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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  April 23, 2019 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 2.00pm. mass funerals for victims of the bomb attacks in sri lanka, as the death toll rises to 320. the country marks the atrocity with a day of national mourning. as cctv pictures are released of a suspected suicide bomber entering a church, the sri lankan prime minister says the police investigation is making good progress. all that we knew earlier there was further links and this would not have been done just locally. further links and this would not have been donejust locally. there has been a coordination we have not seen. a full state visit for president trump in june. he'll meet the queen at buckingham palace and mark the 75th anniversary of d—day landings in france. the new ira says it killed journalist lyra mckee in a shooting on thursday night as a 57—year—old woman is arrested
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in connection with her death. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. we have seen perhaps the greatest upset in the history of the snooker world championship, ronnie 0'sullivan has been knocked out in the first round by an amateur. the blue sky and sunshine of the easter break has gone. it has been replaced by a veil of high cloud. there is some rain on its way and it will arrive tomorrow. i will have all the details. thanks, louise. also coming up, we'll hear from greta thurnberg, the swedish schoolgirl who helped inspire global protests on climate change, has been meeting political leaders at westminster.
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hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. the sri lankan prime minister says investigators are making good progress in identifying culprits behind easter sunday's attacks. a0 people, all sri lankan citizens, have been arrested so far and a state of emergency declared. the prime minister says there may be some links with so called islamic state and says it is ‘possible‘ that the attacks were in retaliation for the massacre of muslim worshippers at mosques in new zealand. mass funerals were held this morning for some of the 320 people who died in the bombings, eight of whom were british. 0ur correspondent nick beake reports from colombo. one man about to murder more than 100 easter worshippers. carrying a rucksack packed with explosives, he walks purposefully towards the church. he steps inside, where many are standing because the service is so full. after making his way towards the altar, he blows himself up. the holiest of days
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becoming the deadliest. and so this morning they had to bury their dead. all their dead. it will take a long time. many are struggling to take in the scale of the slaughter. and survivors are trying to understand why they were spared. translation: i was in shock. i was looking for my daughter, but when i found her she could not recognise me. she didn't know who her mummy was. she said, "god saved me. god got me and my mother out safely." but many did not make it. among the britons who died, anita nicholson and her two children, alex and annabel. her husband, ben, survived. former firefighter billy harrop and his partner sally bradley were also killed. danish billionaire anders holch povlsen, the biggest shareholder in the online company asos,
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lost three of his four children. another explosion yesterday was one dramatic reason why an official state of emergency has been declared, although no one was injured here. the authorities, though, are warning of more attacks. the defence minister told the sri lankan parliament two home—grown islamist groups carried out sunday's bombings, with help from an international network. he claimed they were motivated by the killing of 50 muslims in the new zealand city of christchurch last month. but the authorities here are facing fierce criticism for not acting on detailed intelligence about possible attacks on churches. and amid all this death, more than 300 families are now living with the consequences. nick beake, bbc news, colombo. and in the last few minutes, we've heard from the prime minister of sri lanka who was speaking at a press conference in colombo.
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i would like to say that the investigators are making good progress in regard to identifying the culprits. but it means we need to look at was the network is. there has been also a communication coming in from has been also a communication coming infrom cairo has been also a communication coming in from cairo that ias has claimed responsibility. all that we knew earlier was they were foreign links and this would not have been done just locally, there had been training and a coordination which we have not seen. i've had offers of help from many countries starting with the united states and they will be other countries who will come in.
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police will decide who they will work with the step i must offer my condolences to all those who were killed, all those who were killed especially those not of sri lankan origin. they were looking forward to a good holiday. there were others who were visitors during the easter holidays. they were unfortunately caught up in the blast. we are doing oui’ caught up in the blast. we are doing our best to identify all those nonnationals, nationals have been identified. the burials took place on monday. today the rest we hope. the religious leaders, the political
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leaders are asking for calm and today in parliament, everybody is asking for calm in the country. 0ur correspondent nick beake is in colombo with the latest. a day of mourning and a claim of responsibility for these attacks. yes, that's right. ever since the bomber struck on sunday people have been asking who could have carried out these attacks, who could have targeted congregations knowing the pews would be packed, people would have come to celebrate the easter services. the answer it would seem, as far as the eis group is concerned, they were behind this. we need to take this one step back because we have seen in previous cases where there have been suicide bombings, is have been quick to say, yes, we bombings, is have been quick to say, yes , we we re bombings, is have been quick to say, yes, we were behind this, they have put her photographs are some of the attackers, try to claim as much publicity as possible. this hasn't
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been the case here. we've had the admission but we wait to see what concrete confirmation. the first of the mass funerals. yes, absolutely. the scenes we saw this morning are heartbreaking. people being buried in the church where they went to worship and where they were killed. we have seen this happening and in other cities affected by this. at the same time, the general sense of unease which people have had ever since the first suicide bomber struck has been really accentuated today because there has been quite a specific warning which has been of concern to people. that has been the information sent out to all the police sent out in colombo, they should be on the alert for a van or lorry packed with explosives. that has worried people, it gives you an indication these attacks may not be over. there was this low before anyone took responsibility, that is
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anyone took responsibility, that is an area of concern because people thought a group was holding back, biding their time before they completed the last of an attack. that is speculation that it is the kind of thing that worries people. the government is coming under pressure on the basis of who knew what and when, and what is passed on in the days before. yes, there is has exposed a really dysfunctional government here in shankhar. it is clear there is tension between the prime minister and the president, which we knew about. the extent to which we knew about. the extent to which that has been able to foster would seem that intelligence was held back, people who needed to know we re held back, people who needed to know were not informed and as you say, earlier this month it was very specific intelligence concerning names and addresses and particular groups that was received by some of the powers that be here. the prime minister and his cabinet apparently did not know about this. we were listening to the archbishop today saying if he'd known he would have
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cancelled all the easter sunday services, that means in the coming days and weeks real questions for the authorities to answer. the families, once their grief has subsided in some way, they will be asking could this have been stopped. thank you very much. we are going to be speaking related to a british holiday—maker who was in sri lanka over easter. buckingham palace has announced president trump will make a state visit to the uk in earlyjune. theresa may promised him the visit shortly after he was elected in 2016, but no date was set. it will coincide with the preparations for the 75th anniversary of the d—day landings. president trump's last visit to the uk was met with mass protests. more now from our royal correspondent, jonny dymond. he is at buckingham palace for us. the big smile is shared by many but not by everybody. the big smile
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simply because i'm outside buckingham palace on a warm day, it wasn't a sign of any political affiliation! there are many people who are already up in arms about the visit. they have been a fair number of tourists who are disapproving of the visit as well. the visit was offered very early on by theresa may when she visited donald trump after his inauguration. the invitation comes from her majesty the queen after advice from foreign and commonwealth of a son it will take place between june commonwealth of a son it will take place betweenjune the 3rd and during the fifth. you mention that working visit the president made last year. what was noticeable about that was how little time he spent in any british city, in any city where he could experience of the huge protests that took place here, london, glasgow, belfast, leeds, a lot of the city saw large protests and then larger than one in london. the president most of us because he
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took helicopters in and out from where he was staying every night. most of his meals and meetings were at blenheim it'll be or chequers. this time it'll be different, the invitation is from the queen, the focus is buckingham palace, the normal way of these things happening is a meeting by the monarch of her visitor and horse guards parade which is ten or 15 minutes walk that way. then a carriage ride, a procession down the mall which is this huge ceremonial street that runs from trafalgar square to buckingham palace. it is there that generally people gather to try and make their voices heard to try and make their voices heard to the visitor, either in approval or in disapproval. we will have a state banquet at buckingham palace, the president will not stay here. sometimes state visitors do, he will not because there is work going on inside the palace. and then they
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will be the question, big question, as to whether and where if he does he addresses members of parliament. the speakerjohn bercow has made it clear he doesn't want the president inside the house of parliament, some sort of compromise may be found. enjoy the sunshine! thank you. talks on brexit between the government and labour will resume this afternoon, as mps return to westminster after the easter break. theresa may has been holding a cabinet meeting this morning, the first since the eu agreed to delay our departure date until the end of october. 0ur political correspondent chris mason is at westminster. chris, those brexit talks with labour resuming in a couple of hours, should we be holding our breath for a breakthrough? we have had a week without using the brexit word. the easter bunny has run for the hills probably because he guessed we would be having this conversation. guess what, we are
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where we were with all of this. the talks rendering on between labour and the conservatives are reaching a pretty detailed stage but whilst thatis pretty detailed stage but whilst that is necessary to reach some arrangements, it is unnecessarily sufficient. when you look at the barrier, if you like a mother stands between jeremy corbyn barrier, if you like a mother stands betweenjeremy corbyn and signing on the dotted line and helping the prime minister out, you have to ask yourself whether there would be enough offered by the government to make that politically worthwhile for a man who wants to succeed theresa may as prime minister, not help her out. even if the government was to say, labour, you can have everything in your election manifesto from a couple of years ago, in short, staying in the customs union into the long term, they would be loads and loads of labour activist who will say, that isn't enough, we want the second referendum or you are selling us out. from jeremy corbyn
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was my perspective, that is a dilemma he can avoid by not bothering in the end and walking away. labour say they are treating that all seriously at every level they are involved. jeremy corbyn is meeting the prime minister, we've had officials meeting, senior shadow ministers meeting their opposite numbers. it comes back to whether they are willing to make the leap and make thejump. the prime minister would have to do something as well which would involve several of her cabinet resigning. it is one heck of a thing to meet in the first place, it is another big thing to be able to reach an agreement at the end of a 12. she could look closer to home to those against her. conservative mps are returning this afternoon, the executive of the 1962 committee meeting this afternoon. plenty of tory mps returning from easter break. a good number of
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conservative activists are pretty fed up with the prime minister and trying to find a mechanism to get rid of her. but that isn't won because the exhaust of the last on backin because the exhaust of the last on back in december. the same anxieties, the same questions, the same swirling around brexit as they we re same swirling around brexit as they were a couple of weeks ago before we shut up about it for a while! nothing has changed at all. that is the essence of it. thank you. the new political party change uk, formed by members of the independent group of former labour and conservative mps, has launched its campaign for next month's european elections. the party is opposed to brexit and is campaigning for another referendum. speaking at the launch event in bristol, the interim leader of change uk, heidi allen, said the two main parties had failed. the conservatives have drifted yet farther to the right, now so anti—europe and anti—business that conservative voters can barely recognise their party anymore. and labour have continued to let the country down, offering ineffective opposition to a government at the time
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when the country needs it most. lacking leadership on brexit and still — still failing tackle anti—semitism. let's speak to our political correspondent nick eardley who is in bristol at that launch. a couple of interesting faces in the crowd there. absolutely. the kind of names you need to get a bit of attention in these sorts of campaigns. some former conservative politicians, former conservative politicians, former labourfigures former conservative politicians, former labour figures as well. perhaps the best known among them was racheljohnson, an author and journalist in her own right, but better known as the sister of boris johnson. she will be standing for the party in the south—west if the european elections go ahead on the 23rd of may. the big picture is a simple one, change uk want to be the natural home for people who want to stay in the european union by having
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another referendum and voting to stop the brexit process altogether. it isn't going to be easy, to be frank, there are other parties making that case. the lib dems and the greens, the snp, plaid cymru. we are going to hear a lot from these quys are going to hear a lot from these guys over the next few weeks. they can be the natural home for people from all parties. can we expect, they've got 70, i think i counted it up they've got 70, i think i counted it up and running, are they on the hunt for more? i think the whole process is going to be quite a challenging one for change uk in some ways. it would only set up a few weeks ago, they were called the independence group then. they don't have some of the infrastructure that some of the more established parties have. i'm not sure whether the polls just now
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suggest they are going to do as well as some would perhaps hope. there was an attempt here to try and paint the race on the 23rd of may as a battle between remain and leave. you have nigel find out on one wing and change uk on the other wing. i suspect they will be quite a battle for those votes. there has been suggestion that votes could be spread because there are so many parties that have that stop brexit view. thank you very much. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines — funerals take place in sri lanka for some of the hundreds of victims of the easter sunday bombings as the prime minister says the police are making good progress in find. buckingham palace says president trump will make an official state visit to the uk
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at the beginning ofjune. a 57—year—old woman is arrested in connection with the murder of the journalist, lyra mckee in londonderry. and in sport... the five time champion ronnie 0'sullivan has been stunned at this year's championship. beaten 10 frames to 8 by the amateurjames cahill. 0'sullivan said he was feeling unwell and lacking energy celtic legend billy mcneill has died at the age of 79. captaining the famous lisbon lions in 1967 he was the first british player to lift the european cup. and ahead of the manchester derby tomorrow night, united manager 0le gunnar solskjaer says he's the right man for the job. they lost 4—0 to everton over the weekend. a 57—year—old woman has been arrested under the terrorism act in connection with the murder of thejournalist, lyra mckee, in northern ireland. she was shot while she was reporting on riots in londonderry on thursday night.
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the dissident irish republican group the new ira has admitted it was behind her killing. in a statement, it offered what it said were "full and sincere apologies" to lyra mckee's family and friends. 0ur ireland correspondent, chris page is in londonderry for us. an apology, they are always hollow, aren't they. a number of friends of leader mckee have said this morning they don't take this apology seriously, they have dismissed it, they regarded as hypocritical and offensive. the new ira the distance groups who oppose the peace process, are thought to be the largest of those groups. the security sources would say they have many members and maybe a few dozen who are willing to go out and kill. as the recent tragic events in the city have
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proven, it doesn't take many people to create a tragedy, doesn't take many people to take a lie. there is still a sense of disbelief and anger although a few days have passed since lyra mckee was killed. this morning, police made their third arrest in the investigation, 57—year—old woman detained under anti—terrorism legislation. she is in the police station in belfast currently be in question. 0ver in the police station in belfast currently be in question. over the weekend, two teenagers, aged 18 or 19, were arrested but they were released without charge. the police hoping to make progress in the investigation, still concentrating effo rts investigation, still concentrating efforts from the community here in derry, more than 140 people have beenin derry, more than 140 people have been in contact with the police. they've uploaded cctv footage i mobile phone footage. police have been appealing to —— cam footage.
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detectives say they need more than just information and intelligence, they are hoping for tangible evidence that could be used potentially to secure a prosecution. they want to reassure anyone i may be thinking about coming forward to them that in the first instance, all they need to do is talk to police, tell them what they know and then the police will decide how they can move forward to step on a positive note on that point, they describe a palpable changing support of their investigation in terms of off the record intelligence. this really has galvanised people in derry. hasn't it. the outpouring of grief, the public demonstration, all the sentiments that have been expressed have been unprecedented, i would say. early on friday, good friday, a few hours after lyra's death was announced, you had the arlene
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frosting in creggan, standing side by side with a sinn fein leader and the other main political party leaders in northern ireland to condemn the killing. that is an early exa m ple condemn the killing. that is an early example of a unity of purpose, condemnation of the killers. the police have said, come there has been a sea change. they have seen more people than ever before cooperating with them in that part of derry. they have also said they still need more assistance, their ultimate aim is to bring the killers to justice and they are going to work on that, still gotta work on reassuring the local community, working with representatives, politicians, clergymen, to reassure people they needn't be frightened to come forward. a conservative mp has been sentenced to a community order of 50 hours unpaid work and a fine of £1,500 at southwark crown court. chris davies had earlier admitted two charges of making a false expenses claim,
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one charge of providing false or misleading information for allowances claims and one of attempting to do so. the swedish schoolgirl, who helped inspire global protests on climate change, has been meeting political leaders at westminster. in a bbc interview, greta thurnberg has called for urgent action to deal with what she says is an ‘existential crisis‘ and has urged british politicians to "listen to the scientists" on climate change. sarah walton reports. not many 16—year—olds could hold the attention of political leaders, but today greta thunberg took her message of climate change activism to the houses of parliament. well done on what you have brought to the debate. she has become the face of the school climate strikes, a global movement which has seen more than a million children across the world walk out of classrooms in protest at the lack of action for tackling climate change.
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she says she wants people to panic. by panic i mean stepping out of comfort zones and realising what is going on. if your house is on fire and you want to keep your house from burning to the ground, it requires some level of panic. you don't sit talking about insurance claims or rebuilding or renovations, you do everything you can to put out the fire. the campaigner has also met the pope and been nominated for a nobel peace prize. and just a few days ago, she addressed protesters from extinction rebellion. their week—long action brought areas of central london to a standstill, making headlines across the world and bringing climate change protests to the capital on a scale never seen before here. today they also went to westminster, according on the government to engage with them in discussions
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about climate change. police say they have made 1000 arrests since their demonstrations began last week, but greta thunberg is calling on more people to take similar action. as long as it is non—violent, and i think that can definitely make a difference. it could change people's minds, make people become more aware of the situation that we're shipping this an as an emergency, an existential crisis and we must do everything we can to stop it. the leaders of labour, the snp, lib dems and green party heard what greta had to say today. her message to them, don'tjust listen to me, listen to the science and the scientists. time for a look at the weather. for the visitor who have been working for the last few days, it has apparently been wonderful! we have had these lovely sunsets and
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sunrises. this is louise leo, by the way. saharan dust, have you heard of this phenomenon? does it come from the sa ha ra phenomenon? does it come from the sahara like we've got these dust particles at the moment and we are picking up cloud so if you have noticed the sunshine turning hazy, today it's nowhere near as glorious as it was, but that is amazing sunrises. see this from south yorkshire. hopefully, some amazing sunsets. we will, potentially, have some interesting blood rain, sounds a bit scary, over the next few days. what is blood rain? when the lovely weather we have seen is coming to an end, we are going to see some rain and it is a question mark. if we get the big droplets, it
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might see the best particles on the windscreen. and there is that lovely smell. yes. but if you get torrential downpours, that is going to clear the sand away so you will think i am com pletely the sand away so you will think i am completely crazy! it is coming from the sahara on a south—easterly went a step you always think i'm crazy! you'd better tell us what is in store. back to reality with a bump, ladies and gentlemen. for those of you who haven't heard, where have you been? it has been an amazing easter. 25 degrees, the weekend coming up though, this is where we should be, 12 or 13 degrees and there will be some rain. back to our april showers. for the rest of the day, it does look as though we will continue to see a veil of high cloud across
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the country and the wind strengthening. but all have an impact across scotland and northern england. some of the temperatures still very good, we would be happy with 22 degrees but it is noticeably a little less warm that we had over the weekend. this evening and overnight, we'll start to see showers pushing in for cornwell, south wales. it isn't going to be as cool south wales. it isn't going to be as cool. the police will pick and drive in clash of the north sea. there was the two major changes. low pressure is starting to drive the story forward and that is going to bring outbreaks of showery rain, continuing through cornwall, devon, across the south coast, not reaching london, and into wales. we could see a few sharp showers so may part of 0xfordshire, into the midlands, we could have sent beefy thundery downpours tomorrow. they will move further north. with all that cloud around in the breeze picking up, it
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will feel cooler. the wind will continue to strengthen, particularly across east of scotland, a lot of cloud here so it'll be a cool afternoon. you should see some decent sunny breaks that a as a result, 18 degrees not out of the question. then we keep looking out of the atlantic to drive that's where the story in. this moist air flow coming in off the atlantic over the next few days. there is some rain profit on thursday, great news for the growers out there, you will be desperate for rain is going to move into england and wales come into the scottish borders. the bulk of northern ireland and scotland should stay dry in daylight hours. just to add insult to injury, friday, saturday and sunday, cooler showery weather. it's all over. this is bbc news — our latest headlines.
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funerals take place for some of the victims of the bombs attacks in sri lanka, as the death toll rises to 320. the country marks the atrocity with a day of national mourning. as cctv pictures are released of a suspected suicide bomber entering a church, the sri lankan prime minister says police are investigating whether the islamic state group was involved. buckingham palace says president trump will make an official state visit to the uk at the beginning ofjune. he'll meet the queen — and mark the 75th anniversary of the d—day landings in france. the new ira says it killed journalist lyra mckee in a shooting on thursday night — as a 57—year—old woman is arrested in connection with her death. and, a smile fit for a prince — these pictures have been released of prince louis, as he celebrates his first birthday. sport now on afternoon
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live with 0lly foster. what a shock with the snooker. you never know what you're going to get ronnie 0'sullivan from monday the next. his many millions of fans around the world do not like to see the world number one and five time world champion knocked out. he has been knocked out in the first round of the world championship in one of the great crucible upsets. he was beaten by the amateurjames cahill. 0'sullivan was 5—4 down overnight and though he pulled it back to 5—all, and 8—all but he seemed strangely out of sorts, missing some very simple pots, and he also appeared to be struggling to stay awake when he was in his chair. this pink would have put him 9—8 up, that summed up a very bad day at the office. cahill, who is the first amateur to qualify for the world championship, the 23 year old won the match 10—8,
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to stun the favourite. you have to come here physically and mentally feeling good and mentally i was feeling up for it, i had a good season. i do not expect to do well but you come here trying to do your best and if you are physically not 100% then it is going to make it even harder. i try to hang in there and do as much as i could just see ifi and do as much as i could just see if i could get to this match and have a few days off to try and feel a little bit better. i thought i would be nervous when i went out there but i wasn't and it really surprised me, to be honest. ifelt really good and i was a bit tense at parts but apart from that, if i can just hopefully kick on, i don't think i've shown my scoring match well. i think i've shown a lot of bottle but i think i can offer more
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than that as well. so then clearly under the weather. also he beat former world number one mark selby at this season's uk championship and then lost in the second round. he's got stephen maguire next. he is certainly a name to watch. and some sad news for celtic. billy mcneill, has died at the age of 79. they put a statue up of him outside celtic park a few years ago. a true legend, one of the most important figures in the clubs history. captained them to nine successive titles, seven scottish cups and six league cups. but it was this iconic moment for which he will be best remembered, lifting the european cup, the first british player to do so, when they beat inter milan in the 1967 final in lisbon — thus the famous lisbon lions were born. he had two spells as celtic manager and also had spells in charge
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of manchester city and aston villa. celtic say he "passed away surrounded by his family and loved ones". the manchester united manager 0le gunnar solskjaer says he is the right man for the job. the honeymoon is certainly over after they suffered their 6th loss in 8 games at the weekend. and it wasn't any old defeat, a 4—0 humbling at everton, with reports of dressing room arguments between players afterwards. raised voices. united are now three points off top four in the premier league with four games to go, and they can have a big say in the title race, they face city tomorrow night. iam i am confident in my team and myself in that i will be ready to take this challenge on. i know it is a big challenge on. i know it is a big challenge and that is why i came in when i came in as well. i am going
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to say i am going to enjoy every single second. i do not like losing but it is a great challenge and challenge that all of the managers of this club have had. when you go through bad results you still have to be confident enough to say this is the way we are going to do it and we are planning ahead. former liverpool and leeds striker robbie fowler is the new head coach of a—league side brisbane roar. fowler spent two years playing in australia towards the end of hsi career. he has coaching experience with liverpool's academy. he's signed a two—year contract and will take charge from the start of next season. that's all the sport for now. more in the next hour. let's return now to our main story. mass funerals have been held in sri lanka for victims of the easter sunday suicide bombings. 321 people, eight of them british, are now known to have been killed in coordinated attacks on churches and hotels. marisa keller and herfamily have
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just got back to london you were incredibly lucky because you were staying at the hotel. take me back to easter sunday morning because i think you went to church? we did, we had gone to saint michael's anglican nearby because traditionally sri lankans go to church and then have breakfast. we we re church and then have breakfast. we were staying at the hotel overnight and returned to colombo, checked in late the previous night and then got up late the previous night and then got up that morning very early. decided we would go to church first and return to breakfast for around 90 m. sue going to have brunch at the shangri—la? sue going to have brunch at the shangri-la? yes, it was one of the hotels in the city hosting large easter brunch and we thought it was a perfect place to spend with our family because we were travelling with our young child and they were doing a easter egg hunt and they had a eastern and western boothbay.
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—— buffet. -- buffet. and your husband was quite keen to get back? he was, we we re quite keen to get back? he was, we were planning to spend time having easter lunch elsewhere and he said, we need to go which is when we left the church and started to head back towards the hotel. and then what happened? i suddenly started to get phone calls from people and the first was my cousin and he said, are you all right? he was in sri lanka? he was, i have family members around the country and he was the one we we re the country and he was the one we were supposed to spend easter day with and they had left the church earlier. he was calling and i assumed it was to check we were on track. he asked if we were all right andi track. he asked if we were all right and i said, yes, why wouldn't i be?
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he said they had realised there was a bomb at our hotel and when i looked up i realised there were ambulances going down the main road from the hotel area. then i saw a lot of police presence and traffic coming out of the area but we were allowed to go in. i said, you are right, there has been a bomb but i thought it was on the ground. at another luxury hotel which was targeted? correct, they were all close by on the strip. i told him i think it was that one and they had been evacuated but as we were driving towards the shangri—la i realised it was the ambulances coming from there. we had been bombed as well and ijoined the evacuation group on the lawn. your son is five years old, you get back to eating of presumably horror?m was distressing to see. the dining room is facing the road so we could
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tell it was above the lobby, we could see streams of ambulances and a lot of police presence and police we re a lot of police presence and police were circling the building. i was concerned about whether we were still safe there and we saw a large vehicle swat team coming in so the locals were quick to respond to make sure that people were safe. the hotel staff were trying to attend to some of the guests on the floor, some of the guests on the floor, some of the guests on the floor, some of them had been dining or preparing things around the hotel because there was a lot of stuff there as well. we could see there we re there as well. we could see there were ambulances in the loading bay which was one of the main areas to evacuate people from. what was going to your mind? if you are not stayed behind at church he would have been there. we were in shock. at first you look around i think you are in a scene from a movie or the news but then you realise you are in this. it was frightening for us because we had our child with us and sri lanka
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had our child with us and sri lanka had been safe for ten years so we cannot fathom why it had happened. as we were trying to get information and understand that our first concern was how do we get help? how do we check that everyone is ok? that was our first question, are people 0k? where does the people there that needed help? there were, because the blaster probably happened about half an hour to 45 minutes prior so they were still attending to the emergency scene for the first victims that were able to watch and get out but they were probably trying to go in and find people. we were probably not aware that because the police were there we we re that because the police were there we were not sure if there were bombers or other people there for a hostage situation. i think we were just confused at the time as to why the churches and hotels as well? you
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knew another hotel certainly had been attacked. were you threatened further attacks? i think we were. -- where you frightened of further attacks? i thought maybe it was it because there was three churches and tree hotels and there was a sort of symmetry to that. i thought this was probably at the end of it. but this is where the danger of flowing is because of the safety on the grounds and in the police. because there we re and in the police. because there were rumours about the bombed which is why i became concerned about safety in anywhere in the city. is why i became concerned about safety in anywhere in the citylj don't know if you got the chance to go into the restaurant but you are booked on table one for brunch and the restaurant took the brunt of this attack, didn't it? it did. from what we understand two suicide bombers entered and the dining room would have been at its peak of
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dining and breakfast at the time. the hotel was open to both the guests who had been dining there from the hotel for easter but it also was open to public guests and locals that lived there in sri lanka because it was one of the main hotel is hosting this branch, the dining room would have been most packed at this time. so we do not get a chance to go to the scene and we would have not wanted to anyway because there is dangerous structures and dramatic scenes. and you have a five-year-old son, david, who you do not want to see these things. absolutely. we took david away from the site but there is an issue of how safe we we re there is an issue of how safe we were and where we wear the safest. i do not regret that decision. we had to stand close to the army and to officials and ambulances are evacuating, and i just officials and ambulances are evacuating, and ijust told him to close his eyes. he asked why but i saidi close his eyes. he asked why but i said i do not want him to see things soi said i do not want him to see things so i closed his eyes as we were walking past ambulances because i was fearful he would see things that
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would affect him for the rest of his life. you saw them. i saw people being moved but i do not encounter any victims directly but my husband did. clearly sri lanka is a place you know well. ten years without incident and before that period it was a dangerous place to be. i wonder what you're feeling now is of sri lanka and what this has done?” have not been back to sri lanka for about 19 years because of the civil warand about 19 years because of the civil war and the last ten years has been safe and peaceful, it seemed like the ideal destination, a good way to show my husband where my family had originated from. that was the intent of the trip, just to have a fun holiday and we felt really safe. when we arrived in colombo i was amazed to see health wonderful it was, the locals were very warm, there was beautiful beaches. it was a colonial hotel so it had english
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ties so we were quite fascinated with the history and the north part of the strip has been modernised as a financial district so i was amazed to see how modern the roads were. as we we re to see how modern the roads were. as we were travelling around sri lanka we were travelling around sri lanka we never felt unsafe, we were in beautiful places but even as we travelled through i was delighted to see the country was a lot massive and the infrastructure had gotten better. it was honestly a dream trip and location to go to. we never felt u nsafe and location to go to. we never felt unsafe in the capital even after the bombs went off because the locals on the ground were quick to respond and the ground were quick to respond and the army and the military services. they were very good in operating and trying to keep people safe on the ground. have you had time to realise how lucky you were? we have been discussing that in the last 24—hour race. it is the first time we have been able to stop and take pause of what has happened. we do know how lucky we were. we feel very mixed i think because we know there are some families that were staying there that lofts —— that lost their loved
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ones and children and that was heartbreaking to hear. we feel we we re heartbreaking to hear. we feel we were fortu nate heartbreaking to hear. we feel we were fortunate and question why was it somebody else that wasn't? we are most relieved that we got a lot of help on ground and were able to get our son out of the country safely. we are hoping this won't spoil people's impression of sri lanka because they have been living harmoniously for the last ten years and we thought it the most magic place to travel to. we think our adventures were amazing. five—year—olds pick things up and how is david ? five—year—olds pick things up and how is david? how do you explain what happened ? how is david? how do you explain what happened? it is simplifying and making things easy and trying to be honest but not fully honest, if that makes sense. for example, he was excited then he was seen on these ambulances and we were talking about how hospitals and ambulances help people. i do not tell him they were probably removing people who are critically injured or had passed
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away. you leave those details out because no five—year—old needs to hear them. because no five—year—old needs to hearthem. in because no five—year—old needs to hear them. in other cases, because no five—year—old needs to hearthem. in other cases, he because no five—year—old needs to hear them. in other cases, he was hearing pieces of news and we couldn't help it, either in conversation or passing. does talking about it help because we are only talking a few days on. we are, but i think we will have to take time to pause and let things seep in and deal with the reality that questions will come up with him. welcome home. thank you, i am glad to be back. there's a warning that a lack of english classes for migrants will harm the integration of communities, and fuel right—wing extremism after brexit. dame louise casey, a former integration tsar, and the association of colleges have condemned a halving of funds over the last ten years. leigh milner reports. cup of tea... muna al—wadi from syria is one of 750,000 people in the uk that
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speaks little or no english. it's up to her 14—year—old daughter to help her. when she has an appointment in the doctor or dentist or anything, i go with her to help her because she doesn't know the language. and when she goes, sometimes, shopping i go to help her. the government is spending £50 million to help women like muna integrate better. 6 million is solely dedicated to helping women to learn english. here at this doctor's surgery, they've got a challenge. 80% of appointments have to be translated. and what language? lithuanian. so they've recruited workers who speak 15 different languages. i don't understand. you don't understand all the words? but some patients bring their children to help, like this woman from venezuela, who's brought her 17—year—old daughter. we've taken people from the local community, we've trained them up and upskilled them to communicate with our patients, translate and also deliver health care. don't you think this is actually discouraging people from learning english?
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what can we do, we have to be able to communicate with our patients. find the word with a... bbc research shows there's been a 12% rise in the number of people taking official english classes in the last three years, but that's still much lower than it was more than a decade ago. the reason this community centre is so popular is because it's right next door to a mosque, where most of the migrant community live here in peterborough. but the city is one of five places across the country the government has identified as needing help with integration. the people that have been here longer are more integrated than the newcomers. i mean, i think it's quite diverse. i don't think they want to live with us. it's never really felt like they're completely meshed. maybe some more than others. so we're going to do these words in alphabetical order... 0verall funding for courses has heart in more than a decade. the
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government has warned that a lack of in which classes will fuel right—wing extremism. in which classes will fuel right-wing extremism. we have nasty stuff happening in our society with the rise of the right wing. languages detoxify everything. the government says it recognises the pressure facing colleges and will reassess the funding in the next review. as for muna, she's grateful for her daughter's help with english. i help her so much. leigh milner, bbc news, in peterborough. funerals take place in sri lanka for some of the of victims of the easter sunday bombings, as the death toll rises to 320. buckingham palace says president trump will make an official state visit to the uk at the beginning ofjune. a 57—year—old woman is arrested in connection with the murder of the journalist, lyra mckee in londonderry.
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here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the three biggest mobile operators — vodafone, ee and 02 — are failing to offer adequate levels of service and support, according to new research. the consumer group which? says this was despite the big operators often costing more than smaller rivals. london's top transport boss should consider quitting according to a report into delays on london's crossrail. the project, to build a new railway underneath central london, was due to open last december but it might not open until 2020 at the earliest. a report by the london assembly says transport for london commissioner mike brown should reflect "on whether he is fit to fulfil his role". the proportion of uk firms reporting a cyber—attack has jumped, despite most businesses admitting they are under—prepared for breaches, according to research from hiscox. the insurerfound 55% had faced an attack in 2019, up from 40% last year.
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twitter results are out — what have we learned? if you look at the performance over the past three months — the number of users is higher than at christmas — they've added 9 million more. and it's also making significantly more money than it did at the start of last year. earnings were up 18% compared with the first three months of 2018. on both measures — that's better than analysts were expecting. they predicted a fall in user numbers and more modest earnings growth. i'm confused as to how they make money on twitter but i am sure i am just being stupid. a lot of it is from advertising. but when you go on twitter it is not thrust out you. people pray to promote certain content and habits appear around videos. 0ne content and habits appear around videos. one of the most popular ones is sports videos, clips of goals.
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their popular selling advertisements around that. and they're trying to make it a " ' to get rid of some of the nastiness? and i checked your account is still active, do not panic. the firm's founder, jack dorsey, has said he regrets that twitter‘s design encourages "outrage". he told a ted conference in vancouver last week that he was ready to make changes. what is a ted talk? it is business leaders showing the experience and expertise. he said he was ready to make changes to the way twitter works to make it a more pleasa nt twitter works to make it a more pleasant space and to make it more conversational and to discourage abuse and misinformation. mr dorsey said: "we are taking a more proactive approach to reducing abuse and its
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effects on twitter." samira hussain is at the new york stock exchange. did he explain what he meant about this more proactive approach to dealing with hate speech and abuse? in general social media companies have faced a lot of backlash from people in regards to privacy issues and the platform has really become a place for radical ideas, is a lot of misinformation and frankly, a lot of abuse. what we are hearing from twitter is that they are going to be taking more aggressive tactics to try and clamp down on that. already we have seen they have taken down a lot of accounts, fake accounts or accou nts lot of accounts, fake accounts or accounts that were created and spreading misinformation. that was taken as good news by investors. if you look at the weighty stock prices
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are trading, it is up 13% tojust this morning. clearly investors are really ha p py this morning. clearly investors are really happy about what they have seen. and to your point, simon, about advertising and how twitter makes money. it is all about advertising and that is why the number of monthly users and the number of monthly users and the number of monthly active users is just so important so the fact that you see there are so many more users that have started to use the twitter platform, that is the other big reason why investors are pleased because it means that a lot more people receive video advertising thatis people receive video advertising that is on twitter. thank you. that was simon, but thank you for me as well. the big factor affecting markets as the price of oil. the prices have gone up significantly over the past few days. it is
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pushing up oil companies but hits airlines as well such as the british airways. an exception — shares in holiday firm thomas cook have jumped amid reports that it could be taken over. time for a look at the weather... the easter break was beautiful in terms of the weather, we had 25 degrees but it will be a distant memory if you have outdoor plans this coming weekend and you will need extra layers. there will be a cool breeze and showers around and if you are lucky, a maximum of 12 or 13 celsius. we are starting to see the first signs of that change as we speak, he vale of highs filling up from the new continent and in the next couple of hours we could see showers in cornwall and parts of the southwest. there have been a couple of showers today and the cloud a
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stick the further west you are. we will pick up card across eastern scotla nd will pick up card across eastern scotland and north—east england and it is these two areas that will be the talking point for tomorrow's weather because an area of the pressure is starting to push in off the atlantic. 0utbrea ks pressure is starting to push in off the atlantic. outbreaks of rain expected tomorrow, not for all of us but starting from the south—west and moving their way gradually into south wales through the morning. the head of it we can see sharp showers. there will be more cloud around for all of us and a freshening breeze which will make it feel noticeably cooler. some of these showers could be heavy with the odd rumble of thunder. the heaviest rain is in the south—west and into west wales, gradually moving its way through the bristol channel. claudia conditions the eastern scotland, western scotla nd the eastern scotland, western scotland and northern ireland, you might see some more brightness and temperatures were perhaps peak in the sanyo spot at around 17 to 20 degrees but most of us low to mid
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teens. 0n degrees but most of us low to mid teens. on thursday we are drawing aircoming of the teens. on thursday we are drawing air coming of the atlantic and winds was swing around to a north—westerly direction bringing outbreaks of more persistent rain. thursday, rain weaving its way across england and wales pushing up across the border. the north of scotland and northern ireland should stay dry during daylight hours, not especially warm with temperatures widely at low to mid teens. the weekend will be cool, showery and breezy at times. you have been warned.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3.00pm — mass funerals for victims of the bomb attacks in sri lanka, as the death toll rises to 320. the country marks the atrocity with a day of national mourning. as cctv pictures are released of a suspected suicide bomber entering a church, the sri lankan prime minister says the police investigation is making good progress. all that we knew earlier was that there were foriegn links and this could not have been done just locally, there has been training even and a coordination which we had not seen earlier. a full state visit for president trump in june. he'll meet the queen at buckingham palace and mark the 75th anniversary of d—day landings in france. the new ira says it killed journalist lyra mckee in a shooting on thursday night, as a 57—year—old woman is arrested in connection with her death.
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coming up on afternoon live all the sport, that's with 0lly foster. a huge shock at the world championship, the favourite, the world number one, the five—time champion ronnie 0'sullivan knocked out by an amateur. the nation had a chance of an early summer. it is all over from tomorrow onwards. cloud and april showers are set to return. and give you all the details in half an hour. thanks louise. also coming up — we'll hear from greta thurnberg, the swedish schoolgirl who helped inspire global protests on climate change, she's been meeting political leaders at westminster.
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hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. the sri lankan prime minister says investigators are making good progress in identifying culprits behind easter sunday's attacks. 40 people, all sri lankan citizens, have been arrested so far and a state of emergency declared. the prime minister says there may be some links with so called islamic state and says it is "possible" that the attacks were in retaliation for the killing of 50 muslims in the new zealand city of christchurch. mass funerals were held this morning for some of the 321 people who died in the bombings, eight of whom were british. 0ur correspondent nick beake reports from colombo. one man about to murder more than 100 easter worshippers. carrying a rucksack packed with explosives, he walks purposefully towards the church. he steps inside, where many are standing because the service is so full. after making his way towards the altar,
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he blows himself up. the holiest of days becoming the deadliest. and so this morning they had to bury their dead. all their dead. it will take a long time. many are struggling to take in the scale of the slaughter. and survivors are trying to understand why they were spared. translation: i was in shock. i was looking for my daughter, but when i found her she could not recognise me. she didn't know who her mummy was. she said, "god saved me. god got me and my mother out safely." but many did not make it. among the britons who died, anita nicholson and her two children, alex and annabel. her husband ben survived. former firefighter billy harrop and his wife dr sally bradley were also killed. danish billionaire anders holch povlsen, the biggest shareholder in the online clothing company asos,
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lost three of his four children. another explosion yesterday was one dramatic reason why an official state of emergency has been declared, although no one was injured here. the authorities, though, are warning of more attacks. the defence minister told the sri lankan parliament two home—grown islamist groups carried out sunday's bombings, with help from an international network. he claimed they were motivated by the killing of 50 muslims in the new zealand city of christchurch last month. but the authorities here are facing fierce criticism for not acting on detailed intelligence about possible attacks on churches. and amid all this death, more than 300 families are now living with the consequences. nick beake, bbc news, colombo. and in the last few minutes, we've heard from the prime minister of sri lanka who was speaking
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at a press conference in colombo. i would like to say that the investigators are making good progress in regard to identifying the culprits. but it means that we identify all the culprits and look at what the network is. there has also been a communication, a story coming in from cairo that is has claimed responsibility. all that we knew earlier was there were foreign links and this could not have been done just locally. there has been training even and a coordination give that we had not seen earlier. i have also had offers of help, many countries are helping us. starting, of course, with the united states and there have been other countries willing to come in.
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the police will decide with whom and how they work. firstly, i must offer my condolences to all those who were killed, all the relatives of all those who were killed, especially those not of sri lankan origin. many of them came in to have a holiday of three or four days, those who were working here and they were looking forward to a good break. there were others who were visitors during the easter holidays, the long break you had abroad, and they were unfortunately caught up in the blast, together with a number of sri lankans who were here. we are doing our best to identify all those. we can now speak to dr sajjan gohel, the international security director for uk—based think tank the asia—pacific foundation. we have had a claim of responsibility from islamic state, that raise the odd eyebrow because it has come quite late.
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it has, but not necessarily surprising because they were potentially waiting for all the devices to be used by the cell which with a winter because some were found left over in vehicles at the airport. this wasn'tjust that her tea rs airport. this wasn'tjust that her tears and the hotels, this was wanting to carry out follow—up attacks. churches and hotels. isis wa nted attacks. churches and hotels. isis wanted the death toll to continue to rise before they took credit for one of the biggest attack since 9/11, bigger than the madrid train bombings. the sri lankan government was quick to say that there had to be international involvement in this. do you agree? definitely. the group that is being accused of having done the reconnaissance, the scouting and leaving the explosive devices, their local outfit, they have ideological... the ideology is
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an extreme radical strand of islam that wants to go back to the original tenants or how they believe to be original. anything that is modern or devious from it is deemed to be an enemy, including muslims. the group has ideological connections to a group in pakistan, the ones that carried out the mumbai attacks in 2008. if you can pair mumbai attacks and the sri lanka tax, they are similar in scale. they have connections with isis. 0n tax, they are similar in scale. they have connections with isis. on one hand they add an al-qaeda affiliate but on the other hand they are willing to work with isis. the suggestion this was a retaliatory action against the attacks in christchurch. enough time for an attack like this to be planned?m is difficult because isis did call for reprisals after the christchurch shootings and they did mention easter holidays to be a time to do it. or to carry out this type of
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attack in a short space of time would have been a challenge because of the number of people involved, putting together sophisticated aeds. it is possible they were planning this at a later date and brought it forward. the frustration for many in sri lanka is there was some sort of warning and a warning that didn't get passed on to those who needed to hear it. it wasn't the only country mentioned either. there was a significant intelligence warning that spoke of potential attacks on churches in sri lanka but also targeting hotels in the maldives which thankfully hasn't arisen. the warnings were shared with the president of sri lanka and he basically hand onto the information, the problem is sri lanka's political system as you can have a prime minister and president of two political parties and their president didn't share the information with the prime minister. he has been barred from being inside
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the national security council and then the prime minister's office could not act. frustration for sure. in terms of the logistics of this, the planning that you say was probably done somewhere else, we are talking about suicide bombers, the most committed ofjihadists or however you want to describe them. they would have been recruited, the days before? this is what needs to be looked at, how the recruitment strategy goes on inside sri lanka. it is similarto strategy goes on inside sri lanka. it is similar to the uk where people get recruited online, they get groomed, they are talking to isis handlers who are discussing with tactics target about locations? are also using the dark web, encrypted messaging. where the international is the ied is, the explosive devices. we have seen it in home—grown terrorists, they failed to d eto nate home—grown terrorists, they failed to detonate their devices. it is
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those who went abroad, like the manchester bombings, they are training aboard. there is an international component he and the authorities need to understand that. it isn't just have authorities need to understand that. it isn'tjust have ramifications for sri lanka but the whole world because the tigers weren'tjust sri lankans, there were foreign too. this is an illustration that you don't need to have a caliphate in order to carry out mass casualty attacks. remember, this is a bigger terrorist attacks than the ones we've seen since 9/11. 320 plus and it may continue to grow. it is good of you to come to talk about this. buckingham palace has announced president trump will make a state visit to the uk in earlyjune. theresa may promised him the visit shortly after he was elected in 2016, but no date was set. it will coincide with the preparations for the 75th anniversary of the d—day landings.
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president trump's last visit to the uk was met with mass protests. so what will be on the agenda? (tx the three—day state visit to the uk will be from the 3rd to the 5th ofjune. once inside buckingham palace, it is expected the queen will host a banquet for around 150 guests in mr trump's honour.in addition to meeting the queen, the president will have a meeting with prime minister theresa may. donald trump will then attend a ceremony in portsmouth to commemorate the 75th anniversary of d—day. and will then travel to normandy onjune 6th will for further normandy commemorations. speaking today, the mayor of london sadiq khan, says president trump should visit to commemorate d—day but the uk should not roll out the red carpet. and he says it's likely there will be protests injune. i think there will be protests, it doesn't take a crystal ball for people to predict there will be protests. many of the things this president has said, people find objectionable. the amplification of tweets
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from racists for example, some of his views around people who belong to my faith, some of his views some people find objectionable. one of the great things about living in a democracy is people will make their views known. they key thing though is any protest is peaceful but also lawful as well. 0ur washington correspondent is gary 0'donoghue. 0ur royal correspondent isjonny dymond. we are getting a few more details. the president trump may not like this. everything at the moment is being created and carved and the word... created and carved ? the word i am getting is that we will not get the state visit that perhaps some people might expect. some people, especially those who wa nt to some people, especially those who want to make their voices heard against president trump, would have hoped. you are talking about the carriage down the mall? it is a
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pretty traditional part of the state visit. it didn't happen with president 0bama, it did happen with the chinese president. it is very important part of the public viewing of any visitor and it is the point at which a lot of protesters could have turned up and made their views heard. what i'm hearing is that the palace will lean towards what they did with president 0bama, which was a meeting at buckingham palace rather than a meeting at horse guards parade and the long procession down the mall. that may be about us security, it may be because president trump doesn't want to be booed or cheered for hundreds of metres. what i'm hearing is that it will be the significant change when it comes to the state visit. they will be the pomp and ceremony, the big banquet, what about addressing both houses of parliament? john burkle has had his view on this. he essentially said
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that this house is anti—racist, anti—sexist, believes in a judiciary and therefore no thank you very much to president trump. there's a fair amount of criticism from other members of the house, there is a difference of opinion about whether or not president trump should address the house. there's been this controversy before, westminster hall which is the traditional spots for us president to do this address is under the control of the lock of the speaker, the royal gallery which is one of the largest rooms in the palace of westminster is a little bit more independent of him and may bea bit more independent of him and may be a compromise solution. it is pretty clear a large segment of the labour parliamentary party are unhappy about the visit and unlikely to turn up to hear president trump speak. 0ur washington correspondent is gary 0'donoghue.
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what about over there? a lot ofjoy? pretty much nothing here, not much a reaction here at all. this is something that has been in the offing for a while as you know there have been discussions about it. it was first offered by theresa may just a week after president trump took office. more than two years ago now. we know that has negotiated. there has all sorts of normal talks about the special steadfast relationship and all that kind of thing but apart from the ceremonial stuff butjohnny was talking about they and the question about addressing parliament, they will be some business to be done. they will wa nt to some business to be done. they will want to reason may come if she is in downing street, will want to talk seriously to president trump about post brexit trade deals at that
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stage. the americans have said they are eager to do one but we know that the president has a taste for zero sum game. he believes the us have two when these trade arguments and it isn't about everybody coming out asa it isn't about everybody coming out as a winner they will be a lot of discussion on that as part of this visit. but, undoubtedly, a feather in the cap of the present, only ever the third american president to have a full state visit. he won't be able in the same way as it last time, to avoid central london. he went everywhere by helicopter whether it was blinding, windsor. blame whether he will make the meet and greet on horse guards parade, that procession down the mile, it is going to be a security nightmare. the advance teams will be heading to london pretty much today. gary,
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thank you very much. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. funerals take place in sri lanka for some of the of victims of the easter sunday bombings, as the death toll rises to 320. buckingham palace says president trump will make an official state visit to the uk at the beginning ofjune. a 57—year—old woman is arrested in connection with the murder of the journalist, lyra mckee in londonderry. and in spots, the five—time champion ronnie 0'sullivan has been stunned at this years world championship, beating 10—8 by an amateur. 0'sullivan said he was feeling unwell. the celtic legend billy mcneill has died. he captained the famous lisbon lions. he was the first british player to lift the european cup. ahead of the manchester derby tomorrow, united manager says he is the right man for the job. tomorrow, united manager says he is the right man for thejob. they lost
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4-0 to the right man for thejob. they lost 4—0 to everton over the weekend. i'll be back in the next 50 minutes. talks on brexit between the government and labour will resume this afternoon, as mps return to westminster talks on brexit between the government and labour will resume this afternoon, as mps return to westminster after the easter break. theresa may has been holding a cabinet meeting this morning, after the easter break. theresa may has been holding a cabinet meeting this morning, the first since the eu agreed to delay our departure date until the end of october. 0ur political correspondent chris mason is at westminster. how other politicians going to be feeling about it today? that calm oasis, that brief glimpse into the world that used to exist and might exist in the future, whether are lots of debates, but that's brexit where there is an feature. it has gone, we are all back into it again. mps are ground down by it. also, laden with, they know that isn't a reservoir of
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sympathy for members of parliament, they are laden with this burden of making very difficult decisions. to what extent are you willing to compromise? where is your bottom line? is is possible for a collective of 650 people with 650 different shades of view about brexit, is it possible amongst that group of people, split as it is into different parties and factions, able to come to anything that resembles a deal in order to get the prime minister's arrangement through? labour and the conservatives, there is an mechanism to do that. talks are back under way this afternoon. john mcdonnell is in there as is sir keir starmer, meeting amongst others the chief whip, the prime minister's chief of staff. these are detailed can “— chief of staff. these are detailed can —— discussions going on at a senior level. that is necessary to get at deal but will it be
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sufficient given the political capital that both sides will have to shedin capital that both sides will have to shed in order to shave off some of the things they have spent the last couple of years are saying they are not willing to compromise on. as ever, thank you very much. a 57—year—old woman has been arrested under the terrorism act in connection with the murder of thejournalist, lyra mckee, in northern ireland. she was shot while she was reporting on riots in londonderry on thursday night. the dissident irish republican group, the new ira, has admitted it was behind her killing. earlier i spoke to out ireland correspondent, chris page... a number of friends of leila mckee said they don't take this apology seriously. —— lyra mckee. the new ira among the distant republican groups who are opposed to the peace process a re groups who are opposed to the peace process are thought to be the most active, the largest of all those
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group security sources would say they have 300 members. of those, a few dozen, may be 50, willing to go out and kill. as the recent tragic events in the city have proven, doesn't take many people to create a tragedy, doesn't take people to take a lie. there's still a sense of disbelief, a great sense of anger here in derry even though a few days have passed since lyra was killed when covering a riot in lyra. police made their third arrest this morning in the investigation, 57—year—old woman detained under anti—terrorism legislation. she is in the police station in belfast being questioned. 0ver station in belfast being questioned. over the weekend to teenagers, 18 and 19, were arrested. they were released without charge. the police hoping to make progress in the investigation, still concentrating effo rts investigation, still concentrating efforts on the community here in derry, more than 140 people have
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beenin derry, more than 140 people have been in contact with the police through a portal they have set up online. they've uploaded footage, police have been appealing for dashcam footage. the swedish schoolgirl, who helped inspire global protests on climate change, has been meeting political leaders at westminster. in a bbc interview, greta thurnberg has called for urgent action to deal with what she says is an "existential crisis" and has urged british politicians to "listen to the scientists" on climate change. you said something very striking the other day, you said we need to panic, we can'tjust have a polite conversation about this anymore. what do you mean? by panic i mean, we step out of ourcomfort zones and we realise what is going on. so i say if your house is on fire and you want to keep your house from burning to the ground, it requires some level of panic.
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you don't sit talking about insurance claims or rebuilding or renovations, you do everything you can to put out the fire. let's talk now to our correspondent sarah walton who is in parliament square where a further climate demonstration is taking place. at the moment the protesters here have been moved off the roads in parliament square and they are in the central grass area, they aren't blocking roads. they have been here since midday and it is calm. there isa group since midday and it is calm. there is a group yoga session. there have been some speeches made. they marched here this morning, getting here at around midday. they came from marble arch and they were intending to hand in letter to their mps calling on the government to engage in talks extinction rebellion about climate change. they were met with a heavy police presence here.
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they couldn't get anywhere near the houses of parliament. there was immense when some attempted to lie down in the roads but they were quickly moved on to the centre of parliament square. they say they will stay here until politicians came up to talk to them. today is the latest in 80 days of action now, led by extinction rebellion. they blocked off intersections in london, most of those protest sites were moved over the weekend. police say they've made over a thousand arrests since those protest started last monday, 71 people charged. extinction rebellion says they will continue their campaign of peaceful activism. as you mentioned, this is happening at the same day the young swedish climate activist has been meeting political readers in the houses of parliament. she addressed the extinction rebellion campaign group at marble arch. she has given
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then her supporters that she is calling for more people to take similar action to engage in nonviolent peaceful activism to try and highlight the issue of climate change. sarah walton there. let's have a look at the weather. it isa let's have a look at the weather. it is a rather nice about but for how much longer? louise is here. maybe 24 hours? we might see some photographs like this over the next couple of days. this is spain. i don't want to stand here and gloat that you have to spare a thought for those fronts and family who went to spain for the easter break because there was significant rainfall in parts of southern spain. 323 millimetres, that is ten times more than their monthly average and they had some severe flooding. i'm sure they don't want to hear about our glorious easter weekend. it's all change for us, though.
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we did have 25 degrees over the weekend and all sorts of records we re weekend and all sorts of records were broken across the nation that is 77 fahrenheit, way above the average. the temperature for this time of year should be 13. that is what we are going to get over the weekend. this coming weekend it looks pretty miserable, it is windy, showery, back to square one. we've had the heart a few days, hot spell in federally, is there something we have to get used to? we need some rain for the gardens and i'm sure some will return. it was unusual. you heard it here first! it will return, it is only april. we are going to see more seasonal. i had to go out and what are some plants that were getting desperate. in some respects that is welcome news. we are starting to see the first sign of that change. close billing across the country. the
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sunshine has been hazy today and there is little bits of saharan dust in the upper atmosphere, they might be some stunning sunsets. for the rest of the afternoon, the booking up, it'll be cool, elsewhere the temperatures are down a degree or so. we'd have been happy with 22 degrees. but through this evening, the signs of the change arrives. down in the south—west with see rain pushing into cornwall and into devon, it will move into wales. the breeze will continue to pick up, it drive more cloud into the east of scotland. the change arrives with low pressure really starting to dominate the weather story, notjust through wednesday but for the remainder of this week. it will take its time for some is not a write—off, tomorrow. most of the rain will start in the south—west. they could be some sharp thundery
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downpours through parts of 0xfordshire, authentic english, the midlands as well. the increasing but there will be more cloud around so it will feel cool. you'll an extra layer. —— you will need an external layer. —— you will need an external layer tomorrow. the further west you are, the best of the brightness you will get an perhaps high teens into scotland. if we're lucky, with a little sunshine, we could see highs of 20 degrees. it will start to feel cool as you continue to go through the remainder of the week and us because the wind will swing around from the atlantic, driving in this moister, more rain around on thursday and more across eastern england. it pushes its way through the north of england and across the scottish borders through the day on thursday. behind it, cooler, showery conditions. top temperatures around 13 degrees on thursday. this theme continues into the weekend. if you have outdoor plans, showery, cool
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and windy at times. this is bbc news. our latest headlines. funerals take place for some of the victims of the bombs attacks in sri lanka, as the death toll rises to 321. the country marks the atrocity with a day of national mourning. cctv pictures are released
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of a suspected suicide bomber entering a church, the sri lankan prime minister says police are investigating whether the islamic state group was involved. buckingham palace says president trump will make an official state visit to the uk at the beginning ofjune. he'll meet the queen and the prime minister, but it's not yet been decided whether he will address parliament. the new ira says it killed journalist lyra mckee in a shooting on thursday night as a 57—year—old woman is arrested in connection with her death. and a smile fit for a prince. these pictures have been released of prince louis, as he celebrates his first birthday. let's get the sport. we are talking snooker, a seismic moment today. that is a good word. we saw when hugh 0'sullivan yesterday, it didn't look great. he was trailing, we
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thought he would come back and rattle off the frames he needed but it didn't work out like that. the world number one, five time world champion, the rocket, with five tournament wins under his belt this seasonit tournament wins under his belt this season it knocked out of the world championship where he had been tipped to go all the way. it is one of the great crucible upsets. beaten by an amateur. that is why it is so shocking. james cahill, 0'sullivan was trailing, pulled it back to 5—5. but he was really out of sorts. when you saw him sitting in his chair yawning, falling asleep at times it seemed, struggling to stay awake, that pink would have put ten at 9—8 up. as it was, cahill knocked off the next two frames. he is the first amateur to qualify for the world championships but a very out of sorts ronnie 0'sullivan.
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championships but a very out of sorts ronnie o'sullivan. you have to come here physically and mentally feeling good. mentally i was feeling up feeling good. mentally i was feeling upfor feeling good. mentally i was feeling up for it. i have had a good season, ididn't up for it. i have had a good season, i didn't expect to do well but you come here trying to do your best. if you are physically not 100% than it is going to make it even harder. i try to hang in there and do as much asi try to hang in there and do as much as i could and see if i could get through this match and then have a few days off to try and feel a little bit better. i thought i would be nervous when i we nt i thought i would be nervous when i went out but i wasn't. it surprised me. i felt really good. obviously i was a bit tense and parts but apart from that, if i can hopefully now kick on, i know my squirming in my games there, i haven't shown it that much there. i have done good pressure clearances, shown bottle but i can offer more than that. he showed an awful lot of bottle. he has been playing for an amateur for
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the last couple of seasons. he was a professional and will be playing as a pro against dam again next season. let's talk football. a day of mourning. legend has been lost. he was a legend. he is a legend. billy mcneill, has died at the age of 79. they put a statue up of him outside celtic park a few years ago. a true legend, one of the most important figures in the clubs history. captained them to nine successive titles, seven scottish cups and six league cups. but it was this iconic moment for which he will be best remembered, lifting the the european cup, the first british player to do so, when they beat inter milan in the 1967 final in lisbon, thus the famous lisbon lions were born.
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he had two spells as celtic manager and also had spells in charge of manchester city and aston villa. he got them promoted to the first decision. celtic say he "passed away surrounded by his family and loved ones". iam sure i am sure there will be plenty of things to mark his passing over the next few weeks. big game tomorrow might, manchester city's game in hand on liverpool in the title race is at old trafford the manchester derby. win that and city will move 1 point clear at the top again with three games left to play. manchester united lost badly over the weekend, 4—0 at everton and the city maanger doesn't think that a trip to united is as daunting as it used to be. this club in the last decade grew a lot and that is why it is not as scary to go there. playing them before was more difficult. the distance that they had in the last
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ten seasons, it is not equal now. the gap was bigger. anthonyjoshua says jarrell miller "does not deserve to be in a ring with me or any other heavyweight" after reported drug test failures. miller was due to meetjoshua at madison square garden on june 1st. he was denied a licence for the fight after an "adverse finding" in two separate drug tests. joshua had this message for miller in a post on his you tube channel today today. the lesson to learn in this situation is works in various ways. what goes around welcome back around. he has taken fate and his own blessings out of his own hands. be respectful. i know it is a fight but be respectful, be appreciative and lead by example. what he had done is not leading by example. anthonyjoshua on his youtube
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channel enjoying the sunshine. he could have won a shirt! that's what i thought. you andi and i are of a certain generation. thank you very much. we will talk to you later on. let return to our main story. marisa keller and herfamily have just got back to london from sri lanka where they escaped the bomb at the shangri—la hotel. marisa arrived back in the uk this morning and joined me earlier this afternoon. at first you look around and you think you are in a scene from the movie of the news but you realise you are living this. it was frightening for us because we had our child with us and show anchor had been so safer ten years that we couldn't fathom that this had happened. we were wondering the churches but then why the hotel. as we we re churches but then why the hotel. as we were trying to get information and understand that, ourfirst concern was how do we get help, had we checked that everyone is ok? that was our first we checked that everyone is ok? that was ourfirst question, we checked that everyone is ok? that was our first question, our people
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0k? where there still people there and needed help? there were. by the time we were there, the last had happened half an hour to 45 minutes prior so that meant they were still attending to the emergency scene for the first victims that were able to work and get out, but then they were going in to find people, as you would come up with a blast site. we went aware of because the police we re went aware of because the police were there, we weren't sure if there we re were there, we weren't sure if there were other bombers are other people that hostage situations. i think we we re that hostage situations. i think we were just confused at the time as to why the churches, why the hotels well. you knew that another hotel had been attacked. you knew your hotel was under attack. were you frightened off further attacks, further bombings?” frightened off further attacks, further bombings? i think we were. initially, when we realised several of them had been bombed at the same time, i thought maybe that was it because it was three churches and three hotels and there was some sort
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of symmetry to that with precise timings. i thought that was the end of it. but this is where the danger of it. but this is where the danger of news flowing erroneously becomes problematic for both the police and the safety of the people on the ground. there were rumours that other places were getting bombed and this was when i started to get concerned about our safety anywhere in the city. i don't know if you've got the chance to go into the restau ra nt, got the chance to go into the restaurant, but you were booked on table one for brunch and the restau ra nt table one for brunch and the restaurant took the brunt of this attack. they did. from what we understand, there were two suicide bombers that ended and the dining room would have been at its peak at that time. the hotel was open to both guests who had been dining there for the hotel for easter, but it was also open to public guests and locals who lived there in sri la nka and locals who lived there in sri lanka because it was one of the main hotels hosting this lunch. the dining room would probably have been most packed at this time. we didn't get a chance to get near the scene
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and we would not have wanted to anywhere because there was danger that struck chile and other things that struck chile and other things that you might see are very traumatic. and you don't want your five—year—old son to see these things. absolutely. we decided we would take david away from the site but there was an issue of how safe are we, where are we the safest? in the end, i don't regret that this dumb decision. we had to stand quite close to police and ambulances. i just told him to close his eyes. he asked why and i told him i didn't wa nt asked why and i told him i didn't want him to see things. i was fea rful want him to see things. i was fearful that he would see things that would affect him for the rest of his life. you saw them. i saw people being moved but i did not encounter any victims directly but my husband did. it is a place you know well, you have been going for ten yea rs know well, you have been going for ten years without incident. that followed a period that it was quite
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a dangerous place to be. ijust wonder how you are feeling about sri la nka wonder how you are feeling about sri lanka now. i have not been back to sri lanka for about 19 years because of the civil war. the last ten years it has been safe and peaceful and it seems like the ideal destination, a good way to show my husband where my family had originated from. and so that was the intent of the trip, to have a fun holiday. we felt really safe when we arrived. i was amazed to see how modern it was, the locals we re very to see how modern it was, the locals were very warm. we were to see how modern it was, the locals were very warm. we were saying in a hotel by beautiful beaches. it was a colonial hotel. the north but hasn't really been modernised as the financial district. i was amazed to see how modern the reds were and as we we re see how modern the reds were and as we were travelling around, we never felt u nsafe. we were travelling around, we never felt unsafe. we were in some of the most beautiful places. i was delighted to see that the country was a lot more safe, the infrastructure had got better and it
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was a dream trip and locations to go to. we never felt unsafe in the capital, even after the bombs went off because the locals on the ground with very quick to respond and the army and the military services, they we re very army and the military services, they were very good in operating and trying to keep people safe on the ground. philip hammond the chancellor has tweeted. .. they were at the same hotel when the bomb went off. ben nicholson confirmed the death of his wife and son and daughter. philip hammond said she was a former adviser at the treasury and she was a brilliant and
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dedicated lawyer. you are watching afternoon live. there's a warning that a lack of english classes for migrants will harm the integration of communities, and fuel right—wing extremism after brexit. dame louise casey, a former integration tsar, and the association of colleges have condemned a halving of funds over the last ten years. leigh milner reports. cup of tea... muna al—wadi from syria is one of 750,000 people in the uk that speaks little or no english. it's up to her 14—year—old daughter to help her. when she has an appointment in the doctor or dentist or anything, i go with her to help her because she doesn't know the language. and when she goes, sometimes, shopping i go to help her. the government is spending £50 million on itegration, with £6 million solely dedicated to helping women like muna learn english. here at this doctor's surgery, they've got a challenge. 80% of appointments have to be translated. and what language? lithuanian. so they've recruited workers
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who speak 15 different languages. i don't understand. you don't understand all the words? but some patients bring their children to help, like this woman from venezuela, who's brought her 17—year—old daughter. we've taken people from the local community, we've trained them up and upskilled them to communicate with our patients, translate and also deliver health care. don't you think this is actually discouraging people from learning english? what can we do? we have to be able to communicate with our patients. find the word with a... bbc research shows there's been a 12% rise in the number of people taking official english classes in the last three years, but that's still much lower than it was more than a decade ago. the reason this community centre is so popular is because it's right next door to a mosque, where most of the migrant community live here in peterborough. but the city is one of five places across the country the government has identified as needing help with integration. the people that have been here longer are more integrated than the newcomers.
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i mean, i think it's quite diverse. i don't think they want to live with us. it's never really felt like they're completely meshed. maybe some more than others. so we're going to do these words in alphabetical order... overall, funding for courses has more than halved in a decade. the government is being warned that, post brexit, a lack of english classes will fuel right—wing extremism. i just can't stress enough that, you know, we have some nasty stuff happening in our society with the rise of the right—wing. language detoxifies everything. the government says it recognises the pressures facing colleges and it will assess the funding in the next spending review. as for muna, she's grateful for her daughter's help with english. i help her so much. leigh milner, bbc news, in peterborough. ben is here and will bring us the
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businesses in just a ben is here and will bring us the businesses injust a moment. first, the headlines. funerals take place in sri lanka for some of the of victims of the easter sunday bombings, as the death toll rises to 321. buckingham palace says president trump will make an official state visit to the uk at the beginning ofjune. a 57—year—old woman is arrested in connection with the murder of the journalist, lyra mckee in londonderry. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the three biggest mobile operators, vodafone, ee and 02, are failing to offer adequate levels of service and support, according to new research. the consumer group which? says this was despite the big operators often costing more than smaller rivals. the proportion of uk firms reporting a cyber—attack has jumped, despite most businesses admitting they are under—prepared for breaches, according to research from hiscox. the insurerfound 55% had faced an attack in 2019, up from 40% last year.
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more on that in a moment. london's top transport boss should consider quitting according to a report into delays on london's crossrail. the project, to build a new railway underneath central london, was due to open last december but it might not open until 2020 at the earliest. a report by the london assembly says transport for london commissioner mike brown should reflect on whether he is fit to fulfil his role. they should rename it furious rail. cyber attacks against businesses, they are on the rise. yes stop there could be more because this is all that has been reported. it is up from 40% last year to 55% in 2019. this is despite most businesses admitting that they are underprepared. this was discovered by some research from the insurance
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company. businesses are doing a lot to protect themselves from this, it is highly publicised. exactly, you would think so. what is your password ? would think so. what is your password? simon mccoy is wonderful. no won well guess that. you have thrown me. almost three quarters of firms were ranked as novices in terms of how prepared and ready they we re terms of how prepared and ready they were in terms of cyber steps they have taken against cyber attacks. it was interesting that they felt they weren't even at risk. this was based ona weren't even at risk. this was based on a survey based on 5500 companies. let's speak to gareth wharton. what sort of losses are we talking about? the losses can be very significant.
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for the smaller companies we are talking in the tens of thousands, medium—size companies can be hundreds of thousands and larger companies it can easily be millions. what steps can businesses take to protect themselves? i suppose being in insurer, insure themselves against a loss, but surely they want to avoid falling victim is in the first place. absolutely. we can look at off—line parallels. how businesses would protect themselves against a burglar or fire, businesses would protect themselves against a burglar orfire, fire alarm, fire extinguishers, but they will also have building insurance for the property. it is much the same in the online world. making sure there is good security cultures, training staff to be on the lookout for malicious or suspicious e—mails is important. equally, making sure they have the technology in place. very simple steps. making sure secure passwords are used, making sure they are backing up data and making sure that
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they securely encrypt data if at all possible. when i saw this research, i felt slightly concerned because a lot of the time if the business suffers a cyber attack, it is our data that is at risk, but there is nothing really that we as consumers can do about that, is there?|j nothing really that we as consumers can do about that, is there? i think with the incoming regulation that provides a lot more protection for consumers. businesses have to be more careful with how they look after customer data. this is now enshrined in law with significant fines if they don't do it. steps are being made but you are right. i would try to limit the amount of companies that have my data. i limit the amount of data is out there.|j was wondering how much variation there was between businesses in different countries. how well do british firms compared to other european firms, for example? in our
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research this year, we found that uk firms are spending less than their competitors across europe and the us and was not what we saw last year. we think this is what we see in the press, these are the large incidents. the uk has got over 5 million small businesses. they see the big companies being attacked and wrongly think that they will not be attacked. there is a level of complacency that they were not get attacked. some of these attacks are so indiscriminate, they send millions of e—mails, small companies get caught in the crossfire. they are as much of a target. you mention fishing e—mails, that is a classic, perhaps outdated, technique. how the attackers using more sophisticated and new ways, and if so what kind of thing? you are right. there is a consta nt thing? you are right. there is a constant battle between the good and the bad. as defenders come up with
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ways to protect against existing crimes, the attackers are looking at new routes. if we look at the trends that we have found at hiscox, we saw attacks relating to iran somewhere. in 2018, we have seen business e—mail compromise. if passwords are stolen, and it is the same password used for business e—mail, the business e—mail becomes compromised. they then use business e—mails to send messages to customers saying they have updated their bank details and that is the biggest type of claims we saw in 2018. thank you. shall we have a look at the markets? the ftse100 is up. oil prices are the big factor
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affecting markets today. oil prices are up after the us said it will tighten sanctions on iran, that could limit global supply of oil, so the price has gone up. it has the opposite effect on airlines. thomas cook shares are up after a possible buyer could take over the company. they had problems with profits and bookings at the start of the year. i will see it in an hour. thank you. disposable nappies are relatively cheap and sold in their billions, but they're hard to recycle and one of the biggest sources of waste. but now engineers in italy have found ways of recovering the plastic and other materials from inside such nappies them, turning them into clothes pegs or cat litter. our science editor david shukman reports. time for yet another nappy change. two—year—old maddalena gets a new one ready.
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the world uses 187 billion of these every year and most end up burnt or in landfill. here in treviso in italy, elenora says she cannot help adding to the mountains of nappy waste. i tried the organic cotton ones, but it was very difficult with three little ones to keep on with that. now, just up the road there is a new attempt to do something with all those disposable nappies. they are brought to a special recycling centre. most of us would prefer not to think of dirty nappies, but here they are welcomed. the first step is to reduce the smell. then there is the task of sterilising. the nappies are put through a series of processes. the first step is to separate their contents, which are sent off to a sewage farm. what is left is then sterilised with intense heat and steam before
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being dried out in this oven, and i can feel the heat coming off it. the material is then divided up so it can be sold to different industries. at the end of the process there are three different kinds of material. amazingly, by this stage they are all clean, so they can be turned into everything from plastic clothes pegs to cat litter. the man who came up with this idea used to design nappies. when i was changing my young kids, i always felt i was throwing away something useful because i know, as a designer of the products, i know what i put in these products in the first place. so it did not seem right to throw away such valuable materials. another batch freshly sterilised. the project is supported by the world's largest maker of nappies, procter & gamble.
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it's under pressure to reduce its impact on the environment, so wants to open nappy recycling plants in britain and around the world. maddalena's nappies will soon start to be recycled, and the hope is that this idea will quickly catch on. david shukman, bbc news, treviso in italy. new photographs of prince louis have been released to mark his first birthday today. the youngest child of the duke and duchess of cambridge is seen playing in the garden of the family's home, on the sandringham estate in norfolk. the dutchess took the pictures herself, earlier this month. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear. hello there. what we all spoiled over the easter break with glorious weather. if you haven't already heard, where have you been? but it was a record
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breaker with temperatures peaking at around 25 celsius. all change for the weekend fast approaching. it will be cold with outbreaks of rain with temperatures back where they should be for the time of year. we are already seeing the first of that change, cloud moving in. the upper atmosphere making for interesting sunsets. but the remainder of the day, we will see showery outbreaks of rain developing over the south—west and wales into the afternoon and evening. at the same time, the breeze will pick up and it will be a cool made with quite a lot of cloud coming in over eastern scotla nd of cloud coming in over eastern scotland and north—east england. low pressure in the driving seat over the next few days. there is weather fronts was being in from the atla ntic fronts was being in from the atlantic with the breeze picking up, making it feel noticeably cooler for wednesday. showery outbreaks of rain, some of it heavy as it moves its way slowly through the morning
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across cornwall, into devon and parts of wales. ahead of it, we could see few sharp showers stretching up into the midlands may be with the odd rumble of thunder. a factor in a lot more in the way of cloud and breeze, it will be noticeably cooler. you will need an extra layer if you are heading out and about. for scotland, we keep the figure crowd down a cloud across the east coast. we will be lucky if we see 11 to 14 celsius. 20 celsius the overall high. we have to look at the atla ntic to overall high. we have to look at the atlantic to start a push in from the west on thursday. that will stay with us for the weekend. we should see more widespread rain. good news for gardeners. it will move into the scottish borders by the end of the day. scotland and northern ireland may stay dry. as we approach the
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weekend, it will be cooler, showery and feeling disappointing after the weekend just gone.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 4.00pm mass funerals for victims of the bomb attacks in sri lanka, as the death toll rises to 321. the country marks the atrocity with a day of national mourning. as cctv pictures are released of a suspected suicide bomber entering a church, the sri lankan prime minister says there may be links to the islamic state group. all that we knew earlier was that there were foreign links and this could not have been done just locally, there has been training given and a coordination which we had not seen earlier. a full state visit for president trump in june. he'll meet the queen at buckingham palace and mark the 75th anniversary of d—day landings in france. a 19—year—old neo—nazi who encouraged the shooting of prime harry for marrying a woman of mixed race, has pleaded guilty to
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terror offences at the old bailey. coming up on afternoon live— all the sport with olly foster. a huge uspet at the world snooker championship, ronnie o sullivan the five time champion at the crucible and the world number one, sent packing by an amateur in the first round after glorious easter break, there isa after glorious easter break, there is a change on the way for some high clouds moving across the country. there is rain from wednesday onwards. thanks, louise. also coming up — we'll be live on marsden moor in west yorkshire where a wildfire is covering an estimated 15 square kilometres of wildlife habitat.
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hello, this is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. the sri lankan prime minister says police are investigating whether easter sunday's suicide bombings are linked to the islamic state group. 40 people, all sri lankan citizens, have been arrested so far but the prime minister said some of the suicide bombers had travelled abroad before the attacks. mass funerals were held this morning for some of the 321 people who died, eight of whom were british. our correspondent nick beake reports from colombo. one man about to murder more than 100 easter worshippers. carrying a rucksack packed with explosives, he walks purposefully towards the church. he steps inside, where many are standing because the service is so full. after making his way towards the altar, he blows himself up. the holiest of days becoming the deadliest. and so this morning they had to bury their dead.
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all their dead. it will take a long time. many are struggling to take in the scale of the slaughter. and survivors are trying to understand why they were spared. translation: i was in shock. i was looking for my daughter, but when i found her she could not recognise me. she didn't know who her mummy was. she said, "god saved me. god got me and my mother out safely." but many did not make it. among the britons who died, anita nicholson and her two children, alex and annabel. her husband ben survived. former firefighter billy harrop and his wife dr sally bradley were also killed. danish billionaire anders holch povlsen, the biggest shareholder in the online clothing company asos, lost three of his four children. another explosion yesterday was one
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dramatic reason why an official state of emergency has been declared, although no one was injured here. the authorities, though, are warning of more attacks. the defence minister told the sri lankan parliament two home—grown islamist groups carried out sunday's bombings, with help from an international network. he claimed they were motivated by the killing of 50 muslims in the new zealand city of christchurch last month. but the authorities here are facing fierce criticism for not acting on detailed intelligence about possible attacks on churches. and amid all this death, more than 300 families are now living with the consequences. nick beake, bbc news, colombo. more details are emerging about the british victims of the attacks in sri lanka on easter sunday. amelie linsey was 15 when she died, her school said they are "devastated". amelie's brother daniel who was 19 was also killed in the explosion. it was the final day of their holiday.
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daniel's college said they were "shocked and saddened to hear of his tragic death". the prime minister of sri lanka told a news conference that some of the suicide bombers had travelled abroad before the attacks and it was possible they were linked to the islamic state group. i would like to say that the investigators are making good progress in regard to identifying the culprits. but it means that we identify all the culprits and look at what the network is. there has also been a communication, a story coming in from cairo that is has claimed responsibility. all that we knew earlier was there were foreign links and this could not have been done just locally. there has been training given and a coordination that we had not seen earlier.
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i have also had offers of help, many countries are helping us. starting, of course, with the united states and there have been other countries willing to come in. the police will decide with whom and how they work. firstly, i must offer my condolences to all those who were killed, all the relatives of all those who were killed, especially those not of sri lankan origin. many of them came in to have a holiday of three or four days, those who were working here and they were looking forward to a good break. there were others who were visitors during the easter holidays, the long break you had abroad, and they were unfortunately caught up in the blast, together with a number of sri lankans who were here. we are doing our best to identify all those. our correspondent nick beake gave us this update earlier.
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ever since their bombers struck people have been asking who could have carried out at these attacks, who could have targeted congregations and knowing full well the pews would be packed, people would come to celebrate the easter services. the answer it would seem, as far as the is group is concerned, they were behind this. we need to ta ke they were behind this. we need to take this one step back because we have seen in previous cases where there have been suicide bombers, is have been quick to say, we were behind this, they put out photographs of some of the attackers, given their names, try to claim as much publicity as possible. this has been the case here so we've had the admission but we wait to see but concrete confirmation of that. the first of the mass funerals come in the meantime. absolutely, the scenes we saw this morning are heartbreaking. mass funerals, people being buried in the churches where they went to worship and where they we re they went to worship and where they
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were killed. across columbo we have seen this happening and sim and other cities too, affected by this. at the same time, the general sense of unease which people have had ever since the first suicide bomber struck has been really accentuated today because there has been a specific warning which has been of concern to people. that has been the information sent out all the police here in they should be on the alert for possibly a van or a lorry packed with explosives. that has worried people. these attacks may not be over and the fact there was this lull before anyone seemingly took responsibility, that was an area of concern because people thought may bea group concern because people thought may be a group was holding back, biding their time before they completed the last of an attack. that speculation but it is the kind of thing that is where these people, they are thinking about and talking about. the government is coming under pressure on the basis of who knew what and when and what is passed on in the days before. this tragedy has
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exposed a really dysfunctional government here in sri lanka. there is tension between the prime minister and president, which we knew about. the extent to which that has been able to foster would seem that vital intelligence was held back, people who needed to know were not informed and as you say, earlier this month, there was intelligence concerning names and addresses and particular groups, it was received by some of the powers that be here. the prime minister and his cabinet, a p pa re ntly the prime minister and his cabinet, apparently did not know about this. we were listening to the archbishop today saying if he'd known he would have cancelled all the easter sunday services and that means in the coming days and weeks, real questions for the authorities to answer. the families, once of their grief has subsided in some way, if thatis grief has subsided in some way, if that is possible, they will be asking could this have been stopped? buckingham palace has announced president trump will make a state
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visit to the uk in earlyjune. theresa may promised him the visit shortly after he was elected in 2016, but no date was set. it will coincide with the preparations for the 75th anniversary of the d—day landings. president trump's last visit to the uk was met with mass protests. so what will be on the agenda? the three—day state visit to the uk will be from the 3rd to the 5th ofjune. once inside buckingham palace, it is expected the queen will host a banquet for around 150 guests in mr trump's honour. in addition to meeting the queen, the president will have a meeting with prime minister theresa may. donald trump will then attend a ceremony in portsmouth to commemorate the 75th anniversary of d—day and will then travel to normandy onjune 6th will for further normandy commemorations. speaking today, the mayor of london, sadiq khan, says president trump will face protests during his state visit because people find some of his views "objectionable". i think there will be protests, it doesn't take a crystal ball for people to predict
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there will be protests. many of the things this president has said, people find objectionable. the amplification of tweets from racists for example, some of his views around people who belong to my faith, some of his views some people find objectionable. one of the great things about living in a democracy is people will make their views known. the key thing though is any protest is peaceful but also lawful as well. earlier i spoke to our royal correspondent, jonny dymond. he started by telling me what we could expect from president trump's visit. everything at the moment is being created and carved and the word... created and carved ? created and carved, it's a regal expression, and you probably wouldn't understand, simon! the word i am getting is that we will not get the state visit that perhaps some people might expect. some people, especially those who want to make their voices heard against president trump, would have hoped. you are talking about the carriage down the mall? this is particularly the carriage down the mall. it is a pretty traditional
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part of the state visit. it didn't happen with president 0bama, it did happen with the chinese president. it is a very important part of the public viewing of any visitor, and it is the point at which a lot of protesters could have turned up and made their views heard. what i'm hearing is that the palace will lean towards what they did with president 0bama, which was a meeting at buckingham palace rather than a meeting at horse guards parade and a long procession down the mall. that may be about us security, it may be because president trump doesn't fancy being booed or cheered for hundreds of metres down the mall. what i'm hearing is that that will be the significant change when it comes to the state visit. there will be the pomp and ceremony, the big banquet, what about addressing both houses of parliament? john burcow has had his view on this. he essentially said that this house is anti—racist, anti—sexist, believes in an independentjudiciary
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and therefore, no thank you very much to president trump. there was a fair amount of criticism from other members of the house, there is a difference of opinion about whether or not president trump should address the house. there's a question about where he does it. there's been this controversy before, this controversy with us presidents before. westminster hall, which is the traditional spots for us presidents to do this addresses is under the control of the lock of the speaker, the royal gallery which is one of the largest rooms in the palace of westminster is a little bit more independent of him and may be a compromise solution. it is pretty clear a large segment of the labour parliamentary party are very unhappy about the visit and are unlikely to turn up to hear president trump speak. a teenage neo—nazi,
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who encouraged the shooting of prince harry for marrying a woman of mixed race, has admitted a string of terror offences. michael szewczuk, 19, from leeds, pleaded guilty at the old bailey to two counts of encouraging terrorism and five of possessing documents useful to a terrorist. must go to our home affairs correspondence from the old bailey. court here? michael szewczuk was a student at portsmouth university at the time when he was arrested. he ca ns the time when he was arrested. he cans families, he is a polish national and he is part of a group which was exposed by the bbc in december last year, and extremely far right neo—nazi group which also, as members used to communicate together about cutting women with blades. it was one of the most extreme groups that we have reported on in recent years. two men were arrested as a result of that investigation. one pleaded guilty to
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two charges of encouraging terrorism in december and today, the other man, michael szewczuk, has also pleaded guilty to two charges of encouraging terrorism. he was running two accounts on a social media network. one was a personal account and the other one was the division account. on those accounts he posted messages including one which was an image of prince harry with a gun to his head, where the text, see you later a race traitor. other images posted included one of a woman being hanged, suggesting any white women who have relationships with men of any other race should be killed. thus the extreme propaganda are these men were putting out. michael szewczuk has today pleaded guilty to five charges of possessing documents that might be useful to terrorists including the anarchist cookbook, the al-qaeda manual, how to survive in the west, a practical
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guide to strategy and tactics of revolution and the white resistance manual. he will be sentenced along the other man injune on during the 17th back here at the old bailey. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. funerals take place in sri lanka for some of the of victims of the easter sunday bombings, as the death toll rises to 321. buckingham palace says president trump will make an official state visit to the uk at the beginning ofjune. the five—time champion ronnie o'sullivan was beaten ten — eight by an amateur. o'sullivan said he was u nwell an amateur. o'sullivan said he was unwell and was lacking energy. he was the first british player to lift
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the european cup. ahead of the manchester derby tomorrow night, the united manager has backed his players to —— despite their poor run of results. back with full details in the next 15 minutes. talks on brexit between the government and labour will resume this afternoon, as mps return to westminster after the easter break. theresa may has been holding a cabinet meeting this morning, the first since the eu agreed to delay our departure date until the end of october. our political correspondent jessica parker is at westminster. these talks with labour, they go on, do we get any sense of how they are doing? they go on for some weeks. there was a brief break over easter but they have resumed this afternoon. we've had an update from downing street. they are saying there is no specific timetable for there is no specific timetable for the end of talks with labour but the talks are serious but difficult in some areas. there are some known
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sticking points between the two sides, labour want to be in a customs union with the eu while the conservative government, theresa may, say that could limit the uk's ability to strike trade deals. does before the talks began this afternoon, the shadow secretary sir keir starmer had this to say. we had resuming discussions with the government this afternoon about brexit and we are looking forward to hearing their position on some of the key issues where there are fundamental issues between us. we are resuming talks and we have been exchanging correspondence between need to know what their position is on the issues that remain between us. for as long as these talks go on, the longer they go on, the more the pressure will mount on both sides to overproduce a result or admit they
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haven't managed to any progress. for theresa may, particularly, she set a timetable for herself. she said she was to get a deal ratified in time for the uk to avoid taking part in european parliamentary elections but again, the longer these talks go on the less likely that looks like to be the case. we have had a week without talking about brexit ones. there will be some people who may need nudging us to where we are. we have a database you have a couple of days to work at —— look out for. have a database you have a couple of days to work at -- look out for. one of the days theresa may has talked about is me the 22nd, trying to get about is me the 22nd, trying to get a deal done before that date. after that, the european parliamentary elections begin. there is a lot of scepticism here in westminster as to whether that is doable. a lot of people are saying, where is this going? where is the withdrawal agreement is that would need to put through the house in order to make this remotely achievable? lots of pressure on the government to step
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as labour takes part in these talks, pressure on them to make some progress the vegas issues of their own. it isn't just progress the vegas issues of their own. it isn'tjust a customs union, people on the labour side want to see what they call a complementary vote, another referendum on the deal. that is the only way forward for them. the new political party change uk, formed by members of the independent group of former labour and conservative mps, has launched its campaign for next month's european elections. the party is opposed to brexit and is campaigning for another referendum. speaking at the launch event in bristol, the interim leader of change uk, heidi allen, said the two main parties had failed. the conservatives have drifted yet farther to the right, now so anti—europe and anti—business that conservative voters can barely recognise their party anymore. and labour have continued to let the country down, offering ineffective opposition to a government at the time when the country needs it most. lacking leadership on brexit and still — still failing
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tackle anti—semitism. we will have coverage of all the parties as they launch the campaigns. a 57—year—old woman has been arrested under the terrorism act in connection with the murder of thejournalist, lyra mckee, in northern ireland. she was shot while she was reporting on riots in londonderry on thursday night. the dissident irish republican group, the new ira, has admitted it was behind her killing. earlier i spoke to out ireland correspondent, chris page. a number of friends of lyra mckee have said this morning into this afternoon they don't take this apology seriously. they have dismissed it, they regard it as hypocritical and even offensive. the new ira among the dissident republican groups who are opposed to the peace process, they are thought to be the most active, the largest of those groups. security sources would say they have 300 members. of those, a few dozen, perhaps 50, who are willing to go out and kill.
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as the recent tragic events in this city have proven, it doesn't take many people to create a tragedy, doesn't take people to take a life. there's still a sense of disbelief, a great sense of anger here in derry even though a few days have passed since lyra mckee was fatally wounded while covering a riot in the creggan area of the city on thursday. police made their third arrest this morning in the investigation, 57—year—old woman detained under anti—terrorism legislation. she is in the police station in belfast being questioned. over the weekend two teenagers, aged 18 and 19, were arrested. they were released without charge. the police hoping to make progress in the investigation, still concentrating efforts on the community here in derry, more than 140 people have been in contact with the police through a portal they have set up online. they've uploaded some mobile phone footage, some cctv footage,
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police have been appealing for dashcam footage. detectives say they need more than information and intelligence from the community. they're hoping for what they're describing as tangible evidence that could be used potentially in court to secure a prosecution. the swedish schoolgirl, who helped inspire global protests on climate change, has been meeting political leaders at westminster. in a bbc interview, greta thurnberg has called for urgent action to deal with what she says is an ‘existential crisis‘ and has urged british politicians to "listen to the scientists" on climate change. sarah walton reports. not many 16—year—olds could hold the attention of political leaders, but today greta thunberg took her message of climate change activism to the houses of parliament. well done on what you have brought to the debate... the swedish teenager has become the young face of the school climate strikes, a global movement which campaigners say has seen more than a million children across the world walk out
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of classrooms in protest at the lack of action to tackle climate change. she says she wants people to panic about the stae of the environment. by panic i mean stepping out of ourcomfort zones and realising what is going on. so i say if your house is on fire and you want to keep your house from burning to the ground, it requires some level of panic. you don‘t sit talking about insurance claims or rebuilding or renovations, you do everything you can to put out the fire. the campaigner has also met the pope and been nominated for a nobel peace prize. and just a few days ago she addressed protesters from extinction rebellion. their week—long action brought areas of central london to a standstill, making headlines across the world and bringing climate change protests to the capital on a scale never seen before here. today they also went to westminster,
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calling on the government to engage with them in discussions about climate change. police say they have made 1000 arrests since their demonstrations began last week, but greta thunberg is calling on more people to take similar action. as long as it is non—violent, and i think that can definitely make a difference. it could change people‘s minds, make people become more aware of the situation, that we‘re showing this an is an emergency, an existential crisis and we must do everything we can to stop it. the leaders of labour, the snp, lib dems and green party heard what greta had to say today. her message to them — "don‘tjust listen to me, listen to the science, listen the scientists." sarah walton, bbc news. the government is launching a campaign to tackle "botched" cosmetic procedures in england. it follows a rise in the number of people going abroad for operations such the "brazilian
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butt lift" which have led to deaths. a poll commissioned by the bbc has found two thirds of young women say they have had either had a cosmetic procedure or would consider one, while half of those questioned think it‘s the same as having their hair cut. anna adams reports. the cosmetic surgery industry in the uk is now worth more than £3.6 billion, but most people are no longer going under the knife to achieve results. botox and fillers account for the vast majority of those procedures. an online poll of 1000 women aged under 30 found that 83% would like to change their body, if they could afford it and if it was safe. the survey questioned 1000 women between the ages of 18—30, and found 63% would like to change their stomach, 53% wanted to change their breasts and 41% their bottom. half of the people polled for the victoria derbyshire programme said britain was now obsessed with cosmetic surgery. things like boobjob,
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nosejob, botox, filler, it was intense, addictive, it was so addictive for me. i've had botox and some cheek filler and lip filler, but i actually think the lip filler has worn off. but my reasons for doing it were because, literally for ageing. but personally, i don't really agree with people having all this stuff done before the age of 30, because i think everybody's starting to look the same. i think that we are meant to age, we are meant to have a wrinkle, we are meant to look a little bit old, do you know what i mean? we are not meant to look 21 for the rest of our lives, it's ok to age. it‘s notjust women who are seeking these procedures. we spoke to a 27—year—old man who has been injecting himself with lip fillers and botox for three years. he wanted to remain anonymous. the product was so easy to get hold of, there was no issues with, you know, they didn‘t check your credentials, check who you are. i started to have a problem with my lips, just did a normal injection. i woke up the next morning,
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they were uneven, one side was bigger than the other, i had blisters and it was incredibly painful. there are concerns that the rise in self—injected fillers will be putting pressure on the nhs if they go wrong. the department of health in england says it will now launch a campaign in the coming weeks to tackle the increasing number of botched procedures. anna adams, bbc news. new photographs of prince louis have been released to mark his first birthday today. the youngest child of the duke and duchess of cambridge is seen playing in the garden of the family‘s home, on the sandringham estate in norfolk. the dutchess took the pictures herself, earlier this month. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with louise. it was a perfect easter break in terms of the weather but we are starting to see signs of change now. there is a fair amount of high cloud
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moving across the country. it has turned the essential and hazy so temperatures not as high. nevertheless, we could see 23 degrees. cool across the east coast where we are seeing a freshening breeze. that will drive and stubborn cloud across north—east england and scotland. at the same time we are starting to see some show is pushing into the south—west and parts of wales. that is because low pressure will move and so some of that showery rain were started ten heavy across southern england. moving through wales, up to the midlands and across the north of england. we can‘t rule out a fun day. you might see 23 degrees if you see some sunshine. but a fresher fear will continue into the weekend, back where we should be. sunshine, april showers and cooler.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines.
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cctv pictures are released of a suspected suicide bomber entering a church in sri lanka, where at least 110 people were killed. the country‘s prime minister says police are investigating whether the islamic state group was involved. mass funerals take place for some of the victims of the bombs attacks, as the death toll rises to 321. sri lanka mark the atrocity with a day of national mourning. buckingham palace says president trump will make an official state visit to the uk at the beginning ofjune. he‘ll meet the queen and the prime minister, but it‘s not yet been decided whether he will address parliament. a 19—year—old neo—nazi who encouraged the shooting of prince harry for marrying a woman of mixed race, has pleaded guilty to terror offences at the old bailey. the new ira says it killed journalist lyra mckee in a shooting on thursday night as a 57—year—old woman is arrested in connection with her death. sport now on afternoon live with olly foster.
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we are talking snooker and quite a shock. you should be able to relate to ronnie o‘sullivan. do you know why? a bit of an unpredictable maverick and liable to a bad day at the office now and again. he was knocked out. i am listening.” the office now and again. he was knocked out. iam listening. i know you are. just biding my time. the world number one, five time world champion ronnie o‘sullivan, he has won five tournaments this season but he has been knocked out today in the first round of the world championship where he had been tipped to win it. one of the great crucible upsets. not because he went out in the first round since something like 93. he put it back to 5—5 and then 8—8.
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shots like that, he was really out of sorts. in between shots, he was falling asleep. he looked completely out of it. that pink would have given him 89—8 lead. he is half asleep there. cahill wins it and goes through to the second round. —— 9-8 goes through to the second round. —— 9—8 win. you have to come feeling mentally and physically good. i have had a good season. i didn‘t expect to do well here but you come to do your best. if you are physically not 100%, it is going to make it even harder. i tried to hang in there and do as much as i could and see if i could get through this match and then have a few days after try and feel a little bit you know?” thought i would be nervous but i wasn't. it surprised me to be
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honest. i felt really good and i was a bit tense in parts but apart from that, if i can hopefully now kick on, i know my scoring in my games there, i don't think i have shown it much there. i have shown quite a lot of bottle but i think i can offer a little bit more than that as well. we will see. well done to him. he is into the second round playing stephen maguire next. british football mourning the loss ofa british football mourning the loss of a legend. billy mcneill, has died at the age of 79. they put a statue up of him outside celtic park a few years ago. he had been suffering from dementia. a true legend, one of the most important figures in the clubs history. captained them to nine successive titles, seven scottish cups and six league cups.
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but it was this iconic moment for which he will be best remembered, lifting the the european cup, the first british player to do so, when they beat inter milan in the 1967 final in lisbon — thus the famous lisbon lions were born. he had two spells as celtic manager and also had spells in charge of manchester city and aston villa. but he is a celtic man. the club says he passed away surrounded by his family and loved ones. there‘s a huge game tomorrow, the manchester derby at old trafford, the united manager ole gunnar solskjaer has publicly backed his players today, saying many have the club‘s "dna". they came in for some heavy criticism after the thrashing at everton on sunday. their sixth loss in eight games. united need a win to get back in the race for a top four finish, do that and they would derail
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city‘s push for the title. they won‘t be lacking in motivation. there were reports of dressing room arguments between players after the 4—nil defeat at goodison park and there‘s been speculation as to which of them will be sold in the summer, and which will stay. now is not the talk about to talk about wholesale changes in the squad. liverpool have taken more points than us in the last 18 games and that is it. that is a great effort by the boys. we were where we we re effort by the boys. we were where we were when we came in. we really gave itago were when we came in. we really gave it a go and were when we came in. we really gave ita go and! were when we came in. we really gave ita go and i have were when we came in. we really gave it a go and i have got to say you can see loads of man united standards, the dna in many of these players. you have to get players in and some players will have to go out. cricket for you. england wicketkeeper jonny bairstow went for a duck in the the indian premier league today.
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bairstow, who plays for sunrisers hydrabad was caught behind by ms dhoni off the bowling of harbhajan singh. sunrisers are 124 for two after 14 of their 20 overs, with chennai super kings still to bat. and that is your spot for now. now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to phil bodmer who is on marsden moor to tell us about a fire which broke out on moorland in west yorkshire is covering an estimated 15 sq km of wildlife habitat. and matthew bone is in salford to tell us about a bbc radio manchester project which involved embedding a member of the team within the greater manchester police for three months. we will be with you shortly. but what is the latest on the moorland. the landscape here on marston moor
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should be a lush green colour and this time of year. if you are behind, you can see how charred it is. that is about 1000 hectares of wildlife habitat that has been destroyed in this fire. as quickly as crews from the north of england, it was a massive fire operation. fire crews from across the region helping their colleagues from west yorkshire. as quickly as they can extinguish these smouldering flames. you will see another outbreak of fire in the direction of mouth some six miles away. they have to deploy resources elsewhere. the national trust which owns this land have deployed two helicopters today, very expensive, they have been scooping up expensive, they have been scooping up water in a bucket from this reservoir behind me and then dousing it where the new outbreak is. as these outbreaks continue, that gives these outbreaks continue, that gives the fire service great concern. this is what the local commander on the
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ground had to tell me a short time ago. there appears to have been some further outbreaks of fire from this location which we are currently dealing with. we have got additional resources from huddersfield, salad and mouth. we have redeployed some of the support to deal with those. a grave concern. of the support to deal with those. a grave concern. as the day warms up and you get the sun on the ground, the ground is parched. it doesn't ta ke the ground is parched. it doesn't take a lot to start a fire and cause significant damage as you can see behind us. it looks a huge area affected, what is the impact on wildlife? wildlife, that is the point. the national trust is really concerned. let me point you in this direction. you can see that is another example of what is happening. that is happening all the time. firefighters get to a
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location, they extinguish the fire and then up pops another area of concern. the national trust has spent something like £200,000 in recent times restoring this wildlife habitat which is open and home to many wildlife. the long—term effects are concerning. this is craig best from the national trust. wildlife will have been devastated. ground nesting birds will have been impacted. also mammals such as mountain has, the pace of this fire will run ahead of any small mammal trying to get out of the way. looking at the last fire, how everything is starting? we know that the first fire was started, we think, by a barbecue, the first fire was started, we think, bya barbecue, a the first fire was started, we think, by a barbecue, a discarded barbecue. that is what the fire
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service have told us. investigations are continuing into that. they are not sure about that fire over there. they have sent investigators to the scene. these fires do pop up all the time, so this is a real issue. they have got about 60 firefighters on the ground here, plus the helicopters. whenever they move to a location to deal with it, somewhere else and other fire location to deal with it, somewhere else and otherfire breaks location to deal with it, somewhere else and other fire breaks out. who knows how these are starting. some of it has been quite windy here, it has been found by a breeze and the peat underneath the soil burns and is very combustible so it could be loose and is reigniting again. it is a real problem for the fire service who are working around the clock. they say they will be here over the next few days because until we get rain, this land is tinder dry. despite all their efforts, they seem to be struggling against the new fires that are breaking out
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periodically around the landscape.” know it is a grim story to cover, but it is a beautiful part of the world. thank you very much. let‘s go to salford. we are talking about a project. how stretched are the police in greater manchester? radio manchester is running a series all week on this and showing how stretched greater manchester police are. i went out with an officer that response to 999 calls recently. to give you an example of what things i like on the ground, the firstjob we went to was a missing teenager. we we re went to was a missing teenager. we were there for five minutes before were there for five minutes before we we re were there for five minutes before we were pulled to a report of domestic abuse. we did not get to that because on the way we were directed to a report of a burglary.
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you have really got a sense of speaking to officers about the state of the morale as well. the guy i was with, a very affable and outgoing and cheery kind of guy but as soon as you got onto the subject of police resources, you could sense his frustration having worked there the last ten years and seen things change. how is this changing the way police respond to reports of crime? he often points out that there are 2000 fewer officers in greater manchester police than in 2011. they have gone down from 8200 to 6200. 60% of reports of crime are now not fully investigated because they are screened. the police say if there is a violent incident, they will get to
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give, of course, but save our shed has been burgled and there are no witnesses or your car has been broken into with no cctv, then that will be screened at an early stage and will probably not be investigated fully. around 90% of bicycle thefts and vehicle crimes is now closed without a suspect. around 80% of burglaries as well. the home office have released a statement. they are committed to ensuring the police have the resources they need to carry out their vital work. but what we‘re hearing from the chief co nsta ble what we‘re hearing from the chief constable and we have been hearing for some time is there pressure the police and under and today he put a figure on the effect it is having. it isa figure on the effect it is having. it is a great project. we were all saying to have the opportunity to be embedded in the police foster three months is a greatjournalistic
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opportunity. thank you to you both. if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them by bbc iplayer. there‘s a warning that a lack of english classes for migrants will harm the integration of communities, and fuel right—wing extremism after brexit. dame louise casey, a former integration tsar, and the association of colleges have condemned a halving of funds over the last ten years. leigh milner reports. cup of tea... muna al—wadi from syria is one of 750,000 people in the uk that speaks little or no english. it‘s up to her 14—year—old daughter to help her. when she has an appointment in the doctor or dentist or anything, i go with her to help
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her because she doesn‘t know the language. and when she goes, sometimes, shopping i go to help her. the government is spending £50 million on integration, with £6 million solely dedicated to helping women like muna learn english. here at this doctor‘s surgery, they‘ve got a challenge. 80% of appointments have to be translated. and what language? lithuanian. so they‘ve recruited workers who speak 15 different languages. i don‘t understand. you don't understand all the words? but some patients bring their children to help, like this woman from venezuela, who‘s brought her 17—year—old daughter. we‘ve taken people from the local community, we‘ve trained them up and upskilled them to communicate with our patients, translate and also deliver health care. don‘t you think this is actually discouraging people from learning english? what can we do? we have to be able to communicate with our patients. find the word with a... bbc research shows there‘s been a 12% rise in the number of people
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taking official english classes in the last three years, but that‘s still much lower than it was more than a decade ago. the reason this community centre is so popular is because it‘s right next door to a mosque, where most of the migrant community ive here in peterborough. live here in peterborough. but the city is one of five places across the country the government has identified as needing help with integration. the people that have been here longer are more integrated than the newcomers. i mean, i think it‘s quite diverse. i don't think they want to live with us. it's never really felt like they're completely meshed. maybe some more than others. so we‘re going to do these words in alphabetical order... overall, funding for courses has more than halved in a decade. the government is being warned that, post brexit, a lack of english classes will fuel right—wing extremism. i just can‘t stress enough that, you know, we have some nasty stuff happening in our society with the rise of the right—wing. language detoxifies everything.
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the government says it recognises the pressures facing colleges and it will assess the funding in the next spending review. as for muna, she‘s grateful for her daughter‘s help with english. i help her so much. leigh milner, bbc news, in peterborough. now ben is here with their business needs and he will bring it to shortly. but first the headlines here on afternoon live. cctv pictures are released of a suspected suicide bomber entering a church in sri lanka, where at least 110 people 110 people were killed. the country‘s prime minister says police are investigating whether the islamic state group was involved. buckingham palace says president trump will make an official state visit to the uk at the beginning ofjune. a 19—year—old neo—nazi who encouraged the shooting of prince harry for marrying a woman of mixed race, has pleaded guilty to terror offences at the old bailey.
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here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. the three biggest mobile operators — vodafone, ee and 02 — are failing to offer adequate levels of service and support, according to new research. the consumer group which? says this was despite the big operators often costing more than smaller rivals. the proportion of uk firms reporting a cyber—attack has jumped, despite most businesses admitting they are under—prepared for breaches, according to research from hiscox. the insurerfound 55% had faced an attack in 2019, up from 40% last year. seven water companies will automatically pay out more money to households if the supply is cut off for more than 12 hours. people who get their water from firms including wessex water, united utilities and dwr cymru welsh will get £30 for every 12 hours of disruption. the regulator says other water
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suppliers should do the same. let‘s talk twitter because the results are out. the number of users is higher than they were at christmas. they have added 9 million monthly users. the site is also making significantly more money than it did in the same period last year at the beginning of 2018, earnings up at the beginning of 2018, earnings up 18% compared to january last year. on both measures — that‘s better than analysts were expecting. they predicted a fall in user numbers and more modest earnings growth. after a torrid few months — thomas cook shares are up — why? they have jumped after reports that the holiday firm could be taken over. as you say, thomas cook‘s profits have been hit recently by a declining demand for package holidays and online competition. last month, thomas cook
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said it proposed closing 21 high street stores, with the loss of 320 jobs. let‘s ta ke let‘s take stock of the markets. sophie kilvert is senior investment manager at seven investment management. i want to pick up on the oil movements because over the past few days, it has been rising. it has eased off a touch now but that really does have a big effect on the market. and people savings. really does have a big effect on the market. and people savingsm really does have a big effect on the market. and people savings. it does. when you look at the ftse100 where you have the really big companies like bp and royal dutch shell making up like bp and royal dutch shell making upa big like bp and royal dutch shell making up a big percentage of the market. the rising oil price over the last couple of days, incidentally on the back of us topping the 0bama sanction waivers which were put in place earlier this year —— the iran sanction waivers. we are seeing a
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tightening of oil supply, which puts up tightening of oil supply, which puts up prices. we are at a high for 2019. there companies that are big users of oil, for example the airlines, we c shares of easyjet are really down today. one of the many tech firms reporting results, twitter exiting analyst expectations. it was a bit of a surprise. what we saw and what we have seen over the last year or so is monthly users have been declining but now we have seen a big jump in numbers. some of the decline was down to twitter taking action against abuse and fake accounts and that has made twitter a bit of a nicer place to be which means users have risen. we saw the head of twitter saying they want to pull
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back some of that credibility. it looks like they are starting to do so with the rising numbers. talking about oiljust so with the rising numbers. talking about oil just a so with the rising numbers. talking about oiljust a moment ago, that causes a rise in costs for airlines, but at the holiday firm thomas cook, this talk of a potential buyer has caused a surge in its share price. it has. shares up 80% just today. it is interesting hideous buyer might be. it could be a chinese company who already has a joint venture with thomas cook in china. we are expecting more details. you told thomas cook has been having problems, shares are down 75% over the last year and some of that they can put down to the heatwave last summerand can put down to the heatwave last summer and people not holidaying abroad. some of it is that competition has increased from online businesses and because people
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have access to more information, they are happier to start their holidays at themselves, so it is a real problem for thomas cook. how are they going to take their business model forward? perhaps it will be a different company that ta kes will be a different company that takes over to do that. you very much. 18% up. let‘s have a look at the markets. the ftse100 is up, as is their dax. let‘s check in on wall street. they start the day significantly higher helped by the tech results as we were talking about, twitter, helping to lift the us market. also positive results in
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other sectors like toys, food and beverages. the pound just slipping back against the dollar. that is it for the markets. you will be delighted to know i am back with you tomorrow. oh! that is a lot of joy. once more with sincerity, please. don‘t push it. researchers in scotland have helped create a revolutionary new type of aircraft. phoenix is an unmanned aerial vehicle designed to stay in the air indefinitely thanks to a new type of propulsion involving helium. engineers at the university of the highlands and islands hope it can be used to create a cheaper alternative to launching satellites. that‘s it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at 5 with ben brown. time for a look at the weather. here‘s louise lear. hello there. weren‘t we all spoilt over the easter break with some glorious weather? i hope you got out and enjoyed it. if you haven‘t already heard,
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where have you been? but it was a record—breaker with temperatures peaking around 25 celsius in many spots through the weekend. all change though, for the weekend fast approaching. it is going to be cool with outbreaks of rain and those temperatures back to where they should be for the time of year. we are already starting to see the first signs of that change, with a veil of high cloud spinning up from the continent and mixed in there a little bit of saharan dust in the upper atmosphere. that is making for some pretty interesting sunrises. quite an orange glow around at the moment, and you may well notice it over the next couple of days. now, for the remainder of today, we will see some showery outbreaks of rain developing across the south—west and into wales by the end of the afternoon and into the evening. at the same time, the breeze will pick up and it will be a cool night with quite a lot of cloud coming in across eastern scotland and north—east england. so, low pressure in the driving seat over the next few days and those weather fronts will continue to spill in from the atlantic with the breeze picking up, really making it feel noticeably cooler for wednesday. a few showery outbreaks of rain,
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some of it heavy as it moves its way slowly through the morning across cornwall, into devon and to parts of wales, and ahead of it we could see if few sharp showers breaking out, maybe through parts of 0xfordshire, stretching up into the midlands, maybe with the odd rumble of thunder. factor in a lot more in the way of cloud and more of a breeze, it will be noticeably cooler out there. you will need an extra layer if you are heading out and about. for scotland, we keep that thicker cloud across the east coast and the winds really quite strong so quite a cool feel on those exposed coasts. we will be lucky if we see 11 to 14 celsius. perhaps in the sunniest moments, 20 celsius the overall high. as we move out of wednesday, we have to look out to the atlantic for this cooler, fresher air start to push in from the west and that is going to stay with us right into the weekend. by thursday, we should see more widespread outbreaks of rain around. that is great news for gardeners and growers, some welcome rain here. as it moves its way across england
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and wales, up into the scottish borders by the end of the day. scotland and northern ireland may stay dry during daylight hours. but as we approach the weekend, it looks as though it will be cool and showery and really feeling quite disappointing after the weekend just gone.
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today at five — mass funerals for victims of the bomb attacks in sri lanka, as the death toll rises to 321. a day of national mourning has been declared. the sri lankan government warns there could be more attacks — and says the bombers may have links to so—called islamic state, who have claimed responsibility. these cctv pictures are thought to show one of the suicide bombers entering a church before detonating his device. we‘ll have the latest from our correspondent in colombo, and we‘ll be talking about security with an expert in sri lankan politics. the other main stories on bbc news at 5pm:

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