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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  April 24, 2019 3:30pm-5:01pm BST

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from the uk, he then went thousands. from the uk, he then went to australia to carry on with his studies, a postgraduate course they are. we are hearing that these men we re are. we are hearing that these men were from relatively affluent, middle—class backgrounds, they were all sri lankans. what is yet to fully emerge is how they went from being in what was a pretty hard—line islamist group here, which frankly and annoyed a lot of muslim communities here, the out buddhist statues last year. how they went from bad to carrying out such a for sophisticated attack. is there a sense that things are coming down, given that there were concerns that there were other bombs around and police were very on h. 7 there were other bombs around and police were very on h. ? the state of emergency continues, there will was another copy here overnight, more controlled explosions in colombo here. the police are still on the lookout for a van or lorry
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potentially packed with explosives, thatis potentially packed with explosives, that is of great concern to people. there are no signs that security is being diminished here. and all the big buildings, there are armed troops, commandos, patrolling the streets. this feels like a country which is not letting down its guard. the un envoy chuter langer has said that the opinion of the us is that this is a place where more terrorist attacks are being plotted. particularly travellers too. for foreigners coming to this country in the coming days and weeks, there will be concern there. of course, the dreadful prospect of burying the dead is going on. more mass there was today, women and children and mentally at the weekend. time for a look at the weather. here's susan powell. after the sun shone and the warmth of the weekend, today has been somewhat of a change, cooler air
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squeezing in from the west, so pretty thick cloud arriving in some heavy showers which might turn thundery in the rush hour. some of the most intense wells in north wales, parts of northern england and spreading into northern ireland in the late evening and overnight. further showers by then also spreading into the south which will effect southern england and parts of wales. breezy across the board overnight and milder. tomorrow, another day of sunny spells and scattered showers and it will be breezy again. northern scotland could see some of the best of the dry and bright weather, some rain spreading across england and wales and it could be heavy and persistent at times. hopefully a little sunshine as well but even in the best of the brightness, attempt is nowhere near the dizzy heights of the weekend with highs of nowhere near the dizzy heights of the weekend with highs 01:14 or 15 at best.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines. the funeral has taken place in belfast of the journalist lyra mckee, the 29—year—old who was shot in the head by a member of the new ira during violence in londonderry last week. the event was attended by theresa may, jeremy corbyn, the irish prime minister, as well as political leaders from across political spectrum in northern ireland. father martin magill made a pointed reference to the political problems in northern ireland. why in god's name does it take the death of a 29—year—old woman with her whole in front of her... applause scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, says she wants to hold a second referendum on scottish independence by 2021 if the country is taken out of the eu. the chinese telecoms firm
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huawei welcomes reports that the government is to allow it to help build britain's 56 data network, despite concerns over security. sport now on afternoon live. we are talking football and a big night in manchester. good afternoon. it isa it is a huge night. if city win, they will be top of the table but if united win, they will boost their chances of champions league qualification. but if they do that, they will of course and fierce rivals liverpool the advantage in the title race and a lot of united fa ns the title race and a lot of united fans are suggesting they would rather lose the match than see liverpool win the title. it is city's game in hand over the league leaders while united are on a bad run having lost six of their last eight and manager ole gunnar solskjaer added to the intensity beforehand suggesting city will attempt to found his site later. pep
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guardiola was unimpressed by that suggestion. we never prepare a game since my ten seasons as manager thinking about these kind of things, never. players can talk about it, the place in barcelona, munich, here, it is never a player to make fouls to avoid something from the other ones. you don't want to miss it and you can follow it all on bbc radio 5 live later. manchester united v manchester city is an 8 o'clock kick off. there's full commentary on 5 live sport. coverage begins at 6.30pm with mark chapman live from old trafford. and in tennis, one of the main tournament is on the move. it is. it is the big tournament for the atp which comes at the end of the atp world tour finals are on the move from london to turin. the tournament's been held
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in the uk for ten years but will move to italy for four years, from 2021. our tennis correspondent russell fuller says the atp want it to remain their showpiece event despite the change in location. two reasons, first is the fact that it had been in one place, in london, and phenomenally successful for 12 yea rs and phenomenally successful for 12 years with only madison square garden, which hosted it for 13 yea rs, garden, which hosted it for 13 years, has been host for longer and historically it has moved around. it needs to move around. novak djokovic, was number one and atp player council president has been saying for a while that we need to look elsewhere democrat world number one. the other, inevitably, is money built the wta tour struck a ten year deal to host the wta finals in shenzhen in china from this year and the prize fund is $14 million this year at the 02 arena prize the prize fund is $14 million this year at the o2 arena prize money will only be $9 million, only! but that has not gone unnoticed by members of the atp tour and they
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will be playing for $14.5 million when it gets under way in turin in a couple of years. that was russell fuller speaking to us earlier about that moved from london to turin. after ronnie o'sullivan‘s exit, judd trump narrowly avoided another shock at the world snooker championship in sheffield. he was trailing the world number 43 thepchaiya un—nooh by six frames to three overnight but fought back to level it up at nine all. then in the final frame decider, uh—nooh miscued at a crucial point, allowing trump to wrestle control and win the match. he went on to win the match. he will play things and we in the next round. these are live pictures from the crucible. mark allen is in action here.
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zhou yuelong just needs one more frame to win the match and you can follow this on the bbc sport website but that is all from us, i will be back with another update at 4:30pm. let's return to that service in belfast. the funeral of murdered journalist leera mckee has taken place at st anne's cathedral, in belfast. ms mckee was shot dead by a paramilitary group during riots in derry last thursday as she observed clashes between police and new ira dissidents. prime minister theresa may, labour leaderjeremy corbyn, irish premier leo varadkar, and president of ireland michael d higgins were among those who attended her funeral. during the service, her friend stephen lusty said her lasting legacy should be peace. he also revealed she was planning to propose to her partner and showed him pictures of the engagement ring. in those early days, lyra was
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fearless a nd in those early days, lyra was fearless and naive in equal measures. it gave her charm she never really lost. she rang me one day and said i'm going to dublin to see the taoiseach, would you like to come with me? i said yes, of course. i wanted to acquire desperate inquire about the logistics and she said, i'm not sure can you ring him and find out when he's free! i wasn't able to manage to get the taoiseach but i've been doing a little bit of work with a late brian lenihan and he kindly gave her ten minutes of his time. the net time i met brian he said, what a star, but i'd rather do ten rounds in a boxing ring with paisley than do that ain! speaking at the service, lyra's sister, nichola corner paid this tribute. let's face it — none of us will ever be the same again. we have all been changed by the events of last thursday.
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we don't have dumbledore's time turner that will enable us to change the past. but within each of us, we have the power to create the kind of society that lyra envisioned. one where labels are meaningless. one where every single person is valued. child gets the chance to grow up and to make their dreams come true. this is lyra's legacy that we must carry forward. this is the gift that
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god gave the world on the 31st of march, 1990. and we are all responsible for helping god's will to be fulfilled — each and every one of us. in the words of lyra herself, "we must change our own world, one piece at a time." now, let's get to work. that was lyra's sister talking at the service and we will have more including the words of father martin magill later on the show. but now to another story. the government has given the go—ahead for the chinese telecoms giant huawei to supply equipment for the uk's 5g data network, despite objections from senior
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members of the cabinet. concerns have been raised by the united states that the company could pose a security risk. it's believed huawei will be able to supply "non—core" equipment, such as antennae, but not critical infrastructure. let's speak to the international cybersecurity expert at chatham house, emily taylor. perhaps we need to define 5g and why there is such a fuss about it. 56 is going to be the new generation of superfast mobile broadband and it will really be a step change both in terms of speed and also in the types of devices that are attached to the network. it will be the enabler of the so—called new —— internet of things so there will be many more devices attached to the network and much faster speeds. the worry about china is that the government wants companies to keep important data within its borders so what does that
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mean when we are talking about something setting up in the uk? we have laws in the uk that require service providers to retain data and share it in certain circumstances. china has similar sorts of laws but the environment is very different in china and quite rightly that gives rise to concerns about where that data is going to go and what it will be used for. it should be said that huawei denies any links with the chinese government. wrote in terms of web sets up a new 5g network in the uk, will they be doing the same thing or are we talking about different standards? how will it work? in one way it will be building on tops of existing infra structure so the 40 another mobile brand we have will be put to work in 5g but it will be a very different type of network. traditionally, this technologists talk about internet networks is being done but 5g will
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bea networks is being done but 5g will be a much more intelligent network, it will be able to do more things and it will be much more of a living, breathing type of animal, if you like. is i suppose the worry some would have come if it has the huawei name on it and it is in the uk, it means perhaps somebody invasion could flick a switch and every car in the country grinds to a isn't that technology easily ove 1120 m e isn't that technology easily ove rco m e by isn't that technology easily overcome by our isn't that technology easily overcome by oui’ own isn't that technology easily overcome by our own security experts? the uk has had huawei in its telecommunications infra structure for more than a decade and has adopted quite a practical risk—based approach, so there is a cyber security evaluation centre based here in oxfordshire and its job is to take the kit apart and put it back together again and check nothing untoward is happening. that is the approach the uk has taken to date to try to build confidence and
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to manage risks associated with any foreign provider. very good to talk to you. ben bland is here — in a moment he will have the latest first a look at the headlines on afternoon live the journalist lyra mckee — the 29—year—old who was shot the funeral has taken place in belfast of the journalist lyra mckee — the 29—year—old who was shot in the head by a member of the new ira during violence in londonderry last week. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, says she wants to hold a second referendum on scottish independence by 2021 if the country is taken out of the eu. as the death toll rises in sri lanka to at least 350, it emerged that one of the nine bombers studied in the uk. these are your business headlines. boeing has reported lower
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first—quarter profits today showing that the global grounding of its 737 max plane following two crashes is having an impact. the us aerospace giant reported $2.1 billion in profits, that is down 13.2% from the same period a year ago. more on that shortly. and more on huawei. china's huawei says it welcomes reports that britain would allow limited use of its equipment in new 5g networks. a security source said britain will allow the chinese company some restricted access to non—core parts of the 5g network, but ban it from installing equipment in so—called core parts of the system. and how about this for a job vacancy. the government has advertised a job to replace mark carney as governor of the bank of england. he steps down from the £480 , 000—a—year post, at the start of next year. for the first time the government has hired a recruitment firm to help with the search.
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let's talk about boeing because what are they telling us about how much they are in trouble following the much—publicised problems after two crashes? there were a lot of attention on these results for that reason but boeing has said it still does not know the full extent that the crisis over those 737 max 8 models will have on its profits. you might remember in march a max 8 plane belonging to ethiopian airlines crashed killing 157 people on board and it was the second crash involving that model within five months, the other one a ryanair flight months, the other one a ryanair flight in indonesia. after the disasters regulators ground that model of playing all around the world, it was until a secretary softwa re world, it was until a secretary software update had been installed and tested —— lion air. it said that
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due to the uncertainty about when the planes would be able to fly again, it could not forecast profits for the rest of this year. when will they fly again? analysts say that comes down to airlines re—establishing trust in the safety of that particular model. re—establishing trust in the safety of that particular modellj re—establishing trust in the safety of that particular model. i think what you are now seeing is an acknowledgement by boeing that there isa acknowledgement by boeing that there is a confidence issue, a confidence with its direct customers, the airlines, who have now got to deal with a confidence issue with their customers, the passengers. ithink you are seeing that acknowledgement, that it you are seeing that acknowledgement, thatitis you are seeing that acknowledgement, that it is going to take time, there will be different steps getting this plane back into service but then there is the step of restoring the confidence from passengers on the plane. that is a big ask, isn't it? it is. it is a big unknown. we know that a fall in orders for the 737 by
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airlines to a drop of $1 billion in sales and boeing is already cutting production temporarily of the 737 from 52 planes a month down to 42 from 52 planes a month down to 42 from the middle of april. the 737 is its most popular and bestselling model until now. to an extent it has offset this effect by increasing sales of its 787 planes but even so, everybody will be waiting to see what happens in the next set of results. that talk about universal credit because it is back in the headlines, specifically the winners and losers of the latest roll—out. this has been done but the institute for fiscal studies, a very well respected financial think tank which shows large gains and losses from the roll—out and it says they are fairly common. 1.6 million adults will gain by more than £1000 a year but 1.9 million will lose by at
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least the same amount. did they specify who would be worst hit? among those, the iss says three quarters are within the groups of the lowest earning incomes, those with assets greater than £6,000, a employed who have low earnings and some claimant with disability benefits although some disability benefits although some disability benefits claimants will actually gain. this is all under the new benefit scheme? yes, universal credit is a basic six other benefits including child tax credit, income support and income —based jobseeker‘s allowance. we can speak to our guest, tom waters, the research economist at the ifs. inevitably, any new system is going to create winners and losers? that's right. universal credit is one of the biggest reforms we have seen to working age benefits in decades and any reform of this pic that integrates together six different benefit is inevitably going to create winners and losers. what we
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find in our research that those that lose a lot, the 1.9 million who lose at least year, there are are not so much an actual consequence of integrating benefits but more because of some specific choices that the government has made around how to design the benefit system. i would think less to people who are self—employed and people with significant financial assets and so on. that said, the government takes a slight issue with your findings, saying at the department for work and pensions that the report wrongly assumes that everyone was claiming theirfull assumes that everyone was claiming their full benefit entitlement under their full benefit entitlement under the old system which they were not, because it was overly complex. they are saying that on paper it might look like people are losing out but they suggest more people will gain because the system is easier. we are looking at benefit entitlement and some people might not take up the benefits to which they are entitled for a benefits to which they are entitled fora numberof benefits to which they are entitled for a number of reasons. there are reasons to think that maybe universal credit will increase the
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amount of take up a benefits, make it easier to apply in some ways but in other ways, for some claimants, it might make it harder to claim benefits. the overall effect is not clear but i think the bigger picture is that even if there is a bit of an increase in take—up as the government hopes, the overall big picture of lots of winners and lots of losers and the kind of patterns we have been talking about would stay pretty similar. what can be done to mitigate the effect for those losing out? because it is integrating together lots of benefits, it is inevitably going to create lots of winners and losers and unless the government chucks a huge amount of money at universal credit, there is not really any way to eliminate any losers or get rid of most of them or anything like that. what the government does face a challenge in doing is getting the transition to universal credit right because we are only part way through that roll—out now. making sure that those who are affected know what is
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coming and when it is coming is a key challenge i think the government faces. tom, thank you very much. shall we have a look at the markets? yes, the ftse 100 shall we have a look at the markets? yes, the ftse100 is down from mining companies are among the big follows after some data out of china which is a big consumer of metals. and also energy companies, the oil price has just and also energy companies, the oil price hasjust edged off and also energy companies, the oil price has just edged off the and also energy companies, the oil price hasjust edged off the highs it was touching in the last couple of days with a bit of reassurance about supply and demand. they have come down a bit as well. a good day for some retail stocks. associated british foods that owns primark, some strong results from them which is held there share price but the online fashion retailer abdul lathief jameel mohamed, their price was up about 8% last checked. —— the online fashion retailer boohoo.
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thank you. salmon fishing is one of scotland's largest rural industries — supporting more than four thousand jobs. but new figures released today show wild salmon catches in scotland are at their lowest level since records began. the scottish government says the decline is of great concern and fishing experts are calling for urgent action to help heading out today to catch a salmon, probably more in hope than expectation. numbers have fallen badly here on the tay and on other scottish rivers. if these anglers do land a fish, they'll put it back to help protect stocks. those who oversee the rivers say it's a crisis, and urgent action is needed to protect wild salmon. there's a climate change and wider environmental change, which is having an impact on the salmon at sea in terms of what they feed on and things like that, but there are also a whole host of human induced pressures which are putting the species under pressure. figures released today showjust
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over 37,000 wild salmon were caught on scotland's rivers last year. that's the lowest since records began in 1952. salmon return from the sea to scotland's rivers to breed. studies show only 3% make it back. 50 years ago, it was ten times that. one factor that has led to the collapse in numbers. the opening of the salmon fishing season is celebrated on scotland's rivers. it's worth tens of millions of pounds to the rural economy, supporting thousands of jobs. even 30, 50 years ago... claire runs a hotel that has been welcoming anglers since 1820. the fishing, she says, is vital if it's to stay open all year. for us, that means we can have long—term full employment in the village versus having to rely
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on temporary seasonal workers. amid the concern, the scottish government says it is determined to protect this iconic species, and is helping to fund research. the concern is not so much that salmon could disappear entirely from rivers like this, but that their numbers fall so low, fishing becomes unsustainable. if that happens, it could have a very serious effect on scotland's rural economies. andrew anderson, bbc news, on the river tay. time for a look at the weather. here's susan powell. after a ll after all the warmth and sunshine of the weekend, it is changeover day with cooler air trying to push in from the west and the clouds rolling in and we will see more heavy showers through the rest of the day in parts of england and wales. a fresh area of showers pushing in
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towards the south coast by the evening rush hour but potentially some of the most vigorous downpours targeting parts of north wales and spreading into northern england through the latter part of the afternoon and the early evening. some rain in wales at this stage as well and for part of the midlands, heavy showers are eventually in northern ireland and southern scotland. temperatures still in the high teens for people heading home in easton exhibit in the west by 6pm, they are into the low teens and the feeling is rather more of spring than summer. some of the heavy showers in northern ireland in the small hours of thursday, they also affect scotland and then heavier showers in the south of the uk by the end of the night, particularly into the south—west of england and in wales. pretty breezy across the board and overall mild enough because we are still sitting in warm weather coming from the south, all the way from the sahara impact which has brought quite a bit of dust with it. if you see something on your car first thing, that is where it will have come from. you might have
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noticed the colour changing towards the end of the week as the cooler air starts to push its way in. on thursday, showers are just about anywhere. northern scotland gets the best of the dry and fine weather but temperatures across the board continued to edge down with highs evenin continued to edge down with highs even in the best sunshine of 15 or 16 degrees and again, some fairly windy weather and perhaps persistent rain thursday night into friday. things will calm down a little on friday, not to say we will be shower free but if anything, friday should bring more right spells to most of the uk will suffer some heavy showers potentially gathering in the south across england and wales through friday afternoon. again, temperature is about average for this time of year, sitting in the mid teens. and looking to the west, this is what is waiting for us on a saturday with a deep area of low pressure and it could be a wet and windy day to start the weekend. fortu nately, windy day to start the weekend. fortunately, things look calmer and drierfor sunday fortunately, things look calmer and drier for sunday and good fortunately, things look calmer and drierfor sunday and good news fortunately, things look calmer and drier for sunday and good news for anyone taking part in this year's
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london marathon.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 4: the funeral has taken place in belfast of the journalist, lyra mckee — the 29—year—old who was fatally shot by a member of the new ira during violence in londonderry last week. the event was attended by theresa may, jeremy corbyn, as well as political leaders from across political spectrum in northern ireland. in a powerful reflection — father martin magill — asked why it had taken lyra's death to bring the politicians together. why in god's name does take the death of a 29—year—old woman, with her hill life in front of her... applause.
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to get to this point. in other news — the chinese telecoms firm, huawei, welcomes reports that the government is to allow it to help build britain's 5g data network — despite concerns over security coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. obviously we are hours away now from the manchester derby, a match which could determine the destination of the premier league title. looking at the premier league title. looking at the weather for us, susan the premier league title. looking at the weatherfor us, susan powell. and unlike its change of a day for our weather today, becoming much more unsettled after the fine long holiday weekend. as the rain arise, so will some cooler air from the atlantic. more on that in half an hour. also coming up — wild salmon catches in scotland are at their lowest level since records began, with stocks at "crisis point". more on that in news nationwide after 4.30pm.
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the funeral of murdered journalist lyra mckee has taken place at st anne's cathedral in belfast. ms mckee was shot dead by a paramilitary group during riots in derry last thursday as she observed clashes between police and new ira dissidents. prime minister theresa may, labour leaderjeremy corbyn, irish premier leo varadkar, and president of ireland michael d higgins were among those who attended her funeral. during the service, a friend told mourners that ms mckee had revealed her plans to propose to her partner sara just hours before she was murdered. and a priest received a standing ovation when he asked why it took the death of a 29—year—old woman "with her life in front of her" to unite political parties. ms mckee was a person who worked to bring people together.
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introducing the service, the dean of belfast cathedral said ms mckee was a person who worked to bring people together. lyra was a person who broke down barriers and reached across boundaries. this was her hallmark in life, and this is her legacy in death. as a journalist, she pursued truth wherever it took her, never content with the sullen silence of unanswered questions. lyra was a child of the good friday agreement. she was a primary school pupil in north belfast when the agreement was signed. she grew up to champion its hope for a society that was free from the prejudices of the past and open to the possibilities of a new future for the peoples of these islands. lyra's sister, nichola corner, also paid this tribute. let's face it — none of us will ever be the same again. we have all been changed
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by the events of last thursday. we don't have dumbledore's time turner that will enable us to change the past. but within each of us, we have the power to create the kind of society that lyra envisioned. one where labels are meaningless. one where every single person is valued. child gets the chance to grow up and to make their dreams come true. this is lyra's legacy that we must carry forward. this is the gift that
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god gave the world on the 31st of march, 1990. and we are all responsible for helping god's will to be fulfilled — each and every one of us. in the words of lyra herself: "we must change our own world, one piece at a time." now, let's get to work. politicians from all sides of the political divide attended the service. father martin magill told mourners that lyra's death should mark a new beginning for northern ireland. many of us will be praying that lyra's death, in its own way,
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will not have been in vain and will contribute in some way to building peace here. since thursday night, we have seen the coming together of so many people in various places, and the unifying of the community against violence. i commend our political leaders for standing together in creggan on good friday. i am, however, left with a question — why in god's name does it take the death of a 29—year—old woman, with her whole life in front of her... applause.
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to get to this point. stephen lusty, a friend of lyra mckee, also gave a personal tribute at the funeral. in those early days, lyra was fearless and naive in equal measures. it gave her a charm that
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she never really lost. she rang me one day and say, i'm going to dublin to see the taoiseach, would you like to see the taoiseach, would you like to come with me? i said, yes of course. but when i inquired about the logistics of the event, she said, i'm not sure, can you ring him and find out when he is free? i wasn't able to get the taoiseach but i was doing a bit of work of the late brian lenihan and he kindly gave her ten minutes of her time. the next time i met brian he said, what a star but i'd rather do ten rounds ina what a star but i'd rather do ten rounds in a boxing ring and do that again. chief constable george hamilton, from the police service of northern ireland, spoke outside the cathedral after the funeral. we have just been we havejust been in we have just been in the we havejust been in the most we have just been in the most moving of services where people cried out last in equal measure, it was a very powerful service of us up. as a police service, we would want to pass on our sympathy and condolences
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to lyra's partner, herfamily and friends. she was a great person who worked hard to shine a light, to recover truth. she cared passionately about issues and worked ha rd passionately about issues and worked hard and with an integrity. of course, that is in complete contrast to those people who came out of the shadows last thursday night, fire shots towards police lines, hitting lyra and fatally injuring her. i suppose that the outpouring of confirmation from the communities of derry, the creggan, the politicians all standing together in creggan and with that community last friday was something that, i think, it was quite unique and different. we need to capitalise on that. we believe that the evidence to bring those
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responsible for lyra's murder to book is out there. don't forget, you can let us know what you think. tweet us using the hashtag afternoonlive. all the ways to contact us on screen right now. many in northern ireland saying that this funeral should mark a turning point in the history of northern ireland. some breaking news. we are just hearing about the environmental protesters, extinction rebellion, saying that they will end at the protest in the capital at marble arch tomorrow. there is no time given, itjust arch tomorrow. there is no time given, it just says arch tomorrow. there is no time given, itjust says on thursday. extinction of onion ending their protest at marble arch and parliament square tomorrow. more on that later on. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, says she wants to hold a second referendum on scottish independence by 2021 if the country is taken out of the eu.
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she told holyrood that she would introduce legislation soon to set the rules for another vote. but she indicated that she would need the agreement of the uk government before actually holding a referendum. our scotland correspondent james shaw gave us the latest. this is the strongest statement that nicola sturgeon has made on the issue of a second independence referendum for at least two years. back in 2017, before the general election, she was pushing quite hard, as she had been since the eu referendum in 2016. but then the snp lost ground in that election, they lost 21 of their mps at westminster, and it went rather quite at that point. ——quiet. but nicola sturgeon is back and making now a very strong case for an independence referendum. if brexit happens, she leaves unanswered the question of what happens if there is no brexit. but if brexit happens, she says people in scotland should have the choice between that and scotland being an independent country within the european union. she says that legislation enabling that should
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be in place by the end of the year. although she also acknowledges that the uk government has said that it does not want a second independence referendum. let's listen now to a key part of the statement she has just made. to rush into an immediate decision before a brexit path has been determined would not allow for an informed choice to be made. however, if we are to safeguard scotland's interests, we cannot wait indefinitely. that is why i consider that a choice between brexit and a future for scotland as an independent european nation should be offered in the lifetime of this parliament. if scotland is taken out of the eu, the option of a referendum on independence within that timescale must be open to us. that would be our route to avoiding the worst of the damage brexit will do. of course, that intention does not mean that we should cease trying to build as much agreement
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on the best way forward as we can, nor should we cease our efforts to avoid any brexit at all. we must also try in all of our actions to avoid the mistakes that have caused so much division over brexit and instead bring people together to focus on finding the common ground that does, i believe, exist between us. our aim must be to act in a completely different manner to the uk government and parliament. the fact is, presiding officer, based on the evidence of the last three years, westminster has failed. it has failed to protect scotland's interests, it has failed to reach a consensus and it has degenerated into utter chaos. essentially, what this means is that nicola sturgeon has put herself head to head with the uk government. they have made it clear that they do not want an independence referendum, she has said that there
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must be one before 2020, the next scottish parliamentary elections. response from other parts of the political spectrum — the conservatives in scotland, saying that people here are not interested in these constitutional questions. they care about things like education. they say that nicola sturgeon has not devoted enough time to those bread—and—butter issues that people really care about, that is the conservative point of view here. then if you look at people strongly in favour of independence, they would say that she is kicking the can down the road. they want an independence referendum as soon as possible, not maybe some time in the next couple of years. so what are we left with? we are left with confrontation between the scottish and uk government for the foreseeable future. we are left with doubts, uncertainty, about what this means for the relationship between the two governments. no one knows how that will pan out, just like we do not know
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what will happen with brexit. in the past few moments, we have had a response from downing street. saying that scotland had a referendum in 2014 where the majority rejected an independence, that should be respected. the chinese telecoms firm, huawei, has welcomed reports that the government is to allow it to help build britain's 5g data network. that's despite objections from senior ministers here — who believe it poses a security risk. the us and a number of allies have also expressed concerns about the security implications of working with huawei. the telecoms firm has always denied being controlled by the chinese government, and says that its work does not pose any risks of espionage and sabotage. richard lister reports. imagine a world where all the machines in our lives can talk to each other to make everyday a bit easier.
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traffic lights turn red and tell the sat nav to be us. this is the promise of 5g. 5g is like going from earth to mars. it is a different world. right now we have to instruct our machines but in the 5g world is our machines may decide to communicate directly to us or with each other. but 5g needs a new network of processors and antennas constantly working out what to do with all the information so who should you trust to that network? the uk has been considering the chinese telecoms giant huawei that ministers are reported to be close to announcing that huawei will have some role in bringing 5g to the uk but some partners like the us, australia and new zealand warned it is not to be trusted. there is a threat here,
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there are nations who intend to come at our critical infrastructure and pose a threat. and with that understanding, all of us are pretty fairly certain we're not going to use technologies that pose a threat and those most sensitive networks. we're not going to, in the us, have huawei in our sensitive networks. huawei has been building british telecoms infrastructure for almost two decades and strongly denies intelligence links with the chinese government. in 2012 it signed £1 billion investment deal with downing street and uk intelligence community says that the uk has a rigorous security in place. when we analyse a company for their suitability to supply equipment to the uk telecoms networks, we're looking at the risks that arise from their security and engineering processes. as well as the way these technologies are deployed in our national telecoms networks. a flag of origin of 5g equipment is important but it is a
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secondary factor. huawei welcomed the report that the government is preparing to bring it on board for 5g saint while we await a formal a 5g world of smart appliances working out what we need and when to turn on could finally deliver on the big promises of the internet of things. but with technology so fully embedded in our lives, the potential risks are every bit as real as the benefits. richard lister, bbc news. you're watching afternoon live — these are our headlines: the funeral has taken place in belfast of the journalist lyra mckee, the 29—year—old who was fatally shot by a member of the new ira during violence in londonderry last week. the chinese telecoms firm, huawei, welcomes reports that the government is to allow it to help build britain's 5g data network — despite concerns over security. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, says she wants to hold a second referendum
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on scottish independence by 2021 if the country is taken out of the eu. on the spot, at manchester united could hunt liverpool at the advantage in the title race if they beat manchester city later. city will return to the top if they beat their rivals in the derby tonight. the end of season atp tour finals will move from london due to rain in after a 12 year stay in the english capital. judd trump narrowly avoided and a lot upset today, winning the deciding frame in his match. more to come on all of those stories at around half past. officials in sri lanka say one of the suicide bombers who was involved in the easter sunday attacks had studied in the uk. it's believed he came here in the mid—2000s and did not complete a full university degree course. eight of the nine bombers have now been identified — one of them was a woman.
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the death toll has risen again — more than 350 people are now known to have died in the bombings which targeted churches and tourist hotels. paul adams reports we were just hearing that the foreign office has updated its travel advice for travelling to still anchor, saying that an attack could be imminent, including places visited by foreigners. they are not advising uk nationals to travel to the country but say it is under co nsta nt the country but say it is under constant review. that is the latest from our security corresponding, frank gardner. with an update on the situation in sri lanka, here is paul adams. outside saint anthony's shrine in colombo — an eerie silence. more than 100 christians died here. the black and white ribbons signify mourning. the city's hospitals are still full of the wounded and all over sri lanka a visible police presence and a lingering sense of shock and apprehension.
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fresh images too of the men thought to have carried out these atrocities. cctv pictures from a lift in colombo's shangri—la hotel show two men with rucksacks minutes before an explosion in the restaurant. the government says it's arrested more than 60 people. it says the bombers were educated and included one woman. at least one had travelled abroad. we believe that one of the suicide bombers studied in the uk and then maybe later on did his postgraduate in australia. before coming back to settle in sri lanka. most of them are well educated and come from the middle class. as the investigation goes on, the government is facing difficult questions about how this was allowed to happen. why were intelligence reports from a foreign country not circulated ? or, it seems, acted upon.
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translation: the security officials who got the intelligence report from a foreign nation did not share it with me. appropriate actions would have been taken. i've decided to take stern action against these officials. sri lanka is an island acquainted with grief. its long civil war ended only ten years ago. but sunday's attacks were unprecedented in scale and complexity. with so—called islamic state claiming involvement, members of sri lanka's small muslim minority say they fear a backlash. actually you cannot blame all of the muslim community for the subject. so most of the people are peace people. because they are not involved and they all feel very bad about this. three days on, sri lanka is still reeling from one of the world's worst acts of terrorism since 9/11. dealing with the aftermath will be a huge challenge for a government that seems both divided and dysfunctional. paul adams, bbc news. earlier today, the deputy
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defence minister spoke about the attrocities. nick beake is in colombo and told me what was revealed about the killers. what we were hearing is that these men were from a relatively affluent, middle—class backgrounds. they were all sri lankans. what is yet still to emerge fully is how they went from being in what was a pretty hardline islamist group here, which frankly annoyed a lot of muslim communities here, they attacked buddhist statues last year, how they went from that to carrying out such a sophisticated, deadly attack. is there a sense that things are calming down given that there was concern that there were other bombs around, that the police were very on edge? i think that is hard to say, simon. the state of emergency continues, there is another curfew here overnight. there were more controlled explosions in colombo today. the police are still on the lookout for a van or a lorry potentially packed with explosives so that is of great concern to people. there are no signs that the security
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is being diminished here. in all the big buildings you have armed troops and also commandos patrolling the streets. this feels like a country which is not letting down its guard. and also, crucially, the us envoy to sri lanka has said today that the opinion of the united states is that this is a place where more terrorist attacks are being plotted. so i think that is of concern to many people here and particularly travellers as well. forforeigners coming to this country in the coming days and weeks there will be concern there and of course the dreadful process of burying the dead continues. we have had more mass funerals today — men, women and children killed at the weekend. the son of a woman believed to be one of the british victims of the sri lanka bombings today talked of how he wants to bring his mother home. 55—year—old lorraine campbell was on a business trip and staying at the cinammon grand, one of the hotels attacked by suicide bombers. her son mark said the family lost contact when the bombs went off.
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her husband, neil, was i believe informed first that they couldn't find her. and that she was there. and i think, as more details came out, he put two and two together, he was texting her when she was in the restaurant in the morning and then the texts stopped. then the report came out and he put two and two together, same hotel... my mum was inspiring. she was very strong, very independent. but the one thing that kind of stuck out for me throughout my entire life was that she was a leader. she would take one for the team, she would bring the team along, she would never leave anyone behind type of thing. she almost rallied her friends like troops. they would follow her anywhere, because of the mutual respect and love they had for each other. i just want to bring my mum home and i want to give everyone who knew her, who had the opportunity to spend time with her and get to know
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her like we all did, give them the opportunity to come together and celebrate this beautiful woman. figures released today show that government—borrowing last year fell to its lowest annual level in 17 years. borrowing for the last financial year was £17.2 billion less than the year before, but nearly £2 billion more than the official forecast made in the spring statement. the deficit has also fallen to its lowest level in 17 years. people who invested money in a collapsed bond scheme have been calling for conservative mp johnny mercer to quit his second job. a bbc investigation has shown that a company that was paid a commission of 25% from london capital & finance has provided funding to a firm which pays a private salary of £85,000 to the mp for plymouth moorview. mr mercer has denied any wrongdoing, and claims there is a "co—ordinated effort" to discredit him. the actor, edward kelsey,
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best known for playing the character ofjoe grundy on the archers, has died at the age of 88. he was a familiar voice to listeners of the bbc radio drama since 1985 and also starred on both stage and screen. his family have paid tribute to him by saying he always "counted himself immensely lucky that he was able to enjoy a long and varied career, doing the thing that he loved, entertaining an audience, and fortunate indeed to have met and worked with so many talented, generous, creative people along the way." now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell. after the sunshine and the warmth of the weekend, today has been somewhat ofa the weekend, today has been somewhat of a change. cooler air trying to squeeze in from the west, something loud arriving and in some heavy showers, some of which will turn thundery during this evenings rush hour. intense for parts of north wales and north england, spreading
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to northern ireland in the late evening and overnight. further showers spreading into the south affecting southern england and parts of wales. breezy across the board of the night, mild enough. tomorrow, another day of sunny spells and scattered showers, it will be breezy once again. i think northern scotla nd once again. i think northern scotland could see the best of the dry and bright weather through the day, as a whole. some rain spreading through england and wales, persistent at times. hopefully some sunshine as well. even in the best of the brightness, temperature is nowhere near where they were at the weekend. 14 or 15 at best.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines... the funeral has taken place in belfast of the journalist lyra mckee, the 29—year—old who was fatally shot by a member of the new ira during violence in londonderry last week. the event was attended by theresa may, jeremy corbyn, as well as political leaders
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from across the political spectrum in northern ireland. in a powerful reflection, father martin magill asked why it had taken lyra's death to bring the politicians together. why in god's name does take the death of a 29—year—old woman, with her whole life in front of her... applause. to get to this point. the chinese telecoms firm huawei welcomes reports that the government is to allow it to help build britain's 5g data network, despite concerns over security. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, says she wants to hold a second referendum on scottish independence by 2021 if the country is taken out of the eu.
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sport now and manchester could win tonight! somebody certainly well and it isa tonight! somebody certainly well and it is a city or united later but so much at stake. if city win they return to the top of the table. if united win, they boost their chances of champions league qualification, but will hand liverpool the advantage in the title race. this is city's game in hand over the league leaders, if city win they return to the top of the table. while united have lost six of their last eight. manager ole gunnar solskjaer says seeing their rivals battling for the title shouldn't be an extra motivation for his team for the coming years. for me, the motivation is toward something to win something yourself. it's not about taking something away from others. we have to want to
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overta ke from others. we have to want to overtake them not because it is city and liverpool, but of course because it isa and liverpool, but of course because it is a city and liverpool, for the supporters and as a manager now, you know they are so close in the vicinity, we want to be the best. we have been the best and... it's not nice, seeing those two at the top. still some way to go for united to be the best again. plenty of reaction and analysis in the build—up to the game on the bbc sport website. united fans asked would they rather lose to city if it meant stopping rivals liverpool from winning theirfirst league title in 29 years. i have never gone to old trafford for a draw or i have never gone to old trafford fora draw ora i have never gone to old trafford for a draw or a defeat in my life! lose against city. i would rather lose against city. lose against
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city. any proper man united fan would rather lose against city if liverpool did not get the title. i would rather get europa league foot ball would rather get europa league football than have liverpool win. there you go, you are a pop at united fan if you would rather see them lose two city later! —— proper fan. manchester united v manchester city is an 8 o'clock kick off. there's full commentary on 5 live sport. coverage begins at 6.30pm with mark chapman live from old trafford. i would like to know whatjose mourinho thinks but that is by thereby! talking tennis, a big tournament moving out of london. the atp world tour finals are on the move from london to turin. the tournament's been held in the uk for ten years but will move to italy for four years from 2021. our tennis correspondent russell fuller says the atp want it to remain their showpiece event despite the change in location. two reasons, first is the fact that it had been in one place, in london, and phenomenally successful for 12 years with only madison square garden,
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which hosted it for 13 years, has been host for longer and historically it has moved around. it needs to move around. novak djokovic, world number one and atp player council president has been saying for a while that we need to look elsewhere. the other, inevitably, is money. the wta tour struck a ten—year deal to host the wta finals in shenzhen in china from this year and the prize fund fund is $14 million. this year at the o2 arena prize money will only be $9 million, only! but that has not gone unnoticed by members of the atp tour and they will be playing for $14.5 million when it gets under way in turin in a couple of years. that was russell fuller speaking to us earlier about that moved from london to turin. after ronnie o'sullivan's exit, judd trump narrowly avoided another shock at the world snooker championship in sheffield. he was trailing the world number 43,
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thepchaiya un—nooh, by six frames to three overnight but fought back to level it up at 9—9. then in the final frame decider, uh—nooh miscued at a crucial point, allowing trump to wrestle control and win the match. he will play ding junhui in the next round and is the bookies' favourite to lift his first world title after o'sullivan's shock exit to amateurjames cahill. currently in action are mark allen and zhou yuelong. these are live pictures from the crucible theatre. zhou just needs one more frame to win the match. mark allen battling back having won the last four frames. and you can watch it via the bbc sport website right now. that is all for now from us but plenty more to come throughout the rest of the afternoon.
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the funeral of murdered journalist lyra mckee has taken place at st anne's cathedral, in belfast. ms mckee was shot dead by a paramilitary group during riots in derry last thursday as she observed clashes between police and new ira dissidents. the event was attended by theresa may, jeremy corbyn, and leaders from across the political spectrum her death has touched people around the world. today crowds in her home country came to say goodbye to lyra mckee. as a journalist, she reported on the sometimes fractured society in northern ireland. in death she put together leaders from across the political divide, the british by theresa mayjoining irish taoiseach leo varadkar and the irish president michael d higgins to pay their respects. the lord gave and the lord has taken away. that unity was reflected throughout the service for lyra who came from a catholic grab
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herfuneral was lyra who came from a catholic grab her funeral was held in lyra who came from a catholic grab herfuneral was held in belfast‘s protesta nt herfuneral was held in belfast‘s protestant cathedral —— catholic background. lyra was a person who broke down barriers and reached across boundaries. this was her hallmark in life. and this is her legacy in death. it was a service marked with music by northern irish artists and with too many to mourn inside the cathedral, events were broadcast of those outside. but at the centre of this very public funeral there was a very personal grief with memories of a daughter, sister and friend who was about to propose to her partner, sarah. i was fortunate to spend time with lyra on thursday, her last day. as her uncle stevie, i gave her her
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cadburys easter egg and she showed me pictures of the ring she has brought fort sarah and told me of the fabulous plan to be had for a proposal in new york in may. we should give credit to lyra's mother, our mother, for ensuring that lyra became the kindest, the gentlest, the most loving person that the world will never forget. let's face it, none of us will ever be the same again. is the leaders of northern ireland's collapsed power—sharing agreement shared a pue, there was a clear message from those leading the service. since thursday night, we have seen the coming together of so many people in various places and the unifying of the community against violence. i commend our
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political leaders for standing together in creggan on good friday but i together in creggan on good friday butiam, together in creggan on good friday but i am, however, left with a question. why, in god's name, does it take the death of a 29—year—old woman with her whole life in of her... applause
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the death of a 29—year—old woman her whole life in front of her to get to this point? lyra mckee's death has been called the very worst of northern ireland's past taking away the best of its future. today those that love to ask before her loss to bring real change. the remarkable funeral service for lyra mckee. up next it is news nationwide. let's go to paul clifton in southampton to tell us about driverless cars and the data that is being collected in extraordinary detail before vehicle automation can ever be done safely. it would be with you in a moment.
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and laura mciver is in scotland to tell us about the worringly low levels of wild salmon stock, with figures coming out that wild salmon catches in scotland are at their lowest levels since records began. so paul, what sort of data is being collected ? it is extraordinary data as you said. the ordnance survey currently maps to a level of accuracy of a few centimetres and that is not good enough. driverless cars will have to know where they are to within a centimetre. imagine coming up to a pedestrian crossing and being a few centimetres out. what is needed is a level of accuracy that has not been seen before and it is being tested in oxfordshire. we can look at a car thatis in oxfordshire. we can look at a car that is doing the mapping. it is fitted with lasers, radar, 306 d degree cameras, gps and more and the results are some extraordinary digital images. one example of why these are needed, the dropped curbs at the edge of a driveway to a house. the cart will need to know
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exactly where the curb lowers so it can exactly where the curb lowers so it ca n reverse exactly where the curb lowers so it can reverse off the road. being a few centimetres out could mean hitting a lamp post, a hedge or worse. i went out with mark reid in the car. the lasers on the system capture 2 million points a second. the car. the lasers on the system capture 2 million points a seconde million a second? 2 million a second and each of those lasers is measured to about five millimetre accuracy. it is capturing everything it can seek ata it is capturing everything it can seek at a very high level of accuracy. it is seeing the road, the markings, the perp lines, the street furniture. that suggests to me that true driverless cars the ones that get us to the supermarket, they could be some way off —— the curb lines. this is one test route and it is to produce a trustworthy similar to, not a driverless car for real but a stimulator possibly imagine repeating that process for every town centre, housing estate, street and country lane, it is
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mind—boggling. other people working on other driverless projects are looking at ways of making the car see the road ahead itself to that level of accuracy but i think the key point that driverless cars are ata key point that driverless cars are at a project on stage, a concept if you like. we are years away from ordering one to take us to the supermarket or drive us home from the pub. the ordnance survey put it like this, it isn't going to happen in the medium term but nor is it in cloud cuckoo land beyond the horizon. we can expect it to happen somewhere roughly in between. horizon. we can expect it to happen somewhere roughly in betweenm horizon. we can expect it to happen somewhere roughly in between. in the meantime, we have to walk back from the pub! plenty more on bbc cap! south later. going to glasgow, laura, talk us through the numbers because wild salmon stocks are very low. they are, good afternoon. the numbers are worrying. the latest numbers are worrying. the latest numbers we have for 2018 suggest that only 37,000 salmon were caught and that is down around a third on
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the few years beforehand. actually, 93% of those fish that were caught we re 93% of those fish that were caught were put back in the water. for those unfamiliar with the salmon's journey, they travel from the sea into rivers to breed. it is those numbers that it is easier to monitor than when they are in rivers. in terms of looking at what could be causing the problem, climate change asa causing the problem, climate change as a possible issue. it could be that there are pressures on some of the food sources for the salmon, particularly out in the sea where it is more difficult to monitor what they are doing and what they are eating. some campaigners believe that sea lice is a problem. it has been a problem among farmed salmon in scotland and some campaigners suggest it has infiltrated the wild population as well although that is not something that is new to the fishing industry, it is a problem that has been around for a couple of yea rs. that has been around for a couple of years. fisheries cap next management scotla nd years. fisheries cap next management scotland explained there were
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different factors at play. it is climate change in the black —— and wider environmental change which is having an impact on the salmon at the sea in terms of what they feed on and things like that but there are also a whole host of human induced pressures which are putting the species under pressure. the salmon fishing season is under way in scotland so what does this potentially mean for fishing as an industry? angling is already under way on some of the famous rivers here. this is huge to the economy of scotland, hundreds of millions of pounds a year are fed into the economy through this as both an industry, and a sport as well. people come here to do it specifically and as they do they spend money on hotels and restau ra nts spend money on hotels and restaurants other things. it is very important to the economy and also important to the economy and also important to the economy and also important to jobs in terms of all the attached industry is that it feeds into. we have put the problem
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but what is the response? in terms of sea lice, the ministry says that is something they are already trying to tackle. they are making moves on a type of cleaner, so—called clean fish, which essentially lets the sea lice they are not able to be effected by that. that is something thatis effected by that. that is something that is trying to be tackled in terms of sea lice but the scottish government says it is very aware of what is going on here and it is trying to look at all the different factors. half £1 million has been put into research on this recently and they are also helping to fund some research as well about trying to help salmon as they make this migratory journey around scottish rivers. it is your first time on news nationwide! great to have you here. thank you very much. paul has been doing it for many times but thank you as well.
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if you would like to see more on any of those stores you can access them on the bbc iplayer and a reminder that we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon live. the north korean leader, kimjong—un, has arrived in russia ahead of a summit with president putin. he travelled to russia on his personal armoured train. the leaders are expected to discuss the future of north korea's nuclear programme in tomorrow's meeting. it's kim jung—un's first visit to russia. he was invited a year ago but has chosen to meet vladimir putin now after talks with donald trump over dismantling the north korean nuclear programme broke down. there are flashing images in this report from steve rosenberg. he'd taken an armoured train to get here. this is kim jong—un's first visit to russia. he's come for a summit with vladimir putin. and, after crossing the border, another first.
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an interview to a foreign broadcaster. north korea's leader told russian tv that on the agenda was solving the problem of the korean peninsular. he is looking quite the statesman these days. two summits with donald trump have ensured that. even if they failed to persuade north korea to give up its nuclear weapons programme. in vladivostok, kim jong—un was treated to a guard of honour. the summits with president putin could end up producing more ceremony than substance. no major agreements are expected. but if the two leaders are seen to get on, it will already be a diplomatic success for both of them. whenever there is a summit with kim jong—un at the table, we've kind of got used to the man
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sitting opposite being donald trump. but this time it will be vladimir putin, and that puts the kremlin leader exactly where he wants to be, centre stage, with russia demonstrating that it is a global player. president putin has not met kim jong—un before, but he has met his father, the previous leader, kimjong—il. as for this summit, what can north korea expect out of it? at the least, moral support and the message is clear to america, if you want to solve the problems of the world you cannot do that without russian help. steve rosenberg, bbc news. ben bland is here — in a moment he will have the business news. first a look at the headlines the funeral has taken place in belfast of the journalist — lyra mckee — the 29—year—old
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who was fatally shot by a member of the new ira during violence in londonderry last week. the chinese telecoms firm, huawei, welcomes reports that the government is to allow it to help build britain's 5g data network, despite concerns over security scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, says she wants to hold a second referendum on scottish independence by 2021 if the country is taken out of the eu. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. boeing has reported lower first—quarter profits today showing that the global grounding of its 737 max plane following two crashes is having an impact. the us aerospace giant reported $2.1 billion in profits, that is down 13.2 percent from the same period a year ago. more on that shortly. and more on huawei. china's huawei says it welcomes reports that britain would allow limited use of its equipment in new 5g networks. a security source said britain will allow the chinese company some restricted access to non—core parts
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of the 5g network, but ban it from installing equipment in so—called core parts of the system. and how about this for a job vacancy? the government has advertised a job to replace mark carney as governor of the bank of england. he steps down from the £480 , 000—a—year post, at the start of next year. for the first time the government has hired a recruitment firm to help with the search. i always offer a seat to an older person on a long journey on a train. he has written something here, some of us get off a seat if someone sees a stunning on a long trainjourney! i'd offer you my seat! we are talking virgin trains because it is a sort of solution to the problem of standing on long journeys. they are proposing to end that completely, no standing ona proposing to end that completely, no
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standing on a long—distance train journeys, by making booking a train more like booking a flight. so, basically, you don't travel. it depends! the argument is the system should be a reservation only so you book a seat in advance on a particular train. so you can'tjust turn up and buy a ticket on the spot? exactly. currently train operators, they almost all accept walk on fares but the argument goes that they have then no control over the number of people getting on a particular train unless it is judged to be unsafe. why are virgin doing it now? there's a big government commissioned review of the rail system and this is part of that submission. it is also proposing breaking up the whole franchise system where firms bid for contracts for a number of years. they said they would scrap peak and off—peak pricing tiers but the unions are saying it would just lead to total chaos. you can call me cynical and you have before but haven't temple nacker just been you have before but haven't temple nackerjust been told they can't
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rebid for the west coast franchise? —— haven't virgin been told? rebid for the west coast franchise? -- haven't virgin been told? this omission was sent in before the decision was made. —— this decision. another point they made was that train operators currently applies to stick to fairly rigid timetables and the virgin group said that lead to some trains being set back the passengers were forced to stand while others run pretty much empty. more online about the ins and outs of why they have been disqualified from bidding for the west coast franchise when it comes up again. we can take stock of some of the other main stories. simon french is chief economist and we mentioned the boeing results. i noticed a moment ago the share price was up despite them saying they were unable to say quite how much the 737 problems would hit their profits. it is a bit ofa would hit their profits. it is a bit of a quandary. this story has been
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running for a while because following those fatal accidents of the 737 max, the boeing share price took a bit of a hit. we have a bit of additional clarity in terms of first—quarter revenues down about a billion and some indication in the ongoing costs of testing the software updates will be a further billion pounds cost. i think the share price response is that there isa share price response is that there is a bit more certainty to enable investors to try to price up the risk of further either litigation or lost orders. and certainly no tears being shed at boohoo or at primark where the results were very encouraging which makes a change of tone given we often say how struggling the retail sector is. yes, the clothing retail sector has been under pressure because shop prices are falling an average of 7% year on year prices are falling an average of 7% yearon yearand prices are falling an average of 7% year on year and therefore a lot of clothing companies just cannot year on year and therefore a lot of clothing companiesjust cannot cope with that kind of price pressure. actually, boohoo and primark are bucking the trend at a slightly lower price point and their profits
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we re lower price point and their profits were up respectively 38% and 25%. definitely a bright spot on the uk high street. and the job ad for the next governor of the bank of england has gone up. i think people have a couple of months to get applications in. who does the city favour and why? the front runner at the moment is andrew bailey who is a current head of the financial conduct authority but there are other candidates. there is a long list of potential candidates. will there be another international candidate? the former head of the reserve bank of india is one of the candidates being spoken about. i think andrew bailey remains the favourite but there is a question of whether, in the first time in almost 350 years, the bank of england will appoint a first female governor. that is one of the things people looking at the slightly longer odds candidates are thinking about. simon, thank you very much. we have been waiting a
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while for a simon who makes sense on this programme! let's look at the markets! the ftse100 is down this programme! let's look at the markets! the ftse 100 is down this afternoon, outperformed by the frankfurt dax. positive results from the big software company, the snp has helped lift the dax. crude oil coming down from the highs it was hitting earlier in the week with concerns about supply limits easing. right. thank you. are you 0k? concerns about supply limits easing. right. thank you. are you ok? i was just resting! that was ben plant in his last broadcast! that's it from your afternoon live team for today. up next is the bbc news at five with ben brown. time for a look at the weather. here's susan powell. after a ll after all the warmth and sunshine it is changeover day with cool air pushing in from the west. the clouds have come rolling in and we are
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going to see more heavy showers through the remainder of the day across parts of finland and wales. a fresh area of showers pushing its way towards the south coast by the evening rush hour and potentially some of our most vigorous thundery downpours targeting part of north wales and spreading into northern england through the latter part of the afternoon and into the early evening. some rain around for wales at this stage and for part of the midlands. some heavier showers eventually for northern ireland and southern scotland. temperatures whilst still in the high teens for people heading home in eastern england but in the west, by 6p, back into the low teens and the feeling is definitely one of the spring rather than summer. —— 6pm. heavy showers in northern ireland in the small hours of thursday, some affecting scotland and heavier showers coming into the south of the uk by the end of the night, particularly in the south—west of finland and wales. pretty breezy across the board also overall, mild enough —— south—west of england. we have warmth coming up from the sa ha ra have warmth coming up from the sahara which has brought dust with
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it so if you see something on your car first it so if you see something on your carfirst thing in it so if you see something on your car first thing in the morning, it so if you see something on your carfirst thing in the morning, that is where it has come from. you might have noticed the colour changing towards the end of the week is the cool air starts to push its way in. on thursday, showers are possible just about anywhere. northern scotla nd just about anywhere. northern scotland getting the best of the dry and fine weather, temperatures across the board continued to edge down with highs even in the best such run of 15 or 16 degrees. again, quite squally winds. perhaps more persistent rain overnight thursday and friday and things come down a little on friday. not shower free but if anything friday should bring more dry spells to the majority of the uk with heavy showers potentially gathering to the south in england and wales on friday afternoon. temperatures again about average for this time of year in the mid—teens. in the west, this is what is waiting for us on saturday, quite a deep area of low pressure. it could be very wet and windy to start
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the weekend but things looked, and drierfor sunday the weekend but things looked, and drier for sunday and good the weekend but things looked, and drierfor sunday and good news the weekend but things looked, and drier for sunday and good news for anyone taking part in this year ‘s london marathon.
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today at five, the funeral of the murdered journalist lyra mckee takes place in belfast. hundreds gathered to celebrate the life of the 29—year—old — one friend told mourners lyra had revealed plans to propose to her partnerjust hours before she died. theresa may — along with political leaders from northern ireland and the irish republic — heard calls for a lasting legacy from the journalist's death. i dare to hope that lyra's murder on holy thursday evening can be the doorway to a new beginning and i detect a deep desire for this. applause the priest was given a standing ovation when he asked why it had taken the death of a 29—year—old woman to bring political parties

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