Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at Nine  BBC News  April 25, 2019 9:00am-10:01am BST

9:00 am
you're watching bbc news at nine, with me, annita mcveigh. the headlines: cases of measles almost quadrupled in england last year, as a report warns more than half a million children in the uk may not have had the jab. all round the world we have seen a 169 million children between 2010 and 2017 not get the immunisations that they should be having. president putin and the north korean leader, kimjong—un, meet in russia for their first ever summit. the competition watchdog blocks the planned merger between sainsbury‘s and asda. government ministers call for an investigation, after yesterday's leak of controversial plans for the uk to use chinese technology in its 5g network. sirmo farah claims he was robbed at a hotel in ethiopia, and accuses the owner —
9:01 am
a former competitor — of doing nothing to help. and manchester city are back on top of the premier league after beating manchester united last night at old trafford. good morning, and welcome to the bbc news at nine. the number of people in the uk who could be at risk of contracting measles is being described as a "growing public—health time bomb". the nhs says the number of cases in england almost quadrupled last year. the children's charity unicef says more than half a million children in england aren't protected against the highly contagious and potentially fatal disease. 0ur global health correspondent
9:02 am
richard galpin reports. according to unicef, an estimated 160 million people around the world missed out on the measles vaccine in the period from 2010 to 2017, and it says outbreaks of the disease are on the rise. there seems to be a global issue of a lack of information, scepticism around different sources of information, and that's meant all around the world, we've seen 169 million children between 2010 and 2017 not getting the immunisations that they should be having, and that is still the case in the uk. in 2017, more than 100,000 people died, most of them children, and the problem is notjust in developing countries. in the united states, france, the uk, and many other wealthy parts of the world, significant numbers of children are unprotected. there are many reasons for this. here in the uk and in other rich countries, it's linked
9:03 am
to anti—vaccine messages, which have been spread on social media and are untrue. but they've led to some people choosing not to inoculate their children. nhs england is describing the rejection of vaccines as "a growing public health timebomb". richard galpin, bbc news. i'm joined now by dr david elliman, who's an immunisation expert for the royal college of paediatrics and child health. good to have you with us. there is a well established immunisation programme in the uk for childhood diseases and why, in your opinion, what is your take on why this many children have been missing out on the measles vaccine. we have to look into historical context, so the children going through the now, something like 95% or get their post dose of mmr —— first dose by five
9:04 am
yea rs dose of mmr —— first dose by five years old, but the second dose is only 87% uptake. part of the reason for that is going to be that the older children they are just not in contact with health services and we need to check we are sending out reminders, it's not disruptive, we are not having to take children out of nursery to do the second dose, there are enough practice nurses around. and in the older age group we are seeing children and young adults coming through and around the time of the mmr scare in the late 19905, time of the mmr scare in the late 1990s, those children have not caught up on immunisations even though there is no upper age limit, that has never happened, and for those children we need to take any opportunity when the health and educational services are seeing them and to ask, have you been immunised, and to ask, have you been immunised, and if not, give advice that they should. so your message is that you can get the vaccine at any time stop
9:05 am
if you only had one dose of eight and the second dose is needed, you can get the second dose as a catch up can get the second dose as a catch up —— one dose of it. can get the second dose as a catch up -- one dose of it. we would positively encourage people to do that because the older you get, when you become a young adult, it's more ofa you become a young adult, it's more of a severe disease than a five or six—year—old. by putting it off you are making matters worse. how big an impact do you think the anti—vaccine movement in combination with social media is having on the uptake of the vaccine at the moment? it's difficult to tell. there has been very little change in the uptake of the vaccine. it's gone down a little bit. when you ask people, parents, are you confident about the vaccine we have seen no reduction in that confidence. when you ask people have you seen things on social media, yes, do you believe these things? no, we take it with a pinch of salt.
9:06 am
but we know people say that about newspapers and advertising. advertisers would be out of business if people did not believe what they said soi if people did not believe what they said so i think probably people are believing it but in this country, it's different for different countries, but in this country i don't think it's the major factor. if you go somewhere like the states, thatis if you go somewhere like the states, that is a different matter. we've seen a that is a different matter. we've seen a lot of cases of measles in new york state. we reported on that. but if the number of cases of measles quadrupled in england last year and we know it's a highly infectious disease, maybe, a small percentage of children are not getting the vaccine or the second dose of the vaccine then this public health time bomb we refer to, you can see there might be a problem just building up and waiting to happen. undoubtedly so. measles is so happen. undoubtedly so. measles is so infectious that unless you hit the target you will have outbreaks.
9:07 am
but i would concentrate on the practicalities of making sure people are aware at the right time that there are appropriate facilities and having made sure of those, are there enough practice nurses and have they got enough time. once we address those we can move on to the lesser problem of people who are outright refuses. and as i say this is different countries. thank you for your time today on that story. vladimir putin is meeting the leader of north korea, kim jong—un for the first time today in vladivostok. the summit in russia is being seen as an opportunity for president putin to show russia is an important player on the korean peninsula. the two men smiled as they shook hands on a red carpet, and in a televised address, mr putin welcomed mr kim's efforts to normalise relations with the united states. 0ur moscow correspondent sarah rainsford is in
9:08 am
vladivostok now. tell us more about what the two men have been saying. the first thing to say about the meeting is that it lasted longer than expected. it was scheduled for 15 minutes but ran for nearly two hours and it all took place here in this grey building behind me, the sports hall at a couege behind me, the sports hall at a college campus on an island off the coast of vladivostok. that is where president putin and kim jong—un coast of vladivostok. that is where president putin and kimjong—un held the summit. it lasted around two hours, but as per the details of what they were talking about, when they emerged they did not give away a huge amount. it was very positive in terms of body language, smiles, a warm handshake but in terms of what they talked about kim jong—un said it was constructive and useful and president putin talked about a substantial discussion. a lot of this is about simply sending the message that the meeting was taking place and sending the message,
9:09 am
primarily to the united states, because this is happening shortly after talks between donald trump and kimjong—un after talks between donald trump and kim jong—un over after talks between donald trump and kimjong—un over his nuclear programme broke down and this is russia stepping into potentially as a powerful ally. geographically, that make sense, of course, doesn't it? do you see the beginnings here ofa it? do you see the beginnings here of a much stronger north korea and russian alliance given that the last talks between president trump and kimjong—un did not go talks between president trump and kim jong—un did not go well? certainly, potentially yes. bear in mind that vladimir putin invited kim jong—un to come here a year ago and it's taken him time to make the journey and the timing is important. this is about the fact that the talks with donald trump had broken down. what kim jong—un wants talks with donald trump had broken down. what kimjong—un wants is talks with donald trump had broken down. what kim jong—un wants is the easing of sanctions on north korea. economic sanctions which are hitting his country's economy. vladimir
9:10 am
putin and russia are signed up to the sanctions against north korea because of the nuclear programme but they do advocate easing those sanctions and don't believe that pressure is going to bring about major change on the korean peninsula that the international community is pushing for. potentially vladimir putin is an important ally for kim jong—un, alongside china, in pushing for a different approach in resolving the issue. sarah, thank you very much. joining me now is former british ambassador to north korea, john everard. very good to have you with us. listening to what sarah is saying about what the two men have said so far, about what the two men have said so fa r, pretty about what the two men have said so far, pretty big generalisations about the success of the meeting but reading the body language and into what you know about it so far, do you think, as i put to sarah, that we have the beginnings of a much stronger alliance between russia and north korea compared to what happened in hanoi with president
9:11 am
trump? to be honest, i doubt it. what is coming out of the summit is very thin rule. very general statements, as you rightly say. and no communique or agreements signed off between the leaders. which is highly surprising. russia went into this summit wanting one big thing, recognition and prestige. it wanted to be seen as a player in the conundrum that is the north korean nuclear issue and it got that yesterday with the photo opportunities and the world saw that vladimir putin is no longer being snubbed by kim jong—un. vladimir putin is no longer being snubbed by kimjong—un. 0n the north korean side, a long, winding list of things the north koreans want. political support, economic support and, in particular, the ability to keep north korean workers in russia after the security council deadline of the 22nd of december. none of which they are likely to get. i think this might be a one—off. there not much of substance to support a deep and ongoing relationship. not much of substance, possibly a
9:12 am
one—off, but to put it in plain language, could this put donald trump's nose out ofjoint when it comes to the possibility of further contact between the us and north korean on the denuclearisation of the peninsula. i doubt it. the reaction from the white house has been a broad shrug. if kimjong—un wa nts to been a broad shrug. if kimjong—un wants to go running to the russians, let him, they're not going to get anywhere. the russians cannot change the mind of washington in in no position to give kim jong—un the economic support he craves and this isa economic support he craves and this is a sideshow, and president trump knows that. about the optics domestically for the two men?|j think domestically for the two men?” think they both come out looking a bit better. kim jong—un able to show the north koreans that it is not just the americans that will talk to him and he has other allies, although president putin probably can't help him very much. president putin also showing that he too gets talked to by kimjong—un and is not being sidelined and he does count for something in north korean
9:13 am
issues. if we move to the substance, the substantial issues of trying to do the denuclearisation of the korean peninsular, do you see any signs of hope on that front? no, i don't. i don't think this summit ta kes don't. i don't think this summit takes us any closer to the goal. the russians have called for a reconvening of the old six party talks, the previous forum in which denuclearisation was discussed and broke up in acrimony ten years ago but on which russia had a permanent seat or most effectively saying it wa nted seat or most effectively saying it wanted to be a player going forward on this. but even if these talks are reconvened, the chances of them achieving denuclearisation are vanishingly small. good to have you with us and thank you for your thoughts on this story. several government ministers are calling for a ‘full and proper‘ investigation into highly unusual leaks from a meeting of the national security council. ministers and security officials on the committee met earlier this week and are said to have approved
9:14 am
the use of equipment built by the chinese firm huawei in the uk's new 56 data network, despite warnings of a security risk. we can speak to our assistant politial editor norman smith. these are really serious demands for an enquiry, aren't they, with some calling for a criminal enquiry? they are serious because we have become almost a customs to leaks from this government, leaks from cabinet, but the national security council is a different body altogether because it handles some of the most significant and confidential material regarding our national security and i think the widespread expectation is that downing street will have to launch some sort of enquiry to establish how these discussions were passed on to the daily telegraph. joining me as dominic grieve, the head of the intelligence and security committee.
9:15 am
give us a sense of what the significance of these sort of leaks are. the leak itself, the content of it, something that was likely to come into the public domain 24 hours later may not be particularly significant but the principal that what is discussed at the national security council is kept totally confidential is really important, and that that should have been breached in this fashion and i cannot think of any other occasion when it's happened before, i think is deeply worrying. the consequences for whoever leaked it, i presume, they would be sacked, but do you have any sense of the likelihood of who, because the security council has both ministers and officials. who is more likely to have diebold for this information? i'd be very concerned if it was a civil servant —— diebold. iwould be conserved if it was one of my colleague serving on the national security council. but it's right that the problem that we have his collective cabinet
9:16 am
responsibility has been breaking down and we have seen plenty of leaks come out of cabinet meetings andl leaks come out of cabinet meetings and i think it's now pretty well established that those are leaks which are being facilitated by the cabinet members themselves who attend and in this case we just cannot tell where it has come from but whatever it is, it mustn't happen again. and the consequences for the person who did it should be what? if it turned out if it was a memberof the what? if it turned out if it was a member of the cabinet or a minister attending the nsc they should be sacked immediately. we have had lea ks before. isn't sacked immediately. we have had leaks before. isn't the difficulty with these enquiries that after the initial flurry of urgency to get to the bottom of it, nothing tends to happen. it is and it can sometimes be the case that you cannot find out where it comes from. journalists have their sources and protect their sources so have their sources and protect their sources so it can be difficult to establish the origin of the story. but what is important about this is there has been quite a big response
9:17 am
in parliament expressing shock about this and it's absolutely right that they should be because unless people are shamed by the reaction of their colleagues into understanding that this is completely unacceptable than the risk is it will happen again. how much credence do you give to the idea that perhaps this has been prompted in part because of all of the speculation about a new tory leader manoeuvring amongst ministers to demonstrate how tough they are when it comes to standing up to china? there has certainly been some posturing around on a whole range of issues and it would be idle to pretend that there are people who seem pretend that there are people who seem to be preparing themselves for leadership bids. none of this is in the national interest, in my view. the prime minister is in post and she requires such support as we can give her, certainly in maintaining the integrity of the way the government works. and those who seek
9:18 am
particularly, to share collective responsibility in government, who seek to responsibility in government, who seekto undermine responsibility in government, who seek to undermine her by leaking whether it is cabinet or whether it is the nsc or anything else, they are actually behaving outrageously badly because ultimately despite all the difficulties the government has, the difficulties the government has, the centrepiece of the way the uk government works is that collective responsibility of the people that ta ke responsibility of the people that take decisions and unfortunately it's been breaking down for some time. we've seen it with extraordinary utterances by some cabinet ministers in the past and it should not happen. dominic greve, thank you for your time. i think the widespread expectation is that number ten will announce an enquiry this morning they didn't do so but they put out a statement stressing their determination to protect the confidentiality and integrity of the national security committee and i suspect that is just april youth to a formal decision to launch an investigation. norman, thank you very much. now the headlines. the number of cases of measles in
9:19 am
england has almost quadrupled in the last year. the nhs is calling on adults to ensure their children have been fully vaccinated against the disease. russian president, vladimir putin, has met the leader of north korea, kim jong—un, for the first time to discuss how to improve the situation on the korean peninsula. the competition and markets authority block a proposed 12—billion pound merger between sainsbury‘s and asda. it is advantage manchester city in the premier league title race. they are back to the top of the table after a dominant 2—0 win over manchester united at old trafford. both manchester city and liverpool have three games left, so plenty of drama to come. manchester united losing saw arsenal have the chance to claim a top four spot, but they we re to claim a top four spot, but they were outclassed by wolves, beaten 3-1, the were outclassed by wolves, beaten 3—1, the first time wolves have beaten arsenal in any competition since 1979. and andy murray is
9:20 am
cautiously optimistic about returning to action at some point this summer according to his mother, judy. last month he said he was pain—free after hip surgery and still rated his chances of playing wimbledon this year as less than 50%. more and all of those stories at 940. see you then. a merger between sainsbury‘s and asda has been blocked by the competition watchdog, which has said it would have led to higher prices for customers. the two supermarkets had offered to sell up to 150 of their stores to facilitate the deal, but the competition and markets authority said it wanted to protect the millions who shop there each week. i'm joined now by our business correspondent victoria fritz. backin back in february the competition and markets authority gave a strong hint that it was going to do exactly what it has done today, block the merger. tell us why. yes, they did they put out a strong signal that this was
9:21 am
going to not go ahead because it was going to not go ahead because it was going to not go ahead because it was going to break competition are also the competition markets authority is there to look at potential monopolies and abuse of monopoly positions which would be increased prices, reduced quality, reduced range for consumers. and this is what is being looked at, but what is interesting is that they went a lot further than what they said in february and now we are hearing an outright ban. they did not come across with any other alternatives to this. let's hearfrom stuart mcintosh, the guy in charge of the enquiry, about why they went ahead with this. those price reductions we re with this. those price reductions were predicated and linked to savings in costs which we looked at very closely during the course of the enquiry and we have included —— concluded they are unlikely to be realised in anything like the extent suggested by the companies. secondly, we considered it would be very difficult to actually verify amtrak these price reductions over time —— and track. more
9:22 am
fundamentally, these price promises did not address the fundamental competition concerns we had as a result of two of the largest supermarket chains in the country merging, which would reduce competition in supermarkets, online shopping and a petrol filling stations. has there been any reaction from sainsbury‘s or walmart about what they do next? there certainly has. the boss of sainsbury‘s said this morning that what has happened is the competition markets authority have effectively taken £1 billion of savings out of shopping —— shoppers pockets. he saying that in response to the findings back in february they said they would reduce prices by 10% on most regular items and also they would look to try and sell some stores. they are saying that is now not going to happen as a result. walmart are saying they are not pursuing any alternatives at the moment but it doesn't mean that you couldn't get a private equity player
9:23 am
involved in asda and it could be bought by someone else instead. sainsbury‘s may finally get its hands on asda but not through it —— before it passes through somebody else's hands first. victoria, thank you very much. the duke of cambridge is meeting survivors of the christchurch terror attack and theirfamilies in new zealand. earlier he took part in an anzac day memorial service for soldiers who died in the first and second world wars serving australia and new zealand. the prince will spend two days in the country, and will also give a speech at the masjid al noor mosque where the majority of victims of the christchurch attack were killed. let's get more now from our correspondent in christchurch, phil mercer. just tell us more about what prince william has been doing there and who he has been meeting. he will be in christchurch later in the afternoon with the new zealand prime minister, and prince william went immediately to meet first responders, the
9:24 am
paramedics, the police officers who had to deal with the extremely grim and confronting task of the aftermath of the shootings at the two marks —— mosques in christchurch and we understand that prince william was very interested in the mental health of these first responders and the police chiefs saying that those paramedics and police officers were overwhelmed by prince william's interest in coming to christchurch‘s significant not just because of anzac day today but also the fact that he will come on friday be meeting survivors and family members of those people who we re family members of those people who were caught up in the atrocity here almost six weeks ago. has there been any mention of what has happened in sri lanka? we heard the sri lankan authorities talk about that attack
9:25 am
possibly being carried out in retaliation for what happened there in christchurch. new zealand authorities are being pretty circumspect about the view coming out of sri lanka that the terrible attacks over there are in some way linked to the atrocity perpetrated here in the middle of march and the new zealand prime minister is suggesting that there is maybe not a link based on the intelligence she has been privy to but she did say that the investigation is continuing. academics in new zealand ending are also speculating that there doesn't appear to be a direct link between what happened here and what happened in sri lanka given that the attacks in sri lanka seem to be extremely well coordinated and may well have been planned well
9:26 am
before the shootings here in christchurch but save to say that the terrible events over there, because they are making headlines here and they are a terrible reminder for here and they are a terrible reminderfor people in here and they are a terrible reminder for people in christchurch as to the atrocity perpetrated here six weeks ago. phil, thank you very much. climate change activists have blocked the main entrance to the london stock exchange by gluing themselves to walls and each other. a group has also climbed on to a docklands light railway train at canary wharf station. more than a thousand people have been arrested since the group's protests began ten days ago. we can speak to kathryn stanczyszn who's at the stock exchange for us. the protest is really keeping up their profile and what their demands are. absolutely. this is the 11th day of action for extinction rebellion in the capital and you might be able to see behind me that
9:27 am
police are currently blocked off this part of the pavement outside the london stock exchange because three climate change protesters have glued themselves to the floor and it looks like, and you cannot see it at this moment, but what they are doing is removing the people who have glued to the floor and they have banners and placards as well and earlier on, over the other side, banners and placards as well and earlier on, overthe otherside, in paternoster square, we know that seven protesters had glued themselves across the main entrance to the stock exchange. they were wearing black suits and red ties and they had on glass masks with the extinction rebellion logo on. they glued themselves to the wall, so one each and there was somebody glued and the hands were glued together. those seven protesters were all arrested. we believe that was on suspicion of criminal damage and aggravated trespass. this is the other side of the london stock
9:28 am
exchange and p —— people are —— the police are in the process of removing the three protesters. it is a delicate process because they have specialist officers to remove the glue and they are filmed as they do it and they are also told that they are likely to be arrested. we know these three will be arrested as well, so that is ten, plus another two people taking part in the protest here as well. extinction rebellion says today it is targeting financial institutions. i am joined by adam woodhall, a spokesman for the campaign group. just tell us why financial institutions? the reason we are tailgating financial institutions and particular stock exchange is because there are people and businesses in this building and around london who are trading in ecological destruction. they are making money from the death of our future, and this is why we must tell the truth on this and allow them to
9:29 am
recognise their responsibility to see what destruction they are bringing to our future. other than a few bemused —looking financial work as everyone was getting into the building. has this got the message across? what we are very aware of is there are emergency exits and we do not want to block them and what we wanted to do was to disrupt people getting in and going in for business meetings with the staff in there, they were milling around wondering what to do but it's also giving people pause for thought, people going in the building and people observing this through the media, that they can think about their financial investments are impacting on the planet. thank you very much, adam woodhall there, and we know there have been other actions taking place on the docklands light railway on canary wharf, there has been arrested there and there is more
9:30 am
phased action plan for later today but extinction rebellion say that this will be the last day of this phase and they hope to hold a closing ceremony later tonight at marble arch. thank you for that update. in a moment the weather but first let's here's victoria derbyshire with what she's got coming up in her programme at 10. good morning, figures seen exclusively by our programme suggest a third of gang members aged between ten and 15 are girls. it is a figure thatis ten and 15 are girls. it is a figure that is shocking notjust of the public but the police and local authorities, because for some time the extent to which teenage girls are involved with gangs has gone under the radar. now the children's commissionerfor under the radar. now the children's commissioner for england is highlighting the issue because she says these girls desperately need help to get out. this former gang member tells us she was in a gang from the age of 12. i would carry a knife but there would be guns, lots of kitchen knives. you would carry them for gang members? for gang
9:31 am
members and for my own protection. join us for our exclusive film at 10am on bbc two and the bbc news channel and online. this now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood, and carol, i hear we're in for some stormy weather? we now have a named storm, erin, and it means there will be strong winds on friday night and saturday. two bands of rain, one moving north across scotland, the second moving north across england, and also wales, and some of those showers will be heavy and thundery. we will hit 16 to 18 degrees, but widely we are looking at 12 to 15, 16. rain continuing to push north, clear skies, more showery outbreaks of rain coming from the west.
9:32 am
temperature wise, not expecting any trust. tomorrow we start off and bet on dry and bright note. low pressure, this is the name storm, coming our way, ahead of it we will see cloud and showers, some of those will be heavy, as we move from the we st will be heavy, as we move from the west to the east.
9:33 am
hello, good morning, this is bbc news. the headlines: cases of measles almost quadrupled in england last year as a report warns more than half a million children in the uk may not have had the jab. russian president, vladimir putin say‘s he had a substatial discussion about the korean peninsula with north korea's kim jong—un as the leaders met for the first time. the competition watchdog blocks the planned merger between sainsbury‘s and asda,
9:34 am
saying customers would have been worse off. government ministers call for an investigation after yesterday's leak of controversial plans for the uk to use chinese technology in its 5g network. sirmo farah claims he was robbed at a hotel in ethiopia, and accuses the owner, a former competitor, of doing nothing to help. time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing. as you've been hearing, analysis by the united nations child ren's fund, unicef, suggests that more than half a million children in the uk aren't protected from measles. the nhs is also warning that the number of cases of measles in england almost quadrupled last year. the health secretary has been telling the today programme why he's joining the call for adults to ensure that they and their children have been fully vaccinated.
9:35 am
iam not i am not relaxed about this at all, measles is a horrible disease but more broadly, we need to tackle this rise in people not vaccinating. 0ne of the things i am particularly worried about is the spread of anti—vaccination messages online, i have called in the social media companies, like we had to for self harming imagery a couple of months ago, i'm seeing them on monday to require they do more to take down lies, essentially, promoted on social media about vaccination. vaccination is safe and very important for the public health, for everybody‘s health, and we are going to tackle it. iran has suggested that the british—iranian charity worker, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe could be released from jail in a prisoner swap with iranians held in the us and australia.
9:36 am
mrs zaghari—ratcliffe was jailed for five years after being convicted of spying charges, which she denies. joining me now is nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's husband, richard ratcliffe. what is your understanding of what the iranian foreign minister is proposing? i'm struggling to understand, to be honest, it came as a big surprise, any talk about her being released is a good thing and of course it gives us hope but it was the first time we had heard the suggestion of the prisoner swap and what was to bet suggested is that nazanin was referred to a prisoner who was also mentioned according to the us, and they were talking about a swap between the us and iran. 0bviously a swap between the us and iran. obviously there is precedent between the us and iran of prisoner swaps happening, prisoner exchanges, part of what he was saying was, we can do a deal between the us and iran, but then he mentioned nazanin there is
9:37 am
specifically in relation to it. we we re specifically in relation to it. we were not expecting it, we had not had any indication. we have had secret messages over the years for different things but it was almost neverin different things but it was almost never in relation to a prisoner swap. it was nothing the foreign 0ffice mentioned. part of the job going forward, is to the state department, to have a conversation, to find out what they make of it all. you will probably take all this with a hefty dose of caution but on talks with the foreign office, have you had any discussions in the past about the possibility of something like this, a prisoner swap, or about the possibility of something like this, a prisonerswap, orany opportunity thus far to talk about this potential offer, if we can call itan this potential offer, if we can call it an offer, this suggestion by the iranian foreign minister? to the specifics, we have not talked about, a prisoner swap, we have not ever talked about. we have relayed all the messages we have had over the yea rs, the messages we have had over the years, most the messages we have had over the yea rs, most have the messages we have had over the years, most have typically focused on wanting some money from the uk, the uk owes some money in a couple
9:38 am
of cases. there was one time when they signalled a prisoner exchange but that was a couple of years back, nothing recent. behind closed doors, the conversations we have had with the conversations we have had with the foreign office was over the potential for the foreign office was over the potentialfor medical the foreign office was over the potential for medical clemency, actually, so, one of the things, sincejeremy actually, so, one of the things, since jeremy hunt evokes actually, so, one of the things, sincejeremy hunt evokes diplomatic protection, for nazanin, is that she was taken in front of a health commission, a body which checks whether someone is healthy enough to be in prison and they can decide to give someone treatment, but they can also decide that someone is too u nwell to also decide that someone is too unwell to be in prison, so we were getting our hopes up that that was the way out rather than a more complicated swap. how is nazanin? i don't know how she'll respond to this, it blindsided me, so she will be very confused, generally, confusion can be alarming for her and us. generally, she is pretty low, at the moment. she tends to go through, when positive stuff happens, like when private protection was announced, she was
9:39 am
update for a couple of weeks and then as time drags, she can get low again. we were hoping that this medical commission was going to lead somewhere, that is currently doing tests, but, yes, she is up and down, and every so often she threatens that if things don't move, she will ta ke that if things don't move, she will take matters into her own hands. that if things don't move, she will take matters into her own handsm the meantime, your next steps will be to get in touch with the foreign secretary, the foreign office, if they don't get in touch with you, to discuss these latest surprising lines coming from iran. one day ago, before this happened, i was planning on getting in touch to say to the foreign secretary, listen, you invoke to diplomatic protection, nothing seems to have really happened, i think you need to do something to show you are serious. now there is the conversation about this, what you make of what has happened, as this been signalled to you privately, it was not signalled to us. it may well be it is the same
9:40 am
conversation also, that you need to show that it is time for the games to end, and she needs to be home. thank you very much for your time today. thousands of emperor penguin chicks in the world's second—largest colony have been wiped out because the sea—ice where they're being raised isn't strong enough to support them. researchers at the british antarctic survey made the discovery after studying satellite images of the region. dr peter fretwell has been giving more details to the breakfast programme. we have been monitoring the emperor penguins around there with satellite imagery for ten years, in 2016 at this particular site, we found that the sea ice broke way too early, the emperor penguins breed on the sea, they needed to be frozen until december, but it broke up in 0ctober, december, but it broke up in october, november, so the chicks died. what happened to the penguins
9:41 am
themselves? adults will have survived, they have two proof feathers, they do not mind going into the water, if the sea ice brea ks into the water, if the sea ice breaks up, the chicks will die. how easyis breaks up, the chicks will die. how easy is it for a colony, once it is breaking up, to attach itself to another colony and become part of one? we did not know this, we were not sure, up until now, whether emperor penguins would keep going back to a place that was not viable, or if they would move, and go to another new site, or an existing site? one of the things this new study has shown is actually, they move after two or three years to a new site. so, they discover new places where they can breed, where they can breed safely? yes, they have gone to a pre—existing site, a smaller colony, 50 kilometres to the south. how long will that take? they swim quite a long way, they forage
9:42 am
up swim quite a long way, they forage up to 100, 200 kilometres away from colonies, so it would not take too long. is what is happening ok? i know there is a question over whether, why that ice is the way it is, that is a much bigger question about climate change, presumably, but they are adapting, they find other places to go, does that mean they are saving themselves, to a degree? to some extent, we found they are slightly more resilient. we can't say whether this event is linked to climate change, it is a single event, it is difficult to say it for that. but the first event in 2016 was caused by an abnormally warm season, we had a very strong el nino, a really big storm, ripped out all the stable sea ice at the time, and why it has not reformed, we are not sure about. talk to me, i love learning new things about penguins, i want some facts, the adults have
9:43 am
the ability to be in the colder water, you mention, why is that? they have a different type of feather? so, the beautiful light and white feathers you associate with aduu white feathers you associate with adult emperor penguins, waterproof, great layers of fat, but with the chicks, they have very fluffy, downy feathers, and they are not very waterproof. so, if they go into the water, they will freeze. unlike the adults, which can survive. let's ta ke adults, which can survive. let's take a look at what you are reading and watching, ending pension benefits to help the young, this is a suggestion from a group of peers on the committee for intergenerational fairness who say things like winter fuel allowance, tv licences, etc, free television licences, should be taken away from better off pensioners. the money instead spent on helping the younger generation with housing, and with training. if you go through the
9:44 am
stories there, we have touched on sainsbury‘s and asda's deal being blocked, the penguin chicks wiped out, which we havejust blocked, the penguin chicks wiped out, which we have just seen, blocked, the penguin chicks wiped out, which we havejust seen, and climate activists blocking the stock exchange, we have told you about that already. teachers are live streaming bedtime stories using facebook live, the idea is to get pupils, young pupils, more engaged with reading. they are encouraging those children to be tucked up in bed by 7pm, ready for a bedtime story, and on nights when pa rents a re bedtime story, and on nights when parents are too busy to read to the children, they can listen to the teachers reading a bedtime story. so far they say it is having a really positive impact on reading in the school. and, at number three, joe biden, question posed there, a third time lucky, 2020 us presidential election, speculation thatjoe biden, vice president to barack
9:45 am
0bama, will throw his hat in the ring for the third time. that is it for today's morning briefing. a bit of sport focus now. manchester focus! never mind bedtime stories, everyone had to stay up well past their bedtime to stay up well past their bedtime to see the end this match. manchester city really couldn't afford to lose this one — their game in hand over title rivals liverpool. and they didn't disappoint, as they beat manchester united convincingly to move back to the top of the league. here's our sports editor dan roan. with the final hurtling into view, this was a finale with a twist. to many fans, it felt like a no—win situation. get a result against manchester city and they would be handing rivals liverpool an advantage in the title race. lose and their rivals would be on course for another league triumph.
9:46 am
after a series of poor results, united desperately needed to restore some pride. marcus rashford repeatedly posing a threat. city's best moment in a goalless half carved out by raheem sterling and only denied by david de gea. but the champions have won ten league games for a reason. bernardo silva giving them the lead they craved. at this stage, manchester united was still in it, butjesse lingard then blew a golden chance to equalise, before substitute leroy sane extended city's lead. the manager all too aware that, once again, he should have done better. united, their hopes of a top four place in jeopardy. city back on top with what could prove a decisive win and the dream of retaining the title within touching distance. so, manchester city now back in front for what has been surely
9:47 am
the most relentless title race in premier league history. neither city nor liverpool has lost since january. crucially, both teams have now played the same if both sides win their last three games, this is how they would finish the season, liverpool missing out by one point, and the points tally would have comfortably won them the title in pretty much any other season. now, as you would expect, the manchester derby dominating discussion in the newspapers this morning. let's have a look, the picture of score a bernardo silva sliding on his knees. so with manchester united losing, arsenal had the chance to strengthen their claims on a top four place but they were comfortably beaten by wolves.
9:48 am
three first half goals at molineux put wolves out of sight — ruben neves with the pick of them. it finished 3—1, the first time that wolves have beaten arsenal in any compeitition since 1979. —— competition. in the last hour the professional footballers association has released it's team of the year. and perhaps surprisingly, paul pogba is the only player included who doesn't play for manchester city or liverpool. remember this is voted for by the players. plenty of debate over pogba's inclusion already going on, on social media. his form has certainly been up and down. the player of the year is also announced today, and in the most watched video on the bbc sport website gary lineker explains why thinks man city's raheem sterling should win the award ahead of liverpool defender virgil van dijk. it was very close, for me, i was arming and eyeing about virgil van dijk and raheem sterling, they are the two standouts, a two horse race,
9:49 am
and there are two reasons why i went with raheem sterling. virgil van dijk did not have the disadvantage of playing in a world cup, which is exhausting and very difficult the following season, what raheem sterling has done post—world cup, especially having had a bit of stick, is nothing short of remarkable. —— umming and ahing. and also it is easy to be a defender and stop things...! also it is easy to be a defender and stop things. . .! laughter to the world snooker championships in sheffield next, wherejudd trump narrowly avoided another shock at the crucible. he was taken to a deciding frame by the world number 43 thepchaiya un—nooh, and the thai player then miscued at a crucial point, allowing trump to win the match. he'll play ding junhui in the next round and is the bookies' favourite to lift his first world title. three months after having major hip surgery we have an update on the fitness of andy murray. his mum judy says we could see him back on court this summer if everything goes to plan with his rehab. so far things are looking positive
9:50 am
he has been back hitting a ball against a wall, hitting a little bit from a static position. so, still early days, and we have to wait and see how he does but i think he is cautiously optimistic about getting back onto the match court, perhaps at some point over the summer. don't forget, sportsday, all the days of sports news. that is at 6:30pm. plenty to talk about. the headlines: the number of cases of measles in england almost quadrupled last year — the nhs is calling on adults to ensure their children have been fully vaccinated against the disease russian president, vladimir putin, has met the leader of north korea, kim jong—un, for the first time,
9:51 am
to discuss how to improve the situation on the korean peninsula. the competition and markets authority block a proposed £12 billion merger between sainsbury‘s and asda. figuresjust in, knife crime across england and wales has risen to record levels — that's according to figures which havejust been published by the office for national statistics. there was also a sharp increase in homicides let's talk about knife crime, let's such a feature of the news. these figures show that it is continuing to increase across england and wales, figures show there was 40,800 offences recorded by police last year, 2018, that is up 6% on 2017, those figures, by the way, exclude gran greater manchester police because of ways that they recalled
9:52 am
offences, differences in ways they recalled. highest total since 2011, since offences related to knife crime have been recorded in this way by police. what is interesting is that the rate of increase appears to be slowing, that is the good news. 6% rise was less than the 9% in the previous 12 month period to the end of september. that was lower than the 13%, and then the 18%, lower than that. we can see over the past couple of years, although knife crime is still going up, the rate of increase is slowing. don't forget, knife crime is concentrated in urban areas, in particular, london, the west midlands, west yorkshire and greater manchester though those figures don't include greater manchester. while we are on the topic of knife crime, some of those offences will be robbery offences, and robberies were up 11%, that is also the highest in a decade. on to
9:53 am
the murder and manslaughter figures... s, 732 people lost their lives last year as a result of a murder or a case of manslaughter. that was 40 to more than 2017, those figures don't take account of terror attacks, across england and wales. that, again, is a higher, ofabout attacks, across england and wales. that, again, is a higher, of about a decade, the highest number in a decade. and that carries on a pattern that we have been saying over the past few years since 2014, where mergers dipped and since then they have been on a steady increase. that is a real concern. we have seen previous sets of figures showing that some of this rise in killings is being driven by knife crime. many of those crimes are following stabbings. just a couple of highlights, if you look at the overall picture of crime, the crime survey of england and wales, which measures crime according to people, whether they have been a victim or not, does not necessarily include
9:54 am
crimes reported to police, that shows a very small increase, but the office for national statistics says it is not significant and overall levels of crime are stable. thank you for pulling out the headlines for us from the headlines for back published in the last few minutes. the four—time olympic champion sir mo farah has become involved in a dispute with ethiopian athletics star haile gebrselassie over an alleged robbery at a hotel in the ethiopian capital, addis ababa. gebrselassie says he's considering taking legal action against farah, as jon donnison reports. a photocall for sir mo farah and his rivals ahead of the london marathon this weekend, good—humoured sparring with the favourite, world record holder, eliud kipchoge e, from kenya, but is with highly gabba selassie, an ethiopian legend, that mo farah is now involved with a
9:55 am
genuine spat. —— haile gebrselassie. mo farah claims he was robbed by hotel staff of two phones and money. somebody at the hotel had gone into my bag, opened somebody at the hotel had gone into opened my somebody at the hotel had gone into bag, somebody at the hotel had gone into my bag, opened my bag, took my money, took my nice watch that my wife brought me as a present. stay for three months in that hotel, it is very disappointing to know that someone is very disappointing to know that someone who has that hotel, that support, could not do nothing. they didn't do nothing. i'm disappointed. haile gebrselassie hit back by accusing mo farah of blackmail and not paying his bill, in an astonishing statement by his age and he also said his hotel staff
9:56 am
reported disgraceful conduct by mo farah and his entourage and he was reported to police for attacking a married athlete in a gymnasium. a criminal charge was dropped. a spokesperson for mo farah has said disputed all the claims and that he was disappointed with the refusal haile gebrselassie by to take responsibility for the robbery. —— refusal by haile gebrselassie. half of all local authorities in england and wales have no publicly funded legal aid to help people facing homelessness or evictions. hat‘s according to analysis by the law society, which represents solicitors. their research shows there are whole counties that do not have any legal aid services. the government says people can be covered by nearby providers or over the phone if they can't travel. labour is pledging to reverse cuts to thousands of bus services across england and wales at a cost of £1.3 billion a year. the party says the policy would be paid for by vehicle tax
9:57 am
but the conservatives claim labour's plans would slash funding for road repairs. almost ten o'clock, time for a look at the weather forecast. storm hanna is on the way. the irish met service have named it, it is moving friday night into saturday, storm hanna, i will bring you the details injust a moment. 0ver will bring you the details injust a moment. over the next few days we will see the weather a bit change from last weekend, much cooler, further rain and showers, courtesy of this area of low pressure, quite a messy pressure pattern, we have the low pressure system, lots of weather fronts spiralling around, continuing to see showers moving north as we go through the day. some sunny spells developing this afternoon across england and wales, also the risk of some heavy and thundery showers, showery rain will spread into central and southern scotland. far north, staying largely dry and bright. 17 or 18 celsius,
9:58 am
otherwise, 13 to 16 degrees. through tonight, showers will continue to feed north, and come out west again, a rotating pattern of low pressure into friday morning. more rain starting to move its way in across western areas. throughout friday, that showery rain will move in from the west, spreading north and east, breaking up into the afternoon, still a risk of heavy, potentially some thundery downpours. some sunny spells eventually across wales and the south—west of england, the north—east of scotland as well getting some sunshine. maximum temperatures on friday afternoon, 13 to 16 degrees. then, storm hanna moves in, and this area of low pressure, look at the white lines, quite close together, taking aim for parts of south wales and the south—west of england. that is where we are likely to see the strongest of the wind, gusting potentially up
9:59 am
to 70 mph, round exposed coastal areas of south wales, south—west england, even 50 mph across southern parts of england, with it, heavy rain moving through and it is going to feel much colder during saturday.
10:00 am
hello. it's thursday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. our exclusive story today: a third of gang members aged between 10—15 are girls, according to new figures seen by this programme. this girl was in a gang at the age of 12, and she carried knives. i'd carry a knife but there'd be guns and, you know... mostly kitchen knives. how big were they? like around this big. and you'd carry them for gang members? for gang members and for my own protection. the children's commissioner has told us exclusively that girls like samira are less likely to receive support than boys, and are being failed by the authorities.

29 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on