they were not expecting these and there has been a lot of panic because a lot of people have now come to this place to see what happened to their relatives. we are also hearing more attacks. there were three 5—star hotels in colombo where there were blasts reported and another church which is nearby, several miles away, was also under attack. in the eastern city, batticaloa, where another major blast went on, another church, which killed dozens of people. ukrainians head to the polls today in the country's presidential election. voters face a choice between incumbent president petro poroshenko and television comedian and political newcomer, volodymyr zelensky. 0ur correspondentjonah fisher is in the capital, kiev, for us.
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good morning. it is the comedian who has his nose ahead? yes, good morning from kiev. ukrainian is facing a huge choice, between a man who has been the president for the last five years, petro poroshenko undelete into the political unknown with this comedian candidate, volodymyr zelensky. i am at a polling station where mr zelensky will come in to vote in the next hour arsenal. more journals than voters at this point. he has run an extraordinary campaign. he has not held rallies or done speeches, we do not know what he stands for politically but people here in ukraine are fed up politicians so every time the president says you must vote for me, i'm the experienced politician, you must trust me, this has turned people
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off. according to the opinion polls, mr zelensky said for a big wednesday. —— is set for a big win today. hundreds of extra police officers have been drafted into central london to help clear climate change protestors from the capital's roads. oxford circus was reopened to traffic yesterday afternoon, but demonstrators are continuing to occupy waterloo bridge, which is closed, and parliament square, as leigh milner reports. throughout the night, specialist officers worked carefully to remove protesters who had attached themselves to a truck on waterloo bridge. after being up there for about two hours or so, this protester is now being carefully hoisted down the side of this truck using specialist equipment. he has been up there for about two hours and officers are doing their best to get him down safely. it has been almost a week since the extinction rebellion protest began in central london. so far, there have been 750 people arrested and 28 charged, according to the metropolitan police. i guess we're going to here
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until the government declare a climate emergency, and agreed to sit down and have a conversation that we feel is crucial. every day, more than a thousand officers police the protests, and an extra 200 have been requested to help from neighbouring forces. some people are here because it is kind of a mini party. because they are really here for the cause, and i guess you have everything in between. this morning, waterloo bridge remains closed to traffic as protests continue there and on parliament square. the main easter sunday celebration in paris, which would have taken place at notre dame cathedral, will instead be held at the church of saint—eustache, as workers continue the task of making the cathedral safe following monday's fire. last night, french television put on a concert of music to raise funds for the renovation. almost £1 billion has
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been raised so far. hugh schofield is in paris for us this morning. good morning. a gorgeous sunny morning there but the ruins of notre dame. they are very much in the hearts of people in france? yes, absolutely. and she said, the main easter service which would have taken easter service which would have ta ken place easter service which would have taken place there has been relocated to this church on the north back of the river stand. not far away from notre dame. there will be large crowds gathering in an error to further service which will be presided over by the archbishop of paris where the choir of notre dame will be singing. what has been detectable for me over the last couple of days, moving among the congregation at the various easter
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services is how christians in paris, far from being weighed down by what has happened are almost buoyed up by it. there is a kind of symbolism in what has happened to notre dame cathedral, it is a cathedral which will be rebuilt, there is the hope of resurrection. that for them at easter time is very apt. far from seeing despair, one sees a good deal ofjoy and hope. we were also talking about this concert, raising almost £1 billion, some controversy about how people are donating or why they are donating to this cause and not others? quite a lot has been made of this in the press and certainly there are some voices which the if a billion can be raised for the roof of a cathedral, why is that money no meat available for all the other causes people have been
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protesting about? —— that money not made available. we saw the yellow vests were protesting again yesterday, it is still very much a force in france and there are people in that movement who are making the point that money seems to be easily available when the big multinationals feel they want to make a pr gesture regarding the cathedral but not on other matters as it comes to alleviating social misery and so on. for me it is a bit ofa misery and so on. for me it is a bit of a falsity and not that most people in france parts of. rescuing notre dame is very much a national priority. thank you very much. prison staff are using new technology in five jails in england and wales to find phones being used illegally by inmates. the system produces a heat map when a mobile is detected, allowing officers to trace the device to a particular cell. ministers hope the technology will also help tackle drug smuggling
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and violence in prisons. if your password is 123456, then you share it with more than 23 million people. that's according to a study published today by britain's cyber security watchdog. the national cyber security centre says people should make it harderfor hackers to access their data by using three random but memorable words. 0ur security correspondent gordon corera has more. a password is supposed to keep our information secure, but as we have all had to use more and more passwords, the temptation is to keep them simple. that, though, can be a mistake. a new study which analyses the passwords that have already been stolen shows the risks. the most used password overall is "1231156" ,
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appearing more than 23 million times in the study. the next biggest is the not much more imaginative "123456789". and the phrase "password" appeared 3.6 million times. all of these are easy for a hacker to guess. when it comes to the premier league, it seems liverpool are champions. it's the team most picked, with chelsea second, followed by arsenal and man united. as for fictional characters, the number one choice is superman. the study was released by britain's national cyber security centre, part of gchq, ahead of their annual conference this week. they are calling on people to try something different. they want people to combine three random but memorable words. there are five simple things we are saying: passwords, get your three random words. password manager, back—up your data. do two—factor verification if it is available to you, and also, when those updates for your apps come through, do it. nearly half the people in the survey said information on how to stay
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secure online is confusing, and as we move more and more of our lives online, the hope is that today's survey may make some people think again before they take the easy route when it comes to their password. pope francis will lead easter sunday celebrations at the vatican later this morning. the 82—year—old pontiff, leader of the world's 1.3 billion catholics will say mass in st peter's square. worshippers and pilgrims have travelled from around the globe. her majesty the queen is celebrating her 93rd birthday today. elizabeth ii is britain's oldest and longest—reigning monarch. she is exactly 11 years and four months older than queen victoria, the next oldest ruler. the queen has another official birthday on the second saturday in june, to celebrate the landmark publicly. lots of statistics about her majesty
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flying around today, she has met 11 of 12 us presidents. she has signed more than 3500 bills into law during the course of her reign. we will have the weather shortly. but we need to bring you up—to—date with ernie studies. —— our main story. more than 50 people have been killed in a series of explosions in sri lanka. the blasts happened at a number of churches and hotels. 0ur south asia correspondent rajini vaidya nathan joins us from delhi. bring is up—to—date with the latest. as you said, the death toll is rising. we do not have official numbers but one hospital has told the bbc they believe there have been some foreign fatalities, we're not sure what nationality is. remember three of the blast happened at
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high—end luxury hotels. three others happens at churches during easter services before nine in the morning. there are images on social media which shows the churches being damaged. people look like they are panicking trying to escape the churches. the sri lankan prime minister has given a statement, saying i strongly condemn the cowardly attacks on people today and i call on 03 lancasters remain united and strong. please avoid propagating unverified reports on speculation. —— sri lankans.. this is the first violence since the end of the civil war. we are just watching some pictures, mindful of what you said about avoiding speculation, any idea who has been responsible for something like this
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which was clearly coordinated? as the government say, it is too early to speculate but this is a surprise. there have been tensions, yyeah go in through anchor there were tensions, but nothing on this scale since the seven year —— since the civil war ended a decade ago. we had a statement from the finance minister on twitter who said his attacks appear to have been well coordinated, and attempt to create murder, mayhem and anarchy. but at this moment the administration officials are not apportioning blame and no groups have come forward to ta ke and no groups have come forward to take responsibility. for the churches in particular, there were easter services and people were attending, although christianity is attending, although christianity is a comparatively small religion it is nonetheless disparate comes with many different religions? that's
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correct. lots of different tensions. 0n the whole, religions left peacefully in sri lanka so this is why it has come as a huge shock. whoever was behind it specifically. if you look at the targets, three luxury hotels. we know from one hospital there will be foreign casualties. that was clearly, potentially a guess, too early to speculate but targeting foreigners by targeting those for tales but also targeting specifically members of the christian faith while they we re of the christian faith while they were worshipping. those attacks took place just as the easter service was in full swing at it 45 in the morning. the images were very distressing. i am sure as the day goes on, we will hear from distressing. i am sure as the day goes on, we will hearfrom on distressing. i am sure as the day goes on, we will hear from on the ground on sri lanka that the
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estimate of 100 dead is a conservative one. thank you very much. we will keep you up—to—date on the bbc news channel through the day, more than 100 dead and many injured in those coordinated attacks. if you're a liverpool fan called ashley, you might just be the perfect target for cyber criminals, as a new survey reveals that millions of us are using our own names and favourite football team as passwords. the national cyber security centre says people need to make it more diffcult for hackers to access their data. we're joined now by technology expert dan sodergren. good morning. good morning. you have been hacked. straight to. haven't we all? it is interesting to know how many people have been hacked, it is pa rt many people have been hacked, it is part of modern life. there are so many data breaches nowadays. you can go to our website cold have you been
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fooled? you can find out how many times you have been hacked. by do you think you are? i think when i was younger it is to do with not having the best past word. they were easy to find out, some even had my name on it. that was a long time ago. most probably because of the passwords. so liverpool is a weak password, so is one to 345. —— one, too, three, four, five. that is justly safe. what should you be aiming for? —— that isjust justly safe. what should you be aiming for? —— that is just lazy. what they are telling you to do is pick three random words, computers cannot work out the randomness of the human brain. i took them from my favourite book. do not tell us. i
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took them from my favourite book, highlighted a page, highlighted that the words and that is what i use plus!. the favourite words from your favourite book. from a random page. how do these work for hikers?m favourite book. from a random page. how do these work for hikers? if you look at how you can look at how your social media profile works, and may not be your name or your children's name. also on social media if you like things like eminem or 30 cents, they are used often. it gives you a picture of this person of a certain age. not too old, if you are past 60, they take it seriously. ashley is the most popular name for a child and liverpool is the most popular
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team, this gives you the easiest demographic to attack. he described the randomness of the words but it is difficult, we are on so many websites, we sign up to meaningless, websites, we sign up to meaningless, we pick tails and restaurants, so it is easier to have one password. telephones now, the as for but you said you were not sure that was the safest thing. if someone can get into your phone... yes, people strong password generators. there is nothing stronger than the human mind. when it comes down to it, if you ripen down and put them safe, thatis you ripen down and put them safe, that is probably safer than e—mailing them to yourself. —— if you write them down. many people do not realise they have been hacked before and they are nick —— sitting
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there waiting for you to make another mistake so security people are saying have a very strong password for your e—mail account and have several passwords within that. should we change it often? yes, your work is based on that principle. should we change it often? yes, your work is based on that principlelj use work is based on that principle.” use the same word and change the numbers. that is not best practice. that is only for your work computer, no one is interested? i have been here for ten years, how many passwords do you want me to think 7 passwords do you want me to think t passwords do you want me to think up? it depends how secure you want your house to be. how seriously do your house to be. how seriously do you take the keys to that house. imagine if everyone had the same keys, they could turn up at your house. changing the number at the ends of the word is not bad but add a special character and you will be
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fined. that is a tricky one, always good talking to you. i hope you do not get hacked again.” good talking to you. i hope you do not get hacked again. i will get more digitally minded myself. three random words, whether with staff. good morning. a bit of mist and fog around but that will clear. easy across scotland and northern ireland because we had a weather front bringing outbreaks of rain to northern scotland overnight. easter sunny northern scotland overnight. easter sunny warm northern scotland overnight. easter sunny warm and sunny, we could be challenging the easter sunday record. 25.3 celsius. this is bringing rain into the north—west corner of the country, retreating back into the atlantic. long gone by easter monday. scotland and northern ireland have sunshine tomorrow. this
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vale of clwyd brings hazy sunshine, rain becoming confined to the north—west of scotland. elsewhere it isa dry north—west of scotland. elsewhere it is a dry and spiny day, temperatures inland responding, into the net 20 is. cooler along the channel coast. —— net 20. pollen levels will be high today, it is cheap all in so it could be bad news for hay fever sufferers which is the downside to the dry and sunny weather. into this evening, it is a fine into the day and overnight it will be clear with some of the fog again. when creating from north—west scotland, temperatures around 11 degrees. a bit of cloud, low figures, a bit of a chilly start, mist and fog around for easter monday. i find the across—the—board, ifeel for easter monday. i find the across—the—boa rd, i feel he's for easter monday. i find the across—the—board, i feel he's coming in from the south, south—east. we
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could see some cloud in the far south—west of england and the channel islands, perhaps a shower. most channel islands, perhaps a shower. m ost pla ces channel islands, perhaps a shower. most places dry and warm away from the coast. things start to go downhill from tuesday night onwards. we see this low pressure moving, temperatures will fall, we will see showers from the state. some could be quite heavy, merging to bring long spells of rain and that could be thunder and lightning, especially on wednesday, turning coolerfrom the south—west. temperatures dropping down to the mid—20th, back to the seasonal norm for this time of year. back to the studio. thank you. we will get the shorts on later, looking forward to the next couple of days. the first few days of school are a mixture of nerves and excitement for parents and children, but this year,
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some four year olds will also be assessed on their language and maths skills. primary schools in england, have been asked to take part in trials, before the rollout of the ‘reception baseline assessment‘ next year, but the plans have been opposed by parents. we're joined now by abul and hannah who willjoin the march of the four—year—0lds to deliver a petition against the tests to downing street. do you know your first test for the little ones, see if you cannot look at yourself in the screen? it is such an unusual one. telus, if this gives a benchmark at which children can be assessed when the going, this gives teachers a barometer to measure progress, what is wrong with
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that? how can you test a four—year—old? have you tried t° that? how can you test a four—year—old? have you tried to sit for you to dine at as them simultaneous questions, it is nearly impossible. children are very shy and timid when it starts school. leaving their appearance behind and making new friends and getting used to their new environment. —— their appearance. it is not the right thing to do. it is not a test, more ofa thing to do. it is not a test, more of a chat and away for a professional to gauge their development. professionals are testing their development over time, they are doing assessments, planning their future learning, they are doing assessments, planning theirfuture learning, it they are doing assessments, planning their future learning, it does not mean you take a child i'd from the on their own, that time is very crucial for children on their own, that time is very crucialfor children and on their own, that time is very crucial for children and it should be about fund. we will find out what others think in a moment but hannah,
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do you feel the same way? absolutely. teachers and schools are not going to be aware of the results therefore the barometer you spoke about is not actually there. who will see the results? the results will see the results? the results will be locked away for seven years until this set their stats when the rl avenue sold which in effect renders them useless to skills. —— when they are sent to the school. so therefore it will not inform practice art also it will not benefit our children at all. it could benefit other children? in the longer—term. but not our children. the benefits i am focused on our well—being and how he settles into school. the most important thing to me as the parent of a four—year—old is my son is happy, enjoying
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learning, not that he understands how many letters and in the alphabets, regurgitation of faxes not important to me at four. it is important he can think of ideas and run with it, he can get along with other children, he can self regulate, he is resilient, this is more important. either children both going to reception this september, orare going to reception this september, or are they already end? that is right. i looking forward to going to school? yes, very much. what would you like to do? play. what is your favourite game? hide and seek. sometimes i wish i could hide on the sofa. oscar is in reception and he already plays and reception all day.
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his teacher media great baseline assessment and it was done through observation while he played, by building relationships with them. she observes and and that was the baseline. the department for education has said there is no preparation needed. it is not a case of sitting down and coaching the children ahead of the assessments. if these do take place, some teaching leaders have said it will replace the current statutory tests for seven—year—olds and we have spoken about that pressure. surely changing that structure is a good thing? it depends, at four years old, how are they able to answer questions? people for example might not have english as their first language and they may not understand these results might not be meaningful. 0ther these results might not be meaningful. other children may be shy. i don't want to labour it, even
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if you have it shy child, nothing wrong with that and if english is their second language, nothing wrong with that, it shows their progress and flaws and benefits to the english —— to the education system. but how can we test the progress of these results are not accurate. we have not heard from 0scar, what you like to do at school? do you play football? no, i do not. what do you play? i play hide and seek. it is a good game. everyone is good that heightened seek, perhaps they should be tested on hide and seek. i am sure that i'm any appearance either who will be sympathetic. bottom line
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is these tests are unreliable, unnecessary and frankly our children deserve better and so to everyone else's. thank you all very much for joining us. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and rogerjohnson. here's a summary of this morning's main news. more than 100 people have been killed in a series of explosions in sri lanka. we understand hundreds more have been injured. the blasts happened at a number of churches and hotels. the attacks happend as worshippers gathered to celebrate easter. 0ur south asia correspondent rajini vaidyanathan joins us from delhi and i wish we were talking under better circumstances, this is horrendous, obviously a coordinated targeted attack. it is absolutely horrendous and details are still very much emerging. six separate explosions, three in churches, just
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before nine in the morning, when people are attending easter sunday services, the explosions went off. we have seen images, you have shared some on the programme, on social media, people and planet trying to rescue people. you can see debris. —— people trying to rescue people. the hospital has told us they have been some foreign fatalities. we are not sure which nationalities or the number. at the moment, the death toll in the coordinated attacks is at least 100. i have to say, looking at least 100. i have to say, looking at some of the images and what we have been hearing from people on the ground, it is likely the death toll will climb even higher. the country first met prime minister has said he strongly condemns what he describes as the cowardly attacks on our people today and he says he calls upon all sri lankans to remain
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united and strong. it is the first incidence of the scale since the civil war ended. incidence of the scale since the civilwar ended. he incidence of the scale since the civil war ended. he will keep us updated throughout the day on the bbc news channel, as the story progresses “— bbc news channel, as the story progresses —— you will keep us updated. hundreds of extra police officers have been drafted in to central london to help clear climate change protestors from the capital's roads. demonstrators are still occupying waterloo bridge and parliament square. the metropolitan police commissioner cressida dick told the bbc the demonstrations had caused miserable disruption and urged protestors to move on. the main easter sunday celebration in paris, which would have taken place at notre—dame cathedral,
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will instead be held at the church of saint—eustache, as workers continue the task of making the cathedral last night, a concert was held to raise funds to rebuild the 800 year—old landmark. almost a week after a huge fire, nearly £1 billion has already been pledged. prison staff are using new technology in five jails in england and wales to find phones being used illegally by inmates. the system produces a heat map when a mobile is detected, allowing officers to trace the device to a particular cell. ministers hope the technology will also help tackle drug smuggling and violence in prisons. ukrainians head to the polls today in the country's presidential election. voters face a choice between incumbent president petro poroshenko and television comedian and political newcomer, volodymyr zelensky. the winner will be elected for a five—year term. we understand it is a close race. the incumbent is trailing in the polls, we were hearing earlier. if your password is "123456", then you share it with more than 23 million people —
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that's according to a study published today by britian's cyber security watchdog. the national cyber security centre also says three million use the word "password". it's urging people to make it harder for hackers to access their data by using three random but memorable words. hgppy happy birthday to the queen. 93 today. i tell you who will not be celebrating, amir khan. knocked down in the first round. the fight was stopped because he got caught very low, below the belt. amir khan wasn't given too much of a chance against terence crawford the wbo welterweight champion. he lost in the sixth round. here's our reporter ade adedoyin, who was at the fight in new york. a lot of people i spoke to here expected terence crawford to win,
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but it was the manner in which he won that was a real surprise, as you just said. amir khan was hit low. he does have five minutes to recover. but i spoke to trainer virgil hunter ringside afterwards and he said, after three minutes, it was clear amir khan would not be able to continue. and in the ring afterwards, he said he felt pain in his stomach, pain in his leg as well, and he wasn't mobile enough against such a great fighter as terence crawford. he was heckled in the ring when he was doing his ringside interviews and at a press conference as well, he was heckled by members of terence crawford's camp who suggested he had quit rather than been knocked out because terence crawford was so dominant in the contest. here is what khan had to say about that. i've never quit from anything. i'd rather be knocked out. i'd rather honestly be knocked out than quit a fight. it'sjust not in me to quit. obviously, i was hit with a low shot. i couldn't recover from it. that's the reason the fight was called off. i tried to continue, but it was getting worse and, obviously, virgil in the corner called it off and we just chose to not fight.
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in all the time i have watched amir khan's career, whether it is amateur or pro, i have never seen him dominated in the way he was this evening. yes, he has been knocked out in the past, but in those bouts against saul alvarez and breidis prescott and danny garcia, he was doing well, when they were stopped, he was winning. in this fight, he could not get a foothold, right from the opening round, as you say, when he was put down by that overhand right. he has a decision to make as to what he does next. he has fought at the elite level throughout his career, amateur and pro. but tonight, he was just one step behind. he says he still has a lot to offer the sport but does he want to be a contender or turn into a possible opponent because that is the danger here so he says he's going to take some time away, spend some time with his family. his trainer virgil hunter told me he would support him whatever he decides to do. i asked him if he thought he should quit and he said, that is not my decision, he needs to talk to his family and decide what to do and we
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will go from there, but both of them still believe he has something to offer the sport, but tonight was a very bad night for amir khan. after the midweek fireworks of their champions league quarterfinal, which saw tottenham knock manchester city out, the repeat at the etihad yesterday, a nervy1—0 win for city. the goal came early. phil foden's first in the premier league. the three points puts them one point clear of liverpool again. both have four games left to play. liverpool play strugglers cardiff later. the city manager is really relishing the title fight. fight with the best liverpool ever, the best liverpool ever, i think one of the best teams i have ever seen in my life, so being there, what can i say? we fight until the end, we are going to put everything in there, we will put away leicester and brighton, and we will see how far we get. if we win, we will be so happy. if not, we will congratulate liverpool and when next season.
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brighton couldn't manage a shot on target against wolves and pushed their luck against the home side, but the goalless draw could be crucial for their survival hopes. they are now three points clear of the relegation zone. celtic play at hibs today in the scottish premiership, but even if they win, the title will have to wait at least another week. that's after rangers beat hearts 3—1 to prevent their glasgow neighbours from celebrating too early. aberdeen and st mirren also won yesterday, and stjohnstone beat dundee, who are now six points from safety. manchester united women won the women's championship by thrashing crystal palace 7—0. lauren james scored four goals as united claimed the title just 11 months after being re—formed. they had already confirmed their promotion to the super league. they have scored 88 goals in 18 league games, conceding just seven. saracens beat munster to reach their fourth rugby champions cup
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final in six seasons. after a week in which billy vunipola was warned for defending israel folau's homophobic social media post, the forward scored their last try in a man of the match performance — 32—16, the final score. he was booed throughout. he was confronted by a fan at full—time, he said, it is not something i am afraid of, i probably have to expect it is going to keep happening. both english teams lost their challenge cup semifinals. this is the second tier of european rugby. sale had won twice in france this season, but they were knocked out at la rochelle. gregory alldritt with the decisive try in their 24—20 win. and it'll be an all—french final, after clermont auvergne survived a late fightback from harlequins to beat them 32—27. great britain's fed cup tie against kazakhastan is poised at 1—1. katie boulter wasted
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three match points before losing her singles rubber — she said she was devastated. she took the first set against yulia putinseva at the copper box in london and she led 4—0 in the decider, but she went on to lose it on a tie break. johanna konta won the first rubber of the day, but it's all—square ahead of the decisive doubles. easy to say! now time to look at the papers. teacher and author bobby seagull is here to tell us what's caught his eye. new google threat to children, sunday times. tell us more. the story as broadband providers are meeting on the 8th of may hosted by the national cyber security
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discussing the risks posed by a new browser of google chrome. beneath that, the story is a bit more detail. initially, the new version is meant to boost privacy and security and prevent government snooping, but parental blocks might not be as effective with the new version of crime. that might be blocks... looks like your help is all right. moving on to the telegraph. family split on how to rebuild notre—dame. telegraph. family split on how to rebuild notre-dame. yes, with the spire being destroyed in the fire, two schools of thought. the prime minister of france that we can build a copy of the existing one or a new one based on modern techniques. what is really interesting as it has split the family, the author of
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hunchback of notre—dame, some saying we should build a new one, some the existing one. it is always difficult, when you have something so iconic, so many people have seen it, you look at something like the pyramid of the louvre, loads of objections, modern and old and new vetting, cannot miss it —— setting. angry text from the people.” vetting, cannot miss it —— setting. angry text from the people. i get e—mails from parents. angry text from the people. i get e-mails from parents. the pupils are better behaved? e-mails from parents. the pupils are better behaved ? what e-mails from parents. the pupils are better behaved? what is this about? there are more apps where parents can communicate directly with teachers. an uncle sends messages to his teachers every time his daughter doesn't end in school. she says, i get in trouble with this. he sends a message to the teacher. increasing
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the burden. what do you say to him? u nless the burden. what do you say to him? unless it is really important, try to think about the message you are sending teachers, if you are burdening them, you told of my child for not bringing the pencil today, it reduces the ability for teachers to focus on planning lessons and marking. quite difficult. this article says messages are sent as late as when i am in the morning and they complain about having to fill out forms, disciplining of their child, how do you as a teacher if you receive a message or e—mail, can you receive a message or e—mail, can you put it into context? a lot of teachers feel during the working week, you are obligated to respond. my week, you are obligated to respond. my advice to parents is, is it necessary? do i need to bring it up now? did you help with the chores going? kind of. so did i. did i enjoy it? ido enjoy it?
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i do not think it is something to enjoy. according to the story in the mail on sunday, children who tidy up and help with chores do better at school. interesting. iam still the most school. interesting. iam still the m ost m essy school. interesting. iam still the most messy person i know. i have to do the big tidy it is such a point where there is so much mess... interesting research. quite substantial, they interviewed 10,000 children. they did a comparison between academic results and the correlation to the amount of household chores and there is a link between the two. is it like when you have a messy desk, people say, tidy desk, tidy mind. i think it is not true. organised chaos! you are that person, really tidy. i love this. i only know this because i lived in that part of the world for a long time. it has a picture of bournemouth, and
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somewhere near bournemouth, none are on the solent, but catchy headline. blackpool, merseyside as well, basking in the sunshine. could be the hottest easter sunday for 70 years. why are you wearing a jumper? different image. it is warm today. a light jumper. smart. shorts different image. it is warm today. a lightjumper. smart. shorts and t—shirt weather. lightjumper. smart. shorts and t-shirt weather. i came to work in a jumper this morning. called at 4:30am. lovely talking to you. nice not having to go through maths homework. i can send you some later. simultaneous equations!” homework. i can send you some later. simultaneous equations! i liked those. not us enjoying the nice weather, have a look at these pictures. feels home for them, these lions. not a bad way to be doing this afternoon. thank you for that
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picture, gorgeous image. we will have all the information about where you should be lying down on a nice piece of grass, shorts and t—shirt, cool drink piece of grass, shorts and t—shirt, cooldrink in piece of grass, shorts and t—shirt, cool drink in one hand, sunglasses, perfect. a few hours, that will be me. it is going to be... waiting, it is going to be glorious today and we could be breaking the easter sunday record. it stands at 25.3 celsius, could be doable, around the solent area. warm and sunny for most places today apart from the very far north—west of scotland which has seen some rain overnight because of this waterfront. it will continue to plague the north—west today but gradually retreating to the atlantic as high—pressure exerts its force one last time monday into tuesday
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before low—pressure wins out mid next week next week and brings us heavy showers. in the short chilly start and mist and fog clearing away and lots of sunshine, hazy in the north and west of scotland and northern ireland, little bit of rain for the outer hebrides and more of a breeze here. aberdeen and edinburgh, 20,21, breeze here. aberdeen and edinburgh, 20, 21, same for belfast, mid—20s further south with the chance of 24, 25. the downside this time of year and all of the dry and sunny weather, high tree pollen count, giving rise to a miserable day for sufferers. ending on a fine note, overnight clear skies, quite chilly inafew overnight clear skies, quite chilly in a few places once again like this morning, mist and fog too. weather front pushing at the atlantic, dreyer and heather knight for western scotland. easter monday, chilly start —— dryer night for
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western scotland. breeze coming in from the south—east, cooler on coastal areas, cloud bubbling up possibly for the channel islands, far south—west of england, heralding the change that is coming. another very warm day. tuesday night onwards, increasing showers in western areas as the weather front pushing in. pretty good chance of hefty downpours spreading up from the south—west on wednesday. a week of change. increasing chance of showers, thunderstorms, longer spells of rain, turning cooler to where temperature should be for the time of year. wednesday we start to see the noticeable change, heavy showers moving through and turning cooler for all. that is showers moving through and turning coolerfor all. that is how showers moving through and turning cooler for all. that is how it is looking. very noticeable, i guess thatis looking. very noticeable, i guess that is the point of graphics, starting to rain on wednesday!
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that is the point of graphics, we need to update you with the main news we have been covering this morning, four hours ago, five hours ago, a series of blasts in sri lanka in the capital, colombo and nearby negombo. we understand it to be coordinated targeted attack, on churches and high—end hotels. the death toll now we understand has resented according to reports 156, including 35 foreigners —— we understand has risen to. the injured have been taken to main hospitals in colombo and negombo. three churches have been targeted, three high—end hotels, presumably many western tourists in those hotels as well, but 35 foreigners among the dead, 156 people killed, latest reported figure. we will keep you updated on
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the bbc news channel with our correspondence on the ground. worshippers in paris will be celebrating easter at the church of saint—eustache today instead of notre—dame after last week's devastating fire. last night, a concert was held to raise funds to rebuild the 800—year old cathedral, which is still closed to the public as workers try to make the structure safe. nearly £1 billion has been pledged already. joining us now from paris is journalist and historian stefan de vries. thank you for talking to us this morning. you are outside the cathedral. tell me how people are feeling today, one week on after the soulful fire. of course, feeling today, one week on after the soulfulfire. of course, many tourists and parisians like come to watch what happened with the notre—dame —— after the awful fire. drama and lots of tears, devastating fire, i witnessed the fire myself, from a bridge further on, this
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bridge was closed that night. a lot of people were praying, silent, watching what was happening before their eyes. the next day, the parisians woke up with their beloved monument in ruins, that is what they thought at least, and at the end of the day, it became clear the walls we re the day, it became clear the walls were safe. the main parts that were destroyed was the wooden roof, 800—year—old wooden roof, completely gone, and also the 19th spire. the walls were still standing. for ordinary people, it looks very reassuring because it seems the church has been saved. but architects and specialists say, do not be optimistic too soon because we need to do a very, very thorough assessment of the real damage to the church which can take weeks or even months because of course a lot of water has been used to extinguish the fire and the water gets into the walls and the walls are almost a
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millennium old so there will be a chemical reaction and it is very ha rd to chemical reaction and it is very hard to say how far the walls are damaged. the structure seems to be safe, but it is still too early to say. time is always limited, there is some controversy about the rebuild, how it should look, what are the sticking points? yeah, there was the 19th—century spire, a lot of people say we have to rebuild it identically, but the church he was seeing here, the building started in 1163, it has been adapted through the ages —— the church you are seeing. it is in the cathedral because my history to be changed along the centuries. it may well be adapted to the 21st century but many art historians say it is still too early to have that debate because we have to know what happened and more
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importantly, how are we going to consolidate the structure? although it looks safe, it is far from sure the rules will keep standing. -- the walls will keep standing. thank you for joining walls will keep standing. thank you forjoining us. good to hear your thoughts, coming to us from outside notre—dame. it is easter sunday which means you may well have started on your chocolate eggs and you may be looking forward perhaps to roast lamb at lunchtime. think differently! hot cross bun burger, deep—fried cream, easter themed cocktail. some restaurants are selling these. including yard and coop. and the owners laura and carl morris are here, and joining us from brighton,
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food historian. same name, not related! hot cross burger. we are a fried chicken restau ra nt, burger. we are a fried chicken restaurant, but one thing we do is i guess restaurant, but one thing we do is i gu ess every restaurant, but one thing we do is i guess every month we like to have fun with food, it is all about having a good time. that comes across in our food as well. this is the seasonal special for the weekend. what is this next to it? i am just not even sure what this is. tell me. that is a deep—fried cream egg. we did it last year. very, very popular. we decided to bring it back. when you bite into it, is the... i hate creme eggs. it is melted and delicious. it has tempura batter on the outside which we quickly fry, nice and crispy crunch to start with, and gooey in the middle. these are different twists
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on the easterfair middle. these are different twists on the easter fair people may or may not be used to. sam, for you as a food historian, roast lamb at lunchtime. yeah, traditionally, we would have eaten lamb or any meat because during lent, we did not eat meat. catholic nation prior to the reformation, easter sunday was a big celebration because you had not had to meat for 40 days. how has traditional easterfair to meat for 40 days. how has traditional easter fair changed over the years? we certainly did not have hot cross bun burger is or deep—fried creme eggs. i think it has changed... it is a 20th century phenomenon, the chocolate easter egg thing. prior to that, phenomenon, the chocolate easter egg thing. priorto that, we phenomenon, the chocolate easter egg thing. prior to that, we did have easter eggs, but they would have
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been dyed, a hand's died using natural dyes like spinach —— hen's egg. and we used to roll the easter eggs downhills. the chocolate egg is a modern thing. quick word on the hot cross bun. it was banned, wasn't it? hot cross buns? well, they were. elizabeth i... we jumped the gun a bit in england because most european countries do not celebrate easter and have easter treats until easter sunday but we had our hot cross buns. even prior to now obviously they are available from just after christmas but even prior to that, spiced funds were very popular and elizabeth i, she decreed they could
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only be eaten on special feast day days like good friday. yes, they we re days like good friday. yes, they were banned during other times of the year. she would not have approved of them being in the shops in february, for example. people who come to visit yard and coop, are they calorie conscious? they come to us they calorie conscious? they come to us for something different, a treat, unique experience. how many people have said or in the oven to you?l lot! —— bun in the oven. thank you for coming in. enjoy the food. thank you to you in brighton too, son, and for sharing your historical knowledge. lots more will come up on the bbc news channel coming up to 9am. the presenters will keep you updated with what has been happening in sri lanka. more than 150 people
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that reported now, 35 foreigners, many hundreds injured in the coordinated bomb attacks —— 150 people dead reported now. targeting churches and high—end hotels. brea kfast churches and high—end hotels. breakfast will be back tomorrow at six iron. have a good easter sunday. thank you for watching. —— at 6am.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 9am. more than 150 people have been killed and more than 400 injured in a wave of explosions at churches and hotels in sri lanka. at least six blasts have been reported, worshippers were targeted as they were praying at easter services. bringing back the violence, blasts and gunfire to this country, to achieve their targets, they are misleading us. the main easter celebrations in paris will be held at the church of saint eustache following monday's devastating fire at notre dame cathedral. nhs england says deaf children, who can't use standard hearing aids or implants, will be offered cutting—edge brain surgery to help them hear.

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