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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 28, 2019 8:00am-9:01am BST

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coming through its doors to keep things afloat. laughing in other pod. oh, my goodness. and that's it for the short cut of click this week from otherworld. don't forget, the full version is on iplayer, and don't forget, we live on social media. you'll find us there throughout the week on facebook, instagram, youtube and twitter at @bbcclick. thanks for watching, see you soon — and if you need me, i'll be in my pod.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with tina daheley and chris mason. our headlines today: the uk's fracking tsar quits, accusing the government of pandering to scare stories about the safety of shale gas. a new link between obesity and mental health problems in children. researchers say the two go hand in hand from the age ofjust 7. a shooting at a synagogue in the us city of san diego leaves one woman dead and three people injured. mo farah aims to win the london marathon for the first time this morning, claiming victory would sit alongside his incredible achivements on the track. good morning from the start line of
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the london marathon, 40,000 people are about to start going through here this morning and they will be pa rt here this morning and they will be part of a amazing landmark raising more than £1 billion for charity over the london marathon‘s 39 year history. in weather, the breeze begins to ease down. for most is slightly dry and warm day. details later here on brea kfast. the uk's shale gas commissioner has resigned after only six months in thejob, saying the government is paying too much attention to a small but noisy environmental lobby. natascha engel was tasked with uniting communities over the controversial process, but says stringent rules are stopping the industry from being successful, as john mcmanus reports. is this a vision of the uk's future energy market? hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in this case at a site in lancashire.
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maybe not, because despite government support for shale gas exploration, the woman in charge of inspiring confidence in the project has just quit. natascha engel was appointed as commissioner for shale gas just 6 months ago, but in a letter to the government announcing her resignation, she complained that safety regulations were strangling the industry. retrieving gas through fracking involves pumping water, sand and chemicals at high pressure into shale rock. when that rock fractures the gases released and brought to the surface. the industry says it is safe, but it can cause earth tremors. to reassure local communities, fracking must pause if those tremors reach a magnitude of 0.5. this site has had to stop work several times. natascha engel says that rule amounts to a de facto ban, and she writes that:
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those campaigners aren't just worried about tremors, they say climate change and fossil fuels should stay underground. in scotland, fracking remained under a moratorium. holyrood still has not decided how to proceed. supporters in the usa say fracking there has lowered gas bills, but some states have still banded. the government here maintains that shale gas is both environmentally and consumer friendly. now it needs to find somebody new to make that case. a new link between obesity and mental health problems in children as young as seven had been idenfied by researchers. they found obese seven—year—olds were at greater risk of suffering emotional problems, such as anxiety and depression, by the time they reached 11. the findings are being presented at the european congress on obesity in glasgow today. richard lister reports.
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exercise and a healthy diet have long been the best prescription for avoiding obesity at any age. but this new study has found a link to mental health in children too. researchers analysed data on more than 17,000 children, up to the age of 14. they found that from the age of 7, obesity and emotional problems were closely linked. and that linkage was the same for girls and boys. researchers don't fully understand the link between obesity and mental health in children. the extent to which poverty plays a role is also unclear. but the relationship between these issues could be important. i don't think it is as simple as one causing another. i think they influence each other and it is probably going to be different in different people, the extent to which that happens but i also agree there are other factors at play here in one of those could be social or
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economic disadvantage which is something we looked at in the study. no harm in a little snack, is there? but half the sugar our kids eat comes from snacks and sugary drinks. which could lead to harmful fat building up inside. public health england has been encouraging parents to cut the sugar in kids's diets for years, to reduce obesity and stave off physical health issues. this study suggest there might be mental health benefits too. at this school in salford, children start the day playing and chatting, giving staff a chance to spot any potential emotional problems. the research may mean this focus on mental health could also improve children's physical well—being. a woman has died and three people are in hospital after a gunman opened fire at a synagogue in california. a 19—year—old man has been arrested after the shooting in san diego. 0ur correspondent sophie long reports.
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#we shall overcome. a community brought together in pain and multi—faith prayers for peace. they came to soothe each other‘s sadness and to pray for those suffering. for laurie gilbert kay who went to worship on a sunny saturday morning and died hours later in hospital. for a child shot in the leg and for two men, one a rabbi. i have been going here my entire life and to see all these wonderful people come together from all these faiths, it's just absolutely amazing. we had one person today full of hate, one person and look, there is 1000 people here tonight that are full of love. that is what it's about. this is not the first time a tight—knit community like this one have come together to try and help each other heal the wounds inflicted by a man with a gun.
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it's unlikely it will be the last. i am hoping this does not become the new normal, places of worship are sacred. human life is sacred and just the idea of every time we have to keep responding to acts of hate and acts of terror is really traumatising for the community. police have arrested a 19—year—old, john earnest. they are now investigating what made a young man take an assault rifle, shoot a child, kill a woman and destroy lives in a place of peace and worship. sophie long, bbc news, poway, california. sri lanka's roman catholic leader has condemned the easter attacks as "an insult to humanity" as the country marked a week since suicide bombers hit three churches and three luxury hotels. the archbishop of colombo, cardinal malcolm runjeet, held a mass shown live on television after cancelling all public services amid fears of a repeat of the attacks which left 253 dead. caroline rigby was watching.
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one week on, they pray for peace, for safety and to remember the 253 people who lost their lives in last sunday's attacks. it is a great tragedy that happened. it is an insult to humanity. # hallelujah, hallelujah. .. roman catholics in sri lanka have been celebrating mass in their own homes, amid fears of further attacks on the churches by islamist militants. this service, televised to the nation was held in a small chapel at the residence of the archbishop of colombo. in a rare show of unity it was attended by both sri lanka's president and prime minister, whose political rivalry has been blamed for security lapses that preceded
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the easter sunday bombings. other services have also been taking place including by buddhists who make up the majority of the population. and this heavily guarded vigil took place outside st anthony's shrine in colombo where dozens of worshippers were killed last week. since then nearly 10,000 soldiers have been deployed to sri lanka's streets. as security forces believes dozens of suspects could still be at large. over the past week they have carried out raids across the country. on friday 15 people including six children were killed when suspected islamist militants blew themselves up while police descended on their hideout. in another, troops seized items including a huge cache of bomb—making materials. a discovery that will do little to alleviate people's fears that those behind the bombings may have been planning more attacks. china's ambassador in london has said the uk government must make its own decisions about whether to let huawei build the 5g network.
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the us says the chinese telecoms firm is a security risk. but writing in the sunday telegraph, lui xiaoming said britain should resist pressure and choose independent decision—making. mps will vote this week on whether to declare an environmental and climate emergency following mass protests amid concerns the crisis hasn't been addressed. labour will force a commons vote on the issue — one of the key demands of the ‘extinction rebellion‘ movement whose activists paralysed parts of london in recent weeks. jeremy corbyn said he hoped other countries would follow if the uk parliament became the first in the world to declare a climate emergency. take a look at these pictures of actor idris elba's luxury wedding in morocco. the celebrations in marrakesh lasted three days, and wife sabrina wore not one but two bespoke vera wang dresses. friends and family celebrated
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at a "colours of the souk" themed dinner and a festival—themed party. the couple got engaged last february after he dropped to one knee during a screening of his film yardie. that is quite a pair of earrings. a lot of blame. —— bling. the london marathon gets under way later this morning and 41,000 people are getting ready to take on the 26.2 mile race this year. graham satchell is at the start line, speaking to some of the runners about their reasons for taking part. it is looking quite cloudy and dull but probably good for london marathon runners? yes, i think so. last year it was hot and this year it is not. the runners told me it is pretty good weather for runners told me it is pretty good weatherfor running, runners told me it is pretty good weather for running, much runners told me it is pretty good weatherfor running, much better desk than anything else. pretty much
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eve ryo ne desk than anything else. pretty much everyone running the race has their own personal story, their own reason for doing it. let's have a chat with some of the guys. we have steve, rachel, mark and hugh. steve, you are running because, this is steve bland was part of a podcast which originally featured your wife rachel who died last year of cancer? she died in september. she had breast cancerfor died in september. she had breast cancer for two years and we are trying to raise as much money as we can for trying to raise as much money as we canfora trying to raise as much money as we can for a charity that is close to oui’ can for a charity that is close to our hearts. you, me and the big c was a phenomenon podcast because it was a phenomenon podcast because it was a phenomenon podcast because it was a no holds bar explosion of what it is like to be living with cancer? that is right. it was not replicated in the wider media and my wife had the idea for it and it took off. the
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people it is important to the people in the cancer community, it is important to them. they are engaged in topics. it is really important, a conversation we need to be having a lot about cancer. you have taken over rachel's role in the podcast. that is quite a step? the girls won't mind me saying they need someone won't mind me saying they need someone to keep them in order and they found it hard to imagine someone they found it hard to imagine someone else in rachel's chair other than me. it seems to be going well from a different perspective. it is an honour to be able to carry on what she was doing. you are rachel as well, herfriend. i do think he is doing in the podcast? amazing, i listen to them when i am training and they are fantastic. completely in awe of all of them speaking about such hard—hitting topics, fantastic.
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it is so difficult, this, because you did the podcast within weeks of rachel dying and it was so raw listening to that. it is a conversation we need to have. the topics are deaf and around cancer are things we need to talk about and the more we talk about it and the less terrifying they are, that is something which was passionate about and if she could do it while she was facing what she was facing, how can we not carry on the conversation now for her? it is an honour. how important is it for you to be running this? it was amazing to be pa rt of running this? it was amazing to be part of the team and i was honoured when steve asked me. i know we have reached the fundraising target so i am delighted. it is great to be part ofan am delighted. it is great to be part of an amazing event. are you confident about today?” of an amazing event. are you confident about today? i am not sure about confident. have you run a marathon before? steve ran with me in 2012 are my own cause so i am delighted to pay him back and cannot
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wait to get going. whew, let's talk about the bigger picture because there is an elite race going on and all eyes will be on most —— mo farah. he is up against the record—holder? farah. he is up against the record-holder? he is up against one of the greatest runners of all time but he is in amazing form. his training has gone really well. we are delighted to have him on the start line, the competition is going to be amazing. that is brilliant. you have got an amazing women's race going to happen, the greatest woman field ever. we have also got david weir, he has been on the start line for 20 consecutive years. incredible. incredible, he has won it eight times. that is part of the world parrot athletics championship. there are so many things going on,
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so many great athletes. —— world para—atheltics. so many great athletes. —— world para-atheltics. must warm your heart to see it achieve so over the years. when my father found to see it achieve so over the years. when my fatherfound it to see it achieve so over the years. when my father found it at this event withjohn when my father found it at this event with john sally back when my father found it at this event withjohn sally back in 1981, ido event withjohn sally back in 1981, i do not think they realised what they had started. this year we are celebrating the fact that £1 billion is being raised for good causes. that is a truly incredible figure and the efforts the runners have gone through, the cold winter nights, the dark nights... 0k, we are nights, the dark nights... 0k, we a re clearly nights, the dark nights... 0k, we are clearly having technical difficulties but thank you. finding the only bloke in blackheath wearing
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a suiti the only bloke in blackheath wearing a suit i suppose but he is an important chap because he has to run the whole thing. good luck to everyone taking part today. coverage of the masson is on everywhere today. —— masson. the bbc has live coverage of today's london marathon starting on bbc two from 8.30, and on bbc one from ten o' clock. you can also follow the action on bbc radio 5 live sports extra, bbc iplayer, the bbc red button and online. you cannot escape the feeling of guilt that a lot of people are making a huge effort to run a long way and the rest of us are sitting on the sofa watching them. let's check on the weather now. here is matt. there is a bit of encouragement from the skies for those heading to london to run. the skies are breaking up a little bit. if you are heading down take a couple of layers because even though the sunshine will come through
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winding things up it is going to be rather cool day, especially in the cloudy moments. quite a breeze but not as strong as the winter yesterday. there is a small chance ofa yesterday. there is a small chance of a shower but it should stay dry to much if not the entire race. for the rest of the uk it sums up that as well. not as windy as yesterday, some sunshine and a couple of showers around. this was storm hanna that was with us yesterday, bringing us that was with us yesterday, bringing us basic conditions. close spilling into the west, turning such an hazy but already worked in northern ireland to the far south—west of wales, devon and cornwall. patchy rain and drizzle pushes in reaching the channel islands in afternoon. claude breaks up it across scotland and england. a couple of showers in the counties of england but away from the... much of inga dam wales dry, hazy sunshine and feeling
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warmer and the rain arrives. keeping temperatures suppress but with sunny spells across northern scotland and the latest of the winds, 17, maybe 18 celsius just about possible sally very pleasant feel when the sun is on your back. it will ease through tonight and the eastern counties are he mist and fog. in the west lots of cloud around across northern ireland and to the west of scotland and wales. temperatures up to seven or at 90 degrees, patchy rain and drizzle but a chilly start to scotland, maybe even a touch of frost. this is the big picture for monday. the one front is producing the rain today. it does not great for tomorrow. it could start to push westwards supplies of somerset and devon breaking up. anotherfine day,
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when even lighter than today and so temperatures are up a degree or so, most notably across counties. turning his it for many, showery rain across parts of northern ireland, western parts of wales. a good part of the country staying dry and temperatures up to 17—28d, the highest. that is how it is looking. -- 20 highest. that is how it is looking. —— 20 degrees. ‘exercise tiger‘ was the code name for a large—scale military rehearsal, which took place 75 years ago, ahead of the d—day invasion of normandy in 1944. robert hall is at slapton sands in devon this morning where a special ceremony is taking place. robert — what more can you tell us about ‘exercise tiger'? good morning, this is slapton sands,
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one of the beautiful spots along the south devon coast. in 1944 at this whole area would have been different. every civilian was moved out, there were thousands of americans based here and they were taking part in what were in effect their final act taking part in what were in effect theirfinal act as taking part in what were in effect their final act as sessions before their final act as sessions before the d—day landings in june. their final act as sessions before the d—day landings injune. exercise tiger was one of the biggest practice sessions or exercises but as you are about to hear it ended in tragedy. sla pton sands, popular today as a nature reserve, but 75 years ago the setting for a dress rehearsal which went disastrously wrong. in 1944, allied commanders matched this wide bay with the beach in normandy codenamed utah. slapton's geography was perfect for landing craft, tanks and thousands of troops to practise their assault on hitler's atlantic wall. the exercises were held in total secrecy.
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residents from every nearby village had been moved from their homes. i had six weeks to move out of the area... pam hill remembers the day she was filmed watching the removal men loading her family's furniture into lorries as the first americans arrived. she also remembers an april morning when rumours began to spread that something very bad had happened out at sea. they knew something had happened because the fellow remembers seeing all the ambulances going up the line here. so they knew there was quite a lot of injury. as a huge tank landing craft made their way in convoy towards the beach, they'd been attacked by german e boats armed with torpedoes. two american vessels were sunk, two more badly damaged. official figures at the time rose to well over 700. many bodies washed ashore along the south coast, but dozens more were never found.
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it's moving to stand there and look out at the english channel and think about where my uncle's body lay. was his body everfound? no, he's still in the ship. for decades, no—one knew what had happened here, partly due to the security around the d—day landings. but this weekend, families have crossed the atlantic to remember young men lost in the grey waters of the english channel. my dad described the water as hejumped in on fire. annelle reynolds‘ father was badly injured but he survived. she‘s brought his uniform to be placed in the local museum. i feel now that meeting with these people that it was a shame that these men did not get recognition through their lives. every visitor pays tribute to dean small and his local volunteers. dean‘s father raised the sunken sherman tank which now forms
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a permanent memorial. we have the incredible sacrifice that the local people made to give up their home and their land, and at the same time, this horrendous disaster that took so many young lives. 0n the beach below, 749 sets of bootprints. a powerful way to remind us of a loss of life which far exceeded the figure on the real utah beach just over a month later. those footprints, those boot prints, it was a dress rehearsal, they are being laid out for a real and the man who brought out the whole idea is here. —— thought up the whole idea. where did you get this thought from? i was asked by a charity to think about how we can reflect on this disaster that happened exactly 75 years ago and i was inspired by the pictures of the men running down the pictures of the men running down the craft into the open ocean, into the craft into the open ocean, into the unknown. i wanted to create
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something that was there but not there. you can see the footprints, i wa nt there. you can see the footprints, i want people to think about that and i want to inspired them by appealing to their senses. to look at the feet, to think of them here but not there. to look at the ocean, deep and called in to listen to the waves and called in to listen to the waves and through that, get the feeling for these poor individuals. we are in the beginning of the run—up to the d—day commemorations, are you going to repeat this exercise on the other side the channel? yes, we have to ta ke other side the channel? yes, we have to take it through d—day, through the water and up the other side. we have to remember what you said, we have to remember what you said, we have got the figure behind you and a lot of people remember that from the first commemorations 18 months ago. that was about getting into the communities. this is an installation that will make people thoughtful and fascinating. how do you get this period of commemoration into the public perception? the communities
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got behind the campaign last year in an incredible way and we help they will reflect on the 22,763 british and cornwall individuals who never returned and we have created this beautiful plaque which actually has a name for each of those individuals. we have put them on our website, there are but not there, and we hope everyone will cherish having one of these. so getting these individuals into communities just like last time? absolutely, getting the whole nation behind these individuals that never returned. these brave men and women, so many who had never seen their front door again. you have got so many footprints still to lay so i will leave you with it but thank you very much indeed. that commemoration ceremony will take place at the other end of the beach. early this afternoon about half past two and we hope to bring you pictures of that
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here on bbc news later on today. we look forward to it, stunning pictures. they are 50 year old episodes of dr who, the originals were discarded after broadcast — with only the soundtrack surviving. but now the doctor‘s 19605 adventures have been recreated on dvd, using animation, and much of the artwork was done by a sunderland university graduate, using a computer in his back bedroom. peter harris went to meet him. get out. that's not very polite. i was interested in what you are saying. the voice is the original active but where the voices survived the pictures did not and that is where animators like rob come in, bringing the doctor back to life. no animation will bring in his level of comedy and timing but we can try. backin comedy and timing but we can try. back in the date the bbc would ditch material after broadcast. some did survive like this. i suppose that is
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true, that seems more vulnerable than others, yes. but of the last material on the sound survived because fans would record it off the tv at the time. someone would hold a microphone up to the tv but then you would hear the whole family, the dog barking, nanette saying she cannot hear anything are some of that exists on the recordings stop but some fans to fight the tv and hard—wired a some fans to fight the tv and ha rd—wired a real to some fans to fight the tv and hard—wired a real to it so they have got some real crystal recordings of these stories. rob has worked on a number of doctor who animations in which long lost episodes have been brought back to life. he creates the monsters. the studio will animate the characters and i will get something which looks a bit like that, which is just something which looks a bit like that, which isjust a character acting against nothing in the middle of no set. there is no monsters involved and then by the time i have finished all my bits, it looks a bit more like a finished product. so you
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are the monster creator? yeah. the monsters industry are essentially based on giant crabs, it was a challenge but is great to give them a new lease of life. rob does these animations with the bbc in his spare time but it is a labour of love for a lifelong doctor who fan. the episodes just released are available now on blu—ray and dvd. peter harris, bbc news. we great story. it is half past eight, stay with us. stay with us, headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with chris mason and tina daheley.
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here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main news. the uk‘s shale gas commissioner has resigned after only six months in thejob, saying the government is paying too much attention to a small but noisy environmental lobby. natascha engel — a former labour mp — said that unnecessarily strict rules imposed by the government meant it was nearly impossible to make a success of the industry. 0bese seven—year—olds are at greater risk of facing emotional problems such as depression when they reach 11 according to a major uk study. the findings are being presented at the european congress on obesity in glasgow today.
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people have been told to worship at home instead. sri lanka‘s president has outlawed two groups. a woman has died and three people are in hospital after a shooting at a synagogue in california. the congregation was celebrating the last day of passover when the gunman stormed the service and opened fire. a 19—year—old man has been arrested over the attack just outside san diego. mps will vote this week on whether to declare an environmental and climate emergency following mass protests amid concerns the crisis hasn‘t been addressed. labour will force a commons vote on the issue — one of the key demands of the ‘extinction rebellion‘ movement whose activists paralysed parts of london in recent weeks. jeremy corbyn said he hoped other countries would follow if the uk parliament became the first in the world to declare a climate emergency.
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there is football, rugby and snooker, and also the marathon. there is football, rugby and snooker, and also the marathonlj snooker, and also the marathon.” think you can expect a titanic battle with mo farah. although it is a tough ask for him to win it. his best time is four minutes short of the world record holder. he will have to go some. his preparations somewhat overshadowed by a row with haile gebrselassie but farah says his build up has gone well ahead of the marathon. after all his success on the track the four—time olympic champion turned his attention to road running two years ago. he set a new european record by winning the chicago marathon last year and finished third in london last year. and hopes that experience will help him go one better this year as he attempts to beat eliud kipchoge, the holder
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of the men‘s title. with the pace early on it was so hard, and ijust went with it because i had no choice. whether you run your own pace and not get a great times, and you are not feeling great, at some point it hits you. i knew that and i felt that if i felt like that and finished 2:06, ifinished third, i definitely have a lot more. after three seasons away, norwich are back in the premier league. they beat blackburn rovers 2—1 to secure promotion. a draw next weekend and they‘ll go up as champions, with sheffield united all but guaranteed to join them after a 12—year absence from the top flight. joe lynskey reports. the championship is one of football‘s unpredictable divisions. this is the feeling to depart it for the top. but even in this league few expected norwich city to go up. this side finished 14th last season then sold their two best players. this time they have swept teams away. norwich have surged to the top through the efforts of their german manager, daniel farke, who has encouraged the canaries to go high tempo and take aim.
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talent from across europe has been key to their recipe for success, beating blackburn 2—1 puts an end to their three years away and the premier league‘s riches await the side no—one fancied. sheffield united are reaching the end of a longerjourney. they are on the verge of promotion, 12 years after coming down. their manager chris wilder is a blades fan himself, he arrived with the club 11th in the third tier. but beating ipswich means only an unlikely goal swing will now stop them going up, and were he not the dugout, and were he not in the dugout, he would be in the stands himself. it is an amazing day, i have not slept a wink all week waiting for this game, such a reward for the way that supporters have stuck by us because we have had some tough times down here. after the celebrations it all starts again in the summer. for now the players can enjoy the applause and prepare for english football‘s biggest leap.
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hoping to avoid going the other way are brighton who took a huge step towards staying in the premier league. they claimed a crucial point after coming from behind against newcastle, ayoze perez with the opening goal. they equalised through pascal gross with a huge goal, but they‘ll have to wait another week before their survival is confirmed. that‘s because cardiff could still catch them despite losing to already—relegated fulham, ryan babel with the only goal. cardiff only have two games left and will be relegated if they lose to palace next weekend. after livepool‘s win on friday, manchester city will attempt to move back on top with victory over burnley later — they‘d be a point clear with two games to play. it‘s one of three fixtures today. and pep guardiola was quick to pay credit to the improvemnet their title rivals have made. defence between this
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season and the previous season is one reason, it is liverpool. we did the same the last season, the same. the only difference is liverpool were much better. the other clubs were in the same level last season, but the reason why this season is different is liverpool. they improve a lot, they bought incredible players, they were incredibly consistent. last season and this season. celtic are just point a point away from winning their eighth successive scottish premiership title after a 1—0 win over kilmarnock. in the week of club legend billy mcneill‘s death, members of the team who won the european cup in 1967 were present for a special tribute to theirformer captain before the game. and, rather poignantly, it was their current number 5 — jozo simunovic — who scored the winner with, ironically, 67 minutes on the clock. exeter edged past harlequins to increase their lead at the top of rugby union‘s premiership. the 17—15 victory means exeter need one more win to ensure they end
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the season on top of the premiership while quins are still in the hunt for the top four with a losing bonus point. what a story forjockey bryony frost who made a winning return after breaking her collarbone last month. you might be remember she suffered the injury four days after becoming the first woman to ride a grade 0ne winner over jumps at cheltenham but returned in style, riding black corton to victory at sandown on the final day of the national hunt season. and we‘ve seen some great scenes of celebration with clubs getting promoted, and it‘s no different for lionel messi who scored as barcelona won the spanish league title with three games to spare thanks to his 46th goal of the season, enough to give them victory against levante and seal a 26th la liga title. and after the goal his son runs onto the field. it isa it is a theme we often see when you
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see success in professional sport. so many professional players love to celebrate with their family, making itafamily celebrate with their family, making it a family affair. asiam it a family affair. as i am sure you do at the end of the breakfast show. not on a sunday morning the time we have to be here. absolutely. it is very cute to get daddy written on the back of your shirt. the champions of 2019. the clubs look after the family as well as the players. in just under two hours, thousands of people will take part in the 39th london marathon, including some very well—known faces. brea kfast‘s graham satchell is at the starting line in blackheath and has been speaking to some of the runners this morning. who have you got with you graham? good morning, it is all starting to hot up. the weather is improving and the sun is out. it was freezing
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earlier on this morning, but i am told it is pretty good weather for running today. they will reach the figure of £1 billion of raising money for charity over the years today. let me talk to someone running. how are you feeling?” today. let me talk to someone running. how are you feeling? i am a bit nervous, i have not done anything like this since i had my children. i last did this in 2014 andi children. i last did this in 2014 and i have not ran until february this year. i am thinking have i still got the thing i had that will get me through this. ? it is a great event and a great atmosphere. listen to the drums. i am looking forward to the drums. i am looking forward to getting round in one piece and making the most of the day. who are you running for? prostate cancer. it feels so weird to talk about prostate cancer whilst a blast band
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is going by. it is a joyous kind of event. people reach amazing personal goals and they are running for some very sad stories. there is nothing more humbling than standing on that starting line. people are looking and running for their partners or their parents or their kids. it is a reminder that people are good and there is a light at the end of the tunnel. it is very humbling. what do you think about the figure of £1 billion raised for charity? when you said that i got goose bumps. ifeel bad asking people to sponsor me. but loads of people message me and said, we wa nt loads of people message me and said, we want to sponsor you, we want to be part of it. if you only put in a pound of it, it doesn‘t matter, people want to feel part of the event because it is a national event. i want to remind you of the year that you ran the race and reported on it at the same time. the
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bbc really got their money out of you then. i ran it in 2014 and i reported it as i ran around and i thought it was a great idea to chat. but at the last five miles i said, nobody chat to me, i am just running. have a good day to day. you will be good. i will get there, i will be good. i will get there, i will not win it, but i will get round. hello, how are you? terrified. you won the great british bake 0ff. who are you running for?” am an ambassador for alzheimer's research uk, so it is a massive day. have you run a marathon before? never. how are you feeling? terrified. but my worries are so
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much less. the reason for me doing this is much bigger than my worries and to be a part of this is incredible. good luck today. it will be good. thank you, good luck, everyone. everybody is running for their own personal reasons. some people are running for records today. somebody is running the fastest dressed as a shoe, someone else as a tent, and someone else running the fastest dressed as a tooth. try and keep your eye out for those and let‘s see later on if they have broken any records. i think on balance i would rather be dressed as a shoe than a tent. i think i would go for the tooth. a tooth sounds it could be quite big and pointy. go for the tooth. a tooth sounds it could be quite big and pointym go for the tooth. a tooth sounds it could be quite big and pointy. it is not happening any time soon.” wonder if you will see four people carrying some kind of contraption.
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it should make for some colourful coverage. good luck to everybody taking part. good luck to everybody taking part. the bbc‘s live coverage of the marathon has already started on bbc two, and will start on bbc one from ten o‘clock. you can also follow the action on bbc radio 5 live sports extra, bbc iplayer, the bbc red button and online. you will struggle to avoid it pretty much. you will struggle to avoid it pretty much. it‘s time to say goodbye to chris as he‘s going to read the news for the andrew marr show. michelle is standing in for andrew. goodbye. goodbye, nice to see you. let‘s have a look at the weather for marathon runners and the rest of us. if you are one of the spectators heading down to lend your support, these are the skies over central londonjust a these are the skies over central london just a couple of moments ago. you will probably need some layers
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if you are heading down there. temperatures at best 14 celsius this afternoon. that is the story for many of you today. much quieter compared to yesterday, the winds are not so strong. a few showers around and it will feel a little less chilly. this was storm hanna. cloud is spilling in across the west, but a lot of that is high cloud and western areas will have hazy sunshine. in northern ireland, south—west wales and devon and cornwall will have outbreaks of rain. where it falls there could be the odd heavy burst. they arrive into the channel islands by mid afternoon. elsewhere, the showers fade away and there is hazy sunshine and warm compared to yesterday.
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there is rain in northern ireland but with sunny spells in scotland it could be 16 or 17. this is where we have the latest wins and if the sunshine is on your back, it will feel pleasant indeed. the wind eases down further overnight and there is a chance of mist and fog patches are forming. to the far west of scotland, northern ireland, west wales, devon and cornwall, patchy drizzle and it is a chilly start to tomorrow in the east. this is the picture for tomorrow. the weather front is still in the west, cloud and patchy rain with a drizzle which could move back westwards through the day. sky is bright and in much of scotla nd the day. sky is bright and in much of scotland and england. sunny spells into the afternoon and the
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winds are lighter than today. temperatures up a degree or so further, 17 or 18 the highs by tomorrow afternoon. warmer into tuesday. cloud and showery rain in northern ireland. but for many of you it is a fine tuesday afternoon. fingers crossed for the bank holiday weekend. fingers crossed for the bank holiday weekend. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news, time now for a look at the newspapers. let‘s go to today‘s front pages. the telegraph leads with the story about
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huawei and the new 5g network. last week, details from a national security council meeting about the possible risks of using the chinese company‘s technology were leaked to the telegraph, due to concerns about the company‘s alleged closeness to the chinese government. the times carries a story about changes to house of lords rules which would force peers to declare the full extent of their russian and chinese business interests. the photo is of imtiaz dharker who is expected to be appointed poet laureate next month. the sunday express claims the conservative party is set to lose more than 1,000 seats in the upcoming local elections, after what it describes as theresa may‘s failure to deliver brexit. the observer leads with a photo of labour leaderjeremy corbyn, who will this week try to force a vote in parliament to declare a "national climate emergency". the paper says the government "has
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spent only a fraction" of the £100 million allocated in 2015 to support clean air projects. lots of different stories dominating today. what have you picked out from inside the papers? i saw the story in the sunday times regarding talk ofa in the sunday times regarding talk of a so—called private audience between president trump and boris johnson when donald trump comes to britain in june. johnson when donald trump comes to britain injune. i do not think private would be a word i would connect with donald trump. what they are saying is there is a potential for diplomatic embarrassment if he holds a private dinner and the prime minister is not there. we will see how that helps borismacaws, that is open for debate. but we are talking
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aboutjune and open for debate. but we are talking about june and knows open for debate. but we are talking aboutjune and knows what the conservative party will be like then and what boris johnson conservative party will be like then and what borisjohnson will be doing. this man could also be at that state dinner. nigel farage. it has been suggested that he is famous for being the cheeky chappie character with a cigarette and a pint in his hand and they are suggesting that he is now on a health kick. he goes on walks in the morning, he has spinach for brea kfast. morning, he has spinach for breakfast. i am not entirely convinced about this overhaul. he has suggested he is looking after himself better than he used to do. there is a suggestion of a bit of a makeover, but i notice him still smoking away so i don‘t think he has changed very much. mr new ukip they are calling him. everyone is talking about this brand—new party. he
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really has kicked the door down again, leading the polls in the european elections again. love him or loathe him, he does have this timing ability to channel the public anger and frustration regarding europe and brexit. at the moment it seems as if he has done it again and it seems as if he will have success in the european elections. what does this mean for ukip? we are hearing about lots of defections to his party. it does look like its successful days are behind it. use the ukip and nigel farage‘s face comes into your mind quickly. i think they struggled for identity and they looked more on the fringes. and it is also ukip‘s association and refusing to denounce the actions of one of its representatives who made a light about rape and
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endorsing racial slurs. it has looked pretty grim and murky. when ukip burst onto the scene it became a force and there were a lot of frustrated tory and labour supporters who were frustrated with the european union and they wanted a fresh voice away from the established parties. for a while it worked, but it has slid away now. i think without nigel farage at the helm ukip looks pretty rudderless. what is next? food. we were talking about nigel farage having a bit of an image makeover. here elizabeth truss, the chief secretary to the treasury, says she is tiring of a puritanical approach of public bodies lecturing us on what we should be eating and drinking and what the calories are. compared to
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30 years ago we have so much more information about what is good for us information about what is good for us and what is bad for us. i go along with if it is something i really like, it is probably not that good for me and i can only have so much of it. i think the argument is you take this information and do everything with a bit of moderation. it can at times looked a bit hysterical. what you can read one week, something saying this is going to kill you, you can eat the next week. chocolate, wine, processed foods, all things in moderation. moderation and treats. and we finished with this. the picture on one side is him scantily clad. he was filming a scene. he was not wandering down camden high street. it made a lot of headlines a couple of weeks ago. jude law, 46, looking
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infine of weeks ago. jude law, 46, looking in fine fettle. but they did a picture of him recently in a rather ill fitting suit. he was walking through london and it suggests he does not look quite as good. i think most 46—year—old men would take looking likejude most 46—year—old men would take looking like jude law most 46—year—old men would take looking likejude law to be honest. even in his ramshackle way he does not look too bad to me to be honest. there you go, food for thought. a good story to finish on. thank you for joining good story to finish on. thank you forjoining us today. thank you forjoining us today. all morning we‘ve been live from the starting line of the london marathon, speaking to just a few of the 41,000 runners taking on the 26.2 mile race. this year the official charity is dementia revolution. graham satchell is with a group of runners for whom the charity is very close to their hearts. yes, that is right. dementia
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revolution is the main charity being featured today. everybody is running for their own reasons, but we have got three guests here who have got a bit ofan got three guests here who have got a bit of an east end is flavour to them this morning. good morning. we have got scott mitchell. absolutely. adam would yet. and natalie. you are barbara windsor‘s husband. tell us how she seems. her diagnosis was in 2014 and things are getting more difficult as we go along, but that is the nature of the illness. but she is still barbara and she is still in good spirits and we still have a great laugh. but confusion does come in. let‘s not forget it is not just barbara, there does come in. let‘s not forget it is notjust barbara, there are 50,000 people living with dementia at this time. we are pleased to hear she is in good spirits. and it is your
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birthday today. yes, it is. i am running on my birthday. this is such an important charity, adam. absolutely. we are supporting him. we know what he is going through. it is to help him and people in the future. we have raised so much money. we have hit our target and it has gone over and beyond. we cannot believe it. we want to keep going up. we are trying to talk him into keeping this going and a few more amazing events. there is a lot of hope out there. it is very underfunded and that is one of the main reasons we are getting involved. they believe in the next decade there will be a breakthrough. we need to think of future generations. how are you feeling today? i only started running in
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0ctober. somebody gave me some great advice coming here. he said, you are not going to win it, just enjoy it. what do you mean you are not going to win it? he was talking to me. and you have run before. i would not say iran it. i have taken part in one. idid it iran it. i have taken part in one. i did it with my son on the first mile and then he said, see you later. the most important thing is you get round. and you have not run one before? no, i have not. iwant to enjoy every minute. i feel honoured to be part of this and i feel extremely emotional. i want to chat to people whilst they are running and it is something to tick off the bucket list for sure. good luck to all of you. give our best wishes to barbara. thank you. you
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will do well. and text babs, £5. the east enders crew will be making their way around. the wheelchair race is just about to get under way. it isa race is just about to get under way. it is a massive day for 41,000 individuals who are all running for their own private stories, some of them heartbreaking, some of them inspirational. every single one of them is important. it will be a brilliant day for the london marathon. in his 39th year they will break the billion pound mark raising money for charity. they break records every year for individual amounts, so it will be quite something. all eyes will be on sur mo farah to see how he does this year. good luck to everybody taking part. that‘s all from breakfast for today. dan and louise will be
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here tomorrow from six. until then, enjoy the rest of your weekend. goodbye.
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this is bbc news, i‘m rebecca jones. the headlines at nine: a woman is shot dead and three people are injured at a synagogue in california. police are questioning a 19—year—old man. as the officer was placing this 19—year—old male into custody he clearly saw a rifle sitting in the front passenger seat of the suspect vehicle. britain‘s fracking tsar quits after six months in thejob. in the next half hour natascha engel will tell us why she‘s gone. security fears in sri lanka sees church services cancelled — a week after the easter sunday bombings. mo farah says it would be an ‘amazing achievment‘ to win the london marathon for the first time.

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