Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 26, 2019 5:00pm-5:46pm BST

5:00 pm
today at 5pm — the british and irish governments launch new talks, in an effort to restore power sharing in northern ireland. they say that after the killing of the journalist lyra mckee, there's a clear message that people want to see fresh momentum for the peace process. lyra symbolised the new northern ireland and her tragic death cannot be in vain. today police released pictures of the man they believe killed lyra mckee in londonderry — they called on the public to help them identify him. i believe that the gunman will carry a very heavy conscience as a result of lyra mckee's murder. when you see the public outpouring of support,
5:01 pm
there has been public condemnation. we'll have the latest from stormont. the other main stories on bbc news at 5... the bbc is told libya has agreed to extradite the brother of manchester bomber salman abedi — but it is now on hold because of heavy fighting around tripoli. britain's top civil servant demands that ministers co—operate — as an investigation begins into who leaked secrets from the government's national security council. retailer debenhams confirms plan to close up to 22 of its stores next year, affecting around 1200 jobs. we lost, all of us. we lost friends, we lost a part of our self... and marvel‘s biggest superheroes assemble to save the universe once more in avengers endgame. you can hear what mark kermode thinks of that in the film review.
5:02 pm
the british and irish governments have announced new talks aimed at restoring power—sharing in northern ireland. they said the funeral of the 29—year—old journalist lyra mckee had delivered a clear message that people want to see new momentum for the peace process. meanwhile police have issued new footage of the man they believe shot lyra during riots in londonderry last week, and appealed for the community to help identify him. a group calling itself the new ira has admitted it was responsible for killing her. our ireland correspondent emma vardy reports. about a minute before the shots were fired that killed lyra mckee, three men were seen on cctv, walking towards the rioting. in front, police say, a man carrying
5:03 pm
a crate of petrol bombs. with him, a man wearing a camouflage face mask and what police believe is the gunman. the man in the face mask is then seen lighting petrol bombs, and some time after the shooting, what police believe is the gunman seen again during the rioting here. officers believe they are all in their late teens. police say they have had overwhelming support from people in derry during the investigation, but today reiterated a plea for people to overcome fears about coming forward, saying witnesses will be protected. i do believe that the community do have information that could help me to unlock the key to lyra mckee‘s murder. i'm not sure those individuals are necessarily protecting this individual but i do believe that they are frightened. the reassurance i want to give to people is that i am able to deal with those concerns and worries sensitively. all i am looking for is a conversation.
5:04 pm
the death of lyra mckee has prompted renewed appetite for reconciliation between northern ireland's deeply divided politicians. why in god's name does it take the death of a 29—year—old woman with her whole life in front of her...? more than two years since the collapse of the power—sharing government, the words of lyra's local priest at her funeral, challenging parties to show unity, were given a standing ovation. the events in derry which led to lyra mckee‘s death were a throwback to northern ireland's past. the question now is whether this tragedy can lead to real political change for the future. emma vardy, bbc news. we can get more on this with our ireland correspondent chris page who is at stormont for us. let's pick up on that question. can this fresh momentum to restoring
5:05 pm
power sharing, might it be successful? well, the british and irish governments have decided there isa irish governments have decided there is a window of opportunity now to reopen talks between the stormont parties in a fresh bid to restore the devolved governments here in stormont that hasn't been in operation for more than two years. in the last hour there has been a news c0 nfe re nce in the last hour there has been a news conference by karen bradley and the irish foreign minister and they have announced those new talks will begin on may the 7th, the tuesday after the may bank holiday, the first working day after the counting in the council elections here which will be held next week as they were when the rest of the uk. after that there will be a meeting, a peace process forum, between the two governments where they will talk to each other. so you will have two talks process is going on in parallel in that first full week of
5:06 pm
may but both are linked to each other and the whole aim will be to restore political stability in northern ireland, bring back ministers to their offices here in stormont, put them back in charge of making decisions in northern ireland. let's hear some of that news c0 nfe re nce ireland. let's hear some of that news conference now, firstly from the irish foreign minister. what we saw this time last week of party leaders coming together and standing united in putting out a joint statement, it really gives me a clear indication that the party leaders do want to do this. now, we we re always leaders do want to do this. now, we were always clear when we talked about this that we would want to start talks after the local elections. what we are here today to say is that this will happen on the 7th of may. what we want and i think what every decent thinking person wants now in northern ireland is to see us
5:07 pm
wants now in northern ireland is to see us take that spark of determination that i think we've all felt in the last few days and to see if we can build eight momentum from that that can do something real and positive. we need new thinking about how to restart politics in northern ireland. so will the parties be able to reach an agreement? there is still plenty of issues dividing them, for example the issue of same—sex marriage, sinn fein wants to legalise it and the dup don't. the dup are in favour of brexit and sinn fein has said it will be a disaster for this part of the world. also big disagreement on the troubles and whether there should be legal protection for the irish language. the parties have started to give their reaction to news that there will be a talks process and we have heard from the vice president of sinn fein michelle o'neill. there
5:08 pm
is an onus on all of us to find a way forward. i don't think the electorate would thank us. we need to test it and see if there is a way forward. we are determined to get stormont up and running again but it has to be credible. as for sinn fein‘s form a partnership, the democratic unionist party, arlene foster has said that the dup won't be found wanting in any talks process saying that northern ireland needs a sustainable assembly and thatis needs a sustainable assembly and that is best delivered through working together with other parties. so on the whole positive sentiment is from the parties is a move towards new process of negotiation but everyone involved acknowledges that there is plenty of hard work ahead if there is to be in agreement to finally bring back the government here after so long. chris, thank you
5:09 pm
very much indeed. chris page for us at stormont. britain's top civil servant has demanded ministers co—operate with his inquiry into a leak of classified information from the national security council. sir mark sedwill has written to ministers and is reported to have given them an ultimatum — that they either confess to or deny the leak about government plans to allow the chinese technology giant huawei to help build britain's new 56 network. our political correspondent chris mason reports. look who happens to be in beijing today, talking up the prospect of business deals between the uk and china, the chancellor, philip hammond. while back home, a row is raging, yes, over a chinese telecoms firm but also over who done it, who, after a meeting of the national security council, where those there have signed the official secrets act, disclosed what happened? to my knowledge, there has never been a leak from the national security council meeting before.
5:10 pm
therefore, i think it is very important that we get to the bottom of what happened here. it is not about the substance of what was apparently leaked. it is not earth—shattering information. but it is important that we protect the principal that nothing that goes on in national security council meetings must ever be repeated outside the room. the daily telegraph reported that five cabinet ministers disagreed with the prime minister's assessment that a limited role for huawei in the uk's sg roll—out, the next generation of souped up mobile internet coverage, was a good idea. some argue that it would be a security risk. all five have since denied leaking the informational strongly criticising the leak. but there is fury that it has happened. how serious do you think these lea ks are? this is incredibly serious, actually, a complete outrage. i set up the national security council on behalf of the coalition government back in 2010. it is a very special body.
5:11 pm
the national security council is a senior committee of cabinet dedicated to particularly sensitive subjects and it is rather appalling that the lack of discipline should have extended to this body. i think my comment is, people need to get a grip and actually start treating serious subjects seriously. huawei has denied there is any risk of spying or sabotage or that it is controlled by the chinese government. it is already working here and it already has an eye kept on it. what is called a cell was created, manned by british intelligence, paid for by huawei but manned by our people and answerable to our government, who monitor on a daily basis whether huawei is behaving themselves are not. so far, as far as i'm aware, they have not found any obvious examples of abuse. that balance of risk clearly remains an active debate at the heart of government but it is now over to this man, the head of the civil service, sir mark sedwill,
5:12 pm
to try to get to the bottom of this leak. let's speak now to lord kerslake, former head of the civil service and now a member of the house of lords, hejoins us from sheffield. what do you think of this leak of information‘s i think it is exceptionally serious. it is not just a substance it is where the lea k just a substance it is where the leak has come from. the national security council is where some of the most sensitive conversations go on about intelligence and security. in my view for someone to have lea ked in my view for someone to have leaked from that committee for what appears to be political advantage is quite unforgivable. he is entirely right to be pursuing this as far as possible. how likely is he to find
5:13 pm
the culprit. unless he goes on consul creates people's mobile phones and go through the e—mail is how is he going to know? —— confiscates people's mobile phones. it is not easy. but it should start with the letter and then go on to interviews at all levels. it should involve checking e—mails and seizing phones again without fear or favour. i think every single possible effort must be made to pin down who did this however difficult it is because if it happens and there is no redress, it is an open invitation for others to think that this is ok and it most definitely is not. it is and it most definitely is not. it is an absolute disgrace, as lord 0'donnell has said. you talk about seizing you talk about seizing mobile phones. would he have the power to do that? a lot of people say that they need a police
5:14 pm
investigation where they would have the power to do that. the cabinet secretary has written asking if he would cooperate and cooperation should include giving up your phone and if they refuse to give up their phone then you would draw your own conclusions. my personal view is and it has to be for the government secretary to decide, they should focus first of all using the resources and expertise they have in the civil service in cabinet office to do this investigation and bring in the police only if they feel they are not making progress. that would be my view about the quickest and surest way to get to the bottom of this. he talked at the beginning of somebody doing this for potential political gain. does that mean you think it was one of the ministers presence rather than one of the security officials? i think it is ha rd to security officials? i think it is hard to be certain about this. there we re hard to be certain about this. there were both ministers and special advisers in the room, i'm sure. but the way in which the story was reported, it looked to be seeking to
5:15 pm
make an argument that was about political advantage, indeed challenging quite unfairly the prime minister. so the direction of travel seems to me in that way but we can't be certain until the investigation has been concluded. thank you very much for your time and joining us here on bbc news. former head of the civil service there. the headlines on bbc news... the british and irish governments launch new talks, in an effort to restore power sharing in northern ireland, following the killing ofjournalist lyra mckee. today police released pictures of the man they believe killed lyra mckee in londonderry — they called on the public to help them identify him. the bbc is told the extradition of the brother of manchester bomber salman abedi is now on hold because of heavy fighting around tripoli. and in sport: liverpool bossjurgen klopp says it would be "pretty special" for the premier league title race
5:16 pm
to go down to the final weekend of the season. they continue their game of leapfrog with manchester city this evening. a win at home to huddersfield will see liverpool back on top. montenegro will play their european championship qualifier against kosovo behind closed doors after their supporters racially abused england players last month. sam billings' hopes of forcing his way into england's world cup squad look to be over. he will be out of action for three to five months after injuring his shoulder playing for kent yesterday and will now require an operation. i will be back with more on those stories just after half past. the bbc has been told that the authorities in libya agreed to extradite hashem abedi — brother of the manchester bomber salman abedi — to britain to face charges, but this is now on hold because of heavy fighting on the outskirts of the capital tripoli. hashem abedi has been in custody
5:17 pm
in libya sincejust after the bomb attack on the manchster arena nearly two years ago. from tripoli, our international correspondent 0rla guerin reports. gunfire. 0n the outskirts of tripoli, another round of battle. gunfire. government fighters mounting a chaotic defence of the capital. it's under attack by forces from eastern libya. 0ne unseen casualty of this conflict, the attempt to extradite a suspect in the manchester bombing. this is hashem abedi, brother of the bomber salman abedi. he was detained here in libya a day after the attack in may 2017. greater manchester police have a warrant for his arrest on charges relating to the murder of 22 people.
5:18 pm
in libya's heavily guarded interior ministry, we were told his extradition has been approved but the minister warned it was bad timing. the court ruling was issued just a week before the latest fighting erupted. they agreed to give hashem abedi to police because he is a british citizen. and what will happen with that now? i mean, is it possible now to extradite him? they are waiting for the precision, there is some precision between our attorney office and your attorney office and the police but now the war, everything is stopped. the minister is focused on protecting his city from an offensive by general khalifa haftar, the military strongman from the east. he accuses theresa may of abandoning tripoli in its hour of need by withdrawing british special forces and embassy staff. why you go out?
5:19 pm
why you are afraid? if you go out, you give clear to haftar to kill us. i have to say something to mrs may, we have built very good relations after 2011, after 2019. now, within one week this relation is broke and we lose that trust and confidence. so you don't trust the british government anymore? i cannot trust. i cannot. their behaviour, i cannot trust them. the foreign office has confirmed all remaining british staff were withdrawn from tripoli due to the worsening violence. it says it maintains full diplomatic relations with libya and is in contact with the government. but the view from here is one
5:20 pm
of betrayal and it's clear that security co—operation between britain and libya, vital in the fight against so—called islamic state has been badly damaged. 0rla guerin, bbc news, tripoli. the sri lankan prime minister has admitted there was a serious breakdown in the machinery of government ahead of the easter sunday suicide attacks which killed at least 250 people. in an interview with the bbc, he insisted that warnings of imminent attacks had not been passed on to him by officials, and he rejected calls for his resignation. our correspondent nick beake is in the capital colombo. tell us a bit more about what the prime minister has been saying. ben, of course for the past five days ever since these dreadful attacks the question has been hanging over the question has been hanging over the situation here. sri lankans have been asking one question, could
5:21 pm
these attacks have been prevented? pretty early on we saw this huge security lapse, this intelligence lapse. we knew that indian intelligence had passed forward quite specific information that possibly christians would be targeted in colombo and other parts of the country. today the prime minister sat down with the bbc to address some of those issues. 0ur colleague spoke to him and put it to him why was it the case that senior officials didn't pass on to him this very detailed information? there are two different levels, the inspector general of the police. there doesn't seem to have been very much activity on that side. maybe some of them did not know it would actually take place or there was a group capable of doing this activity in sri lanka. so they didn't think it was important enough to tell you?
5:22 pm
no. even though you're the prime minister? i didn't get the information. this so that is what the prime minister is saying. meanwhile there has been a big raid by the police in the wake of these attacks. yes, ben, we'rejust getting more information about this and it seems to bea information about this and it seems to be a significant moment in this investigation. sri lankan police are telling us they now believe they have located the safe house used by the suicide bombers. this is in the east of the island in a town about one hour's drive south of batacloa, one hour's drive south of batacloa, one of the targets of the suicide bombers. sri lankan police have recovered a large
5:23 pm
—— a large supply of materials. some very detailed information is we also have. 150 explosive sticks and 150,000 metal balls, a drone camera and some containers of liquids. this isa and some containers of liquids. this is a really significant moment here. separately, to the east of the islands, there are reports of a shoot out possibly between expected militants and security forces. that isa militants and security forces. that is a developing story and if we get more information on that we will bring it to you as soon as possible. that is nick beake there with the very latest from colombo. in the last few moments —— the dup have been speaking at stormont —— last take a listen.
5:24 pm
we would prefer if the assembly was up we would prefer if the assembly was up and running immediately to deal with people's issues around health, education, infrastructure and to have the power —— parallel process for the outstanding issues. we will enter into these talks with a willingness to find a solution for eve ryo ne willingness to find a solution for everyone in northern ireland. she said the deal was done in february la st said the deal was done in february last year and could be done again. is that a chance this time?|j last year and could be done again. is that a chance this time? i think there is a real chance. i think the people of northern ireland very much wa nt people of northern ireland very much want us to get back into devolution and for that to happen as quickly as possible. i'm on the same page because we want to deliver to people who are waiting for their hospital appointments and operations and we are with people who want to be sent their children to the school of their children to the school of their choice. there are big issues to happen in the reform of
5:25 pm
education. it is important that we move forward with a willingness to get a deal which is a balanced deal. of course, the talks last year ended because there wasn't a deal and no amount of sinn fein think will make ita amount of sinn fein think will make it a deal because if there is a deal it a deal because if there is a deal it has to be agreed by both sides. there was progress made but we weren't able to come to a deal that was balanced and that is what i want to see. inaudible speech. n0 there is always a moral pressure. what people want to see happening is devolution. i have been out and about as have my colleagues and people want to see devolution back. when we were working in devolution
5:26 pm
sometimes we got attacked for not delivering but in fact it made a real difference and fasten the dup to have delivered extra funding for northern ireland through the confidence and supply agreements, think a much better it would be if we we re think a much better it would be if we were able to deal with that money through the assembly. at this arlene foster there of the dup with their reaction to that new push to share power—sharing at stormont. the dup saying they will not be found wanting in any talks process. jeremy corbyn has said he will boycott the official state dinner during president trump's state visit. the president is due to visit britain injune later this year. the labour leader said the prime minister should not be rolling out the red carpet to a president who rips up vital international treaties, backs climate change, and uses racist and misognyst rhetoric. the liberal democrats are the party for remain —
5:27 pm
that was the message from its leader, sir vince cable, as he launched his party's european election campaign earlier. he reiterated his party's call for another referendum, saying there were several versions of what brexit is supposed to look like — and that the process has put the country in a state of paralysis. the world has become a more dangerous place since the referendum took place. we've got putin and trump running a mock and it's much safer to be within the european union. now, what we will be arguing in these elections is that if you believe that, if you want to stop brexit and you want to remain, you should vote for the liberal democrats. so vince cable there, leader of the liberal democrats. time for a look at the weather, with louise lear.
5:28 pm
thanks, ben. hello, everybody. it will be a bumpy ride to start our weekend but then things will quieten down. there a storm there so quite a stormy start first thing but its moves stormy start first thing but its m oves over stormy start first thing but its moves over the north sea saturday into sunday and things will be a bit calmer. the first signs of that will arrive in the next few hours and we will see severe gales and some of that rain heavy in northern ireland, wales and up into north—west england as well. a lot of cloud through the night so temperatures will hold up at around seven to 9 degrees but the wind will be the key feature. first thing in the morning we will really notice that if you are stepping out. the strongest of the wind will start to ease through the morning but gales likely first thing and that rain will work its way across north wales, northern england and northern ireland. to the south somewhat drier and brighter but not particularly warm with top temperatures at nine
5:29 pm
to 13 degrees. a little bit quite as we move into sunday.
5:30 pm
this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. our latest headlines: the british and irish governments launch new talks, in an effort to restore power sharing in northern ireland following the killing of the journalist lyra mckee. today, police have released pictures of the man they believe killed lyra mckee in londonderry. they called on the public to help them identify him. the bbc is told the extradition of the brother of manchester bomber salman abedi is now on hold because of heavy fighting around tripoli. britain's top civil servant demands that ministers co—operate — as an investigation begins into who leaked secrets from the government's national security council. and the retailer debenhams confirms plan to close up to 22 of its stores next year, affecting around 1,200 jobs.
5:31 pm
let's get all the latest sports news for you now with lizzie. good evening. liverpool could go back to the top of the premier league with a win against huddersfield at anfield this evening. manchester city don't play until sunday, so liverpool can regain the advantage — at least temporarily. our sports correspondent andy swiss is there for us. andy, liverpool know it's out of their hands now, so are they still feeling positive there? they are still positive, yes, lizzie, but as you say now they need one of manchester city's final three opponents to do them a big favour. we have seen pressure opponents to do them a big favour. we have seen pressure can opponents to do them a big favour. we have seen pressure can do very strange things when it comes to this pa rt strange things when it comes to this part of the season. all liverpool can really do is keep winning and that's something they've been doing pretty well in recent weeks. they have won their last nine matches in all competitions. they should really win pretty comfortably tonight. they are up against a huddersfield side who are rock—bottom of the premier league. they trail liverpool by a mere 7a points in the table, so it
5:32 pm
will be really the shock of all shocks if liverpool don't come away with the three points tonight. jurgen klopp said he was not remotely surprised manchester united could not do them a favour earlier in the week. he was very philosophical about the situation but he won't know, as you say, that if liverpool when he tonight, they would go back to the top of the table. and that just puts a little bit of pressure on manchester city. they will have to play catch up on burnley on sunday. turf moor is not an easy place to go it have to get three points. liverpool fans will be hopeful that something remarkable will still happen and we could still see a few twists and turns in this title race. kick—off here at infield don't act —— kick—off here at anfield is at eight
5:33 pm
p:m.. andy kick—off here at anfield is at eight p: m.. andy swiss at anfield. montenegro will play their european championship qualifier against kosovobehind closed doors after their supporters racially abused england players last month. danny rose, raheem sterling and callum hudson—odoi were targeted by groups of home fans during england's 5—1victory in montenegro last month. the second round continues in the world snooker championship. amateurjames cahill is trying to cause another upset after his shock win over ronnie o'sullivan in the first round. he's up against scotland's stephen maguire. maguire, though, leads 5—3. they will resume this evening. you can follow all the action from sheffield on bbc two and the bbc sport website. f1 now. charles leclerc led a ferrari 1—2 in an incident—packed second practice at the azerbaijan grand prix. he finished seconds ahead of sebastian vettel, with lewis hamilton in third. earlier, there had been a bizarre incident during first practise when a car hit a loose man—hole cover, causing the session to be abandoned. george russell's williams was damaged by the drain cover and then doused in hydraulic fluid after its recovery truck hit a bridge on its way back to the pits. sam billings' hopes of forcing his
5:34 pm
way into england's world cup squad look to be over. he will be out of action for three to five months after injuring his shoulder playing for kent yesterday and will now require an operation. he wasn't named in england's preliminary world cup squad, but was included for the odi against ireland and the t20 with pakistan and was still hoping to force his way into england's final world cup squad. bryony frost has been passed fit to ride just in time for the final jumps meeting of the season. frost broke her collarbone shortly after making history at the cheltenham as the first female jockey to win a grade 1 at the festival over fences. she'll ride present man in tomorrow's gold cup at sandown for trainer paul nicholls, who will be crowned champion trainer. and also richard johnson will be crowned the champion jockey and has made 200 wins this season. we'll have more for you in sportsday at 6.30pm. see you then. thank you very much indeed.
5:35 pm
debenhams has announced the closure of 22 stores by next year, putting 1,200 jobs at risk. the retailer says that all stores will remain open for the rest of this year, including the christmas trading period. the struggling department store chain was taken over by its lenders this month. our business correspondent rob young reports. debenhams is one of britain's oldest retailers, it traces its roots back to 1778. now, it's battling for its future. the crisis facing the high street has hit debenhams hard. it has issued a series of profits warnings. a few weeks ago, the retailer went into administration and was taken over by its lenders. now, the company says it plans to close 50 stores. 22 will shut next year. about 1,200 workers could be affected at those. no one likes to close stores. it's something that none of us want to do, and we've talked to our staff this morning, they've been briefed, and we will do our utmost to minimise the 1,200 jobs that are at risk of redundancy by trying to redeploy them into differentjobs over the next period of time.
5:36 pm
the list of stores due to shut is longer than expected. it includes places like canterbury, kirkcaldy and wolverhampton. many places have already lost other big chains in recent years. debenhams is a key store on many high streets, but it's failed to move with the times and keep pace with some of the big changes that have been buffeting retailers. sales at debenhams have been falling recently, but it seems many shoppers still have a fondness for the brand. debenhams is also saddled with huge debts, and it, like many large retailers, say its rent and business rates bills are just too high. but its restructuring plan is by no means a done deal. the majority of creditors have to vote in favour, that includes landlords, and many of them are being asked to accept painful cuts to the retailer's rent bill. the rent at some stores could be halved. i think it is very likely that the landlords will vote through this cva. it's very unusual for them not to do so, and in this particular case,
5:37 pm
debenhams are only asking for 22 stores to be closed, and the landlords know that to keep the rest of the business going and to have a long—term, sustainable future for the other stores, some stores at debenhams have to close. debenhams is the latest of several retailers to announce store closures. topshop is understood to be looking at its estate, too. the crisis on the high street is far from over and continues to affect many once much—loved big names. rob young, bbc news. with me to discuss this further is retail analyst maureen hinton. thanks for being with us. what's gone wrong at debenhams? it's mainly because it hasn't been invested in its stores. what they were doing, they were opening more stores because that opened more sales and he really should have been investing in their online business. it was more relevant what we want to buy these days. it has not moved with
5:38 pm
these days. it has not moved with the times. know, and now it's got high debt and so it has not at the cash to invest in new business. that is what has been hindering it over the past few years of. this plane to close these stores, do you think that's enough? is that going to save debenhams? it will probably stem the tide. it does need to close stores. it's got far too many. it's going to close a more stores after this as well. it's got 50 b pipeline eventually. it should help it and hopefully, that will free up some more cash for it to spend is this going to release some cost it has. but it really does have to look at the whole offer and hopefully, it will have enough cash to invest in it. another big store closing shops in high street, and shopping centres around the country, how big a whole is this going to leave? it's going to leave quite a big hole. they were
5:39 pm
the anchors of shopping centres. it's what everybody came for. they tend to be large spaces. what you are finding is now, because we are shopping differently, they are being reassigned. a lot of the house of fraser stores are going to be part retail but part leisure, part cafes, restau ra nts, retail but part leisure, part cafes, restaurants, fitness centres, so it's really a change in high streets to try and fit in with how we are today, how we spend our money. it's pa rt today, how we spend our money. it's part of the problem, these stores we re part of the problem, these stores were just too part of the problem, these stores werejust too big. part of the problem, these stores were just too big. they are too big for now. they weren't too big originally. but they are too big for how we shop now. it's really about trimming it down to a more relevant offer. but there is still going to be, they're still going to be stores, and some are going to have big stores. the stores that are going to remain, would they need to be smaller, do you think? the debenhams stores. yes, i think they will have to reassign some of the space. probably to make it more
5:40 pm
profitable as a store as well, because they have several floors. and lots of time, you don't go to the top floor them and if you're selling things like furniture, you probably go elsewhere for it. they probably go elsewhere for it. they probably will reassign space elsewhere. that is the best way of utilising and making it more profitable. just looking ahead long—term, in the next ten, 20 yea rs, long—term, in the next ten, 20 years, what's going to happen to the high street? i think it's going to change. even amazon and all the baba, just online retailers in the world, or taking on stores. i thing we wa nt world, or taking on stores. i thing we want that physical experience as well. the weaker ones are going to fall by the wayside and we will have a different time of high street, probably more community—based, social based then it is at the moment. so it willjust evolve as it a lwa ys moment. so it willjust evolve as it always does. evolve, and not die. maureen, thank you for talking to us. maureen, thank you for talking to us. maureen hinton, thank you for talking to us.
5:41 pm
two people have suffered minor injuries in an explosion at the tata steelworks in port talbot in south wales. the blast happened in the early hours of the morning and triggered a number of small fires. it's thought to have been caused by a train carrying molten metal into the works. another powerful cyclone has made landfall in mozambique, a country still recovering from a storm last month which caused hundreds of deaths in the region. thousands of people have been evacuated from areas most at risk. winds peaked at more than 200 kilometres an hour, and there are warnings that several days of heavy rain could cause serious flooding and landslides. prince william has called on people to reject all forms of extremism. he was speaking during his visit to new zealand, where he met survivors of last month's mass shootings and relatives of the 50 people who died. in an emotional speech at one of the mosques that was attacked, the duke of cambridge described the shootings as an unspeakable act of hate. hywel griffith reports from christchurch. reclaimed as a place of prayer, the al noor mosque is no
5:42 pm
longer a crime scene, but what happened between these walls has scarred every memory. the prince came to bring a message of hope that the unity shown here in christchurch would overcome the actions of the gunman. in a moment of acute pain, you stood up and you stood together. and in reaction to tragedy, you achieved something remarkable. i've had reasons myself to reflect on grief and sudden pain, and loss in my own life. and in my role, i have often seen up close the sorrow of others. that message of love overcoming hate does still resonate here for the survivors and the families of the victims. a message that they do belong here, that this is their country. and that means something to the family of abdel fattah kasem, one of the 50 gunned down in the mosque. his wife and daughter felt
5:43 pm
the words were genuine. that means they are acknowledging we are not left alone, they're acknowledging what happened to us and they're showing that they are sharing our feelings and they are supporting us. it's really appreciated. sharing our grief from a really authentic and honest place. before leaving, the prince laid a wreath for the victims of the 2011 earthquake, a reminder that the city has been tested and overcome tragedy before. our latest headlines on bbc news: the british and irish governments launch new talks — in an effort to restore power sharing in northern ireland following the killing ofjournalist lyra mckee. today, police released pictures of the man they believe killed lyra mckee in londonderry. they called on the public
5:44 pm
to help them identify him. and the bbc is told the extradition of the brother of manchester bomber salman abedi is now on hold because of heavy fighting around tripoli. a look ahead to sportsday at 6.30pm tonight. and coming up on bbc news, we're live at anfield, where liverpool begin their countdown to one of the tightest title races in history. they're playing huddersfield tonight, the first of their three final matches this season. liverpool are a point behind leaders manchester city, who play burnley on sunday. the last time liverpool won the league title was in 1990 — nearly 30 years ago. we'll also be looking ahead to a big weekend in women's football, as well as getting all the latest from the snooker and much more, so join us on sportsday at 6.30pm. now, though, on bbc news, it's time for the film review.
5:45 pm
hello there, welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. mark, what do we have this week? we have eighth grade, the debut feature from bo burnham. avengers: endgame, the saga comes to a conclusion. and bel canto, a troubled drama starring julianne moore. eighth grade, just to be clear, because there's a difference in system in the united states. this is 14—year—olds? system in the united states. this is 14-year-olds? exactly. the end of middle school, and it stars elsie fisher is kayla, a 13—year—old coming to the end of her eighth grade. and she is socially anxious in person. we see these shots of her
5:46 pm
moving through the corridors

29 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on