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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 25, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: "a public health time bomb" — a warning from the head of nhs england, as cases of measles quadruple and vaccinations drop. two top sri lankan officials lose theirjobs over a "major intelligence la pse" prior to sunday's bomb attacks, which killed 359 people. good morning. checking out. sainsbury‘s and asda learn the fate of their £14 billion merger this morning. reports say that both supermarkets are ready to accept defeat if the competition regulator blocks the deal.
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manchester city have the premier league title almost within their grasp. they win the manchester derby to go back to the top of the table above liverpool, with just three games to go. this one will go to the wire. good morning. today we have bands of showers all moving north. some of them will merge to give longer spells of rain, which could also be thundery. in between, some spells of sunshine. i will have more than 15 minutes. —— inis sunshine. i will have more than 15 minutes. —— in 15 minutes. good morning. it's thursday the 25th april. our top story: the number of people in the uk who could be at risk of contracting measles is being described as a "ticking time bomb". the nhs says the number of cases in england almost quadrupled last year. the children's charity unicef says more than 0.5 million children in england aren't protected against the highly contagious and potentially fatal disease. it's calling on everyone of all ages to ensure they're fully vaccinated. our global health correspondent richard galpin reports. according to unicef, an estimated 160 million people around the world
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missed out on the measles vaccine in the period from 2010 to 2017, and it says outbreaks of the disease on the rise. there seems to be a global issue of a lack of information, scepticism around different sources of information, and that has meant all around the world we have seen 169 million children between 2010 in 2017 not get the immunisations that they should be having that is still they should be having that is still the case in the uk. 2017, more than 100,000 people died, most of them children, and the problem is not just in developing countries. in the united states, france, the uk and many other wealthy parts of the world, significant numbers of children unprotected. there are many reasons for this. you uk and in other rich countries, it is linked to anti— vaccine messages, which have been spent on social media and they are untrue, but they have led to some people choosing not to inoculate their children. nhs
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england is describing the rejection of vaccines as a growing public health timebomb. sri lanka has admitted it had a "major intelligence lapse", after information was received ahead of the easter sunday bomb attacks which wasn't passed on to authorities. 359 people were killed and more than 500 wounded in the blasts. last night, the us secretary of state, mike pompeo, said there was "every indication" the attacks were inspired by islamic state. ramzan karmali reports. sri lanka, country in the state of shock, and utter confusion. there is also anger, anger at how an indian intelligence warning from the beginning of the month was not properly shared. the president has sucked the defence secretary and inspector general lease. —— of the lease. but lincolns are finding it ha rd to lease. but lincolns are finding it hard to comprehend how little—known
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nationalist group may have unleashed the wave of co—ordinated suicide bombings which led to the carnage of easter sunday. —— of the police. so far, eight of the nine bombers have been identified, including one woman and one who studied both in the uk and one who studied both in the uk and in australia. also, 60 suspects have been invested. the government has said they doubt the attacks would have been successful without the help of an international network, and it is investigating whether the islamic state group, which has already claimed responsibility, was involved in the attacks. political leaders around the world were quick to declare the defeat of the islamic state in syria, but after the attack in sri lanka, it seems the group's total demise is not as clear as once thought. ramzan karmali, bbc news. the duke of cambridge is set meet survivors of the christchurch terror attacks in new zealand, as part of a two day visit
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to the country. prince william's already attended a service for anzac day. later, he'll give a speech at the masjid al noor mosque, where the majority of victims lost their lives. 0ur reporter hywel griffith is in christchurch for us this morning. morning, or evening i am assuming, over there. this is important, isn't it? there was actually request for member of the royal family to come over. yeah, and it is being seen as a sign of support internationally for what people here in christchurch, people across new zealand have gone through and although six weeks have passed, you still get that sense of grief and shock, very rare in some cases, here. now, just in the last two minutes, he's actually left police headquarters in the centre of christchurch and that is where he met some of the lease officers and paramedics were first on the scene on the day of the shooting on march 15. people will have seen the enormous scale of the shootings first hand. he will be meeting, as he said, few of the survivors and a few of those despite so much time
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now having passed still receiving hospital treatment. he may well give his thoughts on what has happened here. prince william came to christchurch eight years ago in the wa ke christchurch eight years ago in the wake of the earthquake that devastated that city, so it is seen as significant that his here following such a human disaster. early on today, there was another side to this visit though, one which we often see royalty represented out. he went to an anzac day service. the anzacs were the australian and new zealand soldiers who fought in the first world war, and today was the anniversary of the gallipoli campaign, the landing, which saw the loss of lives. so is that that they are commemorating today. labour is pledging to reverse cuts to thousands of bus services
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—— iran's foreign minister says the british—iranian charity worker, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, could be released from jail in a prisoner swap. mrs zaghari—ratcliffe was jailed for five years after being convicted of spying charges, which she denies. the country's foreign minister, javad zarif, says he's ready to exchange her for iranians held in the us and australia. labour is pledging to reverse cuts to thousands of bus services across england and wales at a cost of £1.3 billion a year. the party say the policy would be paid for by a vehicle tax, but the conservatives claim labour's plans would slash funding for road repairs. here's our political correspondent, nick eardley. buses are the most popular form of public transport, accounting for nearly 60% of ourjourneys. campaigners say cuts in funding have hit local services hard. if you live ina town, hit local services hard. if you live in a town, you might not notice much difference. if you live in the suburbs, you will have seen fewer buses going to fewer places. if you live in the country, he would be lucky to get any buses at all. campaigners say that since 2010, more than 3000 roots in england and wales have either been cut back or withdrawn completely. labour says
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that local bus services are an important lifeline for many people, so it is pledging an extra £1.3 billion. the idea is that confound new services and hopefully provide a boost for towns and cities. questions overfunding boost for towns and cities. questions over funding are devolved in scotland, wales and northern ireland, so it is up to politicians there to follow suit. labour's plan for england would be funded on the current tax on cars. westminster will distribute money from central pot. the conservatives say they already spend £1 billion per year providing free bus travel but the greens think more cash is needed and the lib dems want bus companies to supply whole networks, notjust roots to make money. buses are crucial public service in a debate about how to make them work for us all. sainsbury‘s and asda will learn this morning if their planned merger is allowed to go ahead. ben is looking at this, it does not look good. no. there were lots of doubts about it. there were lots of
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concerns about a merger between two of the biggest supermarkets in this country, how would limit how much choice we would have go to shop and how it would affect prices, frankly. the regulator said that there were 30 areas in the country where it said that it was worried that competition be affected, so what sainsbury said is ok, well, we will sell off some of those stores to try and alleviate some of those concerns. the big question is whether the regulator thinks that thatis whether the regulator thinks that that is enough. we're talking about 2800 stores altogether, £31 billion worth of sales, more than 231,000 people being employed. the bit that the regulator is worried about is that the combined group will account for nearly £1 in every £3 that we spend on groceries, and so therefore, if the firm had too much
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power, does it have too much influence over prices and competition? that is what the regulator is going to rule on later today. we will find out? i will bring you those findings just after seven a.m.. i suspect there will be quite a lot of legal wrangling off the bat, i suspect that both sides are going to say that if the regulator will now not allowed to go through, we're going to walk away. and what happens at the top? well, it interesting because the head of sainsbury‘s has really pinned his future to this, and also walmart, which owns asda, has also been scouting out who else wants to buy it because it really wants to offload aster, so yeah, lots of change on the way. thank you. if you're a penguin, sticks and stones aren't for breaking bones. if you are a penguin watching the
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programme, they are symbols of love. take a look at these gentoo penguins at sealife london. they're preparing for breeding season. what they do is they grab a stone and give it to the other penguin as and give it to the other penguin as a sign of love. isn't that nice? it is very nice, i think. picked a special stone? well, it is penguin day today, sally. good. we have had a debate this morning. you are not pa rt a debate this morning. you are not part of it. thanks, 0k. no, you can't be everywhere at once. how tall do you think a six—year—old is? that's all. see, i am with you. everyone this morning said they are down there. the point is that it is a statement of the obvious but they do vary in size. there is not a specific size. have you ever been
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very close to a penguin? yes, in south africa, on a beach, very bizarre experience. beautiful thing. they do not smell the best. well, it is probably all the fish. can ijust say, do like penguins hang on a minute, there is a cracking story in the sport this morning. what a cracking game last night, the manchester derby played at old trafford. manchester cityjust manchester derby played at old trafford. manchester city just being absolutely fantastic, the most wonderful team to watch this season. liverpool, who were not playing last night, potentially not winning the league this season despite incredible run of performances and perhaps looking at coming second by one point, and then manchester united, who quite frankly were dreadful. this was the game that manchester city really couldn't afford to lose, their game in hand over title rivals, liverpool. and they were dominant, 2—0 winners over manchester united.
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so they're back to the top of the table, some say they have one hand on the trophy, but both sides have three games left — there is more drama to come. mo farah is involved in a dispute with the double 0lympic champion haile gebrselassie over an alleged robbery at a hotel owned by the retired ethiopian athlete. farah says gebrselassie didn't help him when he had money, a watch, and two phones taken from his hotel room. gebrselassie has responded by saying the allegations "blackmail". judd trump survived a big scare to book his place in the last 16 of the world snooker championship. he's now the favourite to win the tournament after being pushed all the way to a deciding frame by thailand's thepchaiya un nooh. and andy murray is "cautiously optimistic" about returning to action at some point this summer — that's according to his mum, judy. last month, murray said he was pain free after hip surgery, but still rated his chances of playing wimbledon this year as less than 50%.
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i would not, yeah, iwould not, yeah, i i would not, yeah, i would not write him off anytime soon.|j i would not, yeah, i would not write him off anytime soon. i think they will be in appearance at wimbledon, i think that will happen. yes, i agree. 5096 is quite a good statistic, considering what he has been through. the level of determination literally is unbelievable. he was hoping, hey? here's hoping. we have got to talk to carol. the weather is changing after that glorious easter. good morning. good morning, yes, it is. we're going to have rain showers at times, some of those could be heavy with some hail. it is going to turn cooler because as you can see here the milder yellows, we have some south—easterly winds, will be replaced by the south—westerly ‘s. the low front begins to dominate our weather. everything is beginning to move north, moving north across scotland, southern england and. you can see
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how this band continues to journey through the morning across the midlands, into northern ireland, england and southern scotland, whereas the other one moves up into the northern isles, livingston bided skies behind. scotland will be seeing the line's share of the sunshine today. there will still be some showers and some of the showers across wales, the midlands, into the south—west, could prove to be heavy and thundering. temperatures down once again. we're looking at highs of 11 to 15, you might get 16 18 in scotland. —— lion's share. 0vernight, through this evening, you can see the trend, everything still moving northward but a low pressure sta rts moving northward but a low pressure starts to show its hand, coming in from the atlantic with its attendant fund. you can see some rain coming in first thing in the morning, with temperatures like these, even though we have some clear skies, we're not anticipating any with frost. so the brightest skies to start the day tomorrow will be in eastern parts of the south as well, as a low pressure
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comes in, it is going to throw in more cloud some rain. patch in the south but a bit heavier as we move further north and tomorrow as well. as we move from friday and saturday, he was a low pressure moving across the uk, a bit ofa he was a low pressure moving across the uk, a bit of a squeeze on those isobars in the latter part of the night into the morning, we could have gusts of wind across the south—west of england, southern wales, south of england as much as 65 to 75 miles an hour. it will not be as windy in the north of the country but you can see how the rain moves from the west over towards the east and behind it, late in the day, it should lighten up across northern ireland, wales and south—west england, you might catch the odd shower that it is going to feel quite cool on saturday. sunday, we see the dregs of that weather front across the easter start with, there will be some cloud, possibly some
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drizzle as well. it will break up and brighten up, a ridge of high pressure will be across us through the day, so things fairly settled but then we have a weak warm front coming in across the south—west. that will introduce more cloud and again, some shower and drizzle through the day as well. temperatures 11 to 15 if you are running in the london marathon, it should stay dry for you. there will beafair should stay dry for you. there will be a fair bit of cloud at times, some brightness and highs as you can see of 15. thank you very much, see you later. let's look at the front pages. the telegraph leads with a warning from america about theresa may's decision to allow the chinese firm, huawei, to supply technology for the uk's new 5g network. it also has a picture of the four—time olympic champion, sir mo farah, who is alleged to have been involved in a dispute with another athlete at a hotel. the guardian reports that half a million children in the uk are at risk of measles after missing vaccinations. sir mo farah is also on the front page of the times but it focuses on reports that ministers have
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called for an inquiry following an unprecedented leak from highly confidential talks about the chinese telecoms company, huawei. emily lindsay, who was killed in the sri lanka attack, was the picture in the front page. the daily mail looks at a report from the un on the risks of obesity and education problems when toddlers have too much screen time. the paper says that pre—schoolers who are glued to screens also have shorter attention spans. you have your nose in something. trying to get my head around mind—boggling numbers. the headline at the times, a $5 billion head over the privacy investigation. this
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relates to the headlines last year that it had been used to spread russian propaganda before the presidential election. you might remember cambridge analytica bridge in 2016. -- remember cambridge analytica bridge in 2016. —— breach. falling slightly to $2.4 billion without the fine but with it a staggering $5 billion. it looks like a lot of money but remember it is worth $525 billion so just a drop in the ocean as far as its evaluation. facebook says it is sorry and working on solutions. tennis, you like a bit of tennis. atp tour finals coming to an. it has beenin atp tour finals coming to an. it has been in london... it has been very lucrative but the last year,
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attendances were not as high. it has beena attendances were not as high. it has been a huge success. the idea was having a tournament inside the arena that would sell out and people thought it was bonkers but it was a massive success thought it was bonkers but it was a massive success but attendances have dropped. it will go to turin and thatis dropped. it will go to turin and that is because the men will get a lucrative pay rise. the men have negotiated just a tiny bit more than the women, i cannot help myself. turin it is not somewhere you associate with tennis automatically? they have financial backing from the italian government and that is why they got it. so a significant pay
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increase for the men and it was never meant to stay anywhere. it stayed in london for a long time but it was meant to move from one place to another. do you want acute picture. a guide dog finding a new role in life. he is a guide dog to his mate. he directs him to food and water. are they physically attached? when he is leading. good question. while we find the answer to that crucial question... he nudges his friend when he needs help. toby picked up on his mate being scared. so when he was scared he would lie next to him until he was ready to
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move on. more crazy numbers. it is not often i get to talk about the film industry but it is a huge one and the latest avengers sequel... you can tell i am not a superhero fan. it gets a lot of stars in this paper. it sold more advanced tickets in its first 24 hours than any other title in history. it is opening in more cinemas than anywhere before and said to take $1 billion in its first week in the us. but also released in china. can i confess something, i am going to see it tonight. it is three hours long. is it really! do you get an interval? no. you cannot go for a comfort
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break because you will miss half the story. i do not really understand them anyway, i watched the one before it. it is about a big purple dude with a big glove. why aren't you writing these reviews! we will be back to the weather with carole later on. but let's go back to one of our main stories. it's been four days since the horrific attacks in sri lanka on easter sunday, that killed 359 people and injured more than 500. more is emerging about who was behind the bombings. here's what we know so far: police have identified eight out of the nine bombers — all of them sri lankan, one was a woman. one of the attackers is thought to have studied in the uk around 2006, and also in australia. two of the bombers are reportedly brothers and the sons of a wealthy colombo spice trader.
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sri lanka's government has blamed the attacks on a local islamist group called national thowheed jamath. although the islamic state group has claimed responsibility, there's no evidence at the moment of their involvement but us secretary of state mike pompeo has said there's every indication the attack was inspired by the group. joining us now from our london newsroom is nikita malik from the centre on terrorism and radicalisation at the henry jackson society. good morning and thank you for talking to us today. you're welcome. many people are asking why now? why sri lanka after it has managed to put so much violence and behind it. the islamic state is trying to show itself as an international organisation which it very much is.
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it has lost a lot of territory in iraq and syria and one of the reasons why tree link up might have been a target is precisely because of what you were mentioning, it is a soft target. it has gone through a lot of its own sectarian division. even though the briefing indicated this attack was coming, it was god for that reason because it was not seen as a credible threat. ——it was not taken for that reason. the footage released of these fighters pledging allegiance and this attack was many months in the making. 0ne of the individuals involved had a factory, the government had found material, hundreds of kg ‘s to create bombs, earlier this year even
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though they had arrested these individuals, they had not thought it would be linked to the attack we have seen recently. 0n would be linked to the attack we have seen recently. on top of that, one of the individuals was also preaching on social media and had an act if youtube channel so the signs of wear that but unfortunately it was not put together to indicate the level of horror we have seen over the weekend. the government in sri la nka the weekend. the government in sri lanka previously blamed national thowheed jamath, now a.s. is seen as the perpetrator. what can you tell us the perpetrator. what can you tell us about national thowheed jamath and about the bigger picture with is. national thowheed jamath it is a splinter group from a much larger organisation in sri lanka. the muslim population in sri lanka is very small. national thowheed jamath
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actually expelled the preachers that we re actually expelled the preachers that were preaching very radical ideas from their larger group. they were so violent, they were almost in line with islamic state and this is essentially what we will see happening in the future, this international threat. we will see probably a resurgent in southeast asia and south asia, as we have seen attacks in europe but while security is getting better in europe, there is getting better in europe, there isa is getting better in europe, there is a threat where international places of religion and churches and christmas markets and concerts are increasingly going to be threatened around the world and that will require greater global intelligence sharing, it will require greater global security perspective and picture which perhaps we have not
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been very good at previously. thank you very much for talking to me this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. business experts say predictions of a major exodus of london city workers to frankfurt haven't yet materialised amid continued brexit uncertainty. germany's fifth biggest city, regarded as the main rival european financial hub, is currently expanding its stock exchange. it markets itself as an attractive alternative to london. 0ne analyst told us the transfer of staff here may not have happened as expected but it was only a matter of time. now i think it is more of the planning than the real situation of people leaving london. the longer
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this process is going on, the more people will be uncertain and will go to frankfurt and paris where the financial sector is important. after ten days of action, the extinction rebellion campaign group will end their protests this evening. the group have occupied key parts of central london including parliament square and oxford circus, with over a thousand activists arrested. they're planning a closing ceremony this evening and have thanked their supporters. the rspca says it it received more than 2000 calls about exotic animals in capital last year. in one incident a londoner in kensington woke to find a snake in their bed. the charity believes the number of calls relating to more unsual pets it's because owners do not research their needs and don't understand the care that they need. let's take a look at the travel situation now: severe delays on thejubilee line otherwise a good service.
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turning to the roads then — traffic on the a13 is building w/bnd from dagenham into barking the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. in central london — bloomsbury street is down to one lane at high holborn for gas main works. finally, there are various events taking place for anzac day , with whitehall closed at around 11:00 for wreath laying good morning, another drop in temperature today, set to feel cooler and wet weather around for most of us in the form of early reign clearing northwards of them through the afternoon some scattered showers but also some decent spells of sunshine as well. a bit of a mixed picture but a mild start to the morning. the early reign mostly towards the east. the cloud thinning and breaking. good spells of sunshine for the second half of the day but also one or two showers and the odd flash of lightning also. 14 degrees celsius two and the
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afternoon. a drop to where we were yesterday. through this evening and overnight, one or two showers but set to clear. a sunny start to friday and it will feel slightly cooler tonight as well. tomorrow, mostly dry. 0ne cooler tonight as well. tomorrow, mostly dry. one or two showers as we head through the second half of the day then saturday very windy but mostly dry for the london marathon on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. good morning. it's 6:31am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: young women are more likely to go for a wax than a cervical examination.
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we'll ask if training beauticians on the subject could help stop the decline in attendance rates. for the past three years, no chicks have survived at antartica's second biggest breeding ground for emperor penguins. scientists tell us melting sea ice could be to blame. iam i am excited about this. the big james bond alert for you fans out there. also this morning, daniel craig has already confirmed he'll play bond one last time. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories on bbc news. more than 0.5 million children in the uk have not been vaccinated against measles, according to new analysis by umccr. the charity warns that being left unprotected against measles could lead to disability and death. it says misinformation and a lack of access to jabs has led to inadequate vaccination rates globally. sri lanka has admitted it had a "major intelligence lapse", after information was received ahead
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of the easter sunday bomb attacks, which wasn't passed on to authorities. 359 people were killed, more than 500 wounded in the blasts. last night, the us secretary of state mike pompeo said there was "every indication" that the attacks were inspired by islamic state. well, eight britons were killed in the attacks. mark campbell, the son of one victim. lorraine campbell, has been speaking to the bbc about his mum. it was a mix. part of it was shock and disbelief on the other part was ijust and disbelief on the other part was i just felt for the person telling me because the person telling me did not want to tell me, of all people and to my mum, i was her world. so to have to tell me that she didn't make it would have been really hard. the duke of cambridge is meeting survivors of the christchurch terror attack and theirfamilies in new zealand. prince william will spend two days in the country. he's already attended a service for anzac day. later, he'll give a speach
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at the masjid al noor mosque, where the majority of victims lost their lives. iran's foreign minister says the british—iranian charity worker, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, could be released from jail in a prisoner swap. she was jailed for five years after being convicted of spying charges, which she denies. the country's foreign minister says he is ready to exchange her for iranians held in the us and australia. a reward of up to £10,000 has been offered for information about the murder ofjournalist lyra mckee. ms mckee, who was 29 years old, was shot dead by a dissident republican group last thursday in londonderry, and hundreds of mourners attended her funeral yesterday. the crimestoppers charity said the cash was available to anyone providing information which directly led to an arrest. labour is pledging to reverse cuts to thousands of bus services across england and wales at a cost of £1.3 billion a year. the party says the policy would be paid for by vehicle tax,
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but the conservatives claim labour's plans would slash funding for road repairs. sainsbury‘s and asda will learn this morning, in about 25 minutes, if their planned merger is allowed to go ahead. the competition regulator will give its final verdict on the deal, which would potentially create the uk's biggest supermarket chain. both companies have agreed to sell some stores and cut prices for customers but the watchdog in charge previously said it has "very significa nt" concerns. those are the main stories this morning and sally is going to tell us morning and sally is going to tell us all about the big local derby that had implications. absolutely, it had big implications for all of the premier league last night. manchester united and manchester city simply could not afford to lose it and they didn't. this was a game in hand over their title rivals, liverpool. they beat manchester united convincingly to move back to the top of the league.
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with the finale hurtling interview, this was a finale with a twist. the many fans, it felt like a no—win situation. get a result against manchester city and they will be handing rivals liverpool an advantage in the title race. losing their rivals will be on course for another league triumph. united desperately needed to restore some pride, marcus rashford repeatedly posing a threat. city's best moment ina posing a threat. city's best moment in a goalless half carved out by raheem sterling and only denied by david de gea. but the champions have won ten league games and a low for a reason. bernardo silva giving them the lead they crave. at this stage, manchester united was still in but jesse lingard then blew a golden chance to equalise before substitute there were sunny extended city's league. the manager or too aware
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that once again he should have done better. united, their hopes of top full place in jeopardy. better. united, their hopes of top full place injeopardy. city better. united, their hopes of top full place in jeopardy. city back on top with what could prove a decisive win and dream of retaining the title within touching distance. so manchester city now back in front for what has been surely the most relentless title race in premier league history. neither city nor liverpool has lost since january. let's look at how the table looks this morning — city with their 11th straight win going back to the top, and crucially now have played the same number of games as liverpool. these are the remaining games — two at home for liverpool, two away for city. —— with the form that both sides are in, you'd expect both sides to win all three. if that were to happen, this is how they'd finish the season. liverpool would miss out byjust one point, with a points tally that would have comfortably won them the title in pretty much any other season.
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arsenal missed out on the chance to strengthen their claims on a top four place after being comfortably beated by wolves. three first half goals at molineux put wolves out of sight — ruben neves with the pick of them. it finished 3—1, the first time that wolves have beaten arsenal in any compeitition since 1979. —— competition. the race for the top four goes on. mo farah is involved in a dispute with the double olympic champion haile gebrselassie, over an alleged robbery at a hotel owned by the retired ethiopian athlete. speaking ahead of sunday's london marathon, farah described a robbery at the hotel gebrselassie owns in the ethiopian capital, addis ababa. he was disappointed with the response. training has gone well and everything else but there was just a slight problem with the hotel i stayed in ethiopia, where someone the hotel went to my bag, took my money, took my nice present, just to be honest it is haile gebrselassie's
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hotel, when you stay there for three months, it is very disappointing to know that someone that has that hotel could not support, would not do nothing. they could not do nothing, so just very disappointed, ijust nothing, so just very disappointed, i just have to say. well, those comments prompted an angry response from haile gebrselassie, who immediately released a statement accusing farah of "disgraceful conduct". gebrselassie also accused farah of "blackmail" and "defaming" his reputation and business. a spokesperson for mo farah says he disputes all of these claims, which are an effort to distract from the robbery, he says. after ronnie 0 sullivan's exit, judd trump narrowly avoided another shock at the world snooker championship in sheffield. he was taken to a deciding frame bt the world number 43 thepchaiya un—nooh by 6—3 frames overnight, but fought back to level
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it up at 9—9. uh—nooh miscued at a crucial point, allowing trump to wrestle control and win the match. he will play ding junhui in the next round and is the bookies's favourite to lift his first world title. well, staying with tennis and three months, after having major hip surgery, we have an update on the fitness of andy murray. his motherjudy says he could even play in matches this summer if everything goes well, having spent most of the year up to now taking it easy. he has been back hitting the ball against a wall, he has been hitting from a static position, so it is still early days and we have to wait and see how he does but i think he is cautiously optimistic about getting back onto court perhaps at some point over the summer. getting back onto court perhaps at some point over the summerlj getting back onto court perhaps at some point over the summer. i feel little bit sorry duty there because you can see she is trying not to put herfootin you can see she is trying not to put herfoot in it, she is saying yeah, we really optimistic that things are going well. he is hitting the ball from the study session, that is early days but it is good. wouldn't
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it be brilliant, wouldn't it be terrific? it is hope. and i would be willing to bet he has not lost any of his hunger. no, not at all. when we reported that he was having this operation, there was a real sense of doom and gloom and everyone was saying well, how can you come back from that? that is it. he never thought that, he has such a strong mental attitude, i think he always thought had the surgery, let's come back. we will extend the invitation i think, if any my would like to come and chat to us, always welcome stop by the invitation is permanently there. yeah. very good, see you later on. thank you. thanks forjoining us. climate change has been very much in the headlines in the last few weeks and the green party could capitalise on that ahead of next week's local elections in england and northern ireland. but what can the party deliver in terms of other policies? let's speak now to their co—leader jonathan bartley, whojoins us from our westminster studio.
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very good morning to you, thank you for your time this morning. thank you. ijust wonder if for your time this morning. thank you. i just wonder if you can for your time this morning. thank you. ijust wonder if you can give us you. ijust wonder if you can give usa you. ijust wonder if you can give us a picture, what sort of numbers as the green party putting forward in the local elections? we have a record number of counsellors on a record number of counsellors on a record number of councils. i expect us record number of councils. i expect us to make records in may. we are very clear that when you have a green in the room, on the table, it is the most powerful vote that you can cast right now. we cannotjust rest on our laurels, we have to work for every seat that we get. so when you get a green elected, you know that they are going to work every vote that they get in their community. having said that, why is it that you have not had greater success previously? well, actually, we are having great success. there isa we are having great success. there is a green wave happening right now in the back of the new awareness about climate change right across europe. your polling is the biggest kafer main party in the european elections, we are polling more than a record—breaking 2015 general election when it comes to
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westminster elections, so watch this space because things are changing. —— remainer. i imagine there are quite a lot of angry people around at the moment, what are you finding? yeah, we're travelling up and down the country to places like trafford, worcester, speaking to people, and there is this feeling of a plague on all your houses when it comes to westminster. there seems to be something quite different about the green party because we have that kind of voice of truth, as we saw with the extinction rebellion protests that have been going on, there is this kind of crying out for there is this kind of crying out for the truth to be told. people trust the truth to be told. people trust the green party to tell the truth, to give the real situation what we need to do, and so i think the other parties are getting short shrift on the doorstep, people are turning to the doorstep, people are turning to the greens of the truth will vote.|j think if you are looking back to see what you actually do deliver, they might look back to brighton and just familiarise people what happened there. 2011, the green party, it became your first counsel that you
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are in charge of, that you lead, then later, 2015, you lost the council to labour, so there was a moment in time when we're talking about there it could have been tested, people saw what the green is about, they were in charge of a local council and yet they were not convinced because you were not re—elected. —— greens. so possibly, you are not delivering as you suggest. well, do watch what happens in maine brighton because i think there might be quite a surprise there. absolutely right, we never had overall control of the council, we are a minority administration and we are a minority administration and we had labour conservatives fading together against the greens and again some of the bold policies that we we re again some of the bold policies that we were putting forward. —— we had labour and the conservatives. watch what happens in brighton, i think it will be exciting in may. do you think that the green party has been superseded by groups like extinction rebellion, you have that protest feel about them and very much garnet
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the headlines in the green party is now seen as behind the curve?” don't think so. i think very, very clearly, the green party has been on the right side of history every time. the green party has set the agenda over so many issues, not least climate change but also a living wage, air pollution, the issues we have been talking about the long time and they are now up the long time and they are now up the agenda because the green party has paved the way things like, this can happen, because wejust had has paved the way things like, this can happen, because we just had the westminster meeting with greta thunberg, the 16—year—old activist from sweden. the thing about what you are saying there though is that other people might look at this and see it very differently, which is that these protesters have over a very short period of time brought about some real thinking & change and michael gove, for example, saying we will have to think about it now whereas the green party, as you rightly say, been going on about this a very long time on the right side of the argument but not getting the results. it seems other people
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seem to have a direct route to getting things done quicker and better. let me tell you a lot of green party counsellors, including myself, were there with extinction rebellion. i was at marble arch, waterloo bridge, getting arrested. this is something that many green party members have done, getting arrested at tracking sites around the country. we believe that you have to put your body on the line, but you also have to fight on different fronts, legally through the courts, and also politically and to direct action. we are seeing something very, very special happening right now, there is a new awareness and it is because of all of us working together. we have a lwa ys of us working together. we have always been open to working with others and using alternative methods, we have never been tribal about our politics. it is when we're sitting on the streets that we actually going to see the change that we desperately need. thank you very much for your time this morning, jonathan bartley is the coleader the green party, speaking to us in westminster this morning.
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—— of the green party. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. we will turned colder over the next few days and it will also turn more unsettled with rain and showers. that is more or less what we have today. still mild and across our shores compared to where we should be. but the coming in will change the wind direction and you can see the cooler blues coming our way. two bands of rain moving north, one across scotland and one across southern england and wales. the first one pushes up into the northern isles, clear in scotland, the next one through east anglia, northern ireland and eventually into southern scotland stop the lion share of sunshine to the east where you could get temperatures of up to
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18 degrees. the second weather front, still some sunshine and showers and some showers likely to be heavy and possibly thundering, especially in wales, south—west england and the midlands. 13—15. through the evening and overnight, you can see the migration of the first band of rain heading off then another pressure coming in from the west introducing more cloud and by the end of the night we will see rain to scotland and the west of northern ireland. we not expecting any with the frost. in the eastern pa rt any with the frost. in the eastern part of the south, first thing tomorrow, dry and bright start but before the low pressure moves in it will not be long flowing and some rain and cloud. temperatures, 13—16 with a noticeable breeze stop at the centre of the low pressure crosses our shores, it will bring
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strengthening winds. look at the squeeze across wales and the southern half of england. gusts of between 55 and 65 miles per hour by the end of the night through south wales. every saturday the wind will start to ease stop in the north the wind will not strong anyway. this band of rain from west to east. behind it, northern ireland, wales, the southwest, one ought to showers but it will bright enough but it will feel cool. the dregs of the weather front in the east on sunday, potentially producing some drizzle at the cloud will break up with brad spells developing as a bridge of high pressure across us. another low front from the west coming in introducing low cloud and some drizzly and damp conditions. for the london marathon we think it will stay dry with a fair bit of cloud some brightness at time. the
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temperature in london 15 degrees. i have a wedding to go to on saturday, can you fix it? don't ask, don't get. it has revolutionised the way we travel and where we stay when we go away, but not everyone loves airbnb. ben's been looking at why. airbnb launched in 2008, as a platform for people who wanted to rent out their spare room. it put them in touch with travellers looking for somewhere cheap to stay. since then, the business has become enormous with over 6 million listings worldwide. according to some numbers we've crunched, it's dominating some city centres. as you would expect, london has the most listings. currently 80,000 properties are listed in the capital. this has increased fourfold since 2015. but edinburgh has also seen a big increase. it's listings more than
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doubling in just two years. more than 20% of the listings are from so—called professional hosts. 0nes with 5 or more properties. that has led to criticisms from a number of quarters, not least more traditional letting companies. we area we are a local agent, i employ local people, we have high standards, we have emergency phone line, we are at hand to help guests if they get into issues. where we are different to airbnb ‘s we tend to let homes to people for slightly longer periods and sometimes i think issues are more likely — though not always the case — when people stay in homes for very short periods of time. kate stinchcombe—gillies is an independent travel expert and joins me now. irain i rain through some of the
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background of airbnb and it is a name most of us would have heard by the end effect it has had on the rent market is huge. it was created asa rent market is huge. it was created as a disruption ten or so years ago. some guys tried letting some beds out during a conference and look at where we are now. it has disrupted how we travel. it has opened up the will to people who cannot afford to travel in some places. it has allowed people to find accommodation in places they could not have before. you have rented out a room in your house but have also travelled in other people ‘s houses so you see both the benefits from those renting and staying. is it some of the criticism affair? that too many professional organisations are getting in? my experience of it
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was as it wasn't born to be. renting a spare room to people who were passing through and staying in a spare room when i was passing through a centre although i have stayed in apartments as well. it has involved and become a commercial entity. it is a global and financial entity. it is a global and financial entity. larger organisations in the letting space are using it as a marketing platform. it has global audience. we have spoken to airbnb and have disputed some of the calculations in terms of how many of these professional landlords there. but the way it has allowed people to travel and we were talking about it this morning, something like ebay was established as something for us to sell spare things but now commercial organisations use that. it is just the way it works. that is
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an interesting analogy because ebay and amazon have evolved into a platform with wider offerings and it will be interesting to see if airbnb go down that route although it looks like they will open a studio in hollywood and make inspirational travel shows so they might stick to the travel route. they want people and to offer them experiences and thatis and to offer them experiences and that is why they have focused on that is why they have focused on that experience. to live like a local experience is a phrase coined yea rs local experience is a phrase coined years ago and it has stayed. that is the offering and that is how they leverage the host as a destination. whether or not you see the host is different these days. more people can go to more places because it might be cheaper to do so and you can see why maybe letting agencies
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do not like it. professional hotel companies do not like it but ultimately it is the consumer that winds. it is and it is enabling. 0riginally, whether you are a homeowner or not you could use it. they wanted to allow people to see the world that way. it is really super simple but let's not be delusional, anybody can take that and scale it and take it to a professional and commercial level. so interesting to see where it heads to next. thank you for explaining that. the latest at seven o'clock. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london news. i'm tolu adeoye. business experts say predictions of a major exodus of london city workers to frankfurt haven't yet materialised amid continued brexit uncertainty. germany's fifth biggest city, regarded as the main rival european financial hub, is currently expanding its stock exchange. it markets itself as an attractive alternative to london. 0ne analyst told us the transfer of staff here may not have happened as expected but it was only a matter of time. now i think it is more of the planning than the real situation that people are really leaving london. the longer this process is going on, the more people will be uncertain and will go to frankfurt, to paris and all the other places where the financial sector is important. after ten days of action, the extinction rebellion campaign group will end their protests this evening. the group have occupied key parts of central london including parliament square and oxford circus,
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with over a thousand activists arrested. they're planning a closing ceremony this evening and have thanked their supporters. the rspca says it it received more than 2000 calls about exotic animals in capital last year. in one incident a londoner in kensington woke to find a snake in their bed. the charity believes the number of calls relating to more unsual pets it's because owners do not research their needs and don't understand the care that they need. let's take a look at the travel situation now: minor delays on the piccadilly road otherwise a good service. turning to the roads then — traffic on the a13 is building w/bnd from dagenham into barking the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. in central london — bloomsbury street is down to one lane at high holborn for gas main works.
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finally, there are various events taking place for anzac day, with whitehall closed at around 11:00 for wreath laying at the cenotaph. hello, good morning. another drop in temperature again today. it is set to feel cooler and there will be some wet weather around for most of us as well, in the form of early rain, that's clearing its way northwards, them through the afternoon some scattered april showers, but also some decent spells of sunshine around as well. a bit ofa of sunshine around as well. a bit of a mixed picture really today but it's a mild start today but it's a mild start to the morning. that early rain is mostly out towards the east. it's clearing northwards. the cloud will thin and break, where we've got it, to give us some good spells of angus sunshine around —— sunshine around for the second half of the day but also one or two showers, perhaps the odd flash of lightning too. temperatures between 12 and 14 degrees celsius to end the afternoon —a degrees celsius to end the afternoon — a drop on where we were yesterday, with a moderate southerly breeze. through this evening and overnight, there could be one or two showers
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but they're mostly set to clear away. clear skies into tomorrow morning so it should be a sunny start to friday and it will feel slightly cooler tonight as well. lows between six and eight celsius. tomorrow, mostly dry. there could be one or two showers as we head through the second half of the day and then saturday rather wet and very windy. but mostly dry for the london marathon on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today: "a public health time bomb" — a warning from the head of nhs england, as cases of measles quadruple and vaccinations drop. two top sri lankan security officials are sacked over a "major intelligence la pse" before sunday's bomb attacks, which killed 359 people. very cute, yes, but not all animals make good pets. we'll look at the rise in exotic animals being abandoned and neglected.
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good morning. the deal is off. asda and sainsbury‘s are blocked from their planned merger plans after the regulator says it would harm competition. i will speak to the man who made that decision. manchester city have the premier league title within their grasp. they win the manchester derby to go back to the top of the table above liverpool, with just three games to go. this will go to the wire. good morning. today we have a day of sunshine and showers. as the showers move north, some of them will be heavy and boundary and it is going to feel cooler. i will have more in 15 minutes. —— thundery. good morning. it's thursday the 25th april. our top story: the number of people in the uk who could be at risk of contracting measles is being described as a "ticking time bomb". the nhs says the number of cases in england almost quadrupled last year.
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the children's charity unicef says more than 0.5 million children in england aren't protected against the highly contagious, potentially fatal disease. here's our global health correspondent, richard galpin. according to unicef, an estimated 160 million people around the world missed out on the measles vaccine in the period from 2010 to 2017. and it says outbreaks of the disease are on the rise. there seems to be a global issue of a lack of information, scepticism around different sources of information, and that's meant all around the world, we've seen 169 million children between 2010 and 2017 not getting the immunisations that they should be having, and that is still the case in the uk. in 2017, more than 100,000 people died — most of them children — and the problem is notjust in developing countries. in the united states, france, the uk, and many other wealthy parts of the world, significant numbers of children are unprotected. there are many reasons for this. here in the uk and in other rich countries, it's linked
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to anti—vaccine messages, which have been spread on social media and are untrue. but they've led to some people choosing not to inoculate their children. nhs england is describing the rejection of vaccines as "a growing public health timebomb". richard galpin, bbc news. sainsbury‘s and asda were expecting news, well, we have had the news right now. ben has got this. this proposed megamerger. yes, the deal is off. regulator has blocked sainsbury‘s and asda from merging and they say that is on competition grounds. we've just got the news through and they have said that they have found that customers would be worse off as a result of this deal, but price rises could not be guaranteed and that there would be a reduction in quality. ijust want to bring you this statement from the head of the competition regulator,
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i'm going to speak to him in about 45 minutes he won breakfast. he says it is our responsibility to protect the millions of people who shop at asda and sainsbury‘s every week. —— here on. we found that they would have two choices, reduced choice and price were poor shopping experience all uk consumers. what is the rationale behind that? basically, this is a deal that would make asda and sainsbury‘s a combined group, the biggest supermarket group in the country. they would have is an astonishing numbers, it will far exceed the numbers that we have seen tesco and put it into first place. the concern though is for what it would mean for staff in terms of price rises, sainsbury‘s promised to close a number of stores, it had promised also price guarantees on a number of products of the scale of this is what had really concerned the regulator, employing nearly
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people, combined sales worth £51 billion. so the regulator says this deal cannot go ahead because it is worried about competition and the effect that it would have on customers. ben, thank you very much. we will catch you up on some more of the details. we'll be speaking to the details. we'll be speaking to the head of the regulator in 45 minutes and we will put questions to him as well about why he was so worried about this. thank you. the time now is 7:05am. investigators in sri lanka say they now think it is highly likely the islamic state group were involved in last sunday's attacks, which killed 359 people. 359 people were killed. more than 500 wounded in the blasts. officials say it's unclear whether the group planned and carried out the attacks, or if the bombings were inspired by them. eight britons were killed. mark campbell, the son of one victim, lorraine campbell, has been speaking to the bbc about his mother. ijust want i just want to bring my ijust want to bring my mum home and
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i want to give everyone who knew her, who had the opportunity to spend time with her and get to know, like we alldid, spend time with her and get to know, like we all did, give them the opportunity to come together and celebrate this beautiful woman. for the latest, let's speak to our news correspondent nick beake, who is in colombo for us. we're hearing just the awful impact this has had on so many people, but still in the country, they are on high alert at the moment. good morning, yes, they are and i am afraid to say there are more security alerts you in the capital this morning. we're hearing that the central bank is now in lockdown, there are fears of a possible exposure nearby, we're also getting information that key road near the airport has been sealed off after they found a suspicious vehicle. about an hour and a half ago, there was a blast to the east of the capital, but to stress there were no reports of any casualties or of anyone being injured there. that
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particular blast took place on some va ca nt particular blast took place on some vacant land next to magistrates' court. we do not know yet whether it was a controlled explosion carried out by those bomb squad specialists are whether the device itself detonated. all this feeds into the continuing sense of unease for sri la nka continuing sense of unease for sri lanka and is trying to go about their business. of course, so many families are trying to bury their dead, so many people killed last weekend. in terms of the investigation here, nearly 60 people have been arrested and we are told 7000 members of the military are now involved in a manhunt, they are trying to find any surviving embers of the terrorist cell that struck with such devastation at the weekend. —— sri lankans. with such devastation at the weekend. -- sri lankans. thanks very much. and just to reiterate what he was saying, we're hearing the news that sri lankan central bank workers have been told to remain in the headquarter building in colombo after being warned of an exposure nearby. 0f after being warned of an exposure nearby. of course, the country is still on high alert. we'll keep you up—to—date on any updates there of
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course, throughout the morning. the duke of cambridge is set meet survivors of the christchurch terror attack in new zealand, as part of a two day visit to the country. prince william has already attended a service for anzac day. later he'll give a speech at the masjid al noor mosque, where the majority of victims lost their lives. 0ur reporter hywel griffith is in christchurch for us this morning. very good morning to you. tell us a bit more about what we know about this stage of their trip. the prince has already been to the police headquarters here in the centre of christchurch, the new zealand city. he got to meet some of the police officers and first responders who went to the scene on the 15th of march and will have seen devastating scenes of the mosques. we spoke to them about how they were feeling mentally, how they were dealing with those kind of traumatic scenes and gave them a message of support, saying that he came on behalf of the
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queen but also as a friend of new zealand to offer a hug of support, we are told. earlier on in the day, he was also in auckland for the moyle service. the anzacs are the australian and new zealand servicemen. today the anniversary of the gallipoli landing, where thousands of those soldiers their lives in modern—day turkey. for the moment, thank you. iran's foreign minister says the british—iranian charity worker, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, could be released from jail in a prisoner swap. mrs zaghari—ratcliffe was jailed for five years after being convicted of spying charges, which she denies. the country's foreign ministerjavad zarif says he is ready to exchange her for iranians held in the us and australia. labour is pledging to reverse cuts to thousands of bus services across england and wales at a cost of £1.3 billion a year. the party says the policy would be paid for by vehicle tax,
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but the conservatives claim labour's plans would slash funding for road repairs. here's our political correspondent, nick eardley. half of all local authorities in england and wales have no publicly funded legal aid to help people facing homelessness or evictions. that is according to analysis by the law society, which represents solicitors. legal aid may not sound sexy but it is important and for those facing homelessness or challenging evoke landlord, it offers vital support. the law society's map shows 184 local authorities have no legal aid service provider and a further 81 have just one. whole counties, such as suffolk, have no provision and in cornwall, one housing law firm serves a population of over 0.5 million, spread across 1300 square miles. that can mean those on low incomes, facing logistical and
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costly travel challenges. 21 million people in our country living a local authority area where there no housing legal aid solicitor. the impact of not being able to get to expert advice when perhaps you are facing homelessness is incredibly terrible for individuals, and these individuals are sometimes the most vulnerable in our society. the society says pay rates have not increased in 20 years, forcing solicitors to give up legal aid work as it is not economically viable. the government says it is misleading to compare legal aid's services to local authority areas is that is not how provision is set and people can be by nearby providers, all over the phone if they can't travel. the message to politicians was clear — the death of lyra mckee
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must not be in vain. that was delivered by father martin magill, who was speaking at the funeral mass of the 29—year—old journalist, who was killed by the new ira last week. leading figures from across the political divide gathered to hear those closest to lyra pay tribute to her. we have all been changed by the events of last thursday. we have the power to create the kind of society that lyra envisioned. 0ne power to create the kind of society that lyra envisioned. one where every single person is valued. many of us will be praying that lyra's death, in its own way, will not have beenin death, in its own way, will not have been in vain and will contribute in some way to building peace here. i am, however, left with a question.
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why in god's name does it take the death of a 29—year—old woman with her whole life in front of her... applause let's talk to a writer and journalist, who knew lyra and was at the funeral yesterday. she's in our belfast newsroom. good morning. it was very interesting watching the father's reactions, what did you make of it? i think it was very powerful and moving ceremony. it was great to hear about different aspects of lyra's life and her
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contribution and i think people got a real sense of what she was like as a real sense of what she was like as a person and how kindhearted she was as well and how incredibly talented as well and how incredibly talented asa as well and how incredibly talented as a journalist and as you say, that moment when father mcgill really put those politicians on the spot and call them out, was i think very striking and the mood change and almost immediately, people were applauding and then standing on their feet and i applauding and then standing on theirfeet and i think applauding and then standing on their feet and i think thatjust shows how much it struck a chord with people here, many of whom are very frustrated with the lack of a government at stormont and many of whom have very serious concerns about the peace process in northern ireland after lyra's murder last week. we saw the politicians across the divide, from the dup, sinn fein, sitting together at the front of the church. if it has given people, if it isa church. if it has given people, if it is a clear message and obviously with such a resounding reaction in support of that message, doesn't give you any hope that they will listen and act upon this?” give you any hope that they will listen and act upon this? i think it is very difficult to say because
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they have been so many attempts to try and get the dup together to try and resolve the dispute since the government collapsed into thousand 17, but i think there is certainly a sense here that if this does not change things, it is hard to say what will because there's so frustration here in northern ireland and so many people just really hoping that dup leader arlene foster and the sinn fein leader can kind of lead by example and show that the peace process is still very much, still in place in northern ireland and evenjust still in place in northern ireland and even just to give reassurance to people here because there are various concerns about where the peace process is happening. what we need see? it is all very well leading an action but what does that look like? talks so that we can see if we can
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get back to the negotiating table and see a way forward. so far been quite a frosty reception from both the dup and sinn fein. they would say they cannot go back into government as a knee—jerk reaction isa government as a knee—jerk reaction is a stable form of government because there are so many issues with previous government that unless the fundamental issues are resolved another government will collapse again. i would like to finish our conversation with a thought about lyra you had an interesting way of becoming friends. a way that betrayed her kind personality. becoming friends. a way that betrayed her kind personalitylj becoming friends. a way that betrayed her kind personality. i had been receiving quite a bit of on
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line abuse from social media trials and she contacted me to get in touch and she contacted me to get in touch and offered solidarity —— trolls. it was something i had not expected. i did not know her but as a fellow journalist she wanted to show solidarity and send the horrendous events of last week, many generous journalists have come forward, offering support and solidarity and to be kind and encouraging to other people and i think it gets to show what a very warmhearted and generous person she was and how much she will be missed. thank you very much for your time this morning. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather.
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good morning. it will turn more u nsettled good morning. it will turn more unsettled from today. 0ver good morning. it will turn more unsettled from today. over the next few days of rain or showers, some pushing north some pushing west and east and also it is meant to be cooler because currently our when it is coming from a southerly direction but as a low pressure stance to take charge of our weather, it will change to a north—westerly direction. lou hughes returning to the child. —— blue colour returning to the child. eventually, it will get into southern scotland and northern ireland. the first bank clearing into northern ireland leaving sunny skies behind. some sunshine for england and wales this afternoon but showers as well and some of those showers in wales and the midlands, into the south—west, could be heavy and thundery.
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temperatures in the range of 13 — 15. in any prolonged sunshine you could see 16 or 18 at the top temperature in the uk. through the evening and overnight, we still have the band of rain continuing to push up the band of rain continuing to push up into the northern isles but as low pressure comes in from the west, more showery outbreaks towards northern ireland. temperatures between 4— eight so we will not anticipate any problems with frost. tomorrow dry weather and sunny conditions north and south but as the low pressure approaches, showers for the west and east and they will be heavy and thundery with a notable breeze as well. you can see the low pressure centre here, what will happen as we move from friday night into saturday, the low pressure will
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cross us into saturday, the low pressure will cross us and as it does so it will bring rain. look at the squeeze behind it. in its flank. particularly wendy. up to 65 miles per hour across south wales, the southern half of england. gusts of wind across northern ireland to watch out for as well. the wind easing through the course of the day and the rain pushing towards the north sea so it will brighten up later for northern ireland, north sea so it will brighten up laterfor northern ireland, parts north sea so it will brighten up later for northern ireland, parts of wales and the south—west. 0n later for northern ireland, parts of wales and the south—west. on sunday, we have the dregs producing some cloud. that will break up and high pressure builds across us. then another front introducing more cloud from the south—west and against some grisly conditions. at this stage it is looking dry for the london marathon. southern flank of the low
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why don't you avoid these tongue twisters. you see, we do not use auto cues. to be fair, carole does all of that without autocue, she just knows that. it is telepathically communicated and it is intrinsically part of her. all the sport with the big derby game last night coming up. young carers from black, asian and minority ethnic families are more likely than their white counterparts to be isolated from support services, according to a report published this morning. the children's charity barnardo's says they're missing out on their childhoods and is calling for steps to overcome the issues. john maguire reports
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like most teenagers, this 19—year—old has lots to do but not enough time to do it in. but unlike most teenagers, when not studying chic as a full—time for her parents, both of whom have serious health problems. cooks, cleans and organises her younger siblings. problems. cooks, cleans and organises her younger siblingsm is something that was difficult to start with but eventually you end up creating a daily routine and you have to get used to it. her father has a rare heart condition, something she has inherited and has also undergone surgery for. her mother suffered a stroke. both pa rents mother suffered a stroke. both parents have to live downstairs and both require frequent hospital visits. and then on the monday dad had his cardiology appointment and then mum got called in for a hospital visit as well. and you need to be around for all of this.
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correct. her brother who is ten and her sister also work out when they can. herfather her sister also work out when they can. her father is grateful and extremely proud. other people help, the family is here, but they have their own families. they help at certain times but not like her. they are supported by bernardo which in a report highlighted the lack of help from black, asian and minority ethnic background. for many it says caring for a family is expected and they may not realise external help is available. they could be a stigma about mental or disability problems and the report calls for the nhs to break down these barriers and to provide translators for parents for medical appointments so the burden does not fall on their children. it
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is now time to help her brother and sister with her homework and if there are any hours left in the day, to study herself. most of my friends are going to university. my ultimate plan was to go to another city for university and find somewhere else to go but it has stopped me from doing that but i do not mind because they are my parents and i would do anything for them. she hopes to go into biological sciences where, once again, she will spend her time helping people. joining us now is lynn perry, the director of children's services at barnardo's. those children, what remarkable young people they. absolutely and so many of the children we work with when we go to our young carers services talk with a lot of pride
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about their responsibilities and they do that from a place of love and compassion and that is natural. it isa and compassion and that is natural. it is a human instinct to care for those we love but, of course, they are quite often undertaking a whole range of practical support tasks at home as well asjuggling range of practical support tasks at home as well as juggling all the things that adolescents have to juggle things that adolescents have to juggle in terms of school, social life and thinking about their future and aspirations. we started this piece by talking about carers from different backgrounds and the difference. what are the main barriers you are seeing? language, cultural differences? what out practitioners tell us and what children and young people and families and tell us is that there
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is sometimes a lack of awareness about the availability of services. it might be information not getting into communities in a culturally appropriate way. sometimes it is because the concept being a young carer perhaps does not exist within afamily setting... carer perhaps does not exist within a family setting... we here at so often, they do not even call themselves carers, just being a part of the family. absolutely. it means they are less likely to be identified as having support needs. typically, within certain communities, they are almost expected to do things that in other communities the families make calling and ask for help. ——to be clear. of course there is diversity within those communities and one family will differfrom within those communities and one family will differ from another but i think younger generations caring
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for older generations is traditional within some family and cultural contexts. so how do you go about reaching, maybe a family like the one we have seen, who is not asking for any help. how do you go about reaching them? for any help. how do you go about reaching them ? that for any help. how do you go about reaching them? that is one of the key things our report seeks to address. it talks about the need for there to be more outreach into communities. it talks about the need for professionals to be more assertive in that provision and to think about are we getting information into the right places and spaces? are we supporting gps and spaces? are we supporting gps and health professionals to see young people in the room who might be acting with translators and interpreters, as we saw, and to talk about support available within the community. it is also really
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important to go about breaking down stigma in communities about asking for help outside the family and the community and helping people to see that doing that will improve the outlook for children and people within that context. thank you very much. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. business experts say predictions of a major exodus of london city workers to frankfurt haven't yet materialised — amid continued brexit uncertainty. germany's fifth biggest city which is regarded as the main rival european financial hub, is currently expanding its stock exchange. 0ne analyst told us the transfer of staff may not have happened as expected but it is only a matter of time.
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now i think it is more of the planning than the real situation that people are really leaving london. the longer this process is going on, the more people will be uncertain and will go to frankfurt, to paris and all the other places where the financial sector is important. after ten days of action, the extinction rebellion campaign group will end their protests today. the group have occupied key parts of central london, including parliament square and oxford circus, with over 1000 activists arrested. they're planning a closing ceremony this evening and have thanked their supporters. the rspca says it it received more than 2000 calls about exotic animals in capital last year. in one incident a londoner in kensington woke to find a snake in their bed. the charity believes the number of calls relating to more unsual pets is because owners do not research their needs or how to care for them properly. let's take a look at the travel situation now:
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0n the tubes there are severe delays on thejubilee line. otherwise it's a good service. the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. in central london — bloomsbury street is down to one lane at high holborn for gas main works. finally, there are various events taking place for anzac day , with whitehall closed at around 11:00 for wreath laying at the cenotaph. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. another drop in temperature again today. it is set to feel cooler and there will be some wet weather around for most of us as well, in the form of early rain, that's clearing its way northwards, them through the afternoon some scattered april showers, but also some decent spells of sunshine around as well. a bit of a mixed picture really today but it's a mild start to the morning. that early rain is mostly out towards the east. it's clearing northwards. the cloud will thin and break,
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where we've got it, to give us some good spells of sunshine around for the second half of the day but also one or two showers, perhaps the odd flash of lightning too. temperatures between 12 and 14 degrees celsius to end the afternoon — a drop on where we were yesterday, with a moderate southerly breeze. through this evening and overnight, there could be one or two showers but they're mostly set to clear away. clear skies into tomorrow morning so it should be a sunny start to friday and it will feel slightly cooler tonight as well. lows between six and eight celsius. tomorrow, mostly dry. there could be one or two showers as we head through the second half of the day and then saturday rather wet and very windy. but mostly dry for the london marathon on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. good morning.
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the time now is 7:31am. thank you for joining the time now is 7:31am. thank you forjoining us. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. more than 0.5 million children in the uk have not been vaccinated against measles, according to new analysis by umccr. the charity warns that being left unprotected against measles could lead to disability and death. it says misinformation and a lack of access to jabs has led to inadequate vaccination rates globally. investigators in sri lanka say they now think it's highly likely that the islamic state group were involved in last sunday's attacks. 359 people were killed and more than 500 wounded in the blasts. officials say it's unclear whether the group planned and carried out the attacks, or if the bombings were inspired by it. a reward of up to £10,000 has been offered
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for information about the murder ofjournalist lyra mckee. ms mckee, who was 29, was shot dead by a dissident republican group last thursday in londonderry, and hundreds of mourners attended her funeral yesterday. the crimestoppers charity said the cash was available to anyone providing information which directly led to an arrest. iran's foreign minister says the british—iranian charity worker, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, could be released from jail in a prisoner swap. zaghari—ratcliffe was jailed for five years after being convicted of spying charges, which she denies. the country's foreign minister, javad zarif, says he is ready to exchange her for iranians held in the us and australia. the competition watchdog has blocked sainsbury‘s £7 billion bid for asda.
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the two leaders, of north korea and russia, both referred to their ‘s long history of tires and vladimir putin said he wanted to help calm tensions. those are the main stories, one of the story for you and it is penguin based. if you're a penguin, sticks and stones aren't for breaking bones, they're symbols of love. take a look at this. what is happening here? what is happening is that the gentoo penguin is in london. they are preparing for breeding, hideous, modelling i think is the term and it takes the stone a to the lady penguin and that is what is happening. to the male penguins than compete over who has the better stone? i don't know, i do not have that summation. —— do.
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stone? i don't know, i do not have that summation. -- do. saying my stone is better than your stone, is that what it is? maybe. ithink stone is better than your stone, is that what it is? maybe. i think that isa that what it is? maybe. i think that is a term that is... is that 0k? take us to a great big team between great rivals and a great big set up ina lot great rivals and a great big set up in a lot of steak. a big story and a lot at stake in the premier league. —— stake. the team who are playing manchester united, manchester city, really had a wobble because they just could not lose. and they didn't disappoint, as they beat manchester united convincingly to move back to the top of the league. here's our sports editor dan roan. with the final hurtling into view, this was a derby with a twist. for many manchester united fans,
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it felt like a no—win situation. get a result against city and they'd be handing their rivals liverpool an advantage in the title race. lose and their rivals would be on course for another league triumph. after a string of recent losses, united desperately needed to restore some pride. marcus rashford repeatedly posing a threat. city's best moment in a goalless half carved out by raheem sterling and only denied by david de gea. but the champions have won ten league games for a reason. bernardo silva giving them the lead they craved. at this stage, manchester united was still in it, butjesse lingard then blew a golden chance to equalise, before substitute leroy sane found himself in acres of space city's lead. the significance not lost on the manager. david de gea are all too aware that, once again, he should have done better. united, their hopes of a top
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four place in jeopardy. city back on top with what could prove a decisive win, and the dream of retaining the title within touching distance. so manchester city now back in front for what has been surely the most relentless title race in premier league history. it has been exhausting, this title race. neither city nor liverpool has lost since january. this is the table looks. city with their 11th straight win going back to the top, and crucially now have played the same number of games as liverpool. these are the remaining games — two at home for liverpool, two away for city. you'd expect both sides to win all three. if that were to happen, this is how they'd finish the season. liverpool would miss out byjust one point, with a points tally that would have comfortably won them the title in pretty much any other season. arsenal missed out on the chance to strengthen their claims on a top four place, after being comfortably beaten by wolves. three first half goals at molineux put wolves out of sight. ruben neves with the pick of them. it finished 3—1, the first time that wolves have beaten arsenal in any competition since 1979. so the race for
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the top four goes on. he'll fancy this! mo farah is involved in a dispute with the double 0lympic champion, haile gebrselassie. it's to do with an an alleged robbery at a hotel owned by the retired ethiopian athlete. jon donnison reports. a photocall for mo farah and his rivals added this weekend ‘s london marathon. a bit of good humoured sparring with the favourite, from kenya. but it is with an ethiopian athletics legend, the double 0lympic gold—medallist haile gebrselassie with him mo farah is now involved in a genuine start. at a media conference ahead of the marathon, mo farah accused haile gebrselassie of failing to help him after he was robbed at a hotel owned by the ethiopian rate of training the country last month. mo farah claimed £2500, watch and two phones had been taken by £2500, watch and two phones had been ta ken by hotel staff. £2500, watch and two phones had been taken by hotel staff. there wasjust a slight problem with my hotel i
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stayed in in ethiopia, where someone at the hotel came into my bag, open my bag, took my nice watch, my wife brought me a present, just to be honest it is haile gebrselassie's hotel. when you stay for three months and that hotel, it is very disappointing to know that someone who owned that hotel could not support and could not do anything. they could not do nothing, sojust disappointed in haile gebrselassie. haile gebrselassie hit back by accusing mo farah of blackmail are not paying his bill. in an astonishing statement by his agent, he also said hotel staff reported disgraceful conduct by mo farah and his entourage and that he was reported to the police were attacking a married athlete in the gym. haile gebrselassie said criminal charge was later dropped. in response, a spokesperson for mo farah said he disputed all the claims and that he was disappointed with haile gebrselassie's refusal to ta ke with haile gebrselassie's refusal to take responsibility for the robbery.
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0bviously with the london marathon coming this weekend, this is probably not what mo farah wanted to be dealing with and talking about. it is of very big race. good luck to anyone who is in training. well, hopefully at this point they are not in training, they are in taper. ego, technical terms, taper. in training, they are in taper. ego, technicalterms, taper. at in training, they are in taper. ego, technical terms, taper. at least the weather is going to be loads better than last year because it was so hot last year. —— there you go. thank you very much. the time now is 6:40 a.m.. beauty therapists in england will receive training on the subject of cervical examinations, so they're better able to hold conversations with their clients about having a check—up. with attendance for screening at an all time low, and young women much more likely to book a wax than an appointment with a nurse, public health england
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thinks it could be a way to improve the numbers. we visited a salon in manchester and asked what they thought of the idea. it is something that is brought up injusta it is something that is brought up injust a natural it is something that is brought up in just a natural conversation when you doing relaxing, so yeah, i think if you have got more training to backup what you are saying is rather than just your backup what you are saying is rather thanjust your gut backup what you are saying is rather than just your gut instinct and what you feel, then obviously it is going to help. i would be quite uncomfortable talking to family about it, but you talk to inverted commas, stranger, because you know it is not going to go any further and they do not know you. once you walk out of the salon, they will have gotten about it. the more people who talk about it, make it less of a stigma or less of something that is going to be horrible or uncomfortable. people need to talk about these things and then you'll think it isjust normal. i think it is all good about telling people to have a pap smear test does not make you more confident to go in it, so having a bikini wax, though it, so having a bikini wax, though it isa it, so having a bikini wax, though it is a small thing to have, it is just that confidence of not feeling uncomfortable, like are they going
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tojudge me, like do i look ok? sol think it is more the act doing something thanjust think it is more the act doing something than just saying think it is more the act doing something thanjust saying it. joining us is laura flaherty, who's in remission after being diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2016, and dr ellie cannon who's in our london studio. thank you forjoining us. we're going to talk to you in a minute. good morning to you as well. laura, 29 years old, what happened? so i put off my spear for three or four months, i was too busy. i was a mum, had two children, it was christmas time and! had two children, it was christmas time and i went for my spear smear and they said everything was fine and they said everything was fine andi and they said everything was fine and i walked away and i was like job done, i walked away thinking it was not as big a deal as what i thought it was going to be. i called my mum on the way home and i said i have been, you can stop nagging me now andi been, you can stop nagging me now and i am pretty sure i do not have
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cancer, and those words will haunt me the rest of my life. and then yeah, eventually i was sat down and i had that conversation with a co nsulta nt i had that conversation with a consultant that nobody wants to have, he said i am so sorry that you have, he said i am so sorry that you have got cancer. and everything changed. well, we can telljust as you are recounting the story, which you are recounting the story, which you know very well, it is emotional even now, isn't it? as you are retelling the story, but this is a good story in so many ways, isn't it? hello absolutely. just take us through to where we are now. so i'm actually just coming through to where we are now. so i'm actuallyjust coming up to my two—year checkup, i am actuallyjust coming up to my two—year checkup, iam in actuallyjust coming up to my two—year checkup, i am in remission known i have no reason to think it is going to go any other way. early detection is key with cervical cancer. that is the beauty around cervical... because you are able to get treatment? hello yes, because i attended my smear. yes, i got cancer, not brilliant news but because i got it early, it was able
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to be treated. i've got children, when they sit you down and say i'm sorry, you've got cancer, that is what you automatically think. you think about your mortality, you realise this could all be taken away, but because i didn't attend my screening, was able be treated. i am going to watch my children grow up into young, beautiful adults. and as charlie said, this is a good story, this is turned out well. this new campaign now, dr cannon, isuppose is to catch people like laura at that point to get them talking about this, get them realising it is important to go to these appointments and make these appointments and make these appointments and make these appointments and stick to them. absolutely, it is about having these conversations where we know women can have these conversations. we know that the of 25 to 34 are unfortunately the least likely to attend their cervical screening. we also know that three quarters of women feel comfortable having these intimate conversations with their
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petition and that they may not have with their family or even with their doctor, so by educating beauticians and empowering them to have conversations, we can get more women through the door for cervical screening. —— beauticians. through the door for cervical screening. -- beauticians. how we get this training put in place? it is quite a lot to ask someone to kind of impart medical advice, isn't it? absolutely, so we're not asking any beauticians to give medical advice. there has been a whole programme of training between public health england and the salons that have signed up. there are a lot of posters, a lot of educational pieces. they get training to open up conversations. they are not giving people medical advice or diagnosis. either than it is a good reason to
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go either than it is a good reason to go for that survival screen. can you envisage that conversation? any level of conversation is good, whether it is going on line and sorting advice. before i was diagnosed i never had that conversation. can you imagine feeling 0k going into a salon... absolutely. you tell your hairdresser and beautician everything. to be fair, i think a rather go for a smear than a bikini wax. they are very, very painful. any conversation and encouragement is good and we need to normalise this conversation around smear testing and cervical testing. it is not something discussed on an open platform. you were joking with your friends about smear testing and all
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your friends have had friends about smear testing and all yourfriends have had the friends about smear testing and all your friends have had the test now? ido your friends have had the test now? i do not think there is any woman in my inner circle that has not had it. i knew what the letters were. it is another one and i look back now and i cannot believe i left it. i was that woman. i was that woman thinking, it will not may be. i had no symptoms, why would i get cancer? there was no reason for it. two yea rs on there was no reason for it. two years on yourfine. there was no reason for it. two years on your fine. absolutely fine. your story can impact a lot of people. thank you very much and thank you for your time as well, doctor. it is a good story. carole brought us sunshine last week but not today. no, some rain but it will turn
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cooler and at times there will be rain and showers. two bands one moving across scotland heading north and another coming up through southern england and wales into the midlands and east anglia and that sue is moving north making it into southern scotland and northern ireland. for the rest of england and wales, afair ireland. for the rest of england and wales, a fair bit of cloud but we will see some sunshine and also some showers which could be heavy across wales into the midlands and the south—west. the odd rumble of thunder as well. somewhere in north—east scotland it could hit 17 or 18 degrees but we are looking roughly at13— or 18 degrees but we are looking roughly at 13— 14 degrees across the board. an area of low pressure approaching our shores and as it does, it will introduce some cloud and showery rain to northern ireland by the end of the night. clear skies
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here but no problems with frost and temperatures falling to between four and eight. tomorrow we start off on and eight. tomorrow we start off on a dry and sunny note across the north and eastern parts of the south and is low pressure comes in, showers from the west to the east. within the last few minutes, the competition watchdog has blocked sainsbury‘s merger with asda. it would have been the number one supermarket by size but the regulator has said the deal is not happening. sainsbury‘s surprised everyone last april with a bid for its rival asda. but the deal proved pretty controversial. the deal would have created the uk's biggest supermarket chain, even larger than tesco. that prompted worries that prices could rise, with one firm dominating so much
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of our supermarket shopping. so the regulator launched an investigation. earlier this year, initialfindings from the investigation, prompted sainsbury‘s and adsa to offer sell around 100 supermarkets, some convenience stores and some petrol stations. they also promised £1bn in price cuts for customers. i spoke to the sainsbury‘s boss about what he would do to get the deal through — and he told me on this programme that he was still confident it would get the go—ahead. an evidence based authority will look at the evidence and decide in orderfor this look at the evidence and decide in order for this transaction to take place but the key message for customers is that there is a unique opportunity to bring the organisations together to lower costs a nd organisations together to lower costs and ultimately that will result in lower prices for customers. stuart mcintosh is the inquiry chair at the competition and markets
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authority and joins me london. good morning to you. i hope you could hear what he was saying and making all sorts of promises about cutting prices. clearly did not believe him? good morning. it is not a matter of that. we were obviously conscious of the promises offered by sainsbury‘s and asda but they were based on cost savings and we looked at that in considerable detail and we concluded the cost savings were unlikely to be realised. we were conscious it would be difficult to track these price changes but i must emphasise this. but more fundamental, the price policies do not mean that these two together
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would actually result in prices rising. typically on that pricing issue, you are suggesting that if sainsbury‘s and asda were both owned by the same company that would be little incentive to bring down prices? that is correct. sainsbury‘s say this morning they promise £1 billion worth of cuts. they say that the cma is today taking £1 billion out of customers pockets. what do you say to that? we do not agree with them. remember, we have looked at this in considerable detail. we have a good sense of what drives competition and the market, particularly for customers and we concluded that, as a result of that, there would be a reduction in competition and that would invite an
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incentive for the company over the longer term to increase prices or reduce other aspects of the experience which customers value like checkout queues and the speed of checkout and stock on the shelves. it was a clear analysis. we we re shelves. it was a clear analysis. we were sure that would be a reduction in competition. what could sainsbury‘s have done to get this deal through? i am sainsbury‘s have done to get this dealthrough? i am not sure it is sainsbury‘s have done to get this deal through? i am not sure it is a matter of what they could have done to make us happy. our matter of what they could have done to make us happy. 0urjob is to conduct an independent and objective assessment about what a merger is likely to be for competition and for shoppers, in this case. we concluded there would be competition issues in supermarkets, petrol stations and on line shopping. some extensive competition concerns. our
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provisional findings competition concerns. our provisionalfindings we competition concerns. our provisional findings we saw it would be quite difficult to find a solution to those competition problems given the scale and the fa ct problems given the scale and the fact that they touched on so many parts of the business. we always felt that, following that, that review, that addressing selling off stores would be challenging. good to talk to you. stuart mcintosh who led the enquiry into the proposed merger of sainsbury‘s and asda which is not happening. we will speak to sainsbury‘s boss and we have had some reaction to the statement but we will speak to him on wednesday. they cannot do before that because the results are out next week. it is strange to promoting something that
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far ahead but it is important. do you think he will be the boss by that time? a lot of pressure on him. it has been the sole focus of the company. a big set for them. both sides said they will walk away from the deal. asda probably looking for another buyer. sainsbury‘s saying they are walking away. a pet snake or a bearded dragon might sound more interesting than owning a cat or dog, but some animal lovers are buying exotic pets without thinking about the long term commitment. the rspca says it had more than 15,000 calls last year — that's around 40 a day — about abandoned or neglected exotic animals. tim muffett reports furry, cute but with raccoon dogs, looks can deceive. if i was to grab this with no gloves on, i would be heard. people have seen them on line
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and say they are cute and want them asa and say they are cute and want them as a pet but they do not make a good bet unless they are specialist. this college, where animals and plants are studied, and very occasional abandoned pets are given a home, such as these five raccoon is which originate from east asia. one was found under someone's decking, others were in the greater manchester area. the big problem with abandoning exotic animals is they could become established in britain and impact our wildlife. they could feed on ground nesting birds and amphibians. the rspca runs a cruelty hotline and last year it received more than 15,000 calls specifically about exotic animals. more than 40 a day. almost two calls every hour. it is heartbreaking to see these animals suffering. we see some deliberately abandoned. we
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thinkjust the reality of caring for these animals have become too much. these bearded dragons were captives in people ‘s homes and people found that they were no longer able to look after them. last year we rescued more than 200 snakes, more than 150 of which were found stray. this breaded dragon belongs to kirsty, who works for the rspca. we have had a lot of bearded dragons dumped into boxes and i have picked up dumped into boxes and i have picked up once that have three legs and half a tail missing and if they are com pletely half a tail missing and if they are completely emaciated. it can be quite easy to think you can get a tank and set it up and it will be fine but day—to—day he needs a salad, love food, the ev lamp and heat lamp and you have to check the temperature. is it frustrating to think that people did not think
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about it before buying one? yes, i have seen babies for sale for 20 quid. in october tougher regulations we re quid. in october tougher regulations were introduced pet stores and sellers that it is feared many animals which need specialist care are still being brought by people who do not provided. unlike a cat and a dog, if you call his name, he will not come back. if they got out of sight, people don't tend to find them again. a pet project more demanding than many realise. raccoon of fox... do not have it as a pet. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. after ten days of action, activists from the extinction rebellion
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campaign group have glued themselves to gates at the london will end their protests later today. the group have occupied key parts of central london including parliament square and oxford circus, with over a thousand activists arrested. they're planning a closing ceremony this evening and have thanked their supporters. business experts say predictions of a major exodus of london city workers to frankfurt haven't yet materialised amid continued brexit uncertainty. germany's fifth biggest city which is regarded as the main rival european financial hub is currently expanding its stock exchange. one analyst told us the transfer of staff may not have happened as expected but it's only a matter of time. now i think it is more the planning than the real situation that people are really leaving london. the longer this process is going on, the more people will be uncertain and will go to frankfurt, to paris and all the other places where the financial sector is important. the rspca says it had more than 2000 calls about exotic animals in capital last year. in one incident a londoner
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in kensington woke to find a snake in their bed. the charity believes the number of calls relating to more unsual pets is because owners do not research their needs or know how to care for them properly. let's take a look at the travel situation now: 0n the tubes there are minor delays on the dlr — that's bank and stratford to lewisham and there are also minor delays on the piccadily line. turning to the roads — traffic is slow on the north circular westbound from the great cambridge interchange in edmonton — towards new southgate finally, there are various events taking place for anzac day, with whitehall closed at around 11:00 for wreath laying. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. another drop in temperature again today. it is set to feel cooler
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and there will be some wet weather around for most of us as well, in the form of early rain, that's clearing its way northwards, them through the afternoon some scattered april showers, but also some decent spells of sunshine around as well. a bit of a mixed picture really today but it's a mild start to the morning. that early rain is mostly out towards the east. it's clearing northwards. the cloud will thin and break, where we've got it, to give us some good spells of sunshine around for the second half of the day but also one or two showers, perhaps the odd flash of lightning too. temperatures between 12 and 14 degrees celsius to end the afternoon — a drop on where we were yesterday, with a moderate southerly breeze. through this evening and overnight, there could be one or two showers but they're mostly set to clear away. clear skies into tomorrow morning so it should be a sunny start to friday and it will feel slightly cooler tonight as well. lows between six and eight celsius. tomorrow, mostly dry. there could be one or two showers as we head through the second half of the day and then saturday rather wet and very windy. but mostly dry for the london marathon on sunday.
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iam from i am from for the latest later. have a lovely morning. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: ‘a public health time bomb' — a warning from the head of nhs england as cases of measles quadruple and vaccinations drop. the deal is off. the sainsbury‘s and asda merger is blocked by the regulator — it says prices could rise, and quality would fall if the two supermarkets merged. the boss of sainsburys says the regulator is "taking a billion pounds out of customers' pockets." the father of two of the men suspected of blowing themselves up in the easter sunday bomb attacks in sri lanka has been arrested. two top sri lankan security officials are sacked over a "major manchester city have the premier league title within their grasp. they win the manchester derby to go back to the top of the table, above liverpool, with just three games to go —
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this will go to the wire. for your eyes only. we'll discuss daniel craig's final mission as 007 ahead of a big announcement about the new bond film. as showers migrate northwards, they will be heavy and potentially thundery and it will feel cooler today than yesterday. i will have more in 15 minutes. it's thursday the 25th april. our top story. the number of people in the uk who could be at risk of contracting measles is being described as a "ticking time bomb". the nhs says the number of cases in england almost quadrupled last year. the children's charity unicef says more than half a million children in england aren't protected against the highly contagious and potentially fatal disease. here's our global health correspondent richard galpin. according to unicef, an estimated 160 million people around the world missed out on the measles vaccine in the period from 2010 to 2017, and it says outbreaks of the disease are on the rise.
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there seems to be a global issue of a lack of information, scepticism around different sources of information, and that's meant all around the world, we've seen 169 million children between 2010 and 2017 not getting the immunisations that they should be having, and that is still the case in the uk. in 2017, more than 100,000 people died, most of them children, and the problem is notjust in developing countries. in the united states, france, the uk, and many other wealthy parts of the world, significant numbers of children are unprotected. there are many reasons for this. here in the uk and in other rich countries, it's linked to anti—vaccine messages, which have been spread on social media and are untrue. but they've led to some people choosing not to inoculate their children. nhs england is describing the rejection of vaccines as "a growing public health timebomb".
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richard galpin, bbc news. sainsburys and asda say they won't pursue their planned merger after the deal was blocked by the competition regulator. ben's been covering this one all morning. you make it sound like a date. this tells you all you need to know. it was a huge planned merger and it was earlier last year that they announced plans to merge and said it would create a huge organisation but one that would deliver savings for us as one that would deliver savings for us as customers. the regulator today said they did not agree and they have blocked the deal, a deal worth around £14 billion, one that would have made it the biggest grocer in the country, bigger even than tesco. but the regulator have said they are worried about prices going up, not coming down, but going up, and that's because there would be less competition so where there is an asda and sainsbury‘s there would be no incentive to cut prices because they would dominate the whole market and we wouldn't have a choice of where to go and shop and they are also worried about customer service
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and that quality might fall as well. i've just and that quality might fall as well. i'vejust spoken to and that quality might fall as well. i've just spoken to the man who blocked the deal and led the enquiry and he told me what they were most worried about. that will provide an incentive for the companies over the longer term to increase prices and reduce other aspects of the grocery experience which customers value like checkout queues, the speedier version of checkout, and stocking on shelves. we are very clear in our analysis and we are sure there is likely to be a reduction in competition and that will flow through in the longer term to increases in prices. stuart mcintosh who led the enquiry, and they have effectively kibosh the deal today. sainsbury‘s came out fighting because they promised £1 billion of price cuts if the deal went through and it was seen as a sweetener to get the deal through. the statement from the chief executive reads, the
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regulator is effectively taking £1 billion out of customers pockets. they are saying this is not good news for customers at the end of the day. and in the bigger picture, does this send out a single about mergers —— signal. is this saying to anybody else, do you know what? stay as you are. i think it is a question of retailers as big as this. it's rare you get a market dominated by so few key players, a —— equivalent in banking where you have the big six but supermarkets are dominated by tesco, sainsbury‘s, morrisons, asda, tesco, sainsbury‘s, morrisons, asda, tesco, waitrose, so they're saying if you reduce the number of players they hold too much sway. 2800 stores, 330,000 staff is what the group would have had so they are saying they would not allow this on those terms. then, thank you. the father of two of the men suspected of detonating bombs in the attacks on sri lanka on easter sunday has been arrested. officials say thousands
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of soldiers have been deployed to help search for suspects. 359 people were killed and more than 500 wounded in the blasts. for the latest, let's speak to our news correspondent nick beake, who is in colombo this morning. bring this up to date with the latest developments. sri lanka remains a country on high alert, and we can tell you this morning there has been a number last of some sort out to the east of the city of colombo —— another blast. to stress, then were no reports of anyone injured or casualties. it's not clear what has happened but it seems there has been some sort of explosion on vacant land next to a magistrates' court. not clear if it was a controlled explosion or if this was a device that went off but it's been an extremely busy morning for the security organisations here and there have been various false alarms and for a time the national bank was shot down and all employees
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we re bank was shot down and all employees were on lockdown. that has now been lifted but it does add to a general sense of unease and more than 7000 soldiers are at the forefront of a manhunt for any remaining members of the cell. tell us about the arrests. there was another arrest, this was the father of some of those involved. that's right. this relates to one particular family, involved. that's right. this relates to one particularfamily, the ibrahimovic family. the father is a man who in the past has been praised by somebody who grave gate —— great service to the country. but it's believed that two of his sons were amongst the suicide bombers on easter sunday —— ibrahim family. it's believed a female member of the family blew herself up and possibly her children when the police were moving into the family villa to make an arrest. so clearly that is a real line of enquiry for the families. it is believed that mr ibrahim has been interviewed for the past day or so
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so that is a line of enquiry that investigators are looking at and we are hearing that the number of arrests has exceeded 60 with 70 in detention and authorities have already said people should brace themselves for further attacks, so we can expect lots more police activity here in colombo and other parts of sri lanka for the rest of the day. nick, thank you very much. the duke of cambridge is set meet survivors of the christchurch terror attack in new zealand as part of a two day visit to the country. prince william has already attended a service for anzac day. later he'll give a speech at the masjid al noor mosque where the majority of victims lost their lives. our reporter hywel griffith is in christchurch for us this morning. good to see you. prince william no stranger to the region as it came after the earthquakes a few years ago. and once again the message he brings is one of support and solidarity for the people of the city who have been through so much.
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back then in 2011, 185 were killed by the earthquake and tragically, as many people will know, last month 50 people were killed in cold blood into mosques in the city and dozens more were injured. he has been speaking initially to some of the emergency teams have dealt with the situation, the paramedics, the police officers on the ground who will have witnessed incredible things. we know he spoke to them about dealing with the trauma of what they saw and about the importance of talking to colleagues and talking things through and looking after their own mental health having seen such horrors in their own city. as you said earlier on in the day there was a ceremony in auckland to remember the australian and new zealand soldiers who perished in the gallipoli landings and again that was representing the queen and looking at the car —— country's fallen.
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the north korean leader kim jong—un and the russian president, vladimir putin, are meeting in russia for their first—ever talks. it's mr kim's first meeting with another head of state since his summit with president trump in february, which ended without agreement. the north korean leader said he and mr putin had a "very meaningful exchange of views on issues of mutual interest" — they spent nearly two hours having one—on—one talks. labour is pledging to reverse cuts to thousands of bus services across england and wales at a cost of £1.3 billion a year. the party says the policy would be paid for by vehicle tax but the conservatives claim labour's plans would slash funding for road repairs. here's our political correspondent nick eardley. buses are the most popular form of public transport, accounting for nearly 60% of ourjourneys. campaigners say cuts in funding have hit local services hard. if you live in a town, you might not notice much difference. if you live in the suburbs, you will have seen fewer buses going to fewer places.
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if you live in the country, you'd be lucky to get any buses at all. campaigners say that since 2010, more than 3000 routes in england and wales have either been cut back or withdrawn completely. labour says that local bus services are an important lifeline for many people, so it is pledging an extra £1.3 billion. the idea is that can fund new services and, hopefully, provide a boost for towns and cities. questions overfunding are devolved in scotland, wales and northern ireland, so it is up to politicians there to follow suit. labour's plan for england would be funded on the current tax on cars. westminster will distribute money from a central pot. the conservatives say they already spend £1 billion per year providing free bus travel, but the greens think more cash is needed and the lib dems want bus companies to supply whole networks, notjust routes to make money. buses are a crucial public service and there's big debate about how to make them work for us all.
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nick eardley, bbc news. a reward of up to £10,000 has been offered for information about the murder ofjournalist lyra mckee. ms mckee, who was 29, was shot dead by a dissident republican group last thursday in londonderry, and hundreds of mourners attended her funeral yesterday. the crimestoppers charity said the cash was available to anyone providing information which directly led to an arrest. people facing homelessness or evictions have no access to publicily funded legal aid in half of all local authorities in england and wales. that's according to analysis by the law society, which represents solicitors. their research shows there are whole counties that do not have any legal aid services. the government says people can be covered by nearby providers or over the phone if they can't travel. we return to one of our main stories
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this morning. families are continuing to grieve for their loved ones as mass funerals take place in sri lanka following the devastating attacks on easter sunday. eight british people were killed in the bombings. lorraine campbell, from greater manchester, was on a business trip and died in the blast at colombo's cinnamon grand hotel. her son mark has spoken to the bbc‘s dave guest. she was inspiring. she was strong, very independent, but the one thing that stood out for me throughout my entire life is that she was a leader. it might seem a stupid question, but what went through your mind when you heard your mum was at that hotel? i think it was a mix of shock and disbelief, and the other pa rt shock and disbelief, and the other part was i just felt for the person telling me because the person telling me because the person telling me because the person telling me did not want to tell me, of all people. it's my mum, i was
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her world, so to have to tell me that she didn't make it would have been really hard. ijust want to bring my mum home and i want to give everybody who knew her, who had the opportunity to spend time with her and get to know her, like wielded, to give them the opportunity to come together and celebrate this beautiful woman —— like we all did. that was mark paying tribute to his mother lorraine killed in one of the bombings. officials in sri lanka now say they think it is highly likely that sunday's attacks are linked to the islamic state group. with us now from our london newsroom is the bbc‘s security correspondent frank gardner. right at the heart of that, for so many people this is a personal tragedy, but we are hearing this morning that there are ongoing conspiracy concerns in sri lanka —— security concerns. that's because they think there are still possibly members of the gang who are still at large. one of the key people in all
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of this is the only unmasked figure that appeared in the islamic state video that was celebrating, and i use that word with disgust, these attacks on easter sunday. it's not clear if he died in the blast or is still at large but there is a fear of further attacks. i have to say that my personal view, for what it is worth is that this is probably the biggest intelligence failure relating to terrorism since the 9/11 attacks of 2001 because the sri lankan authorities were given several warnings by india that were passed on as parts of attacks being planned. they were not specific as to where it would be but it was known that hotels and churches would be targeted and that information was not passed on to the people who needed to know it. we are hearing there have been 60 arrests and 70
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people are in detention in all. the scale of this planning, is becoming clear. this would have taken months to plan, so the idea put out on social media for various groups by supporters of the islamic state that this was in some way revenge for the very recent horrific attacks in new zealand on the mosques there is com plete zealand on the mosques there is complete nonsense. this would have taken a long time to plan and there isa taken a long time to plan and there is a report in the guardian today saying that as early as four months ago indian intelligence warned the sri lankans ago indian intelligence warned the sri lanka ns that ago indian intelligence warned the sri lankans that there was a cell planning tax. but to do these kind of coordinated and sophisticated well planned attacks takes reconnaissance and planning and you have to find people who are prepared to do this and you have to keep them on target so you do not waver and
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lose support at the last minute and you have to require the explosives —— acquire the explosives and do that in secret. that is why western intelligence agencies think that almost certainly islamic state was involved in some way. certainly an inspiration but quite possibly in organising and directing it. frank you talked about the security lapse and the scale of that. should we ta ke and the scale of that. should we take any reassurance from the notion that hopefully that could not happen in other places. why was it able to happen in that way in sri lanka?|j think because of political infighting. sri lanka's own domestic political situation where the right hand wasn't letting the left hand what was going on. some people were informed but they did not let others know what was going on and, in fact, sri lanka itself admitted that there we re sri lanka itself admitted that there were lapses in the passage of information. there have been calls
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for the resignation of the defence minister and chief of police, so there's a lot of internal wrangling going on there and of course, the question that your viewers will be thinking is, could this happen here? every successful terrorist attack is a form of intelligence failure. and it's always investigated afterwards and the questions are asked, could it have been prevented? 2017 was a terrible year for britain and we had five terrorist attacks that got through, they were investigated and things could have been differently done giving the information that police and security services had they are not being blamed for the actions that they took and people make their plans in secret and if you have not penetrated those cells and they are often very hard for intelligence agencies to penetrate, it's very difficult to get inside the mind of a terrorist attack.
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frank, thank you very much. frank gardner, bbc security correspondent taking us through the latest developments from the bombings in sri lanka. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. important we know today because there is a storm coming. it'sjust been named as storm hanna. it is coming our way on friday night into saturday so we will get there in the forecast. beautiful weather watchers picture that shows how cloudy and damp it is and we have some rain around, notjust today but for the next few days, rain or showers with sunshine in between but it will be cooler than it has been for the last few days. we have two bands of rain this morning, here is the first moving northwards across scotla nd the first moving northwards across scotland and the second moving across england and wales. this will eventually be getting into northern
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england, southern scotland and northern ireland later and behind it what you find is we see a return to bright skies, some sunshine and some potent showers they could be thundery. the first band will move into the northern isles and then away, particularly so across north—east scotland where we could have prolonged spells of sunshine and temperatures between 16 and 18 but more or less across the board we are looking at between 13 and 15. as we head through the evening and overnight rain moves across scotland and here is the low pressure being named as storm hanna showing its hand, throwing in more cloud and showery outbreaks of rain and during the course of friday that will move from the west to the east with showers, so eradicating the bright, sunny start in the east and then later in the east it will brighten up later in the east it will brighten up across later in the east it will brighten up across northern ireland, wales and south—west england. here is the centre of the storm and what is
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going to happen is as we go through saturday it will move across the british isles taking rain with it but the strongest winds will be on the southern flank so particularly across south wales and the southern half of england and this is on a loop, just to show you. we have gusts of wind, 65 mph which could lead to disruption. if we have a look at that, you can see the rain coming in from the west and here is the centre of the low pressure and everything is moving around it, and through the day we expect the wind to ease down a touch but it will still be windy, but not as windy across northern ireland, north wales and north—west england nor as windy across scotland. on sunday we have the dregs of the weather from producing cloud and there might be some early drizzle but that will break up and brighten up on a ridge of high pressure comes across but so does a little warm front introducing cloud and drizzle in the south—west
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and temperatures up to 15 and it should stay dry for the london marathon. that will be good for those runners. young carers from black, asian and minority ethnic families are more likely than their white counterparts to be isolated from support services. a report by the children's charity barnardo's, says young carers are missing out on childhoods and is calling for steps to overcome the issues. john maguire reports. like most teenagers, 19—year—old neha has lots to do and not enough time to do it in. but unlike most teenagers, when not studying she cares full—time for her parents — both of whom have serious health problems — cooks, cleans and organises her young siblings. it is something that was difficult to start with, but eventually you just end up creating a daily routine and you just have to get used to it. her father has a rare heart condition, something she has inherited and has
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also undergone surgery for. her mother suffered a stroke. both parents have to live downstairs and both require frequent hospital visits. and then on the monday, dad had his cardiology appointment, dev was going camping, and then mum also got called in on that day for another hospital visit as well. gosh, and you need to be around for all of this? correct. her brother who is ten and her 14—year—old sister also help out when they can. their father is very grateful and extremely proud. the children do a brilliantjob. because other people, they're helping here, the family is here, they're helping but they have their own families. they help at certain times but not like neha. they are supported by the charity bernardo's, which in a report published this morning, highlights a lack of access to help for young carers from black, asian and minority ethnic backgrounds.
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for many, it says, "caring for a family is expected and they may not realise external help is available." there can be a stigma about mental or disability problems and the report calls for the nhs to help break down these barriers and to provide translators for parents at medical appointments so the burden does not fall on their children. for neha, it's now time to help her brother and sister with her homework and, if there are any hours left in the day, to study herself. most of my friends are at university, so there is obviously that difference and also my original plan was to go to another city for university and find about somewhere else that i could do but obviously it has stopped me from doing that but i do not mind because they are my parents and i would do anything for them. she hopes to go into biological sciences where, once again, she will spend her
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time helping people. the words she said there, they are my parents and i would do anything for them. so full of respect for young people who do that. a lovely lady and we wish her well with her studies as well. 8:27pm. we will see you ina studies as well. 8:27pm. we will see you in a couple of minutes. yesterday we saw some pretty impressive thunderstorms moving north across england and wales, over the next few days we will continue with quite a lot of showers, perhaps even thundery, and it is going to feel much cooler than today, and over the next few days as well. we have a band of rain, moving out of england
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and wales and pushing into scotland and wales and pushing into scotland and northern ireland, far north of scotland it will collide with the sunshine, sunny spells for much of england and wales but also some showers, moving north, heavy and thundery. maximum temperatures today about 13 to 16 celsius, feeling much cooler, compared to yesterday. no showers will continue to spread north overnight and then we will have another band of rain, moving into the western areas by the early pa rt of into the western areas by the early part of friday morning. overnight temperatures down to five to eight celsius. this band of rain will spread in from the west and south—west, this breaking into more showery outbreaks of rain on friday. it will be another day to keep the umbrella handy. maximum temperatures, 15 to 17 degrees, some sunny spells developing, particularly across wales and the south—west later on. through friday night into saturday, a close eye on
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this area of low pressure, moving on. look at the isobar, close together, really quite strong wind, particularly in south wales and south—western parts of england, early on saturday. gusts of potentially 45 to 60 mph in some spots, and with it, some heavy rain, moving gradually east. the wind will ease off later in the afternoon, some sunshine into western areas, across northern ireland. cool day, look at the temperatures. nine to 13 celsius.
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this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and victoria fritz. "liked" by wall street — again. facebook shrugs off privacy concerns as earnings surge — despite a multi—billion dollar hit from us regulators. we are live, we're in london, and that's our top story on thursday 25 april. facebook has said it will set aside funds to cover a fine of up to 5 billion dollars to cover the potential costs of an investigation by us authorities into its

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