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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 24, 2019 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news i'm vicki young the headlines at eight. political leaders have attended lyra mckee‘s funeral at st anne's cathedral in belfast, where a priest received a standing ovation for his passionate address for unity. i dared to hope that her murder on holy thursday evening can be the doorway to a new beginning. the death toll rises again in sri lanka — 359 people died in the easter sunday attacks — one of the bombers — who studied in the uk — has been identified. huawei — the chinese telecoms giant — welcomes reports that the government will let it help build britain's 56 data network. but other countries
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have criticised the uk. a lot of countries are looking to what others are doing and i worried that the signal that the uk is sending to others is that this is not really a concern. iran's foreign minister says nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe could be released from jail in a prisoner swap with iranians detained by the us and also coming up before nine o'clock. .. the recommendation‘s come from the world health organization, the first time they've made this kind of recommendation. the funeral service for the murdered journalist lyra mckee in belfast today was transformed into a call for
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the renewal of the peace process. ms mckee was shot dead last week by the republican dissident group new ira. father martin magill was given a standing ovation when he challenged leaders from both sides of northern ireland's religious and political divide who were attending the service. our ireland correspondent emma vardy was there. a modern victim of political violence that many hoped was in the past. thousands lined the streets for lyra mckee, her death uniting protestants and catholics and political rivals. side by side, the leaders of the democratic unionist party and sinn fein, united in their condemnation of the events which led to lyra mckee‘s death. theresa may and labour leader jeremy corbynjoined ireland's president and prime minister. lyra was a person who broke down barriers and reached
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across boundaries. this was her hallmark in life. and this is her legacy in death. lyra is many things to many people... tributes were paid to lyra mckee for her writing and her activism. she campaigned for peace and gay rights. and today, her family appealed for people to embrace her vision for change. we have the power to create the kind of society that lyra envisioned, one where labels are meaningless. and a plea to political leaders. why, in god's name, does it take the death of a 29—year—old woman, with her whole life in front of her? applause. more than two years since the breakdown of power—sharing in northern ireland, a call for them to show this same unity and government.
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i dare to hope that lyra's murder, on holy thursday evening, can be the doorway to a new beginning, and i detect a deep desire for this. 21 years after the good friday agreement, lyra mckee‘s death has prompted a backlash against modern—day dissident republicans, who still try to take northern ireland back to its violent past. the shock of lyra mckee‘s death has been felt widely, but there is also a sense of hope here that it can bring a new turning point, which helps northern ireland move forward. it should have been a thing of the past. it's ridiculous, you know. there's a small minority holding the whole country to ransom, or trying to do it, you know. a young girl's lost her life and i hope there's no more...
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losing their lives after this. if people would only wise up in this country! the celebration of lyra's life also a reminder of how much northern ireland has to lose. well, meanwhile, the police investigation to try to bring her well, we can speak now to father martin magill of stjohn‘s parish, who spoke at lyra's funeral today, and was in emma vardy‘s report there. he joins us live now from west belfast. thank you forjoining us, especially at the end of an incredibly emotional day. for you and the community and we start with lyra and her legacy. such a young woman but she seems to have had an impact already. very much so, especially my thing about her life. she was a very determined and one of the things that, and i'm very clear on is number of people, the number of friends she actually had, but her
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life and her death really has touched so many people. and when you spoke, at that moment where you addressed the politicians who had come together from different parties, from across the divide, people from a different religions as well and you address them and challenge them and said to them, where this is the moment you have to do something to come together.” suppose, i was clearly detecting over the past few days there is a change in mood and your correspondent there touched on that with a sense of, i think lyra's death has given us hope in terms of seeing the reactions and the vigils, to see that right across social media, some of the campaigns that are on the ground, that very clearly there is an appetite for moving forward with peace. there was a standing ovation and those
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politicians all did get up and applied, suggesting that they do agree with you and realise the responsibility that they have to act, but would you like to see them do next? i have no doubt whatsoever that they were to come back and get some sort of talks would they be saying things like, there are difficulties and problems and yes, a lot of us will be very sympathetic to that, the same time, we do want them, we do pay them and we do need them, we do pay them and we do need them to work through this and i referred to seeing the same doggedness to work through all those various mantras. and there is that political deadlock and people in your community are fearful about the apparent rise in violence how are people feeling there in your community? i suppose that is the question, if there is a medical vacuum that allows the opportunity for others to make the most of it,
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but the same time, i am very conscious that i wanted to use this opportunity to make an appeal to those who would use violence, to look around and listen very carefully to the vast majority of people who do not want to go the violent route and that is why i was calling for a nonviolent approach. have you spoken to those politicians privately? before or afterwards to reinforce that message that you gave their publicly? apart from a brief encounter with mcdonald and the bbc, she was in a hurry, i was in a hurry andi she was in a hurry, i was in a hurry and i did not know if i had the chance, i would use any opportunity, i could to encourage them to ask and beseech them to keep working away and break through the deadlock. when you spoke to lyra's family and partner, what do you think they want her legacy to be? very clear and
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listening to her sister, i would have to say, where i was positioned in the cathedral, i could not hear the sound did not come through very well, but nicola really wanted her legacy to be for the people to be who they want to be, a real sense that she really encouraged us to make the most of this opportunity we now have. thank you very much. iran's foreign minister has tonight suggested that the british woman nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe could be released from jail in a prisoner swap with iranians detained in the us and australia. he was speaking at an event in new york where he said he felt sorry for ms zaghari—ratcliffe and had done his best to help her. our dipliomatic correspondent james landale joins me now with the details something that has come to connect
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just come out and the passing minutes. it is unexpected, there is no sort of forewarning of this at all. what is really interesting is the context of this, being held in iranfor the context of this, being held in iran for over three years now for spying accusations that she denies, last month, the british government gave her diplomatic protection, a new status to raise the case on the international stage. since then, the british government had been waiting to see what kind of response would get from iran, there was a fear that the response can be negative in the conditions worse. instead today, this is the first stance of remarks that they have given since then, namely the offer of the deal. people will take some hope from that, however, this does not mean a deal is likely. this does not mean that you will be released. what this does
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is it shows for all the denials before, iran is prepared to use her for diplomatic and political leverage. to get other prisoners out. there are some iranians in australia, germany, the united states the face numerous charges that they said were phoney, it would be willing to exchange. but the problem is, that offer was made six months ago. is it the kind of thing that could work, that does work on other occasions? the kind of prisoner swap, is it something that iran has done for? there is one that is being negotiated in yemen in an attempt to build some confidence there. but these things take a long time, they're very complicated, countries are quite reluctant to do them, particularly if you're talking about many countries involved here, there've been no indications that there've been no indications that the americans will ever be willing to give any prisoners for someone
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who is not there national. i spoke to richard radcliffe, her husband this evening and he said he is surprised by this move.|j this evening and he said he is surprised by this move. i was going to ask if there had been any reaction and the husband has campaigned to keep this in the public eye. constantly and he said that look, the whole, one of the purposes of diplomatic protection given to us was to protect her against this kind of thing and be used as kind of a wider political diplomatic move, they have given a statement saying that it is a pretty bland routine one, including her, it isa bland routine one, including her, it is a priority for the government that will remain concerned about but he will raise them at every level and at every opportunity. thank you james. officials in sri lanka say one
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of the suicide bombers behind the easter sunday attacks, had studied in the uk. eight of the nine bombers have now been identified — one of them was a woman. 359 people are now known to have died in the bombings which targeted churches and tourist hotels. funerals have continued to take place for the victims. clive myrie has this report from the capital colombo. investigators say in this market corner is a investigators say in this market corner is a terror investigators say in this market corner is a terror cell. a car outside has been dusted for fingerprints and inside forensic experts on for clues that shed light on the easter sunday carnage. one of the men who lived here was caught within cctv. minutes before a powerful explosion left several dead, at the hotel. investigators quickly led police to his home, but as they stormed the building, it is believed that his pregnant wife detonated the device killing her and
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three children. in three police officers died. it is not believed to other brothers were also involved in the massacres. —— it is believed that two other brothers. more details of all the bombers, including one man. it is believed that one of the suicide bombers went to the uk and later on in his postgraduate and australia before coming back to sri lanka. most of them are well educated and come from them are well educated and come from the upper middle—class. them are well educated and come from the upper middle-class. from manchester, who was 55, died in the sri lanka attacks in the country on a one day work trip. ijust sri lanka attacks in the country on a one day work trip. i just want to bring her home and everyone who knew her, who had the opportunity to spend time with her and give than
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the opportunity to come together to celebrate this beautiful woman. —— them. it is not confined just to the catholic church, the city at the grand mosque, prayers happen for days including those for the hundreds killed the name of a perverted islam. the rituals remain the same but something has changed here now, there is an undercurrent of fear that there might be christian reprisals in a city that has enjoyed so many years of interreligious harmony. not in our name say the trustees of the mosque, denouncing the bombers as enemies of their faith. we will not accept them, we will not accept them as our
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own. the short walk from the mosque, more of the debt away burial and in this house a woman in her 70s, her daughter aged 50 and another woman in her 60s, christian lives cut short. but in the spirit of reconciliation, mourned by buddhists. the leader of sri lanka's catholic school also paid his respects saying that the bombings left him numb. i lost my people. these were innocent people. these people blasted them to pieces solely because, it is something that i could not grasp or understand. i could not grasp or understand. i could not grasp or understand. i could not understand the rationality of what they did. so many died to that easter sunday, the funerals are stacked. in a land where the
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interreligious and ethnic population is to try to live in peace. the headlines on bbc news. political leaders have attended lyra mckee's funeral at st anne's cathedral in belfast, where a priest received a standing ovation for his passionate address for unity. iran's foreign minister says nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe could be released from jail in a prisoner swap with iranians detained by the us. the death toll rises again in sri lanka — 359 people died in the easter sunday attacks — one of the bombers — who studied in the uk — has been identified. sport now and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's
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just the small matter of the manchester derby this evening — and potential implications of that result on the premier league title race with liverpool fans watching on. after all the build up it's finally underway — about 15 minutes in. ole gunnar solksjaer made 5 changes to united's team after their thrashing by everton on sunday. three changes for city — this is their game in hand — so if pep guardiola's side do win, they would go a point clear of liverpool at the top — and both teams would have three games left to play. there is another match under way as well — arsenal can go fourth with a win at wolves. but the home side have just taken the lead through a ruben neves free—kick. you can follow all the action on radio five live right now — and there's text commentary on the bbc sport website as well. after ronnie o sullivan's exit, judd trump narrowly avoided another shock at the world snooker championship in sheffield. he was trailing the world number 43
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thepchaiya un—nooh by 6 frames to 3 overnight but fought back to level it up at nine all. then in the final frame decider, uh—nooh miscued at a crucial point, allowing trump to wrestle control and win the match. he will play ding junhui in the next round and is the bookies' favourite to lift his first world title after o'sullivan's shock exit to amateurjames cahill. currently in action are english pairjack liz—owski and ali carter, these are live pictures from the crucible theatre. it's currently one frame all. you can watch it via the bbc sport website right now. andy murray could be back in action on court later this summer, according to his motherjudy. murray said in march he was pain—free after hip surgery but that his chances of playing singles at wimbledon this year were "less than 50 per cent". butjudy murray thinks
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there are signs that he's improving. yes, he is almost three months past his surgery, so he was told not to do any impact work which means running around the court and hitting the ball for three months, but he is back hitting the ball against the wall, he is starting from the static position. so it is still early days and we have to wait and see how he does but i think he's cautiously optimistic about getting onto the match court, perhaps over the summer. the atp world tour finals are on the move from london to turin. the tournament has been held in the uk for ten years but will move to italy for four years, from 2021. the event features the world's best eight singles players and doubles teams of the season and will boast a record prize fund of 11.2 million pounds.
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mo farah says winning the london marathon would be one of his biggest achievements. the four—time olympic champion finished third last year but has since set a new european record when winning in chicago. he'll compete against defending champion and marathon world record holder eliud kipchoge of kenya on sunday. iam thinking i am thinking ok, this happened, can ido i am thinking ok, this happened, can i do that in training? there is a lot of stuff to learn and a lot of we have done correctly in terms of training and figuring out faster, slower and just working things out andi slower and just working things out and i am confident that it will happen on sunday. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in sportsday at half past ten. mark on the website.
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the chinese telecoms giant huawei, has welcomed reports that the government is to allow it to help build britain's 5g data network. that's despite objections from senior ministers — who believe it poses a security risk. the us and a number of other countries have also expressed concerns about the security implications of working with huawei. our security correspondent gordon corera reports. the new world of 5g technology promises to transform our lives, connecting millions of devices and enabling everything from driverless cars to smart homes. but it also poses a major security question — should a chinese company be the one to deliver this future? huawei may be best known to most people for making phones, but it's also a leading player in building the infrastructure for all our communications. critics fear that allowing it to build 5g could enable the chinese state to spy on —
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or even switch off — the flow of data we will all depend on. despite some ministers raising concerns, a meeting of the uk's national security council yesterday appears to have given huawei the green light. speaking to me at a conference in glasgow, the uk's top cyber security official suggested the risks from huawei can be managed. whatever final decision ministers reach, we can be confident that it will be a sufficiently tough and demanding oversight regime for all the suppliers, and for our telecommunications networks as a whole. here in glasgow, representatives of the five eyes intelligence alliance are making a rare public appearance. but behind this very public show of unity, there are real divisions about how to deal with huawei, with the us and australia having already decided to exclude the company, and now the uk appearing to look to take a different approach.
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huawei being a company that has to be responsive to their intelligence and military needs presents a threat. and as for five eyes, we're united that that's a threat. so you will see us draw a line and say they can't be in our sensitive networks. the discussions that are going on right now is, where do you draw the line on what's a sensitive network? the expectation is the uk will exclude huawei from the most sensitive core of the new network, but that will not allay all of the concerns. the company itself denies it poses any security risk, as its founder told the bbc earlier this year. translation: we will never undertake any spying activities, and we will never accept anyone's instructions to install a back door. dealing with huawei is about more than one company. it's about how western countries deal with the rise of china and the spread of its technology, and the uk's decision is one
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that will be closely watched at home and abroad. the conservative mp johnny mercer has denied doing anything wrong in accepting a private salary from a company linked to the firm that marketed a failed investment scheme. mr mercer receives £85,000 a year from crucial academy on top of his parliamentary salary. it trains military veterans and has been funded by surge financial limited which marketed a bond scheme that lost investors more than 230 million pounds. the committee which represents backbench conservative mps has decided not to change rules which require a 12—month delay between confidence votes in the party leader. it means theresa may cannot be challenged until december. but the group has demanded the prime minister set out a clear timetable for her departure if her brexit deal is rejected.
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scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon wants to hold a second referendum on scottish independence before the next holyrood elections in 2021. she said scots should have a choice between brexit and a future inside the eu. our scotland editor sarah smith is at holyrood... hoping to appear generous nicola is offering snacks as well as offering ci’oss offering snacks as well as offering cross party talks to her political opponents. she does want another independence referendum within the next two years, but she also wants to invite all parties to discuss more powers for the scottish parliament. across the chamber, are willing to move forward in that spirit they will find in me and equally willing partner. but if all they have to offer the people of scotla nd they have to offer the people of scotland is a failed and damaging status quo, in the process will pass
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them by and support for independence will continue to grow. unionist parties are not convinced that she is looking for consensus and believe voters do not want another scottish referendum. they watched the whole brexit episode unfold in a see that leaving a 40—year—old union has been problematic and has persuaded more people in scotland that trying to leave a 300—year—old union, the most successful that they voted to remain injusta successful that they voted to remain injust a few successful that they voted to remain in just a few years ago is an even more difficultjob. ijust do not think they wanted. the scottish parliament cannot hold a referendum without permission from westminster something that they are not about to grand. nicola knows that it is extremely unlikely that they would allow another scottish referendum within the next couple of years because she is playing a much longer game here. starting a conversation that includes people that do not support independence and how scotla nd support independence and how scotland should be governed, hoping to persuade them that independence would be the best option. the future
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is often debated by the volunteers of this community garden, or brexit has changed some peoples minds on independence. if we end up with a soft brexit, i am not sure that we will be holding a successful independence referendum. if we do crash out, there probably will be another independence referendum. doesn't make it more likely?” another independence referendum. doesn't make it more likely? i think it does, if europe wants scotland to stay and. i think everyone is quite fed up with referendums quite honestly. the s&p know they need to grow support for independence before they throw another vote, they will cultivate a conversation that will persuade people to consider it. figures released today show that government borrowing last year fell to its lowest annual level in 17 years. borrowing for the last financial year was £17.2bn less than the year before,
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but nearly two billion more than the official forecast made in the spring statement. the deficit has also fallen to its lowest level in 17 years. the search has begun for mark carney‘s successor as the governor of the bank of england. mr carney is due to step down at the end of january after six years in the post. for the first time the government is using a recruitment agency to find a successor. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett hello there, the next few days are going to be cooler, wetter days as well, we've had some thunderstorms earlier. there should be easing off so earlier. there should be easing off so wetter weather for a while. some clear skies for a while further south, but again, more showers coming up south, but again, more showers coming up across south, but again, more showers coming up across northern france over the channel into england and wales. pretty mild overnight, court for scotland and northern ireland, the more cloud and showers through
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tonight as well. heading further south as we head towards the rush hour tomorrow, quite a cluster of showers coming into england and wales, particularly heavy rain to the southeast of england, and pushes up the southeast of england, and pushes up to the northeast of england and then to the midlands and he gets very much wetter and northern england. some heavy rain and maybe some sundry downpours as well. sharp showers elsewhere where there will be some sunshine as well. more sunshine to the afternoon the southeast and east anglia, it is temperatures are normal for this time of year. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... political leaders have attended lyra mckee's funeral at st anne's cathedral in belfast, where a priest received a standing ovation for his passionate address for unity. i dare to hope that lyra's murder on holy thursday evening can be the doorway to a new beginning.
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iran's foreign minister has suggested that nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe could be released from jail in a prisoner swap with iranians detained by the us. ms zaghari—ratcliffe been injail in iran for more than three years for spying charges which she denies. the death toll rises again in sri lanka — 359 people died in the easter sunday attacks — one of the bombers — who studied in the uk — has been identified and it's believed he studied at university in the uk. huawei, the chinese telecoms giant, welcomes reports that the government will let it help build britain's 5g data network. let's get more now on the funeral of murdered journalist lyra mckee, which has taken place at st anne's cathedral, in belfast. ms mckee was shot dead
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by a paramilitary group during riots in derry last thursday as she observed clashes between police and new ira dissidents. the event was attended by theresa may, jeremy corbyn, and leaders from across the political spectrum in ireland. during the service, a friend told mourners that ms mckee had revealed her plans to propose to her partner sara just hours before she was murdered. let's listen to some of what was said at the service. the dean of belfast cathedral said miss mckee was a person who worked to bring people together. lyra was a person who broke down barriers and reached across boundaries. this was her hallmark in life, and this is her legacy in death. as a journalist, she pursued truth wherever it took her, never content with the sullen silence of unanswered questions.
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lyra was a child of the good friday agreement. she was a primary school pupil in north belfast when the agreement was signed. she grew up to champion its hope for a society that was free from the prejudices of the past and open to the possibilities of a new future for the peoples of these islands. lyra's sister, nichola corner, paid this tribute to her. we should give credit to lyra's mother, our mother, for ensuring that lyra became the kindest, the gentlest, the most loving person that the world will never forget. let's face it — none of us will ever be the same again. the comments made by father martin magill were given a standing ovation by the congregation.
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he challenged northern ireland's politicians to work together, and told mourners that lyra's death should mark a new beginning for northern ireland. many of us will be praying that lyra's death, in its own way, will not have been in vain and will contribute in some way to building peace here. since thursday night, we have seen the coming together of so many people in various places, and the unifying of the community against violence. i commend our political leaders for standing together in creggan on good friday. i am, however, left with a question — why in god's name does it take the death of a 29—year—old woman,
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with her whole life in front of her... applause. applause. the death of a 29—year—old woman with a whole life in front of her to
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get to this point? that was father martin speaking earlier. more now on the latest from sri lanka, where officials say one of the suicide bombers behind the easter sunday attacks, had studied in the uk. eight of the nine bombers have now been identified, one of them was a woman. 359 people are now known to have died in the bombings which targeted churches and tourist hotels. funerals have continued to take place for the victims. chris phillips is the former head of the uk counter terrorism security office. hejoins me now. thank you for speaking to us this evening, one of the striking things when these attacks happened was there seem to be an incredible high level of coordination, was this a sophisticated attack? yes, this is what we call a multiple coordinated attack. obviously, a group of people have been working closely together
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and closely with bomb makers by the looks of it and a skilled one who has made large devices and all the time to go off at a similar time in history, so what we see here is a group of people that are trained as simple as that. and it's almost certainly they receive training from outside of sri lanka. does that then point to a certain group such as isis, can the people looking into this and the investigations draw that conclusion? i think they probably already know where they have been linked into, could be al-anda, but i think isis seems to be the most likely and of course, this is what likely to happen across the world now because the caliphate has now effectively finished in syria and iraq, and as no other option other than to go into countries to commit terror attacks and that's what we have been saying
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in the uk this could happen over here something of this nature, everywhere in the world has to be prepared and on their game. security services especially, to prevent the sort of things happening. services especially, to prevent the sort of things happeningm services especially, to prevent the sort of things happening. it seems there were windings, that they were told there might be something and evenif told there might be something and even if they had known the targets, is ita even if they had known the targets, is it a country like sri lanka, which has its own problems and civil war, maybe not as easy terrorist attacks, do you think they were equipped to deal with and respond properly to those warnings? actually, i sri lanka are very used to dealing with terrorism, in fact they had been one of the most widely hit by terrorism, but it's always been from the north of the country and within an internal if you'd like. the tamil tigers were extremely bad it terrorist, what we have here of course is perhaps
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people that they had not had their eyes on and these are people who are most were not linked —— linked with the thomas, and they committed —— committed attacks out of nowhere, andi committed attacks out of nowhere, and i think this is a big wake—up call actually for all countries, they need to look at their intelligence services and make sure they are dealing with intelligence properly. the indians it appears had given great intelligence that shouldn't stop this, but it was not acted upon and that will be and that isa acted upon and that will be and that is a huge disappointment for sri lankans and the rest of the world. what do you make up the suggestion that there is a uk link in the sense that there is a uk link in the sense that one of the bombers may have studied in the uk? these terrorists appeared to be quite well off and of course well off people tend to travel, so we should not be surprised that he has been to europe and the uk. in fact, it would be surprising if we don't know something about them across the uk
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within the intelligence network, but it does not mean to say we would had influence on hand now and since he's perhaps been back in sri lanka and becoming a terrorist. sub does will all investigated. but i think the big learning lesson here is all countries should really get on their grain with intelligence services and streamlined them to make sure they're picking streamlined them to make sure they‘ re picking up streamlined them to make sure they're picking up intelligence picking up and make sure they're sharing it well and it'll be a lesson for brexit, we need to keep working with our comrades across the channel to make sure intelligence is not on the collective properly, but used and need attacks prevented. were you surprised that this attack and defence people talking about isis and they had been defeated in the battle ground if you'd like, so if this is a prize? the fact the attacks were taking place not surprised at all because in fact i think people are waiting for it so don't forget ramadan is coming up
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and that's a time often you get spikes in terrorist attacks. he just has that in the last two years, we certainly should not be surprised that attacks take place, in fact they are more likely to take place and probably six months to two years ago when isis were actually still tight —— trying to defend what they consider caliphate. so it's a worldwide problem notjust your opinion, terrorist attacks happen across the world and their security for all the services and they need to keep alert and be aware of the links and types of these networks to make sure we prevent the attacks rather than deal with the aftermath as we are in sri lanka at the moment. christopher, thank you. the former head of uk counterterrorism and security office. the chinese telecoms firm, huawei, has welcomed reports
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that the government is to allow it to help build britain's 5g data network in the face of objections from those who believe it poses a security risk. it's not the first time concerns have been raised about huawei. more than 6 years ago — in october 2012 — a us congresional panel said they believed huawei posed a threat to national security. 6 months later the firm denied spying on behalf of the chinese government. byjuly 2018 huawei had become the second largest smart—phone manufacturer in the but also that year its plans for 5g networks in the us and australia were banned due to fears of espionage — though it denies being controlled by the chinese government, and that its work does not pose any risk of sabotage. a little earlier tonight on bbc news we heard from laura rosenberger — a former us national security council director who explained the complications involved in the development of 5g
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the challenge is how these are constructed number one how you contain parts of the network but number two it's important at the end of the last segment, to note that 5g is going to enable an enormous amount of technological change and development on top of it so it's not just about the 5g capabilities themselves, but what it's going to follow there and i think when they look at the direction that china is taking with the development of many of its technologies, there are real questions about whether that's the future uk wants for its systems. let's get more on this now with director of the china institute at the school of oriental and africa studies, steve tsang who joins me in the studioand i'm also joined by tim stevens, lecturer in global security at king's college, london. first thank you for coming in. steve, what do you make of all of
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this and the relationship that huawei has at the chinese government because there are clearly countries who feel there's a problem where the relationship is one that means the company could possibly be spying on other country. well, can't say whether they will spy for the government are not, but what i can say is it's notjust another chinese company. if the founder of another major chinese company were charged with fraud and detained in canada, awaiting extradition to the us, i don't expect the chinese government to arrest two canadians and had the chinese ambassador to canada confirming those arrests as retaliations to the canadians. some huawei is very clearly a special company in the eye for the chinese government. so why do people have suspicions about the company?
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because it's so incredibly special, and also because for all the times that they have to clarify its ownership and relationship with the chinese government, it has not been able to provide a convincing rate for others. then we had a problem and there is also the issue that ultimately because of the political system in china, anti—chinese company that is required by the chinese government to do something, —— any chinese, the company has to deal it has no choice. turning to you tim, and what can you tell us about the uk government's relationship with chinese companies, because we remember when george osborne was trying to get the chinese involved in investment in the nuclear industry actually theresa may was very concerned about it, do you think the uk government still has this concerns?” it, do you think the uk government still has this concerns? i think it depends on which bits of the
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government you ask. these concerns around the links between for example huawei and the chinese government are not new. we also see concerns in the past with other companies. also abandon some of our allies infrastructure. osborne, you're right, he went on the offensive early on in the coalition government to attract with direct chinese investment in the uk for infrastructure that were mostly nuclear —— nucleotide communications. we have security concerns dan and your right that the homesick secretary at the time teresa may, as far back as 2010 we see particular institutions on the huawei side of the evaluation centre is set up and ask that you precisely with this type of security concerns we air nine years later but yet to be resolved. presumably not rep -- practicalfor be resolved. presumably not rep -- practical for government to freeze out a country like china and those
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companies at. very difficult particularly if you want their kids, because it's cheaper to a large extent and better than the competitors, huawei is good at rolling out infrastructure at a scale to the clients requirements. it's incredibly more difficult because they know there are no obvious competitors and you have other companies like nokia and ericsson who don't do the same job is that in and it's already difficult because you have been in the height of the 4g network, but at the height of the 4g network, but at the same time you want to be a friendly china, particularly given the current geopolitical in europe, and when looking for trade partners internationally, the last thing you really wa nt internationally, the last thing you really want to be doing is annoying the chinese government by excluding one of their stock companies from your network. steve, iwas one of their stock companies from your network. steve, i was going to ask you about the same thing, debate chinese government get irritated when they see and hear country saying they're very suspicious that they are being spied on by companies
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and by the chinese government? mastectomy irritated by that. but then there is also the questions —— then there is also the questions —— the chinese government. there are questions that if the government is concerned excluding huawei from 5g can resolve that's resulted in a chinese government retaliating against the uk on economic trade relationship, that eight of the confirmation that huawei is notjust any other company in china. that is the reason to be very, very concerned about. and tim, do you think there is a way that you can sort of mitigate the risks that you like, people say that they are not allowed to do non—core development, is not realistically a way of saying it means they can be completely safe ? it means they can be completely safe? there is no such thing as perfect security particularly when it comes to telecommunications, and the uk government for a long time has takena the uk government for a long time has taken a very long risk management approach to cybersecurity and this is an issue in
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cybersecurity and you have for example the head of the national cybersecurity centre who is consistently saying we can manage the risks, but that's not the same thing as saying there is no risk. because there is risk but it has to be managed and other partners and government think they can manage it and that's why you get an announcement like today saying 0k, you can manage the risk if theyjust build antennae and the la stations of the like but you decide to exclude from the car because it's a risk to fire. we must leave it there, thank you very much indeed. now when it comes to finding a way of keeping a small child out of trouble, parents increasingly use television, video games and ipads as a way of entertaining them. but new advice from the world health organization says children should not be left to passively watch screens before they are two.
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it is the first time the who has made recommendations on physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sleep for children underfive. dominic hughes reports. a mid—morning play date. in the background, the tv is on, but with the excitement of toys and friends, it goes unnoticed. i find that for him, at this age, he's just not really that interested. but screens, especially phones and tablets, are now a big part of everyday life. she'll sit there and watch upsy daisy on the tv. say daisy. daisy. good girl! this report makes recommendations around activity levels, sleep and screen time, and on this last point, it recommends that for children under two, there should be no passive screen time at all. for children between two and four, it says limit screen time tojust an hour a day, and less is better. pretty colours!
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the report talks about sedentary screen time, when kids are simply plonked in front of the tv or screen. it's my turn now. 0k. but some experts say that's too simplistic a view of what's going on and these mums agree. he doesn't just sit there and so now, there's obviously things going on in his rain at the same time, so in that sense, it's quite useful. i don't know how we'd make the dinner and cook and clean if he didn't have something to watch. i think it's up to you as a parent to decide for your kids what they need and what they... what's best for them, because every child is so different. at age three, just running around the garden is is about as fun as it gets, and that's where concerns over screen time come from. being less active is related to weight gain and illness in later life. parents get all sorts of advice, notjust on screens but on diet, sleep and exercise, but most feel they know what works for their kids. they want to be playing, they want to be outside. i can't get lyra inside some times! i think it'sjust balance,
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that's the most important thing more than anything, so... but that'sjust me! so, we'll see. if she grows up 0k, then we'll report back! there are no plans to update official advice in the uk, which sets no screen time limits that recommends children avoid screens before bedtime. dominic hughes, bbc news, stockport. with me is belinda parmar, technology campaigner and founder of the empathy business, and also i'm joined by dr max davie, officer for health improvement for the royal college of paediatrics and child health. belinda starting with you, it's the kind of fishy parents i think discuss all the time from when children are small to when they are growing up what you make the fact that they decided to get some kind of advice and guidance on this?” think finally we had some guidance,
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but the actual guideline so i really welcome this, i wish they had gone further and got in for children up until age of adulthood when the rain is fully formed, but i think it's right, technology is the digital cocaine at our time and i am a mum i wa nt to cocaine at our time and i am a mum i want to navigate it and i don't have a nswe i’s eve ryo ne want to navigate it and i don't have answers everyone does it differently, and i think this is a brilliant step forward and we need more guidance. what about those is a pa rents would more guidance. what about those is a parents would know best, they know that their child may be out riding out for the entire day so actually sitting down watching something for 45 minutes to an hour is completely fine. it is, if they been running around, iget fine. it is, if they been running around, i get it's up to the parents irun around, i get it's up to the parents i run workshops with parents and schools, and with kids and teenagers as well, and we don't know what we are dealing past that thing. i think what parents want and what they are crying out for a some guidance. ultimately, it is up to parents but we don't want all the responsibility to be on the parent because the fact is we don't have the data. those
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people who say there is not enough research, there isn't that they are right. ultimately, you need to spend time with teenagers to know that it is very difficult getting them off the device and how do we teach our children and baby and social skills if they're children and baby and social skills if they‘ re constantly on a children and baby and social skills if they're constantly on a screen? tending to you doctor max, what do you make at this as someone involved in paediatrics and child health, you think it's right for them to do this? i think it's definitely good to be encouraging active play and social interactions, but we don't think that banning all screen time is practical frankly, we do think like the mothers in the report, that actually most parents make their own decisions and what our guidance actually does give guidance quite clearly. it asks families a series of questions about their own screen time, gives them information and lets them make their own decision. you think it's harmful for babies
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even a plot that is up to the age of two, is it harmfulfor them even a plot that is up to the age of two, is it harmful for them to look at these kinds of ipods or whatever tv for long periods of time? not in itself, there is no evidence of direct toxic effect on the child from screens. so analogies like digital cocaine are not scientifically accurate. however, i think it is true that if you're looking at a screen you're not doing other things, so absolutely true like the mother sat in the report, that kids do want to be outside, so they have the opportunity yet they should be outside playing, but actually screens are not necessarily actually screens are not necessarily a passive kind of one—way street. you can watch a screens with the children, they can interact with them, so it's notjust the kind of screen them, so it's notjust the kind of screen time, it's notjust them, so it's notjust the kind of screen time, it's not just a them, so it's notjust the kind of screen time, it's notjust a passive thing that is precluding everything else. having said that, we did think it's important that particularly
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younger children have regular social contact with adults in order to promote their language and communication skills. we also think it's important that people get good sleep and so we recommend no screens foran hour sleep and so we recommend no screens for an hour before bedtime, so we are getting guidance, we are just not getting rigid rules that frankly people can't stick to it because they had normalised. belinda is that not the point of her parents, they have to accept that i like when we we re have to accept that i like when we were brought up, this is the way of the world and actually teaching children from the end it's a deal at this is probably the late bharat. of course no one is saying to live on a remote island and by devices but we are saying is actual guidance would be nice and help navigating through this. i think like smoking, and the 70s he would go to the doctor and they would start out doctors would say of how a cigarette in a calm you down because we did not have the evidence. now we don't have a correlation and data that we don't have the data we need and it's not longitudinal, but we do have of
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indication, we have a health crisis in this with teenagers, youth suicide rates and tragic cases like molly russell, and what i want is 0k, molly russell, and what i want is ok, we need the data, but should we wait another ten years until he had that? should be late for children to grow up without empathy, i'm not going to do that, all the parents idyllic don't want that. they want actual guidance and we need to get it to them. doctor max, past the point, we don't really know the long—term effects of some of this, daily? a few things, yes there is guidance. we have gotten guidance, there is guidance out there, that's not true to say there is no guidance. second, it's not true that screens are primarily contributing to mental health problems. nasa study on social media recently said it contributed about four —— .4% of variance of well— being it contributed about four —— .4% of variance of well—being contributed by its screen is, the same as eating
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potatoes. this is not, this is a moral panic as they stepped up around screens and how it's robbing children and to be, there is no evidence today that teenagers have less empathy than previous generations. all of this is not true so... generations. all of this is not true so... you have to speak to gps, you have to speak to mental health professionals, you just actually have to spend time with teenagers and not everyone is addicted i agree with that, and no one is saying let's ban technology i like technology from the benefits he gives us. but we need to moderated and we do need advice and i think that's the point, let's not wait for the research let's just bring the children up with empathy and the social skills we want them to have. this is a hot topic i can tell and i know from my own experience but we have to leave it there, so belinda and doctor max, thank you very much. so the children god side, what's the weather going to be like? now it's time for a look
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at the weather with darren bett. the xp days will be cooler early on today they should be easing off wet weather for a while across northern ireland, clear skies for a while for a while further south, but again my shower is coming up across northern france over the channel into england and wales, the amount of a night not as cold as last night for scotland and northern ireland where we have macabre perhaps showers tonight as well. heading further south as they had to the rush hour tomorrow, a cluster i shies coming into england and wales keep your eye on this particularly heavy area of rain in southeast england or the morning pushing its way north into the eastern side of england into the midlands and then afternoon gets wetter and northern england. heavy rain and some thundering down parts to it, if you shop showers elsewhere into the uk where there is sunshine is about my sunshine through the afternoon in the southeast and east anglia does temperature is normal for this time of year.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the death toll in the sri lanka attacks has passed 350. more footage of the alleged attackers has been released. we'll get more details on that. and the political row over intelligence failures is intensifying. most of them are well educated and come from middle, upper middle—class. the uk will use the chinese telecoms firm huawei to supply equipment for its 5g data network — despite being asked not to by the us. political leaders from the uk and ireland have attended the funeral of the journalist lyra mckee.

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