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tv   BBC News at Nine  BBC News  April 24, 2019 9:00am-10:01am BST

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you're watching bbc news at 9 with me, annita mcveigh. the headlines: the government will allow the chinese telecoms giant huawei to supply some non—core equipment for the uk's 56 data network , despite security concerns from senior members of the cabinet. the news comes as the so—called "five eyes" intelligence alliance meet at a security conference today — they say the huawei risk can be managed last month we did our 2019 report, which shows some concern in the way that huawei do engineering, but that wasn't a level of concern in the chinese government itself.
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sri lanka's president promises a big shake up of the country's police and security services — after they failed to act on a warning about sunday's bomb attacks. and more details emerge about the identity of the attackers — it's thought one of the bombers studied in the uk. the funeral of the murdered journalist lyra mckee will be held in belfast this lunchtime. wild salmon catches in scotland are at their lowest level since records began — with research expected to say stocks are at "crisis point". and ronnie 0'sullivan says he "wasn't100%" and was "struggling to stay awake" during his shock first round defeat in the snooker world championship. good morning and welcome
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to the bbc news at 9. the government has given the go—ahead for the chinese telecoms giant huawei to supply equipment for the uk's 56 data network, despite objections from senior members of the cabinet. concerns have been raised by the united states that the company could pose a security risk. it's believed huawei will be able to supply "non—core" equipment, such as antennae, but not critical infrastructure. cyber—security will be discussed by members of the so—called "5 eyes" intelligence alliance, made up of the uk, usa, new zealand, canada and australia, at a security conference in glasgow today. this morning breakfast spoke to ciaran martin, the director general for government and industry cyber security, at gchq. what is public is that there is an extensive and fundamental review of telecom security under way, it has been under way for about eight
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months, and it is notjust dealing with huawei, it is dealing with the whole panoply of security challenges that we face with this new technology. and i think that is absolutely vital to remember. i think if you look back over the recent history of cyber attacks, the most serious cyber attack since the national cyber security centre which i had has faced was a russian attack that had nothing to do with china or huawei, but it showed serious vulnerabilities in the way we do telecom security, and whatever the final decision is taken, i think we can guarantee we will have a much more robust, rigorous regulatory and standards framework for these devices. our business correspondent rob young is here. why is there so much disagreement over this decision? this is a key decision that we think the government made yesterday, and this has the potential to affect all of
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oui’ has the potential to affect all of our lives in years to come, because this is about the feature five mobile networks, networks which will be far faster than the ag networks of today, and the reason this is so controversial is because of huawei, set up by former members of the chinese army, and there are those in the west who are concerned that it could be used by china or its equipment could be used to commit cyber espionage in the uk, and this is an issue that has notjust divided politicians in the cabinet, it has also divided the west, because you have some countries, the united states, australia, saying they won't allow huawei kit to be used in their future they won't allow huawei kit to be used in theirfuture mobile networks, and we have the uk and perhaps others saying they will, evenin perhaps others saying they will, even injust a limited perhaps others saying they will, even in just a limited way. to try to put this in some sort of context, do we have any idea what proportion of the uk's 5g network that huawei will be contributing to? we think
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that they will be allowed into non—core bits, parts of the network where information passes through, so it follows that it won't be allowed into the brain, if you like, that the central processing systems, the core pa rt of the central processing systems, the core part of the 5g network which processes information. that hasn't satisfy the concerns of those who are concerned about the safety and security. we have had one saying that perhaps allies will trust the uk less with intelligence information if they believe it will pass through a 5g network where huawei plays a small part, but the company is building the 5g networks, the big telecoms operators, have for a while then not relying solely on huawei kit which is regarded by many as perhaps the best technology around, they have been using a range of different suppliers. so what were the options have been for the uk if not huawei? there are various companies around the world, some european, some from other parts of the globe, which do make kit for 5g
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networks, but the telecoms companies say 5g has some of the most advanced technology, and when the national cyber security centre did look at the security of huawei kit, they didn't give it a clean bill of health, they didn't say everything was fine, but they did say that there were ways of limiting the risks posed by the technology. rob, thank you very much for that. we will be talking to the chair of the government's foreign affairs committee later on. we are just going to take you live to vladivostok. the russian port city. where in the last few moments, the north korean leader, kimjohn hunt, has arrived on his armoured train for his first visit to russia and for his first visit to russia and for his first meeting with the russian president vladimir putin.
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there he is, kimjong—un getting off the train in the last few moments. the two team say they plan to discuss the situation on the korean peninsula, and that follows on of course from kim jong—un‘s meeting with, meetings with donald trump, the us president for talks on effo rts the us president for talks on efforts to de—nuclear i is the korean peninsula, and now these images live as you can see him there coming towards the centre of your frame wearing the hat, kimjong—un surrounded by his security people, arrives in vladivostok, the russian pacific port city. and of course another important moment for the north korean leader as he takes strides onto the world stage and tries to reposition himself as a
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leader who is trying to reach out beyond the borders of his own country. certainly that is what he is trying to position himself as domestically. clearly beyond north korea, lots of disagreement over his motives for these meetings. but this is expected to be a short meeting with president putin, when the two eventually do get together. but right now, this ceremonial greeting for kim jong—un, the right now, this ceremonial greeting for kimjong—un, the north korean leader, he was greeted by guards in russia in national costume carrying flowers, and was offered bread and salt as he arrived, a tradition russian gesture of welcome for honoured guests.
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and kim jong—un making and kimjong—un making it known that he was happy to be on russian soil. the north korean leader projecting himself as a world leader, a world player, in this meeting with the russian president, following on of course from his meetings with the us president. and we are going to be talking to oui’ correspondence and we are going to be talking to our correspondence sarah rainsford about this very soon here on bbc news. i will leave you with those images from vladivostok for the moment. one of the suicide bombers who took part in the easter sunday attacks in sri lanka is believed to have
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studied in the uk. in a news conference in the past few hours, the country's deputy defence minister said eight of the nine bombers have been identified. the number of people killed in the co—ordinated attacks now stands at 359. andy moore reports. there's a nervousness on the streets of colombo and a fear of more bombings. so—called islamic state has claimed responsibility for the easter sunday attacks on churches and luxury hotels. the death toll has gone up again, and so too has the number of suspects arrested. it now stands at 60. at a press conference this morning, the authorities said one of the bombers had studied in the uk. they also said they thought the attacks were motivated by revenge for the shootings that occurred in new zealand. this is according to an assessment done by the intelligence
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that they believe that this is a reprisal, it was basically motivated, that the christchurch incident motivated those who carried out these blasts on easter sunday. this was one of the suicide bombers calmly walking into st sebastian's church, where he killed more than 100 people. we now know that sri lanka had detailed intelligence about individual suspects and their possible targets, but politicians were not told. in a national televised address, the sri lankan president promised to completely restructure the police and security services in the next few weeks. he said he expected to shake up the top leadership of the armed forces within 2a hours. rebuilding confidence in the country's security system is a priority for the government. sri lanka's tropical beaches were a magnet for foreign tourists, but now they're nearly empty. the number of foreign visitors had gone up a00% since the civil war ended a decade ago.
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but with images like this from sri lanka going around the world, that industry is likely to be hard—hit. andy moore, bbc news. sharanjit leyl is in colombo for us today. more details emerged today about exactly who these people were who committed these atrocities, who carried out the easter sunday suicide bomb attacks. the authorities have said there are nine suicide bombers, and they know the identities of a number of them. all of this was revealed in a press conference with the deputy defence minister earlier. he said they all came from fairly well—off middle—class homes. 0ne came from fairly well—off middle—class homes. one of them even studied in the uk and did his postgraduate degree in australia. he also revealed that one of them was a woman. so a lot more is known about them. but the authorities, particularly the prime minister, they have said they know the group
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behind it, and it is a local group called, a local islamist group, and we are told the leader of that group has committed suicide, but the authority to acknowledge that the group must have had external help because of the coordinated nature of these attacks on sunday, happening just a few minutes apart across the country, and of course on tuesday, so—called islamic state claimed responsibility for them, and a lot more investigations are taking place. it is a very active situation here in colombo, we are still hearing explosions, detonated explosions that are controlled explosions, by the authorities, throughout the city, and of course warnings to stay safe and security still very much on high alert. kim sharanjit leyl.
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the funeral of lyra mckee will take place this afternoon in belfast. the 29—year—old journalist was shot dead by the dissident republican group, the new ira, during rioting in londonderry last week. her family have paid tribute to her ahead of the service, describing her as a best friend, a confidante, and a gentle, innocent soul. prime minister's questions will be taken by prime minister's questions will be ta ken by david prime minister's questions will be taken by david lidington as the prime minister attends the funeral. 0ur correspondent chris page is in belfast. this funeral will be hugely symbolic, bringing together so many different people. yes, and the announcement we've had in the last few minutes that theresa may will attend the funeral really com pletes may will attend the funeral really completes that picture. we knew already that the irish prime minister leo varadkar will be travelling up for the service, so we
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110w travelling up for the service, so we now have the prime ministers of great britain and ireland, the northern ireland secretary karen bradley, the number of politicians across the political spectrum in northern ireland, unionist and nationalist. the service will be led jointly by the dean of our —— belfast, a protestant clergyman, and a catholic priest, so you see that symbolism of people making a stand of unity in the midst of sadness. the family and friends of lyra mckee hope that this will send out a message that her death will have left a legacy. she had often written about her hope that her generation, she was 29, would be able to move on from the bitterness, the division of the troubles in northern ireland, so the troubles in northern ireland, so the hope is that even in the midst of such a great tragedy, such great sadness, that a message will go out that the vast majority of people in northern ireland stand for something different, stand for unity and stand for peace. and chris is there any
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news on the police investigation?m will be continuing, and police officers will be attending today. three arrests have been made since lyra mckee was murdered on thursday night in londonderry. police are still focusing their efforts on the local community in the creggan area, the nationalist area where she was fatally wounded. they said there has been a massive public response to detectives' appeals for information, they have set up an online portal where people can upload —— cam footage, mobile phone footage, anything they think could be of use to the inquiry, and so far 1a3 people have contacted the police that way, but police are still stressing they need more potential witnesses to come forward. they acknowledge that in the circumstances some people might be frightened to speak to police, but they have said they want offer people reassurances, and initially they just want to have that conversation and then they will take
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things forward from there. so the police still maintaining a very high profile around this investigation, still putting a big appeals for information, on social media, and they say they are hopeful that they will be able to uncover enough tangible evidence that will eventually result in prosecution. chris, thank you very much, chris pagein chris, thank you very much, chris page in belfast. the time is 17 minutes past nine. the time is 17 minutes past nine. the headlines: the government will allow the chinese telecoms giant huawei to supply some non—core equipment for the uk's 5g data network, despite security concerns from senior members of the cabinet. sri lanka's president promises a big shake up of the country's police and security services — after they failed to act on a warning about sunday's bomb attacks and downing street say the prime minister will attend the funeral of the murdered journalist lyra mckee in belfast today
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and in the last few minutes the north korean leader kimjong—un has arrived in russia ahead of his first ever meeting with vladimir putin — we'll have more on that shortly a good win for spurs in the premier league last night, a late goalfrom christian eriksen was enough 1—0 win over brighton to strengthen their claim fora over brighton to strengthen their claim for a top four place. but brighton are still in trouble at the bottom. a huge game at old trafford tonight as manchester united host manchester city. united need a result if they are to have any result if they are to have any result of qualifying for the champions league. city need a result if they are to keep the pressure on liverpool. james cahill says he wa nts to liverpool. james cahill says he wants to show everyone what he can do after knocking ronnie 0'sullivan out of the world snooker championship. the 23—year—old doesn't have a world ranking, and he is the first amateur to come through qualifying to the tournament. more on all of those stories at 9:a0am. see you then. thank you, sally. we will see you $0011. senior conservative mps have
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failed to reach a decision about whether to change party rules so that theresa may faces a leadership challenge injune. the executive of the 1922 committee spent yesterday evening discussing the issue behind closed doors. another meeting of all tory mps will take place today. under current party rules, mps cannot mount a fresh challenge against mrs may until december. let's go to westminster and our assistant political editor, norman smith. division everywhere, division over brexit, and division over what to do about the prime minister's future. it is clear that although there are members of the 1922 executive who do wa nt members of the 1922 executive who do want mrs may to face another leadership contest and are pressing for rule changes, there are others who are adamant that that would change nothing, it wouldn't change the parliamentary arithmetic, that would say. they have questioned the legality of introducing a retrospective rule changes, and they ponder about how vulnerable might make future tory leaders if they could be subject to a leadership
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challenge every six months or so. so the executive meeting again this afternoon to have another crack at it, and then if they can reach some sort of consensus to discuss that with the broader 1922 committee of tory backbenchers. but, you know, there is an awful long way to go before there is any rule change agreed, and this morning the former business minister, richard harrington, was frankly rather contemptuous of those pressing for a rule change. if they —— we did what they want and had a leadership election now, it wouldn't be a leadership election, it would be a mini referendum, because presumably there would be one candidate who wanted a hard brexit deal, and one who didn't. this is irrelevant to the country in the party, because the prime minister's position of compromise, accepting the fact that we are leaving the european union but in a way that will not decimate business,
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trade and employment, which is the application of what people who want no—deal once, nothing will change in parliament, whatever happened in a leadership election. richard harrington there. there is talk about the government possibly bringing in legislation to implement theresa may's withdrawal deal, the one that hasn't been agreed or voted on, has reached a majority within parliament. but that would have lots of pitfalls, wouldn't it? brace yourself. this is tantamount to mrs may bringing back her dealfor a fourth crack at it. we know she has had three goes, gone down in flames three times. what they are now looking at, they've not decided but they have a pretty good chance, is introducing the legislation to implement mrs may's deal. in many
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ways this is putting the coach before the horses, because mps haven't voted for the deal, but number 10 haven't voted for the deal, but number10 are haven't voted for the deal, but number 10 are still looking at the possibility of introducing what is called the withdrawal agreement bill, the point being to show that mrs may is determined to carry on and press on, and she has not given up, andi and press on, and she has not given up, and i suppose the hope is that the pressure now on mps will be enormous, because the argument will be, we will have to fight the european elections, nigel farage will say to tory mps that they are being treasonous if they don't go for the deal, —— reject the deal, but the talks seem to be running into the dust between tories and labour, the idea of another round of addictive votes, most people think that won't provide a breakthrough, so we are pretty much entering last chance saloon with what looks like shaping up to be another vote, numberfour on shaping up to be another vote, numberfouron mrs shaping up to be another vote, number four on mrs may's deal. 0k. under word on last time ann
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widdecombe was in the news it was about coming strictly, but now she is back in the news again. portals anton du beke, she was hardly the most graceful of dancers, but now she is back in the news saying that she is back in the news saying that she is back in the news saying that she is fed up with what she calls the parody of parliament, she says both the men parties are not focusing on delivering the referendum, so she is going to back nigel farage's brexit party. does it make a difference? it probably adds a bit more to the gaiety of the candidates now standing in the european elections, gives a bit of a boost to nigel farage, yesterday we had chains uk, unveiling rachel
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johnson, borisjohnson‘s sister, we have jacob rees—mogg's sister, and we also have gavin esler. let's head back to russia now, whether north korean leader, kim jong—un, sarah rainsford is there, and we know that kim jong—un wants to position himself as a world leader, what is in this for mr putin? you are right, that is certainly what kim jong—un wants to do. this was a very ceremonial welcome. i think mr putin sending the message too, that he is prepared to treat kim jong—un as a leader of a neighbouring country, and see he was met here, the band was marching, the red carpets are out, and just there in the station is where kim
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jong—un‘s armoured train pulled in just a few minutes ago. so plenty of ceremony, plenty of pomp, and this is all about the first encounter between vladimir putin, russia's president, and the leader of north korea. i think the focus of the talks themselves will very much be of course on the nuclear programme of course on the nuclear programme of north korea, but i think the timing of these talks is what is critical. they come a couple of months after talks between north korea and the united states broke down, and because that happened, i think north korea is looking at reaching out for different allies, different supporters to back it up, and that is why he has come to russia now. vladimir putin certainly supports international sanctions against north korea. he doesn't want against north korea. he doesn't want a nuclear armed states on russia's border, but perhaps he is a more friendly leader, a more friendly voice for north korea to have a dialogue with, and perhaps there is a lot of talk here about russia potentially becoming a mediator, a
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broker in the peace process at those talks going forward. 0k, sarah, thank you very much. i'm sure we will hear much more from sarah from vladivostok, but for now, thank you, sarah rainsford. they were the protests that brought much of central hong kong to a standstill. now — nearly five years later — some of the key leaders in the pro—democracy 0ccupy movement have been sent to jail. the sentences cames after nine members were found guilty of public nuisance offences earlier this month — charges they had all denied. let's cross live to hong kong — and speak to the bbc‘s stephen mcdonell. these sentences presumably will simply motivate the pro—democracy movement further? certainly news that these protest leaders have been sent to jail will spread around the city pretty quickly amongst the pro—democracy camp, who are saying it is the latest example of hong
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kong's freedom is being eroded. we have two of the leaders who have received 16 months injail, two more eight months in jail, received 16 months injail, two more eight months injail, and the rest have either received suspended sentences or community service. now, the reason people have criticised this movie is prosecutors chose to use an obscure colonial era law in order to obtain maximum punishment for these protest leaders. and the feeling is that this is all designed to send a message throughout hong kong that this type of assembly, that these types of protests will now get you into trouble. more than it did in the past. and from people we spoke to gathering outside the court tonight, and a lot of supporters claim to cheer these people on as they went into the court. they are saying they are finding it now something they have to weigh up, they are considering whether or not hong kong is still a
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safe place to protest, and in the coming months we have the anniversary of the tiananmen square massacre, there will be a big gathering for that. will people be attending that? we have other protest because of a new law which the government says is going to enable it to extradite people to the chinese mainland. now, there are fears that dissidents will be sent to beijing to face the music of the chinese government doesn't like what they are doing, yet again people are not happy about that. so we will see just how unhappy all of this is making them in terms of whether or not they will come out and join these protests that are planned in these protests that are planned in the coming months. stephen, thank you for that. salmon fishing is one of scotland's biggest rural industries — supporting more than a,000 jobs. but new figures out shortly are expected to show the lowest salmon stocks since records began. let's find out why with our reporter andrew anderson who's on the banks on the river tay in perth.
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let's go to our correspondent andrew anderson, who's on the banks of the river tay, in perthshire, on the meikleour estate. the river tay is one of the biggest rivers for salmon fishing in the country, but salmon stocks in salmon catches have dropped. why is that? i'm joined by a couple of people with a close interest in this. dr wells is from salmon fishery scotland. how concerned should we be? this is something we are concerned about right the way across the north atlantic, everywhere where there are salmon we have seen declines in their populations. so we are declines in their populations. so we a re really declines in their populations. so we are really calling on the scottish government and agencies to do everything within their power to manage what we can manage. what is the problem? we can see here the
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river level is very low. is it a problem with the rivers or is it out at sea? because the salmon return to sea for a period of time. it is a multifactorial issue. there are all sorts of issues salmon are facing. 0ut sorts of issues salmon are facing. out at sea they are facing issues related to climate change, food availability, but there are also things within the rivers which we can manage, which are human induced precious. there are conservation measures, anglers are asked to return here every fish that they catch. is there any more that can be done to try to boost numbers? catch. is there any more that can be done to try to boost number57m terms of fish being caught and killed, that is very much under control in scotland, we have the highest levels of catch and release in any country with significant salmon populations, and very few fish are now killed in commercial nets, but there are a range of other things that can be done in relation to fish migration, habitat, improvement, ensuring that the pressures of agriculture don't affect our wild fish, and whole range of other issues we are looking
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at. salmon fishing is very important to the rural economy of scotland, worth tens of millions of pounds every year, understanding, on the mcclure estate near perth, you run the estates, how important is it for your business? it is hugely important, for the rural economy, the salmon fishing season, and on the salmon fishing season, and on the 15th of january, and the salmon fishing season, and on the 15th ofjanuary, and on the salmon fishing season, and on the 15th of january, and on the 15th of january, up to the 15th of january, and on the 15th ofjanuary, up to mid—0ctober, we have anger is coming from all over the world. —— anglers. —— meikleour. at this time of the year, the stories are crucial, for hotels, b and bs, shops, very difficult to find tourist visiting at this time of year.
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they are relying on seasonal employees. without the anglers, your season would be restricted to the summer months? yes, to the summer months, and many on the west coast closed in winter, but thanks to salmon fishing, we have the luxury to be open all year, and provide full—time employment for people in the village, all year long. thank you both very much indeed. the scottish government says it is doing everything it can, it is determined to protect wild salmon stocks. i don't think anyone is suggesting that salmon will disappear entirely from rivers like these but the numbers may fall so low that fishing becomes unsustainable. that would really be a worry for scotland's rural economy. thank you very much for studio: thank you very much for that, andrew, in perth. time for a look at the weather forecast. yesterday was the last of the very
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warm days across the uk, today we will see a transition to cooler conditions, with sunshine and showers, some of the showers could be heavy and thundery, starting off this morning across the south—west of england, south—west wales, before drifting north, across the midlands, into southern parts of northern england. thunderstorms mixed in with that, sunshine behind it, sunny spells ahead of that. staying quite cloudy in the north—east of scotland and the north—east of england. temperatures down on yesterday at about 13, ia degrees in temperatures down on yesterday at about 13, 1a degrees in the north—east, 19 or 20 elsewhere. tonight, further showers continue to lift north into scotland and northern ireland, those are the overnight temperatures. as we go through thursday, almost like a repeat performance, more showers moving up from the south into friday, further showers expected, and it is going to feel cooler.
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good morning. the headlines: the chinese telecoms giant huawei will be allowed by the government to supply some non—core equipment for the uk's 5g data network despite security concerns from senior members of the cabinet. sri lanka's president promises a big shake up of the country's police and security services — after they failed to act on a warning about sunday's bomb attacks. downing street says the prime minister will attend the funeral of the murdered journalist lyra mckee in belfast this afternoon. in the last few minutes the north korean leader kimjon—un has arrived in russia ahead of his first ever meeting with vladimir putin. time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing. as we've been reporting, theresa may is said to have given the go—ahead for the chinese telecoms giant huawei
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to supply equipment for the uk's 5g data network — despite objections from senior ministers. concerns have been raised that the company could pose a security threat, because chinese companies are legally obliged to co—operate with their country's spy agencies. the prime minister has reportedly decided the firm can supply equipment such as antennas, but not critical infrastructure. let's hear more now from ciaran martin, the director general for government and industry cyber security, at gchq - he spoke to breakfast news this morning. what is public is that there is an extensive and fundamental review of telecom security under way, it has been under way for eight months, the analysis has been past ministers and it is not just analysis has been past ministers and it is notjust dealing with huawei but open play of security challenges we face with this new technology. —— but a panoply and that is vital to remember, if you look back over the
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recent history of cyber attacks against the uk, the most serious since the one against the security centre i head was a russian attack which had nothing to do with china or huawei but it showed serious vulnerabilities in the way that we do telecom security and whatever is the final take on huawei, what i think we can guarantee is we will have a much more robust, rigorous, regulatory standards network for these 5g services. i know you work very closely on this, you are the go—to man for all it, what are your concerns in particular about huawei. there are two issues, the kit we have now, while we have been in the uk, for more than 15 years and have special bespoke mitigation arrangements to manage any risks, we report on that every year, last month, we did the 2019 report, which showed some concerns with the way that huawei do engineering, we were clear that that was in evidence of miss behave —— that wasn't evidence of misbehaviour. there is then the
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issue of the sort of kit we have, and the standards we demand from the telecommunication companies and from suppliers to make sure whether it is rushing attacks, chinese attacks, attacks from anyone else, that it is safer and safe enough in this vital new technology. joining me now is chair of the foreign affairs committee, tom tugendhat. you are one of those people who has concerns about why way involvement in the 5g network. exactly right, i have been speaking with partners in recent weeks and months, and the message has been extremely clear, that they have strong doubts about the ability for us all to secure the sg the ability for us all to secure the 5g network, even in non—core items, because even non—core items will need to be opened up for patching,
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as you do, on the computer, or any other electronic item today. and that will give access to a potentially hostile state. the other factor in this, which is key, is the intelligence sharing network which we have built up so carefully over the last 70, 80 years, between the united states, canada, new zealand, australia, relies on trust, and if we undermine that trust, by allowing people to believe, even if they may be wrong, allowing people to believe that our systems are not as safe as theirs, then that undermines a fundamental part of national security. we have just had a clip saying the current oversight regime of huawei is arguably the toughest and most rigorous in the world, does that offer any reassurances to you and could that help in trying to reassure and keep faith, if you
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like, with the other members of the alliance, meeting in glasgow today? i have no doubt at all that gchq are doing an absolutely extraordinary job in keeping the public safe and making sure that this poses the smallest threat possible. indeed i have no doubt they would do exactly the same with any upgraded system. let's not pretend that would be cost free, it would not be, it would have major implication on the security budget of the united kingdom, that isa budget of the united kingdom, that is a very expensive area to keep safe and that would mitigate the cost savings to the telephone network of using huawei. i don't understand the saving mechanism, if you see what i mean, the saving to private companies would be put on the taxpayer, and the taxpayer would not even be guaranteed anyway, still in doubt, so i don't see the appropriate analysis. do you think the decision to go with huawei was primarily a financial one, one that did not take into account as fully
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as you would have liked possible damage to relationships with the likes of the us and others? first of all, the decision does not appear to have been taken, we are still speculating, so let's see before we decide whether it has been taken. but i hope very much that when a decision is taken, it will take into account the very important relationship of trust that keeps so much of our intelligence networks open, and allows us to know when threats approach our shores, or indeed approach any of our citizens abroad. in your doubt, no -- in your mind, no doubt that that relationship with the five eyes intelligence agency is, either you will upset members of the alliance or you are going to upset china, somebody‘s going to be upset. —— five eyes. i don't think china needs to be upset, i don't think china —— i think china has a very grown—up
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attitude, and it has passed its own laws, they know what they are doing. they are an extremely mature nation and they have their own national interest. i respect them entirely, i'd think we don't need to fall out on this, but they would not allow foreign technology to interfere with their national infrastructure, so i don't see any reason why they should be even slightly offended took for us to recognise that there technical skills pose issues for the united kingdom that we feel it would be best not to raise. 0k, kingdom that we feel it would be best not to raise. ok, i appreciate yourtime, chairof the best not to raise. ok, i appreciate your time, chair of the foreign affa i rs your time, chair of the foreign affairs committee. thank you. the sri lankan president says he will replace the the country's police and security forces, days after suicide attacks that killed more than 350 people. his decision comes after criticism that the country's intelligence agencies failed to act on a warning, ahead of the atrocity on easter sunday. yesterday, the islamic state group claimed it had carried out the bombings. well the atrocity came
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after the mosque attacks in christchurch, and new zealand's prime ministerjacinda ardern has been responding to reports that it was a reaction to those attacks. we have not received anything officially, nor have we received any intelligence reports that corroborate what has been said in sri lanka. look, iabsolutely understand sri lanka will be in the very early stages of its investigations and so we simply are stepping back and allowing them to undertake those but as i say, we have nothing to corroborate what has been said. let's ta ke let's take a look at who is making an impression on some of the newspapers. greta thunberg has made an impression in the uk if you go by the front pages of some of this morning's papers. yesterday the swedish teenager, who sparked a series of school
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walk—outs to protest the government's policies on climate change. the times shows the 16—year—old sitting round the table with labour leaderjeremy corbyn and the green party's caroline lucas. the guardian says she has delivered a "quiet but powerful message" to mps about climate change and the government's use of fossil fuels and airport expansion. but the daily mirror moves away from greta to talk about the fact that donald trump will not be staying at buckingham palace for his state visit to the uk in june which was announced yesterday. what you have been reading, a story here about the mpjohnny mercer, and a bbc investigation, we don't seem to be able to show you the story on the most read
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at the moment. a bbc investigation has revealed a company with links to a collapsed investment fund, london n finance, has ultimately been funding mr mercer. investors who have lost thousands have called on him to quit. mr mercer has always maintained there is no connection between lcf and something called the crucial academy, which helps forces vetera ns to crucial academy, which helps forces veterans to retrain and get back into employment. mr mercer has been responding to all of this in the last few minutes on twitter. he says: in response to the story today that through my work with a cyber training academy that skills up vetera ns training academy that skills up veterans and places them in jobs training academy that skills up veterans and places them injobs i have somehow been paid money from a collapsed bond scheme run by a company i have never heard of, never met or never had anything to do without so he is utterly refuting
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these suggestions and indeed he has been saying someone is trying to smear him, effectively. let's have a look at what is in the most read. ann widdecombe, standing for the brexit party, at number two. wireway, talking about at length, number three. and then, if we move on down to the most watched, this is a rather sweet story. —— huawei. korean yoghurt ladies spreading joy, this caught my eye much earlier this morning, these yoghurt ladies have been a familiar sight since the 1970s, they deliver yoghurt directly from their motorised fridges. it is said that in a country with a rapidly ageing population, that the yoghurt ladies are vital point of contact yoghurt ladies are vital point of co nta ct for yoghurt ladies are vital point of contact for many isolated people. rather lovely story. and, lego bricks for children with sight loss, lego have designed special braille
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bricks to help pupils with sight loss, we will be telling you more about the story in a few minutes. sport now...and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's sally. i think when i grow up i want to be a yoghurt lady, sounds like a great job! the buildup is well and truly underway tonight manchester united host manchester city at old trafford in a derby that could have massive repercussions for both the title race and the top four. this is city's game in hand over leaders liverpool, so win this and they'll be ahead with both teams having played the same number of games. united need a result too, they got thumped at everton last time out and are still clinging to the hope that they can finish in the top four. this club in the last decade grew a lot and that is why it is not scary to go there and play them, before it was with the distance, the players, manchester city has
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in the last ten seasons, make this game more equal and may be before the gap was bigger. we've got to pay them respect because they have been fantastic, they have won the last ten games in the league, 17 out of the last 18 i think they have won and you've got to respect that and you've got to try to solve the problems they cause you as well as you can and, by that, also create problems for them to solve. the prospect of that game, the manchester derby, dominates the back pages of the morning papers. most of them focusing on pep guardiola taking exception to 0le gunnar solskjaer‘s suggestion that city are a team that fouls. the mirror calls them "nasty neighbours".
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that one is nicely poised. it's a funny one for manchester united fans. if they beat their neighbours then they pretty much hand bitter rivals liverpool the premier league title. but could united fans ever wish their side to lose against city? well that's a question that we've put to manchester city fans. this is on the website, a rather cruel game... would you rather? you can watch it on the bbc sport website right now. and bbc radio 5 live is the only place to listen to full match commentary from old trafford tonight. coverage starts at 6:30. staying with the premier league, and there was a big win for spurs last night as they edge closer to securing a place in the top four. they beat brighton 1—0, but left it late — christian eriksen's goal coming in the 88th minute. tottenham stay third, three points ahead of chelsea and four clear of arsenal. they're also yet to concede a goal at their new stadium. brighton though remain in big, big trouble.
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they're just three points above the relegation zone. that was the fastest goal in premier league history in the night's other game. southampton's shane long scoring against watford after just 7.69 seconds. they weren't able to capitalise on it though, and watford equalised — meaning that southampton are still not safe. james cahill says he wants to "show people what he can do" after causing the biggest upset in snooker history. he beat world number one and five time champion ronnie 0'sullivan in the first round of the world snooker championship. ben croucher reports. in it goes! and ronnie 0'sullivan, the number one player in the world, is out! they're calling it the greatest shock in snooker. james cahill walked into the crucible a qualifier, a debutante, an amateur. he left it today with a piece of history. if cahill achieved perfection,
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this was a very imperfect ronnie 0'sullivan, one we've not come to recognise, even without the drastic overnight haircut. miss followed miss followed miss. 0'sullivan was struggling simply to stay awake. then what the 0'sullivan fans wanted to see, the amateur started to look like one and ronnie started to look like ronnie again. 8—5 became 8—6, became 8—7, became 8—8. the rocket on a roll. pink and black to take the lead. would you believe it? cahill capitalised. took the frame and showed all the coolness of a seasoned pro to see out the match and send out of sorts favourite home at this stage in just the fourth time in 27 visits to sheffield. all my limbs feel really heavy, legs, arms. i feel absolutely shattered. just drained really. i had no energy. but whatever way you look at it, you have to give credit to him that, you know, he got over the line. if ronnie was playing well, i wouldn't have won that match.
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and i know that. and i'm just happy to be through and happy to be in the next round. what a fantastic win that is. so, how do you top that? well, he'll aim for another shot against stephen maguire on friday. ben croucher, bbc news. before we go, let me remind you about sportsday, it is a big one. all the day sports news, including from the crucible, and old trafford, too. that's all the sport for now. more from the bbc sport centre at 1115. public finance to bring you, public sector borrowing fell by £17.2 billion for the financial year, to the end of march, thatis financial year, to the end of march, that is from the office for national statistics, lowest full year borrowing for 17 years but was 1.9 billion pounds higher than the forecast from the office for budget responsibility. the right direction
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of travel but falling not quite as much or as the government had hoped. in other news, we heard earlier that theresa may will be attending the funeral of the murdered journalist lyra mckee this lunchtime in belfast, labour has announced jeremy corbyn, labour leader, will also be attending the funeral, at saint annes cathedral in the city. two charities are warning that punishing cuts to council budgets are leaving increasing numbers of people at risk on the streets. research by st mungo's and homeless link, suggests nine years of government cuts have left local services for single homeless people in england with a one billion pounds a yearfunding gap. the government said it is committed to preventing all forms of homelessness. the system we have means that people with kids, families, have much more protection in the law, some single people, if they have disabilities, that sort of thing, may be affected, most are not. that is why it is
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really important that services exist for those people, otherwise they are the people that are much more likely to end up on the streets. if you have sight loss, learning to read braille can increase your independence — but fewer children are using it and there are fears it's dying out as a language. now students at one specialist residential school in worcester are testing out new lego bricks with braille printed on them — to try to encourage the use of braille and help the pupils with literacy and maths at the same time. colleen harris reports. it is like you are touching a language, to be honest, and it is so cool. lego has developed braille bricks, designed to help blind and visually impaired children to learn, they reflect letters in the braille alphabet.
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the plan is to eventually distribute lego braille bricks forfree, to selected schools by 2020. you can see more of that on the victoria derbyshire programme coming up victoria derbyshire programme coming up next. right now, time for the weather forecast. yesterday was the last of the really
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quite warm days, north—west of wales, today is a transition day, sunshine and showers in the forecast. you can see from the satellite imagery, quite a bit of cloud, this lump of cloud, moving its way out of northern france, crossing the channel, and that is what is really bringing the showers, you can see that area of rain, moving its way into the south—west of england. through south—west wales, showers moving their way into the southern coast of the of england as well, all of that will move north as well, all of that will move north as well, all of that will move north as we go through the morning and into the afternoon. continuing to drift its way up into the midlands. heavy downpours developing as we go through this afternoon, there will be some thunderstorms mixed in, particularly through parts of the midlands and into southern parts of northern england. larger, —— largely dry weather in eastern areas, scotland, northern ireland, quite a bit of cloud, and the north—east of
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england, and as temperatures lower —— temperatures lower than yesterday. more showers continue to feed up from the south or south—west, pushing through scotland, and those are the overnight temperatures going into thursday morning. we are going to see the warm air we have had over the last few days, gradually shunting away by colder air, coming in from the north and the west. it is going to feel very different on thursday. 0n the face of it in terms of the weather, very similar, showers pushing from the south, those will be heavy and thundery as they move their way up to southern scotland, in through northern ireland, those temperatures will be lower particularly for england and wales and 13 to 16 degrees with a bit of sunshine. low pressure will dominate the weather for the rest of the week, more weather fronts are starting to move their way in. these weather fronts provide moisture and energy that we need to bring more showers back friday. some sunshine, particularly towards scotland and
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northern england, before the showers push their way in from the south and west. some could be on the heavy side, perhaps even thundery, maximum temperature on friday, 12 to 16 degrees. into the weekend, particularly the wet and windy on saturday, maximum temperature, nine to 13 celsius.
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hello. it's wednesday, it's ten o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire. conservative mp jonny mercer strongly rejects accusations he's done anything wrong over his second job which earns him 85k a year. he says there is a co—ordinated effort to go after him. this mum who invested £22,000 in a company whose marketing agent an apology from the mp. the problem is that amount of money was paid fairand the problem is that amount of money was paid fair and square, and people have worked hard in their life savings have been lost. also today:

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