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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  April 29, 2019 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm: rape victims are to be asked to hand over their phones to the police — or risk their attackers not being prosecuted. campaigners are concerned. it's massively intrusive. it really has an impact on victims of rape who may be severely traumatised already by what's happened. it's another violation, in effect. of traumatised victims. spain's socialists celebrate victory in the country's general election — though they can't form a government by themselves. it's worse than we thought — the un says cyclone kenneth did far more damage in mozambique than was first believed. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — john watson. cricketer alex hales removed
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from england's provisional world cup squad for an off the field issue — more to come. thanksjohn — and susan has the weather. we will take a look at a bit of weather and see what that makes up the rest of our spring. talk to you later. also coming up — did you clock this? you'vejust run 26 miles — attempting to get into the guinness book of world records for fastest marathon time dressed as a landmark — and then this happens at the finish line. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. victims of rape and other crimes are being told they must hand over their mobile phones
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to the police — or risk prosecutions not going ahead. police forces in england and wales are rolling out consent forms, which ask for permission to get access to messages, photos, emails and social media accounts. it's a response to the collapse of a string of rape and sexual assault cases, after crucial evidence emerged on mobile phones at the last minute. our legal correspondent, clive coleman, reports. there is going to be evidence in everyone‘s phone... liam allan was falsely accused of rape. the case against him only collapsed when text messages from his accuser, which proved his innocence, were disclosed days into his trial. he favours complainants being asked for their consent to hand over their mobile devices. i can't consider it an invasion of privacy because there is something in there that will either assist the case or assist the defence and that needs to be...the police need to have access to that, otherwise there is no right to a fair trial, that's gone. to ensure our fair trial system, the prosecution has to disclose to the defence any evidence gathered by the police that either
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assists the defence case or undermines the prosecution's. and because of the way we all live our lives today, a lot of that evidence is found on these things. following a series of collapsed trials, a number of reviews revealed a system—wide disclosure problem. at its core was the ability of police and prosecutors to get on top of unprecedented amounts of digital evidence. under a national disclosure improvement plan, all cps prosecutors and 93,000 police staff have received specialist training. disclosure champions have been appointed and management systems used in complex terrorism cases are now being used in all rape cases. but most controversial are new forms under which witnesses and victims, including victims of rape, are asked if they will consent to have their devices examined. if they don't, it might halt a prosecution.
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will they cooperate? i'm optimistic that, if properly explained and communicated, the reference point of what we're calling a "consent form" for access to digital data, where it is reasonable and necessary in any given case, will succeed. and the reason i'm confident is that the people of this country, historically, have always supported criminal investigation and prosecution. but campaigners are worried. it's massively intrusive. it really has an impact on victims of rape, who may be severely traumatised already by what's happened. it's another violation, in effect, of traumatised victims. and what's more, the danger is that it will deter victims from coming forward. striking the balance in the digital age between protecting victims and the accused's right to a fair trial is complex. but if the correct balance is not found, the future of our fair trial system is in jeopardy.
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and clive is with me now. that's quite a strong thing to say, the future of our system is in jeopardy. the reason why i said it is when the state brings all of its resources to bear in prosecuting you and, first of all, investigating you as an individual and then persecuting you, the quid pro quo is that you ensure you get a fair trial, the prosecution have to disclose to you the defender any evidence that is being gathered by the police which might assist your case or undermine the prosecution. that is a foundation of our fair trial system. if we can have confidence that the authorities are able to locate the relevant evidence, and then to disclose that evidence, and then to disclose that evidence to the defendant, where it assists the defendant's case, and a real foundation of the system is shaken. with the best intent in the
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world, the challenge of going through this sort of data in this digital age, it is huge. it is staggering —— mike staggering. the justice committee a report on this. if you think of something like a mobile phone, it has more computing power than nasa had when the first moon landings were launched. if you we re moon landings were launched. if you were to download the contents of this phone, the assistant commissioner at the met said he had done a calculation that if you were to download the contents of a normal phone, then on a4 sheets of paper, but the mod top of each other, you will have a: two high. at that laxity of how you search text speak where people are talking in a whole —— in part words, abbreviations, this is throwing massive challenges at the system at a time when the system has sustained very significant cuts, the police, the crown prosecution service have. it is probably the ultimate challenge
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facing the system at the moment.“ you buy the victim of sexual assault oi’ you buy the victim of sexual assault or rape and you report it to the police, you are a victim. —— if you area police, you are a victim. —— if you are a victim of sexual assault. you will immediately feel like a suspect if they say they want your phone, particularly if it is a stranger rape where the phone would have no application. this will not be applied in a blanket way across—the—board. where you mention stranger rape, i gather one of the women who is bringing a legal challenge, that was in relation to a stranger rape because once the defence put in the defence statement, if the defence statement is that the sex was consensual, the police have to pursue all reasonable lines of enquiry. even in that sort of case, it is possible that the police would seek the consent of the victim to scrutinise their mobile phone, and the reason for this is that we saw late 2017, early 2018 a string of cases go wrong where there was this, if you like, ex coupe to
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re—evidence that benefited the defendant. and it was lying on mobile phones and on victims and complainant's mobile phones. in the leonine case it was stated to his trial before that evidence, which she had been asking for from trial before that evidence, which she had been asking forfrom months and months, and saying there is this evidence, it was only disclosed very late on when the trial had already started. —— in the case of liam allen. that could have been a serious miscarriage ofjustice. it is an unpalatable truth that in a small minority of cases, plain and still make full selling and is. in order to protect people against that small number of cases, we have these disclosure rules which mean that the defendant gets any evidence which prosecutors and investigators locate, which assist their case. bravely getting through that. there is water on the way out. thank you.
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don't forget — you can let us know what you think tweet us using the hashtag afternoonlive. to keep watching. the country's third election in four years. they're the largest party, though they fell short of a majority and will need the help of others to form a government. for the first time since military rule ended in the 1970s, a party of the far right is set to enter parliament. james reynolds reports from madrid. after this country's third vote in four years, spain has a winner. voters picked their way through a collection of fractured parties and gave the governing socialist party more seats than any other group. this is what relief looks like. in the centre of madrid, spain's
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socialists celebrated their victory. their leader, the pro—european prime minister, pedro sanchez, saw off a conservative opposition, which included a rising movement from the far right. translation: we made it happen. the socialist party has won the election and, in doing so, the future has won and the past has lost. pedro sanchez argued during the campaign that he was the only spanish leader capable of stopping the advance of the hard right. and the numbers show that he has done so. he must now form a lasting coalition of his own. we have seen different things in the world. we've seen trump in the states. we've seen different things. we've seen "brexit" — i'm sorry! and sometimes you have to get together and say
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"this is what we want". and you don't want those things, you don't want trump or brexit? oh, my god, no! we don't want franco to come back, all those old ideas, so i think it's a good thing to be here tonight and to support our president. the far right party, vox, the first significant movement of its kind since the end of general franco's fascist regime four decades ago, ended up on the losing side. but they did win enough votes to enter parliament in opposition. translation: we now have a voice in congress and we can tell everyone in spain that vox are here to say. thank you to all our two million supporters. by contrast, the winners, pedro sanchez and the socialist party, will continue to lead this country, probably in partnership with a number of smaller left—wing and regional parties. the exact shape of the new administration may take weeks to decide.
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sri lanka has banned face coverings in public, following the suicide attacks on easter sunday that killed at least 250 people and injured hundreds. the president is using an emergency law to impose the restriction from today. he said any face garment which "hinders identification" will be banned to ensure security but muslim leaders have criticised the move. the united nations says the situation in northern mozambique is worse than thought — days after cyclone kenneth ravaged the country — killing 38 people. the cabo delgado state, has experienced more than 2m of rain and flooding — and has put around 700,000 people at risk. the cyclone is predicted to dump twice as much rainfall as cyclone idai did last month. libo deseko has been the following developments from from the country's capital city, maputo. it does seem that weather conditions eased off slightly in the north
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of the country this morning, and that allowed aid aid agencies a little window of opportunity to start distributing aid. the world food programme started handing out some supplies in macomia. they also sent a plane out to the island of ibo which had been completely cut off yesterday. however, the situation is in flux, it is fast changing. they wanted to send in a second plane — that wasn't able to be sent. that was filled with rice, food — that sort of thing for people. the message from authorities in pemba yesterday was this is worse than we had expected and we need help. there were concerns raised about things like cholera, rain is expected for a number of days here. yesterday pemba had two metres of rain. the issue is going to be how quickly they can get those supplies in. planes were cancelled yesterday, roads very, very difficult to reach. so that's going to be the critical
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thing, how quickly our agencies are going to be able to get in the supplies they need to reach the affected people. a new report has proposed that the social care system in england — which helps older and disabled people with tasks such as washing and dressing — should be funded in a similar way to the state pension. the plan, by the former conservative cabinet minister, damian green, says people should pay for a basic safety net, and then be allowed to pay extra if they want additional help. here's our social affairs correspondent, alison holt. with more of us living longer, the demand from people needing help with day—to—day tasks like eating, getting dressed and washed is increasing. councils that provide that support have also had their budgets cut. it means the care system is under huge pressure. today's report says the need for reform is urgent, to provide a safety net to end the lottery of who gets state funded care and who doesn't. the report calls for a nationally funded pension style scheme. it proposes a universal care entitlement to provide anyone who needs it with a decent
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standard of help. people would pay a per supplement on top if they wanted a more expensive level of support. the report also says the underfunding of the current care system must be tackled. we need universal care provision that is better than it is now. so, it will involve spending more taxpayers' money. we'll have to find £7 billion extra a year. we'll have to find £2.5 billion extra a year. but also on top of that, we need to allow people, if they can, and many people can particularly if they own property, they'll be able to actually buy an insurance policy or something like an annuity that will, when it's all pooled together, put a lot more money into the system. the government says it has put extra money into social care and plans for the future will be published at the earliest opportunity. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: victims of rape and other crimes are being asked to give police
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access to their phones and social media accounts, or face seeing their case dropped. spain's governing socialist party wins the most seats in the general election — but prime minister pedro sanchez will need to form a coalition after failing to secure a majority. the united nations says the situation in northern mozambique is worse than thought — days after cyclone kenneth ravaged the country — killing 38 people. and in sports, cricketer alex hales is out of the world cup picture after england withdrew the batsmen from their squad following the off field incident that led to a suspension. the score of celtic‘s winning goal in the 1967 cup final has died at the age of 83. he was second in the lisbon victory in inter—milan. barry hawkins is leading tyrone wilson at the world snooker championship in sheffield. in their second round, best of 25 frames. back with more on although stories at around 2:30pm.
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a rabbi who was injured in the deadly shooting at a synagogue near san diego has described the moment he faced the gunman. one woman died and two other people were injured in the attack on saturday. a nineteen year old man was arersted shortly afterwards. rabbi yisroel goldstein described what happened. i walked into the banquet hall to wash my hands. i walked two, three footsteps when i hear a loud bang. i thought lori may have fell, the table tipped over in the lobby right here. i turn around and i see a sight... undescribable. here is a young man standing with a rifle. pointing right at me. and i look at him, he had sunglasses on, i couldn't see his eyes,
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i couldn't see his soul. i froze. my first concern was, what's with lori? where did that noise come from? what happened to lori? and as soon as i did that, i took a look and more shots came running right at me, and i lifted up my hands. i lost my index finger of this hand. after four hours of surgery yesterday, to try to save this finger on the left hand. i turn around and i saw the children that were playing in the banquet hall. i ran to gather them together. my granddaughter, 11.5 years old, sees her grandpa with a bleeding hand and she sees me screaming and shouting, get out, get out! she didn't deserve to see her grandfather like this. a new report has highlighted
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the critical role that soil plays in climate change. there's more carbon stored in soil than in all the world's trees — and it's being released into the atmosphere by deforestation and poor farming. the scientists behind the study say that already, nearly half the world's population is suffering because of the way that land is degraded. here's our environment analyst roger harrabin. soil erosion — a double problem. here in the east of england, this isn't smog in the air, it's soil on a hot windy day. losing soil like this lowers our ability to grow crops. it also releases carbon trapped in the earth, and that contributes to climate change. in parts of the south of england, some carelessly farmed fields are steadily running into the rivers. soil degradation is a problem said to affect almost half the world's people. look at this tsunami of dust last year in phoenix, arizona. it's the result of a spectacular storm. for most farmers, soil loss is a creeping problem that's only
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noticed it too late. soils are really important for climate change as well, because they store a lot of carbon. there's three times more carbon stored in soil and there is in the atmosphere. so imagine if all that carbon was released from the soil into the atmosphere, we'd have the runaway climate change that people are concerned about. so, what to do? well, we know cows' burps are a problem for climate change, but their dung also helps put carbon back into the soil. so, this mobile dairy in the south of england may prove part of the solution. it means cows spread their dung across the fields, not leave it in the farmyard. that way, nutrients and carbon from the pasture return to the soil. we were worried that the soil was becoming dead. there was no vitality in the soil, no resilience in the soil. so we realised we need to put grass back into the system, and manage the grass with bought some dairy cows.
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here's the evidence. this field, with its light, stony soil, is depleted from crops grown with chemical fertilisers. see the much darker, carbon rich soil in the far ploughed field, previously fertilised by cows. the simplest way of combating climate change and improving the soil is to turn all this farmland into woodland. but that wouldn't feed the people, would it? perhaps a form of farming like this can be gentler on environment, while keeping milk on the table. we've got to radically cut the number of cattle on earth, scientists tell us. is there a role for pasture fed cows like these that burp out methane but also help the soil? we don't have a clear answer yet. technology used by space telescopes is being redeployed to help doctors beat bowel cancer. researchers at university college in london have teamed up technology used by space telescopes is being redeployed to help with the uk space agency, on a project to detect
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signs of the disease using software originally designed to examine distant planets. it's hoped the programme will be accessible across the world, to spot pre—cancerous tissue which might otherwise be missed by doctors. richard galpin reports. so, it looks like a little mass, rather than something round... doctors hunting for the earliest signs of bowel cancer. they're performing a colonoscopy, manoeuvring a camera around the patient‘s bowels, trying to find any little growths, called polyps, that can become cancerous. the biggest challenge is to detect precancerous polyps, little growths, in the bowel. we know that about one—in—five are missed during colonoscopy and we want to do anything we can to improve that detection rate. anything we can do to improve detection will reduce cancer incidence significantly. there are currently more than a quarter of a million people
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in the uk who have been diagnosed with bowel cancer. it is survivable, but treatment can involve radical surgery. leslie boothe had her entire colon taken out. if i could have turned the clocks back and had more colonoscopies and had those polyps perhaps detected earlier and removed at the time of the procedure and not had a diagnosis of bowel cancer, i think not only me, but my whole family would have done that willingly. could this new software be the answer to finding polyps which might otherwise go undetected? it uses artificial intelligence to spot them in real—time during a colonoscopy. there, in the green box, is a polyp spotted by the ai. but this is only useful if doctors have access to a powerful computer running the software, so the researchers are also turning to space technology to see if they can use satellites to enable
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any hospital in the world to have access to the programme. the really exciting part is that we'll will be able to improve the lives of patients, whether they're in an expert hospital in london or in a rural, remote area of africa. for those who know the impact of bowel cancer, any steps potentially leading to earlier prevention are to be welcomed. polyps are so difficult to detect and if there's a piece of software that will actually capture all polyps, imagine how amazing that is! clinical trials of the use of this artificial intelligence are planned for next year. prison governors are being urged to wear a uniform, similar to that of prison officers, in an effort to restore control and order to jails in england and wales.the independent the independent think—tank, the centre for socialjustice, is calling on ministers to consider
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the measures as part of a raft of proposals to tackle drugs and violence. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw reports. supplying drugs and mobile phones to prisons is a lucrative business. this is one way it happens, over perimeter walls. it's worth thousands of pounds to the gangs behind the trade and to the prisoners who sell the contraband behind bars. but it causes debt and bullying, fuelling record levels of violence. this prison footage can't be independently verified but comes with a report on ways to tackle what it calls the prisons crisis. among 59 proposals in the centre for socialjustice report is a call for an amnesty for corrupt prison staff who co—operate with the authorities. it recommends specialist prisons for the most violent offenders and suggests prison managers or governors should dress like prison officers, wearing uniforms rather than suits to show they're working together to deal with the problems. what we know from evidence in new zealand is that when staff
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are promoted out of uniform in a uniform service, into civilian clothing, actually their perception of competence and the empathy they have with the front line actually diminishes so it creates a them and us culture. we are very keen to see that reunification of the service so that people actually feel that real sense of camaraderie. the ministry ofjustice says it currently has no plans to change the rules on clothing. it means prisons will continue to be different from the police, ambulance and fire services where front line staff of all ranks wear uniform. thomas cook says fewer people are booking summer holidays to countries in the european union this summer, as the uncertainty over brexit continues. the travel agent has seen bookings to destinations outside the eu increase by 10 percent compared with last year. its findings chime with separate post office figures showing currency sales for long—haul destinations have jumped. time for a look at the weather.
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we are going to look at a bit of weather lower. you looked at my lovely friend here and what did you say? sitting on the grass, not going to rain. apparently there is no truth in that at all. people do scientific research into these sayings. i am from a farming community so have grown up with a lot of this. this one is not true. however, i bring you my next friends. this is our weather watcher. no weather in the picture but it did as a treat for today. what weather you know about this one? does it involve braying? yes! i'm not technically sure if he is a donkey or an as. i'm sure someone will correct me. even if you don't. where are we going with this? when
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it prays, surely rain will come that day. how do you think they have proven all this? i have no idea. when we get rain, it is because low pressure is coming. when pressure falls a lot of animals get much more sensitive —— they have much more sensitive —— they have much more sensitive hearing than us. it does make them behave in a slightly odd way. dogs, for example, get a bit crazy in the wind. i keep chickens and you can get something called a winter egg. if it is really windy they turn out things in wobbly shapes. it really upsets them. a winter egg, google that's on your break! people actually research this and there is some truth in the animals reacting. fortunately, our story there is some truth in the animals reacting. fortunately, ourstory for the moment is quite quiet. everyone will behave including simon. we will ta ke will behave including simon. we will take a look at the weather. good job
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we are not in iceland, i'm sure there is also itself crackers business going on over there. a nice big ridge of high pressure here, but a friend trying to come into the west. this afternoon it is dry for a good portion of the uk. this portion getting squeezed out of wales and the west of england, so more sunshine there. more rain in northern ireland and overnight another front comes into join the one lurking today. further east quite a lot of cloud off the north sea and sun mist and fog will return. there is that axis of high pressure, quite cool under their first thing on tuesday. here is our weather front in the west. it is a slow one. tuesday, it pushes into the irish sea. northern ireland could get a bit brighter as the day goes on. by the afternoon, we will see rain and cloud pushing across much of western scotland through the central lowlands. we switch the wind direction so that will push a lot of cloud away from the coast into the north sea. brighter for eastern coastal counties, in the west great.
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some rain for wales in the south—west of england through wednesday afternoon. best of the sunshine in the south—east, better temperatures, too. 0vernight on wednesday —— tuesday into wednesday, the rain becoming increasingly patchy. in the east, up to 90 degrees. in the west, behind that weather front, perhaps degrees. in the west, behind that weatherfront, perhaps 12 degrees. in the west, behind that weather front, perhaps 12 or 13 degrees. —— up to 19 degrees. thursday, evening out, rain first thing across scotland. later on some heavy even —— heavy or even sundry downpours. temperatures starting to taper off. look to the far north as you can see by thursday afternoon feeling pretty chilly across northern scotland. here is the big shock to the system is the week comes to a close, plunged into arctic airas comes to a close, plunged into arctic air as the cold front and the rain sinks south through thursday into friday. thursday quite wet for many of us, friday it will feel chilly with a northerly wind. in a
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bank holiday weekend. is it too much to ask that it is fair? it looks like we will have a lot of dry weather and temperatures will slowly recover. back—up to average values, nothing like the editions over easter when we got highs into the mid 20s. fingers crossed for some decent prospects for bank holiday monday. hopefully a bit of sunshine and territories in the mid to high teens. —— temperatures. this is bbc news —
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our latest headlines. rape victims are to be asked to hand over their phones to the police — or risk their attackers not being prosecuted. campaigners are concerned. it is massively intrusive, it really has an impact on victims of rape he may be severely traumatised already by what has happened. it is another violation, in effect, of traumatised victims. spain's socialists celebrate victory in the country's general election — though they can't form a government by themselves. the united nations says the situation in northern mozambique is worse than thought — days after cyclone kenneth ravaged the country — killing 38 people. sport now on afternoon live with john and england's cricketers have lost a player from their world cup squad. what can you tell us? it is going to be a busy period of
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cricket for england begin the preparations for the world cup. alex hales has been removed from england's provisional world cup squad all but ending his chances of playing at the tournament this summer. it's been widely reported hales failed a recreational drugs test for a second time — which led to a three week ban. that would fit with the matches he's missed for his club side nottinghamshire. last week a spokesman for the batsmen confirmed he'd been suspended following an off field incident, his club said it was for personal reasons, with hales accepting it was right he was suspended. the ecb said his withdrawal is in the best interests of the team, to ensure they're free of any distractions. it is going to be a busy period of cricket, lots of matches to come ahead of that tournament on home soil to come. it's not the first suspension he's faced, following the punishment handed down from the ecb which also included a fine following a street fight outside a nightclub, which you might remember included
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ben stokes. that big news centred around alex hales today. how important a player was hales? he wouldn't have been a starter but he's an integral member of the squad — a powerful and destructive batsmen — who specialises in the shorter formats, having played 70 one day internationals for his country. so with the 50 over world cup on home soil this summer he was expected to be a central figure in that squad. one of the highlights, three years ago he hit 171 from 122 balls to take the record for the highest score by an englishman in one—day internationals against pakistan. which has since been beaten by team mate jason roy. it just goes to itjust goes to show what a powerful hitter he is so he will be missed in that england squad. the former celtic player stevie chalmers has died at the age of 83. chalmers scored the winning goal for celtic in the 1967 european cup
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final against inter milan in portugal. the team later dubbed the ‘lisbon lions', have also been mourning the passing of their captain billy mcneil — who died last week. raheem sterling has been named the football writers association player of the year. the manchester city forward took the award with 62% of the vote. he was also named the pfa young player of the year. he's the first city player to win it since 1969. the pfa player of the year virgil van dijk was second. and the writers differed from the players in the women's award too. nikita parris, also of manchester city, has won the football writers association prize. she beat the pfa winner vivianne miedema byjust one vote. the second round of the world snooker championship is continuing in sheffield. this time next week we'll be well into the final of the competition.
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they're on a break at the crucible at the moment. barry hawkins resumed with a 9—7 lead over fellow englishman kyren wilson — but wilson has hit back — it's now ten all. they're just on a mid session break. 0n the other table china's zhou yuelong had a 9—7 lead over two times finalist ali carter. you can see that carter has hit back reading 10—9 at the moment, he is at the table at the moment. you can follow it on the website and via the app this afternoon. that's all the sport for now. we see carter think that bread in what is a good afternoon so far for him. -- what is a good afternoon so far for him. —— think that red. let's return to the spanish election. governing socialists have won the country's third election in four years, but are short of a majority. prime minister pedro sanchez‘s party
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polled 29% and will need the help of either left—wing podemos and regional parties, or the centre right, to form a government. tim willcox has more from madrid. pedro sanchez is very much the comeback kid. when you think in the past few years he has led the socialists to their two worst electoral defeats ever, so much so that he was kicked out of the party. he then went travelling around spain on a sort of listening tour, came back and is now prime minister again and will be forming a coalition. the point is he has only got 123 seats, he needs 176 so is going to have to rely on other parties for support. podemos has a0 something, they are a hard left party. where else will he look? let's speak to our political analyst here. he is almost there with podemos, i think it is 165, what is going to happen next? well, i think that pedro sanchez is going to try to roll on his own and now he is saying
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that he is going to exploit this kind of coalition but not the coalition itself. -- is —— is going to exploit this kind of coalition. i do not think that psoe wants podemos in the government. they will try to have preferential treatment in the congress and just having their seats to become the prime minister. just explain that, so beyond like a confidence and supply, they would be a minority government but with the deals done, not as a former coalition? —— not as a formal coalition. yeah, this is the point. in the government they want this because they think that maybe podemos is not going to be able to face another election if they do not want to vote for him this time. you will remember in 2016 podemos resigned and then they broke up. they had a crisis because of this scenario. ok, so he might go to the basques for example, i think they have got six or seven. what about the catalan parties, bearing in mind you have got catalan leaders on trial for sedition and rebellion or in self—imposed exile? well, i think that psoe wants
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to avoid this kind of treatment. he told people from the government that they don't want to negotiate with the left wing independent party and the only point is that the new strategy of them is to collaborate with the spanish government. they want to avoid a unilateral path again. but the issue of catalan separatism hasn't gone away, has it? no, and it is not going away but good news for spanish citizens is that they are not needed to form the majority to make him prime minister again. maybe pedro sanchez can have the votes of podemos and for example, the people from the canary islands. and they could pass with the majority. the other point is to have enough stability so as to run a government for a long time. looking to the right, a dreadful night for the partido popular. an 0k night forvox, i mean,
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symbolically they have got a presence in parliament but not nearly as impactful as they thought. well, pp has a problem now because the people that voted for them are very old and young people vote for citizens or vox. we are pleased in spain that vox had a few seats, 23 is not that 70 that some people said. but they will be there and maybe they can change their strategy along the years because now they have a very identifying speech but they can appeal for the working class in the future. yeah, i think they have got 2a seats but they seem to be made up of subsections of the partido popular, rather than that wide—ranging populist vote that perhaps some of the italian parties have. yeah, now its like you are right in this point and we will see how
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they behave on institutions and we will have a very nice fight on the right because ciudadanos now does not want to vote for sanchez or to be in the government. they are going to resign this option which is very nice for a party because they want to lead the right wing. 0k, thank you very much. the final point is interesting because it could take several weeks, maybe more than a month to form this coalition government or whatever pedro sanchez decides to do. that is because by the end of next month there are regional european municipal elections in spain and deals, dirty dodgy deals, that the core supporters of those parties won't actually want to do and the politicians will want to stitch up that up before actually coming back to the congress of deputies. it could well be, for example, that the right wing party, a move to the right, will have to help the socialists in those elections.
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tim wilcox reporting from madrid will. next month will see the publication of the first part of the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse in the church of england. and an investigation by the bbc‘s panorama programme — into past cases of abuse in the diocese of lincoln — has revealed that in 2015 the diocese gave the police a list of dozens of names of concern. jane corbin reports. in the 1960s, roy griffiths was a deputy head teacher at lincoln cathedral school. last year, he was jailed after he admitted sexually abusing six boys while he worked there. one of them was kevin bennington, who now lives in canada. roy griffiths abused him repeatedly before he was 13. speaking publicly for the first time, kevin now knows he was not alone. he would bath us and he would have us naked sitting watching the television. in return, i suppose, we would get treats and candy. kevin says his mother complained to lincoln diocese in 1969, when griffiths tried to abuse him on a school trip to scotland. but the diocese did not tell
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the police for another 45 years. should have been dealt with right away, and... the church should have instructed the police for him being a paedophile. and they didn't. they just. .. turned a blind eye and moved on. roy griffiths was convicted following an investigation by lincolnshire police. they became aware of him in 2015, after the diocese of lincoln handed them a list of names of concern. panorama can now reveal that dozens of names were on the list. there were 53 names on the first list. it was a surprise, to say the least, the number of names that were there. not all the names are related to alleged child abuse. we whittled it down to about 25 names, whereby we either knew that they had committed offences or there was some issue around risk to members of the public from them. some of the names given to the police could have been
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referred earlier by the diocese as part of a national review of church of england files in 2008 and 2009. lincoln diocese said in a statement that past matters have not been handled well and it was committed to learning from mistakes. it apologised it took so long forjustice to be served. what i hope will be increasingly understood is that if survivors and victims of abuse wish to come forward, what they need is a response from the church that is compassionate, that is fair, that is appropriate, and that is swift. the investigation means kevin is now finally able to reveal a secret he has kept for decades. i never told my children. they didn't really know anything about this until the contact with police. do you think your life would have been different if this hadn't happened? more than likely, it probably would have been different. i could have been a totally different person. survivors say the church needs to be more open about the number of abuse cases in its past, to help rebuild trust shattered by decades of hidden child abuse.
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jane corbin, bbc news. and you can see the panorama tonight, at 8:30pm, on bbc one. more than six thousand people have been forced out of their homes near the canadian city of montreal because of rising floodwater. a combination of melting snow and heavy rainfall has aslo led to the capital 0ttowa declaring a state of emergency. donna larsen reports. this is the result of heavy rains and melting snow. spring flooding in eastern canada has already affected thousands of people and properties. this dam at bells falls in quebec is dangerously over capacity and authorities have ordered anybody down river to evacuate, but such warnings came too late for the residents of one town near montreal, where more than 6,500 people were forced to leave their homes after floodwaters breached a dyke, sending a five—foot surge of water
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crashing through the area. the canadian capital 0ttawa and montreal are among the places which have declared states of emergency. and hundreds of soldiers have been deployed to the hardest—hit regions as residents do what they can to shore up their houses. my basement is currently flooding because the power is out as of today. my backyard is flooding too because there's a swamp back there, so i'm pretty much surrounded except for a little bit in the front. canada's prime minister has visited some of the affected areas, even filling up sandbags, but it will take more than a carefully planned photocall to solve the problem, whichjustin trudeau says is a result of climate change. with climate change, we're going to see more and more of these extreme weather events more regularly. we need to think about adaptation, mitigation and how we will move forward together. in some places, the floodwaters are now starting to recede, enabling people to assess
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the damage, but with more rain forecast over the coming days, others can only watch and wait. donna larsen, bbc news, quebec. a new study of nearly 3 million adults in the uk has highlighted the risks of being obese. it found even slightly overweight people are twice as likely to get type 2 diabetes. public health england says sustained action is needed to tackle the problem. the businesses is coming up any moment but first the headlines. victims of rape and other crimes are being asked to give police access to their phones and social media accounts — or face seeing their case dropped. spain's governing socialist party wins the most seats in the general election — but prime minister pedro sanchez will need to form a coalition after failing to secure a majority. the united nations says the situation in northern mozambique is worse than thought — days after cyclone kenneth ravaged the country — killing 38 people
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here's your business headlines on afternoon live. fewer british holiday—makers have booked a summer holiday in the european union this year amid continuing brexit uncertainty. that's according to holiday firm thomas cook. it says almost half of the holidays it sold up until the end of february were to non—eu destinations, up 10% last year. boeing's chief executive is to face shareholders later for the first time since the second of two fatal crashes involving the firm's 737 max plane which killed a total of 346 people. dennis muilenburg will have to try to boost confidence in the plane—maker after a difficult two months. nearly a third of graduates are overqualified for theirjob. the latest figures — they date from two years ago, 2017 — from the office for national statistics, show the incidence of overeducation was highest in those aged between 25 and 49.
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this isn'tjust a case ofjumping into any old job the moment you graduate. around 30% of graduates were still overeducated for their job five years after graduation. boeing shareholders meeting today — they are going to have a lot to say. there are a number of shareholders taking boeing to court saying because of the accident and fatal crashes they were not kept abreast of safety deficiencies in the plane. also chief executive and chairman and president is going to have several people challenging whether he should be all those three things andi he should be all those three things and i think perhaps they should split up the role of chairman and chief executive. there will be some fundamental questions asked. the mood could be quite, i think it will
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be very sombre. having looked at the speech is going to make, saying things like, we do not make safety features are optional and that is a key phrase because one of the things that has been controversial over the past couple of months it's whether certain features on the plane were actually optional which could have helped the plane get out of its problems when they crashed. michelle fleury is in new york. what is this meeting going to be like? i think anyone going into this meeting is going to have lots of questions for boeing about what it is doing to try and resolve this crisis. the 737 max is one of the most popularjets, therefore the hit to the bottom line, most of the planes being grounded, the fact it is hard to scale back the number of deliveries this quarter and moving forward , deliveries this quarter and moving forward, we do not know how far trust will be restored, both amongst
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its customers but with the flying public. that could have serious implications for the future of this programme and future demand. this is why unsurprisingly the company said it did not know how much all of this would end up costing it but this is going to be something at the forefront of the minds of investors. if you look at the context of this disaster. boeing is opaque but it really hasn't dented the share price much, it is down 10%. when you look at the esther producing the planes —— they are still producing the planes. the profits have been hit but they have not been really badly hit. is it going to be a real problem? we are in the early stages of this crisis which, on the surface, itjust of this crisis which, on the surface, it just seems of this crisis which, on the surface, itjust seems to get worse and worse day by day. if you take a glance across us media, you have got
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the wall streetjournal reporting a story that one of the customers, southwest airlines which owns about 34 of these planes, theyjust found out that one of the safety devices had been turned off on the plane. cn and reporting it had received calls from whistle—blowers. there was a report talking about questions about the plant and practices at the plant. given all of this, you have not to mention investigations going on in congress. i think we are at a early stage. it is hard to tell right now how far this will go but make no mistake, this is a big company, not just commercial make no mistake, this is a big company, notjust commercial plane maker. how far does this ripple through the entire company and at this stage, the company itself has stopped giving annual guidance. thank you so much. i think it is
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interesting we are still in an early stage of this crisis for boeing. if you compare it to something like vw but after a couple of months we felt we got everywhere. there are still question marks. yes, but i don't think you'll get much worse with a company where as this i think could get worse. thomas cook is doing nicely despite the fact everyone seems to be travelling not to the european union but elsewhere. turkey is one of the favourite destinations at the moment. the pound is looking reasonably strong. thank you, i shall see you later on. thank you, i shall see you later on. thank you. more than 100—thousand people have watched the moment that a london marathon runner, dressed as big ben, got stuck trying to cross the finish line. i'm glad to say that the runner, lukas bates, has finally escaped his costume, and he's been speaking to us about that moment when he hit the finishing line.
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i was running down and i metres to 90, i was running down and i metres to go, 400 metres to go, 200 metres to 90, go, 400 metres to go, 200 metres to go, i really wanted to be at that finish line. at no point did i think there was going to be a problem at there was going to be a problem at the finish line. it was only when i got there and literally ran up to the the finish line and felt a thud and heard a thud coming from the top of my tower as my costume got snagged, it hit the side of the finishing chute. i stopped and a kind gentleman from the london marathon helped me angle my costume forward , marathon helped me angle my costume forward, advised me to go down lower which was quite awkward but i squatted down pretty much onto my bum, angled my torso forward. i think i tried to go sideways and then forwards and i think because my legs were so fatigued i do not realise how far i needed to go down
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so it was a case of keeping to try and go lower to the point where i could get through. we managed it eventually and i was very appreciative to the gentleman who helped. check his hand at the end. i was so pleased to be over the line are not happy with that question any more! —— so happy i do not have to wear that any more. this is what i have to read, what it is spelt is fur one day only, hollywood has gone to the dogs for the scottish pa rliament‘s hollywood has gone to the dogs for the scottish parliament's dog of the year contest. here are the competitors, battling it out to become top dog, or leave with their tail between their legs.
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can be show this bit of autocue? in a pawsitively tough field, the scotty dogs had to take on a number of obstacles outside the scottish parliament. some fairing a bit better than others. the competitive field was whittled down to the top 3, with sadie, and her ownerjeremy balfour claiming the prize, let's go back to the autocue. a ruff day for everyone else. i trained for this. time for a look at the weather... here's susan powell. i think ithink an i think an east—west split is the best way of describing the weather across the uk for tuesday and wednesday. in the east, high pressure will keep things settled, there will be a lot of dry weather and for the west, a friend trying to squeeze in bringing cloud and rain. if rent is looming through the
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course of today. —— a front. let's engine it will linger across northern ireland and by the end of the night another system will emerge bring wet weather to end the night. further east, chilly and one or two spots, murky along the north sea coast and a bit of fog forming. there is the weather front towards the west that is going to be trying to push up against that high through the day on tuesday. so progress, it will slope its way into the irish sea through the course of the day. cloud along the north sea coast will pull away and we will see some decent brightness in most eastern counties on tuesday. by the afternoon, much greyerfor counties on tuesday. by the afternoon, much greyer for western scotla nd afternoon, much greyer for western scotland and some rain for the central lowlands. northern ireland is brighterfor the central lowlands. northern ireland is brighter for the second central lowlands. northern ireland is brighterfor the second half central lowlands. northern ireland is brighter for the second half of the day but rain pushing into wales and the south—west. further east, where the sentient we could get up to 19 degrees in london. tuesday into wednesday, our eight its way
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east with rain across more central parts. maybe, the odd thundery downpour. brighter in the west. head of the front 16 or 17 in the east with some sunshine. for thursday we see some more balanced weather, rain for most areas. first thing for scotla nd for most areas. first thing for scotland and then clearing in the afternoon for heavy downpours across england and wales. cast your ice towards the north, those temperatures are being sliding away but by thursday afternoon, colder air starting to slide down behind that rain and by the front are the way to the south of the uk by friday. a chilly northerly breeze on friday. a chilly northerly breeze on friday and definitely a very different feel to our weather as we bring the week to a close. we are going into a bank holiday weekend, ona going into a bank holiday weekend, on a positive note high pressure looks like it will stay close by with settled weather and temperatures will creep back up to
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average values.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 3pm: rape victims are to be asked to hand over their phones to the police — or risk their attackers not being prosecuted. campaigners are concerned. it's massively intrusive. it really has an impact on victims of rape who may be severely traumatised already by what's happened. it's another violation, in effect, of traumatised victims. spain's socialists celebrate victory in the country's general election — though they can't form a government by themselves. the united nations says the situation in northern mozambique is worse than thought — days after cyclone kenneth ravaged the country, killing 38 people. coming up on afternoon
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live all the sport... more to come on the news cricketer alex hales removed from england's provisional world cup squad for an off the field issue thanks, john. and susan all the weather. your full forecast through to the end of the bank holiday weekend. simon enjoyed it so much last time we will be learning a bit more about whether stories. thanks. also coming up: did you clock this? you'vejust run 26 miles — attempting to get into the guinness book of world records for fastest marathon time dressed as a landmark — and then this happens at the finish line. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. victims of rape and other crimes are being told they must hand over their mobile phones to the police — or risk prosecutions not going ahead.
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police forces in england and wales are rolling out consent forms, which ask for permission to get access to messages, photos, emails and social media accounts. it's a response to the collapse of a string of rape and sexual assault cases, after crucial evidence emerged on mobile phones at the last minute. our legal correspondent, clive coleman, reports. there is going to be evidence in everyone's phone... liam allan was falsely accused of rape. the case against him only collapsed when text messages from his accuser, which proved his innocence, were disclosed days into his trial. he favours complainants being asked for their consent to hand over their mobile devices. i can't consider it an invasion of privacy because there is something in there that will either assist the case or assist the defence and that needs to be...the police need to have access to that, otherwise there is no right to a fair trial, that's gone. to ensure our fair trial system, the prosecution has to disclose to the defence any evidence gathered by the police that either assists the defence case
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or undermines the prosecution's. and because of the way we all live our lives today, a lot of that evidence is found on these things. following a series of collapsed trials, a number of reviews revealed a system—wide disclosure problem. at its core was the ability of police and prosecutors to get on top of unprecedented amounts of digital evidence. under a national disclosure improvement plan, all cps prosecutors and 93,000 police staff have received specialist training. disclosure champions have been appointed and management systems used in complex terrorism cases are now being used in all rape cases. but most controversial are new forms under which witnesses and victims, including victims of rape, are asked if they will consent to have their devices examined. if they don't, it might halt a prosecution.
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will they cooperate? i'm optimistic that, if properly explained and communicated, the reference point of what we're calling a "consent form" for access to digital data, where it is reasonable and necessary in any given case, will succeed. vand the reason i'm confident is that the people of this country, historically, have always supported criminal investigation and prosecution. but campaigners are worried. it's massively intrusive. it really has an impact on victims of rape, who may be severely traumatised already by what's happened. it's another violation, in effect, of traumatised victims. and what's more, the danger is that it will deter victims from coming forward. striking the balance in the digital age between protecting victims and the accused's right to a fair trial is complex. but if the correct balance is not found, the future of our fair trial system is in jeopardy.
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earlier our legal correspondent clive explained why the future of our legal system may be injeopardy... the quid pro quo is that you ensure to get a fair trial, the prosecution have to disclose to you the defender any evidence that is being gathered by the police which might assist your case or undermine the prosecution. that is a foundation of ourfair trial system. if we can't have confidence that the authorities are able to locate the relevant evidence, and then to disclose that evidence to the defendant, where it assists the defendant's case, then a realfoundation of the system is shaken. with the best intent in the world, the challenge of going through this sort of data in this digital age, it is huge. it is staggering.
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thejustice committee wrote a stinging report on this. if you think of something like a mobile phone, it has more computing power than nasa had when the first moon landings were launched. if you were to download the contents of this phone, the assistant commissioner at the met said he had done a calculation that if you were to download the contents of a normal smartphone, then print it out on a4 sheets of paper, put them on top of each other, you will have a column two miles high. and the complexity of how you search text speak where people are talking in part words, abbreviations, emojis. this is throwing massive challenges at the system at a time when the system has sustained very significant cuts — the police, the crown prosecution service have. it is probably the ultimate challenge facing the system at the moment. if you are the victim of sexual assault or rape and you report it to the police, you are a victim. you will immediately feel like a suspect if they say they want your phone, particularly if it is a stranger
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rape where the phone would have no application at all. this will not be applied in a blanket way across—the—board. where you mentioned stranger rape, i gather one of the women who is bringing a legal challenge, that was in relation to a stranger rape because once the defence put in the defence statement, if the defence statement is that the sex was consensual, the police have to pursue all reasonable lines of enquiry. even in that sort of case, it is possible that the police would seek the consent of the victim to scrutinise their mobile phone, and the reason for this is that we saw in late 2017, early 2018, a string of cases go wrong where there was this, if you like, exculpatory evidence that benefited the defendant. and it was lying on mobile phones and on victims‘ and complainants‘ mobile phones. in the liam allan case it was days into to his trial
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before that evidence, which he had been asking forfrom months and months, and saying there is this evidence, it was only disclosed very late on when the trial had already started. that could have been a serious miscarriage of justice. it is an unpalatable truth that in a small minority of cases, of cases, complainants do make false accusations. in order to protect people against that small number of cases, we have these disclosure rules which mean that the defendant gets any evidence which prosecutors and investigators locate, which assist their case. a police force failed to cross—reference almost half the incidents involving a serial stalker who drove his ex—partner to take her own life. nicholas allen bombarded justene reece with abusive voicemails, texts and facebook messages and had a string of convictions for assault and harrassment. an investigation by the independent office for police conduct found staffordshire police missed the ‘bigger picture‘ of his offending. after ms reece‘s death, mr allen was jailed for 10 years
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at stafford crown court — admitting manslaughter. in spain, the socialists are celebrating after winning the country‘s third election in four years. they‘re the largest party, though they fell short of a majority and will need the help of others to form a government. for the first time since military rule ended in the 1970s, a party of the far right is set to enter parliament. james reynolds reports from madrid. after this country‘s third vote in four years, spain has a winner. voters picked their way through a collection of fractured parties and gave the governing socialist party more seats than any other group. this is what relief looks like. in the centre of madrid, spain‘s socialists celebrated their victory. their leader, the pro—european prime minister, pedro sanchez, saw off a conservative opposition, which included a rising movement from the far right.
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translation: we made it happen. the socialist party has won the election and, in doing so, the future has won and the past has lost. pedro sanchez argued during the campaign that he was the only spanish leader capable of stopping the advance of the hard right. and the numbers show that he has done so. he must now form a lasting coalition of his own. we have seen different things in the world. we‘ve seen trump in the states. we‘ve seen different things. we‘ve seen "brexit" — i‘m sorry! and sometimes you have to get together and say "this is what we want". and you don‘t want those things, you don‘t want trump or brexit? oh, my god, no! we don't want franco to come back, all those old ideas, so i think it's a good thing to be here tonight and to
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support our president. the far right party, vox, the first significant movement of its kind since the end of general franco‘s fascist regime four decades ago, ended up on the losing side. but they did win enough votes to enter parliament in opposition. translation: we now have a voice in congress and we can tell everyone in spain that vox are here to say. thank you to all our two million supporters. by contrast, the winners, pedro sanchez and the socialist party, will continue to lead this country, probably in partnership with a number of smaller left—wing and regional parties. the exact shape of the new administration may take weeks to decide. sri lanka has banned face coverings in public, following the suicide attacks on easter sunday that killed
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at least 250 people and injured hundreds. the president is using an emergency law to impose the restriction from today. he said any face garment which "hinders identification" will be banned to ensure security but muslim leaders have criticised the move. the united nations says the situation in northern mozambique is worse than thought — days after cyclone kenneth ravaged the country, killing 38 people. rain and flooding in northern state of cabo delgado has put around 700,000 people at risk. the cyclone is predicted to dump twice as much rainfall as cyclone idai did last month. lebo deseko has been the following developments from from the country‘s capital city, maputo. it does seem that weather conditions eased off slightly in the north of the country this morning, and that allowed aid aid agencies a little window of opportunity to start distributing aid. the world food programme started handing out some supplies in macomia. they also sent a plane out to the island of ibo which had been
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completely cut off yesterday. however, the situation is in flux, it is fast changing. they wanted to send in a second plane — that wasn‘t able to be sent. that was filled with rice, food — that sort of thing, for people. the message from authorities in pemba yesterday was this is worse than we had expected and we need help. there were concerns raised about things like cholera. rain is expected for a number of days here. yesterday pemba had two metres of rain. the issue is going to be how quickly they can get those supplies in. planes were cancelled yesterday, roads very, very difficult to reach. so that‘s going to be the critical thing, how quickly our aid agencies are going to be able to get in the supplies they need to reach the affected people. a new report has proposed that the social care system in england — which helps older and disabled people with tasks such as washing and dressing — should be funded in a similar way
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to the state pension. the plan, by the former conservative cabinet minister, damian green, says people should pay for a basic safety net, and then be allowed to pay extra if they want additional help. here‘s our social affairs correspondent, alison holt. with more of us living longer, the demand from people needing help with day—to—day tasks like eating, getting dressed and washed is increasing. councils that provide that support have also had their budgets cut. it means the care system is under huge pressure. today‘s report says the need for reform is urgent, to provide a safety net to end the lottery of who gets state funded care and who doesn‘t. the report calls for a nationally funded pension style scheme. it proposes a universal care entitlement to provide anyone who needs it with a decent standard of help. people would pay a care supplement on top if they wanted a more expensive level of support. the report also says
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the underfunding of the current care system must be tackled. we need universal care provision that is better than it is now. so, it will involve spending more taxpayers‘ money. we‘ll have to find £2.5 billion extra a year. but also on top of that, we need to allow people, if they can, and many people can particularly if they own property, they‘ll be able to actually buy an insurance policy or something like an annuity that will, when it‘s all pooled together, put a lot more money into the system. the government says it has put extra money into social care and plans for the future will be published at the earliest opportunity. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: rape victims are to be asked to hand over their phones to the police, or risk their attackers not their attackers not being prosecuted — but campaigners are concerned. spain‘s governing socialist party wins the most seats in the general election — but prime minister pedro sanchez
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will need to form a coalition after failing to secure a majority. the united nations says the situation in northern mozambique is worse than thought — days after cyclone kenneth ravaged. the country — killing 38 people stephen chalmers, discoverer of the winning goal in the 1967 cups finals, has at the and barry hawkins needs tyrone wilson at the second round, best of 25 frames. more to come on all of those stories at half past. a rabbi who was injured in the deadly shooting at a synagogue near san diego has described the moment
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he faced the gunman. one woman died and two other people were injured in the attack on saturday. a 19 year old man was arersted shortly afterwards. rabbi yisroel goldstein described what happened. i walked into the banquet hall to wash my hands. i walk two, three footsteps when i hear a loud bang. i thought lori may have fell, or the table tipped over in the lobby right here. i turn around and i see a sight that i... undescribable. here is a young man standing with a rifle. pointing right at me. and i look at him. he had sunglasses on, i couldn‘t see his eyes, i couldn‘t see his soul. i froze. my first concern was, what‘s with lori? where did that noise come from?
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what‘s happened to lori? and as soon as i did that, i took a look and more shots came running right at me, and i lifted up my hands. i lost my index finger of this hand. after four hours of surgery yesterday, to try to save this index finger on the left hand. i turn around and i saw the children that were playing in the banquet hall. i ran to gather them together. my granddaughter, 4.5 years old, sees her grandpa with a bleeding hand and she sees me screaming and shouting, get out, get out! she didn‘t deserve to see her grandfather like this. the us aviation regulator, the federal aviation administration, has received four calls from current and former employees of boeing with allegations relating to the safety of the 737 max. the aircraft was grounded in early march after two fatal crashes in indonesia and ethiopia that
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killed 346 people. our business correspondent theo leggettjoins me now... what is being alleged? the faa has this hotline were employees in the aviation industry can send over either by the internet or on phone concerns that they have, in confidence, so that safety problems can get resolved. we understand that four people contacted the faa after the ethiopian airlines crash, after the ethiopian airlines crash, after the 737 max had already been grounded. their concerns relate to manufacturing processing. 0ne grounded. their concerns relate to manufacturing processing. one of the reports, just one, suggests that in one case wiring to a crucial sensor was damaged in the manufacturing process. and that this sensor which measures the level of the nose of the aircraft, the angle in relation to the rest of the aircraft, had been damaged. that angle of attack
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sensor has been implicated in the crashes in both indonesia and ethiopia. it is potentially another line of investigation into what went wrong involving the 737 max and why. is we have been reporting, it is a shareholders meeting today. this will be a difficult one. yes, the chairman and chief executive of boeing will come under a lot of pressure, because all of this has happened on his watch. there are questions being asked about whether the 737 max should still have been flying after the first accident, and whether boeing did enough after the first accident to make sure that its aircraft was safe. don‘t forget this isa aircraft was safe. don‘t forget this is a company which is facing a shareholder lawsuit from its own investors, there is a certain amount of pressure on boeing to decide whether to much power is invested in the chairman and chief executive, whether he should give up one of those roles, ring in a new independent chairman. at the moment the company is in crisis. it needs leadership. —— and they should bring
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ina new leadership. —— and they should bring in a new independent chairman. a new report has highlighted the critical role that soil plays in climate change. there‘s more carbon stored in soil than in all the world‘s trees — and it‘s being released into the atmosphere by deforestation and poor farming. the scientists behind the study say that already, nearly half the world‘s population is suffering because of the way that land is degraded. here‘s our environment analyst, roger harrabin. soil erosion — a double problem. here in the east of england, this isn‘t smog in the air, it‘s soil on a hot windy day. losing soil like this lowers our ability to grow crops. it also releases carbon trapped in the earth, and that contributes to climate change. in parts of the south of england, some carelessly farmed fields are steadily running into the rivers. soil degradation is a problem said to affect almost half the world‘s people. look at this tsunami of dust last year in phoenix, arizona. it‘s the result of
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a spectacular storm. for most farmers, soil loss is a creeping problem that‘s only noticed it too late. soils are really important for climate change as well, because they store a lot of carbon. there‘s three times more carbon stored in soil and there is in the atmosphere. so imagine if all that carbon was released from the soil into the atmosphere, we‘d have the runaway climate change that people are concerned about. so, what to do? well, we know cows‘ burps are a problem for climate change, but their dung also helps put carbon back into the soil. so, this mobile dairy in the south of england may prove part of the solution. it means cows spread their dung across the fields, not leave it in the farmyard. that way, nutrients and carbon from the pasture return to the soil. we were worried that the soil was becoming dead. there was no vitality in the soil, no resilience in the soil. so we realised we need to put grass
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back into the system, and manage the grass so we brought in dairy cows. here‘s the evidence. this field, with its light, stony soil, is depleted from crops grown with chemical fertilisers. see the much darker, carbon rich soil in the far ploughed field, previously fertilised by cows. the simplest way of combating climate change and improving the soil is to turn all this farmland into woodland. but that wouldn‘t feed the people, would it? perhaps a form of farming like this can be gentler on environment, while keeping milk on the table. we‘ve got to radically cut the number of cattle on earth, scientists tell us. is there a role for pasture fed cows like these that burp out methane but also help the soil? we don‘t have a clear answer yet. prison governors are being urged to wear a uniform, similar to that of prison officers, in an effort to restore control and order to jails in england and wales. the independent think—tank
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the centre for socialjustice is calling on ministers to consider the measures as part of a raft of proposals to tackle drugs and violence. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw reports. supplying drugs and mobile phones to prisons is a lucrative business. this is one way it happens, over perimeter walls. it‘s worth thousands of pounds to the gangs behind the trade and to the prisoners who sell the contraband behind bars. but it causes debt and bullying, fuelling record levels of violence. this prison footage can‘t be independently verified but comes with a report on ways to tackle what it calls the prisons crisis. among 59 proposals in the centre for socialjustice report is a call for an amnesty for corrupt prison staff who co—operate with the authorities. it recommends specialist prisons for the most violent offenders and suggests prison managers or governors should dress like prison officers, wearing uniforms rather than suits to show they‘re working together
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to deal with the problems. what we know from evidence in new zealand is that when staff are promoted out of uniform in a uniform service, into civilian clothing, actually their perception of competence and the empathy they have with the front line actually diminishes so it creates a them and us culture. we are very keen to see that reunification of the service so that people actually feel that real sense of camaraderie. the ministry ofjustice says it currently has no plans to change the rules on clothing. it means prisons will continue to be different from the police, ambulance and fire services where front line staff of all ranks wear uniform. thomas cook says fewer people are booking summer holidays to countries in the european union this summer, as the uncertainty over brexit continues. the travel agent has seen bookings to destinations outside the eu increase by 10 percent compared with last year. its findings chime with separate post office figures showing currency sales for long—haul destinations have jumped.
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time for a look at the weather... iam taking i am taking you now to chicago because the boss of boeing is speaking at the shareholders meeting, following two fatal accidents involving boeing aircraft. let‘s hear from accidents involving boeing aircraft. let‘s hearfrom him. accidents involving boeing aircraft. let's hear from him. our leadership role is clear, our commitment to our values is resolute. 0ur pursuit of excellence is never—ending. we own it. when it comes to safety, there are no competing priorities. this is clear in the steps we have taken since the accidents and in our performance in the past year and throughout our history. centred on safety, quality and integrity. i will focus on these three important values today. it all starts with safety, from the days immediately following the air accident our engineers and technical experts have been working tirelessly in collaboration with federal aviation administration and our customers to
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finalise and lament a software update that will ensure accidents like these never happen again. the update will prevent erroneous angle attacks sensor readings from triggering the manoeuvring characteristics of mentation system. something that initial investigation reports indicate courage in both accidents. as one link in a longer chain of events. we know we can break this link in the chain. it is our responsibility to eliminate this risk. we are making steady progress on the path to certification, having completed the official engineering test flight of the software and the final technicalflight test flight of the software and the final technical flight test prior to the certification flight. 0verall, our talented test pilots have made 146 737 max flights, totalling roughly 246 hours of airtime with the updated software. nearly 90% of our 50 plus max operators around the globe have experienced that software
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update themselves during one of our simulator sessions. with the certified software update implemented, the 737 max will be one of the safest aeroplanes ever to fly. there is nothing more important to us than the safety of our airline customers and their passengers. everyday 5.3 million people flight safely on boeing aeroplanes. in addition, more than 2,900 700 —— 2,900 737 aeroplanes on average are in the error with nearly half a million people on board at any given time. 1737 takes off or lands around the world every 1.5 seconds. we don‘t make safety features optional. safety has been and always will be our top priority. everyone of our aeroplanes includes all of the safety features necessary for safe flight. safety features necessary for safe flight. we also carry about the safety of our people, internally we have reduced workplace injuries by
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roughly 40%. reduction has increased by 25% through 2018. since launching our company—wide by 25% through 2018. since launching our compa ny—wide safety initiative in 2013. the national safety council recognised boeing with 2018 robert w campbell award for leadership and excellence incorporating environment, health and safety values and best practices at every level of our company. as we improve safety we also continue to prioritise productivity and quality. mutually reinforcing objectives that are never at odds. we are taking steps to transform our approach to first—time quality through an enterprise—wide effort that was launched earlier this year. it is about eliminating non—value—added tasks, waste and rework, regardless of where they occur in the organisation. in addition, we are streamlining our enterprise systems processes , streamlining our enterprise systems processes, creating the digital engineering manufacturing supply chain capabilities that will enable
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our future. we chain capabilities that will enable ourfuture. we are chain capabilities that will enable our future. we are also partnering with our customers to ensure our work exceeds their high expectations for us, including most recently on our tanker programme. wendy bree was found at delivered aircraft, we took immediate next steps in partnership with the customer to develop and lament a corrective action plan. —— when debris was found. the team is using it process to eliminate drilling and shimming from assembly, by adding fastener holes at the supplier. the new process significantly reduces reworks, increases quality and leads to improved ergonomics, because drilling is no longer required. we are also applying this approach on the 777x, as we share best practice across our business. a part of our improvement, i have asked the board of directors to establish a committee to review company—wide
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processes for the design and development of the aeroplanes we build. with their collective experience and expertise, the committee members will confirm the effectiveness of policies and processes for ensuring the highest level of safety on the 737 max programme, as well as other programmes, and recommend improvements where necessary. as we work through this challenging time, and in everything we do, we act with integrity. we know every person who stepped aboard one of our air planes places their trust in us. we will do everything possible to re—earn that trust from our customers and the flying customers. that includes ensuring that customers and pilots are confident in the development materials we are deploying. also that they have the proficiency necessary to succeed in a strong, diverse talent pipeline for the future. the industry will need
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790,000 new civil aviation pilots and 754,000 new maintenance technicians to fly and maintain the world fleet safely over the next 20 yea rs. world fleet safely over the next 20 years. that is according to our outlook. meeting the significant demand requires ongoing, cross industry collaboration among operators, equipment manufacturers, governments and educators. boeing has an important role to play in advancing training efforts that support safe operations and we are committed to going above and beyond. to that end, we took steps earlier this year with a $3 million grant to help students learn with greater efficiency and perform more effectively once on the job. this is just the beginning. 0verall, our investments in our communities exceeded $280 million in 2018. that isa exceeded $280 million in 2018. that is a company record. as we continue to drive positive, lasting change across the globe in important areas
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such as stem subjects and veteran support. boeing‘s leading position in the aerospace industry is also making a meaningful difference in addressing aviation‘s impact on climate change. boeing reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 28%, while increasing aircraft deliveries 66% in the decade leading to a bold new environment strategy for 2018 until 2025. safety, quality, integrity and all of our enduring values represent who we are as a company. when we get the values right, it enables the strategy, if we don‘t, it cannot succeed. looking ahead, we continue to capture the opportunity before us by working together as one boeing. strengthening what we already do well, driving improvements as we and accelerate our pace or process. these are key tenants of our powerful strategy, which drives us in pursuit of our bold goals and aspiration to be the best in
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aerospace and an enduring global industrial champion. the strength of our strategy is reflected in our 2018 strong performance. we booked a record 2018 revenue of $101 billion, exceeding $100 billion for the first time in company history, driven by record commercial aeroplane deliveries, higher defence space and security volume, and continued growth in services. that is the chief executive of boeing, saying that the company was making steady progress towards getting approval for a new 737 max software upgrade, facing shareholders for the first time since the two fatal crashes that have triggered the grounding of that have triggered the grounding of that particular jack. he that have triggered the grounding of that particularjack. he is trying to bolster confidence in boeing‘s fastest selling aeroplane, with questions still lingering over safety. that is what is going on in the meeting was to outside, family and friends of a 24—year—old american, one of the victims of the crash of an ethiopian airlines 737
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max have been holding a silent protest outside that meeting site. that crash killed all 157 on board. it was one of two fatal crashes with the 737 max at the heart of the inquiry. so, unveiling record revenue for the past year, obviously still questions remaining over that particular aircraft. we will leave that and keep an eye on it, if there is any more to come from that. let‘s get the sport now. john is at the bbc sport centre. the england cricket squad are one man down? alex hales has been removed from england‘s provisional world cup squad, all but ending his chances of playing at the tournament this summer. it‘s been widely reported hales failed a recreational drugs test for a second time — which led to a three week ban. that would fit with the matches he‘s missed for his club side nottinghamshire.
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last week a spokesman for the batsman confirmed he‘d been suspended following an off—field incident, his club said it was for personal reasons, with hales accepting it was right he was suspended. the ecb said his withdrawl is in the best intrests of the team, to ensure they‘re free of any distractions. it‘s not the first suspension he‘s faced, following the punishment handed down from the ecb which also included a fine following a street fight outside a nightclub, which you might remember included ben stokes. as things stand, he will not be playing at the world cup, we expect. how big a loss will he be? he wouldn‘t have been a starter but he‘s an integral member of the squad — a powerful batsman who specialises in the shorter formats, having played 70 one—day internationals for his country. so with the 50 over world cup on home soil this summer he was expected to be a central figure in that squad. with the world cup now less than a month away, alex hales, the prolific
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batter, he gave up a red ball cricket to concentrate on white ball cricket. yeah, it is a big call. for england, i hope it is the right one. if you look at the batter is waiting in the wings,jamie if you look at the batter is waiting in the wings, jamie vince has been talked about, he‘s scored a blistering 190 for his county, hampshire, the other day. sam hain, joe clarke, also players that are around. the former celtic player stevie chalmers has died at the age of 83. chalmers scored the winning goalfor celtic in the 1967 european cup final against inter milan in portugal. the team later dubbed the lisbon lions have also been mourning the passing of their captain billy mcneil — who died last week. ajax have arrived in london ahead of their champions league semi final first leg with tottenham tomorrow night. the dutch league cancelled last weekend‘s fixtures to give the team extra time to prepare, while tottenham lost to west ham in a london derby on saturday. manager mauricio pochettino says
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they wont use that as an excuse. the most fair way is to have the same time to prepare for both teams. but it is not an excuse, i only described the situation. what happened for me is going to be a fantastic semifinal. and of course we are going to try to win. but it never is there going to be an excuse, because we didn‘t have the same days to prepare as ajax. speaking ahead of what will be a defining moment in tottenham‘s season. the second round of the world snooker championship is continuing in sheffield. this time next week we#ll be well into the final of the competition. we can bring you some live pictures. barry hawkins resumed with a 9—7 lead over fellow
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englishman kyren wilson — but wilson has hit back — it's 11-11. it looks like wilson will take the lead. 0n the other table china‘s zhou yuelong had a 9—7 lead over two times finallist ali carter. he is in the chair at the moment. carter has taken control of this one and leads 12—9. so, if he can seal this frame it would see him booking his place in the next round. carter at the table. that‘s all the sport for now. i'll i‘ll be back with another update in the next hour. see you then. more now on the news that victims of rape and other crimes are being told they must hand over their mobile phones to the police — or risk prosecutions not going ahead. police forces in england and wales are rolling out consent forms, which ask for permission to get
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access to messages, photos, emails and social media accounts. with me is sue casey, a senior domestic & sexual violence practioner. also i‘m joined by christiana hayward—koura bas, a defence solicitor who‘s worked on the defence team for rape suspects — she‘s in manchester. ifi if i could start with you, what is your main concern about this? the concerns are that this is personal information that has been requested to be used within a court, criminal justice or police process. and it can be perceived as quite intrusive for those victims that are going through that process. yeah. let me put that point to you. there isa let me put that point to you. there is a concern, with all that is involved in making a decision to go and report a crime like this to the police, you are a victim, you are
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feeling once again victimised as soon as you feeling once again victimised as soon as you walk into the police station? yes, i think you have to balance the rights of the complainants and the rights of those who are accused of sometimes extremely serious cases. sometimes cases involving rape. 0ne extremely serious cases. sometimes cases involving rape. one of the biggest problems is that if you do not have this evidence from those complainants, it may be that the defendant cannot prove, for many, many months, his side of the story. now, you have to take it right back to the police. the police may ask for mobile phone evidence. they will then use key searches. so they don't
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look at every single message or every single photograph. they may put in key word searches. from those keyword searches, they may pick out various messages. and that evidence may be used and given to the cps. sorry, forgive me, ijust want to put that to sue. does that in any way allay your fears? not really. there can be contact, contact between the complainant and the person who is defending themselves. contact, in whatever form person who is defending themselves. contact, in whateverform it person who is defending themselves. contact, in whatever form it may be, social media or mobile phones, or text messages or e—mails. that does not disprove an act of sexual violence has taken place. that personal information, they can have
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contact, that does not prove that it didn‘t happen. i think we need to be really careful that the message that may be going out to those that want to report sexual violence is that their information will be asked and requested for, and would the message be that they may be coerced into giving their consent for this to ta ke giving their consent for this to take place, so that they can go to trial? i know that you worked on two cases last year where this evidence was crucial? in one particular case, the accused, in the police station, said if you look at my phone, if you look at my wife's phone, you will see we were not in the same city at the time. and it was very serious matters that were alleged against my client. if the police, upon
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receiving the complaint, had been able to access the complainant's telephone, they would have been able to establish that what she was saying was completely untrue. sorry, to pick up on that case, wouldn‘t it be fair if the defendant in that case said, look, just get access to her phone and let the police do the work at that point? he had given the police his own phone. the problem is that the police and the cps are undera that the police and the cps are under a huge amount of pressure, of time. and it took them from august until november for them to download his phone, not even her phone, to download his phone and look at it, and once the cps had looked at it, they decided that they were not going to pursue the prosecution. the problem with that was that he was held in custody from august until
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november. that is at a huge cost to the public purse. and that could have been dealt with if they looked at her telephone at the police station with certain keywords, for example his name. sue, sadly, false accusations are made. if the defendant was a friend, a relative of yours, you would want the police to have access to any information that might prove... well, important? because you would. but for me, and practitioners and services that support those that experienced sexual violence, we need to think about things in context, in that the amount of cases in which allegations have been made and proved to be
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false, compared to those that actually are experiencing sexual violence and continue to experience it, young people, women, men as well, that may want to come forward and report to the police, then if there is a case where it is in the media about a false allegation, that is what is in the forefront. and that can be a barrier for anybody to wa nt to that can be a barrier for anybody to want to come forward and report. sue, it is very good for you to come in. good to see you. christiana also, thank you very much. more than 6000 people have been forced out of their homes near the canadian city of montreal because of rising floodwater. a combination of melting snow and heavy rainfall has also led to the capital 0ttowa declaring a state of emergency. donna larsen reports.
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this is the result of heavy rains and melting snow. spring flooding in eastern canada has already affected thousands of people and properties. this dam at bell falls in quebec is dangerously over capacity and authorities have ordered anybody down river to evacuate, but such warnings come too late for the residents of one town near montreal where more than 6,500 people were forced to leave their homes after floodwaters breached a dyke, sending a five—foot surge of water crashing through the area. the canadian capital 0ttawa and montreal are among the places which have declared states of emergency. and hundreds of soldiers have been deployed to the hardest—hit regions as residents do what they can to shore up their houses. my basement is currently flooding because the power is out as of today. my backyard is flooding too because there‘s a swamp back there, so i‘m pretty much surrounded except for a little bit in the front.
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canada‘s prime minister has visited some of the affected areas, even filling up sandbags, but it will take more than a carefully planned photocall to solve the problem whichjustin trudeau says is a result of climate change. with climate change, we're going to see more and more of these extreme weather events more regularly. we need to think about adaptation, mitigation and how we will move forward together. in some places, the floodwaters are now starting to recede, enabling people to assess the damage, but with more rain forecast over the coming days, others can only watch and wait. donna larsen, bbc news, quebec. i want to bring you breaking news from nottingham. we are hearing that six teenagers have admitted their pa rt six teenagers have admitted their part ina six teenagers have admitted their part in a street attack on an egyptian engineering student. it left her in a coma. it happened
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on february the 20th last year. she suffered a stroke ten hours after the incident and died almost a month later. we are just hearing that one pleaded guilty at an earlier hearing. now six teenagers have admitted their part in the street attack on mariam moustafa. she died three weeks after an attack on a bus. we will bring you more on that. this was coming from nottingham crown court. we will bring you more on that as we get it. the business news in a moment, first, the headlines. rape victims are to be asked to hand over their phones to the police, or risk their attackers not being prosecuted, but campaigners are concerned. spain‘s governing socialist party wins the most seats in the general election — but prime minister pedro sanchez will need to form a coalition after failing to secure a majority. the united nations says the situation in northern mozambique
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is worse than thought — days after cyclone kenneth ravaged the country, killing 38 people. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. fewer british holiday—makers have booked a summer holiday in the european union this year amid continuing brexit uncertainty, that‘s according to holiday firm thomas cook. it says almost half of the holidays it sold up until the end of february were to non—eu destinations, up 10% last year. boeing‘s chief executive is to face shareholders later for the first time since the second of two fatal crashes involving the firm‘s 737 max plane which killed a total of 346 people. dennis muilenburg will have to try to boost confidence in the plane—maker after a difficult two months. nearly a third of graduates are overqualified for theirjob. the latest figures — they date from two years ago, 2017 — from the office for national statistics, show the incidence of overeducation was highest
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in the those aged between 25 and 49. this isn‘tjust a case ofjumping into any old job the moment you graduate. around 30% of graduates were still overeducated for their job five years after graduation. interesting research saying more people are travelling on holiday outside the eu? actually, it is a currency thing. a bit of a giveaway. an interesting chart. we often say the pound has gone up1 an interesting chart. we often say the pound has gone up 1 cent, it is the pound has gone up 1 cent, it is the highest it has been for some time. that put it into the context of where it was before the referendum. what you got a notice is that the pound was actually falling quite a lot before that. some people argue it was continuing the trajectory downwards. but it is trading ina trajectory downwards. but it is trading in a slightly different trading in a slightly different trading range, as it were, you can see between 1.1 and 1.2, whereas
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before it was between 1.2 and 1.4. you can see the real difference. it isa you can see the real difference. it is a 10% difference. if you go back further, beyond where the graph shows, you will see the real fall in the pound happened in 2008 after the financial crisis. before that, we we re financial crisis. before that, we were actually trading up at about 150. we really did get a lot of euros for our money. as you can see, we are not doing so well now. but thatis we are not doing so well now. but that is one of the reasons why people are not going to europe. there are other places like turkey in place like that, which have better currency rates. 0r in place like that, which have better currency rates. or you can get more for your pound, anyway. alice macandrew is group corporate affairs director at thomas cook. is it just the is itjust the currency? because actually, as you can see from that graph, it was fairly weak last year? i think there are a number of factors at play here. clearly, the weakness of the pound doesn't help when you are thinking about budgeting for your holiday. i think when you are looking at, as you
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mentioned, destinations like turkey, tunisia is also coming back strongly, you are getting more for your money. you have some great value results there. you have a beautiful coastline, lots to see and do, great food. thirdly, it is clear to us now that the prolonged uncertainty around brexit is having some impact. customers are waking up every morning, seeing the news on tv and thinking either when they are booking their holiday they will book outside of the eu destinations, or in some cases, they are putting off booking until things become a little bit clearer for them. you mentioned tunisia, i know that egypt is popular, turkey is popular, they don‘t have the best record when it comes to political unrest and terrorism. is that something that, after a year, people forget about these things? i think as a tour operator, our first priority is
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always to follow government advice. tunisia just came back on the map after three years out for uk customers, it came back onto the map at the beginning of last year, and we have seen really strong returns into tunisia from british customers, doubling in package holiday bookings this year. airline booking, see tony bookings, a perform times. ithink we are very much led by customers. we started quite cautiously, going back into tunisia with just a small numberof back into tunisia with just a small number of hotels. not that many flights. and we tend to wait and see how customers demand it, and ourjob is to meet that demand and make sure they are getting the best value. ok, alice, thank you very much indeed. we have some markets appear for you. it isa we have some markets appear for you. it is a peak, an all—time high. the all—time high before was two 940.
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why? we had good gdp figures on friday, showing continued strength in the us economy, rather against expectations. people have been forecasting the trump bump, as it is called, was going to come to an end. we were forecasting at a year ago and it hasn‘t come to an end. the ftse is up, on the back of america, and the pound is looking a little bit weaker. see you later. more than 100,000 people have watched the moment that a london marathon runner, dressed as big ben, got stuck trying to cross the finish line. i‘m glad to say that the runner, lukas bates, has finally escaped his costume, and he‘s been speaking so i was running down the mall, and i saw 800 metres to go, 400 metres to go, 200 metres to go. i really wanted to be up that finish line. at no point i think there was going to be a problem at the finish line.
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it was only when i got there and literally ran up to the finish line, and felt a thud, and heard a thud coming from the top of my tower, as my costume got snagged. literally hit the side of the finishing chute. so, yeah, i stopped and a kind gentleman from the london marathon, he helped me my costume forward. he advised me to go down a lot lower, which was quite awkward, but i squatted down pretty much on my bum, angled my torso forward. i think i first of all tried going sideways, and then tried going forwards. i think because my legs were so fatigued, i didn‘t realise how far i needed to go down. so it was a case ofjust keeping trying to go lower to the point i could get through. so, yeah, we managed eventually. and i was very appreciative to the gentleman who helped. i shook his hand at the end. i was so pleased to be over that line and not have to wear that costume any more.
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in a moment the weather — but fur one day only holyrood has gone to the dogs — for the scottish parliament‘s dog of the year contest. here are the competitors battling it out to become top dog — or leave with their tail between their legs. in a pawsitively tough field, the scotty dogs had to take on a number of obstacles outside the scottish parliament. some fairing a bit better than others. the competitive field was whittled down to the top 3 — with sadie — with her owner jeremy balfour claiming the prize — a ruff day for everyone else. here is susan powell with the weather. and east— west split sums up the weather. in the west, whether france will try to squeeze in, meaning more cloud and some outbreaks of rain. in
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the next few hours, i am hopeful things will actually brighten across wales on the south—west of england. still cloud and rain for northern ireland. by the end of the night, and weather front bumps into this feature that has been lurking in the west through today. wet prospects for northern ireland to get tuesday under way. elsewhere, dry, for northern ireland to get tuesday underway. elsewhere, dry, cloud coming from the north sea again to coastal regions. some mist and fog developing across eastern counties of england and scotland. definitely you can see the east— west split for tuesday. perhaps as the front slides into the irish sea we will see some brighter skies for northern ireland through the afternoon. rain pushing into western scotland and north western england, and north wales. just barely in double figures where we have the rain, up to 19 in a sunny south—east.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. today at 4pm: four boeing employees raise safety concerns about 737 max jetliners — as the company‘s chief executive faces shareholders for the first time since two fatal crashes. when an accident occurs, we feel it deeply across our company because all of us understand lives depend on what we do. we hold ourselves to the highest standards of safety, quality and integrity in our work. because the stakes could not be higher. because the stakes could not be higher. rape victims are to be asked to hand over their phones to the police — or risk their attackers not being prosecuted. campaigners are concerned. it‘s massively intrusive. it really has an impact on victims of rape who may be severely traumatised already by what‘s happened. it‘s another violation, in effect, of traumatised victims.
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the united nations says the situation in northern mozambique is worse than thought — days after cyclone kenneth ravaged the country — killing 38 people. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport. more to come on you is that cricketer alex hales has been removed from england‘s provisional world cup squad for an off field issue. thank you. looking at the weather for us, susan. good afternoon, it may be monday once again but next monday chances are you may not be working. we are going into the first of our main holidays. i will be taking a look at the forecast all the way through the next seven days to see what you have in store. also coming up: in news nationwide we‘ll be looking at the solar oven — an invention designed to help those without electricty cook meals.
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hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. the us aviation regulator, the federal aviation administration, has received four calls from current and former employees of boeing with allegations relating to the safety of the 737 max. the aircraft was grounded in early march after two fatal crashes in indonesia and ethiopia, killing 346 people. in the past hour, boeing‘s chief executive has been speaking to shareholders for the first time since the aircraft were grounded. it is our responsibility to deliver and service aeroplanes that are safe to apply and can be safely flown by every single one of the professional and dedicated pilots all around the world. we own it. all of us at boeing are deeply sorry for the loss of life. we offer our sincere condolences. we feel the immense
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gravity of these events. and recognise the devastation to the families and friends of the loved ones who perished. we also regret the impact grounding has had on our customers and supply chain partners. many of which are small to medium—sized businesses. we are humbled and continually learning from the recent accidents. that was a few moments ago. four people contacted the faa after the ethiopian airlines crash and after the 737 max had already been grounded. their concerns relate to manufacturing processes, and one of the reports, just one, suggests that in one case wiring to a crucial sensor was damaged in the manufacturing process. and that the sensor, an angle of attack vein which measures the level of the nose of the aircraft, the angle it is in
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relation to the rest of the aircraft, may have been damaged. sensor has been implicated in the crashes in both indonesia and ethiopia. it is potentially another line of investigation into what went wrong. and why it went wrong. today as we have been reporting it as a shareholders meeting at boeing. this will be a difficult one. yes, dennis muilenburg is going to come under a lot of pressure because all of this has happened on his watch. there are questions being asked about whether the 737 max should still have been flying after the first accident and whether boeing did enough after the first accident to make sure its aircraft was safe. don't forget this company is facing a shareholder lawsuit from its own investors. there is a certain amount of pressure on boeing to decide whether to much power is invested in dennis muilenburg who is chairman and chief executive, the right not he should give up one of those roles, perhaps bringing a new independent chairman.
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the company is in crisis and needs leadership. victims of rape and other crimes are being asked to hand over their mobile phones to the police — or risk prosecutions not going ahead. police forces in england and wales are rolling out consent forms, which ask for permission to get access to messages, photos, emails and social media accounts. it‘s a response to the collapse of a string of rape and sexual assault cases, after crucial evidence emerged on mobile phones at the last minute. our legal correspondent, clive coleman, reports. there is going to be evidence in everyone‘s phone... liam allan was falsely accused of rape. the case against him only collapsed when text messages from his accuser, which proved his innocence, were disclosed days into his trial. he favours complainants being asked for their consent to hand over their mobile devices. i can‘t consider it an invasion of privacy because there is something in there that will either assist the case or assist the defence and that needs to be...the police need to have access to that, otherwise
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there is no right to a fair trial, that‘s gone. to ensure our fair trial system, the prosecution has to disclose to the defence any evidence gathered by the police that either assists the defence case or undermines the prosecution‘s. and because of the way we all live our lives today, a lot of that evidence is found on these things. following a series of collapsed trials, a number of reviews revealed a system—wide disclosure problem. at its core was the ability of police and prosecutors to get on top of unprecedented amounts of digital evidence. under a national disclosure improvement plan, all cps prosecutors and 93,000 police staff have received specialist training. disclosure champions have been appointed and management systems used in complex terrorism cases are now being used in all rape cases. but most controversial are new forms
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under which witnesses and victims, including victims of rape, are asked if they will consent to have their devices examined. if they don‘t, it might halt a prosecution. will they cooperate? i‘m optimistic that, if properly explained and communicated, the reference point of what we‘re calling a "consent form" for access to digital data, where it is reasonable and necessary in any given case, will succeed. vand the reason i‘m confident is that the people of this country, historically, have always supported criminal investigation and prosecution. but campaigners are worried. it's massively intrusive. it really has an impact on victims of rape, who may be severely traumatised already by what's happened. it's another violation, in effect, of traumatised victims. and what's more, the danger is that it will deter victims
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from coming forward. striking the balance in the digital age between protecting victims and the accused‘s right to a fair trial is complex. but if the correct balance is not found, the future of our fair trial system is in jeopardy. and earlier clive explained why the future of our legal system may be in thatjeopardy... the quid pro quo is that you ensure to get a fair trial, the prosecution have to disclose to you the defender any evidence that is being gathered by the police which might assist your case or undermine the prosecution. that is a foundation of ourfair trial system. if we can‘t have confidence that the authorities are able to locate the relevant evidence, and then to disclose that evidence to the defendant where it assists the defendant‘s case, then a realfoundation of the system is shaken. with the best intent in the world, the challenge of going through this sort of data in this digital age,
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it is huge. it is staggering. thejustice committee wrote a stinging report on this. if you think of something like a mobile phone, it has more computing power than nasa had when the first moon landings were launched. if you were to download the contents of this phone, the assistant commissioner at the met said he had done a calculation that if you were to download the contents of a normal smartphone, then print it out on a4 sheets of paper, put them on top of each other, you would have a column two miles high. and the complexity of how you search text speak where people are talking in part words, abbreviations, emojis. this is throwing massive challenges at the system at a time when the system has sustained very significant cuts — the police, the crown prosecution service have. it is probably the ultimate challenge facing the system at the moment. if you are the victim of sexual assault or rape and you report it to the police,
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you are a victim. you will immediately feel like a suspect if they say they want your phone, particularly if it is a stranger rape where the phone would have no application at all. this will not be applied in a blanket way across—the—board. you mentioned stranger rape, i gather one of the women who is bringing a legal challenge, that was in relation to a stranger rape because once the defence put in the defence statement, if the defence statement is that the sex was consensual, the police have to pursue all reasonable lines of enquiry. even in that sort of case, it is possible that the police would seek the consent of the victim to scrutinise their mobile phone, and the reason for this is that we saw in late 2017, early 2018, a string of cases go wrong where there was this, if you like, exculpatory evidence that benefited the defendant. and it was lying on mobile phones and on victims‘
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and complainants‘ mobile phones. in the liam allan case it was days into to his trial before that evidence, which he had been asking for for months and months, and saying there is this evidence, it was only disclosed very late on when the trial had already started. that could have been a serious miscarriage of justice. it is an unpalatable truth that in a small minority of cases, of cases, complainants do make false accusations. in order to protect people against that small number of cases, we have these disclosure rules which mean that the defendant gets any evidence which prosecutors and investigators locate, which assist their case. let‘s go back to our top story and the boeing president facing shareholders for the first since the grounding of its 737 max aircraft. let‘s get more from our north america business correspondent, michelle fleury.
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the boss has got quite a battle because the company faces big problems here. ever since these two deadly crashes that happened in the space of five months, the 737 max has been grounded worldwide and that has been grounded worldwide and that has had a huge financial implication for the company. we saw that last week when it reported quarterly earnings. listening to this company, to its boss, dennis muilenburg, they are putting their foot forward, saying, we are very sorry, we realised that safety and trust is crucial in our business. and to shareholders, to investors, the m essa g es shareholders, to investors, the messages our first priority is getting these planes back in the air. that means getting the software fix backing these planes because, of course, at the heart of the investigation‘s —— my early investigations seem to suggest it was the plain‘s and i still system
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at fault. this is designed to address that problem. then it needs to be certified by regulators. this process will be lengthy, it will ta ke process will be lengthy, it will take time and to some extent it is out of boeing‘s control. whilst the ceo is facing shareholders for the first time today, regulators from around the world are meeting to discuss exactly these types of issues. used the word safety and trust, there is a big question over safety given what has happened. an issue of trust, many people are pointing to the ceo and saying the buck stops with you. here is a ceo who, ever since he took over the helm of the company some several yea rs helm of the company some several years ago now, their share prices tripled, since this crisis it has fallen 10%. it gives you a sense of as bad as it feels at the moment, the company‘s share price financially has done very well for investors over the last several yea rs. investors over the last several years. but he is someone who is used
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to having a fairly smooth time, being popular with investors. suddenly he is going to face some fairly tough questions, which i think he is prepared for. if you look at the comments he is making, again, this idea of knowing and addressing full on the idea of trust and safety, but winning that bank is going to be an uphill slog, especially when you look at the slew of headlines in american media. we have had reports of four whistle—blowers coming forward, reporting their concerns on an —— on a hotline set up by regulators with reports of shoddy conditions involving another boeing plane in south carolina. those were not proven but nonetheless it raises questions. the regulator here in america is under scrutiny, where they too cosy with boeing? this means there will be lots of questions surrounding the company, certainly for many months going forward. under that word trust comes
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the reputational damage. you can‘t put a cost on that. no, and i think when you talk to aviation experts, they say when you are in the heat of this it feels, it is hard to imagine that trust can be restored. if you look at the fact that boeing said they were only trimming their deliveries of 737 max jets from 50 -- 52 deliveries of 737 max jets from 50 —— 52 down to 42 in the first three months of this year, after the crash happened, it suggests that there is still some sort of demand that they are maintaining some level of production going forward, because they still think people will want these planes. perhaps memories are shorter than we like to give credit for. that certainly is the view amongst industry professionals i have spoken to. thank you very much. six teenagers have admitted their part in a street
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attack on egyptian engineering student mariam moustafa which left her in a coma on february 20 last year, it can now be reported. the 18—year—old suffered a stroke 10 hours after the incident in nottingham and died almost a month later. west yorkshire police have released footage of a man they want to speak to after the attempted abduction of a 12—year—old girl in leeds. the victim was walking to school on tuesday morning last week when she was approached by a man near the m621 flyover in the city. police say the man tried to carry the girl towards a secluded area but was disturbed when a passer by intervened, filming the man as he ran off across a park near the moor road area. west yorkshire police say they would like to hear from anyone who recognises him. in spain, the socialists are celebrating after winning a police force failed to cross—reference almost half the incidents involving a serial stalker who drove his ex—partner to take her own life. nicholas allen bombarded justene reece with abusive voicemails, texts and facebook messages and had a string of convictions for assault and harrassment. an investigation by the independent
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office for police conduct found staffordshire police missed the ‘bigger picture‘ of his offending. after ms reece‘s death, mr allen was jailed for 10 years at stafford crown court — admitting manslaughter. in spain, the socialists are celebrating after winning the country‘s third election in four years. they‘re the largest party, though they fell short of a majority and will need the help of others to form a government. for the first time since military rule ended in the 1970s, a party of the far right is set to enter parliament. james reynolds reports from madrid. after this country‘s third vote in four years, spain has a winner. voters picked their way through a collection of fractured parties and gave the governing socialist party more seats than any other group. this is what relief looks like. in the centre of madrid, spain‘s socialists celebrated their victory. their leader, the pro—european prime minister, pedro sanchez,
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saw off a conservative opposition, which included a rising movement from the far right. translation: we made it happen. the socialist party has won the election and, in doing so, the future has won and the past has lost. pedro sanchez argued during the campaign that he was the only spanish leader capable of stopping the advance of the hard right. and the numbers show that he has done so. he must now form a lasting coalition of his own. we have seen different things in the world. we‘ve seen trump in the states. we‘ve seen different things. we‘ve seen "brexit" — i‘m sorry! and sometimes you have to get together and say "this is what we want". and you don‘t want those things, you don‘t want trump or brexit?
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oh, my god, no! we don't want franco to come back, all those old ideas, so i think it's a good thing to be here tonight and to support our president. the far right party, vox, the first significant movement of its kind since the end of general franco‘s fascist regime four decades ago, ended up on the losing side. but they did win enough votes to enter parliament in opposition. translation: we now have a voice in congress and we can tell everyone in spain that vox are here to say. thank you to all our two million supporters. by contrast, the winners, pedro sanchez and the socialist party, will continue to lead this country, probably in partnership with a number of smaller left—wing and regional parties. the exact shape of the new administration may take weeks to decide.
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more on our main story, the issues that boeing. they are at chicago right now. dennis muilenburg is facing questions from the press. right now. dennis muilenburg is facing questions from the presslj am facing questions from the press.” am confident with that change there will be one of the safest aeroplanes ever to fly. hello. in light of the crisis facing your company and in the interests of three earning the trust of the buying public, have you considered resigning?” trust of the buying public, have you considered resigning? i think the important thing here is we are focused on safety and i can tell you that both of these accidents weigh heavily on us as a company. i have had the privilege of working for boeing for 34 years. we know that lives depend on what we do, we take that very seriously. i have had the privilege of doing that for my entire career. 0ur boeing employees as well take that very seriously. i
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am very focused on safety going forward. it is important that as a company we have those clear priorities, but we are taking the right actions, that we have the right actions, that we have the right culture. i am strongly vested in that and my clear intent is to continue to lead on the front of safety a nd continue to lead on the front of safety and quality and integrity. that is who we are as a company. it's that is who we are as a company. it‘s important to continue to stress that. we deeply regret what happened with these accidents. it gets to the co re with these accidents. it gets to the core of our company. i have had the chance to walk the factory floor is where we build the max aeroplanes over the last few weeks, a chance to talk with our test pilots. the opportunity to talk with our engineers, the core of our people. they care about this business and the safety of our aeroplanes. that‘s what i‘m focused on. the safety of our aeroplanes. that‘s what i'm focused on. this is the first opportunity we have had to talk to you since this unfolded. why did you put a system in place in the planes without notifying the airlines or the pilots, and why did you not tell the pilots that the
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angle of attack disagree warning light was deactivated? let me take those two questions with two a nswe rs. those two questions with two answers. first of all we take a look at the original design of the system, i think in some cases in the media it has been reported or described as an anti—stall system which it is not. it is a system designed to provide handling qualities for the pilot which meets pilot preferences. we want the air plane to behave in the art similar to the previous generation 737. that isa to the previous generation 737. that is a third pilot feel for the pilots, how it feels as they are flying at. it is a purposeful design, it is something that is designed to be part of how the aeroplane flies so it is part of the certification process, it is not something that is a separate procedure or something that needs to be trained on separately. it is fundamentally embedded in the handling qualities of the aeroplane, when you train on the aeroplane you
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are being trained on the system. it is not separate. your second question on angle of attack, certainly we have been taking a look at some of the reports that are out even today, taking a look at the design of that original system. againi design of that original system. again i can confirm for you that going forward the angle of attack disagree signal is something that will be standard on all of the 737 max planes. we will also be looking at retrofitting that on all of the plane so it will be provided at no cost. think that‘s an important step forward. it‘s also important to understand that angle of attack disagree signal in the cockpit is not something that drives pilot action, or that we design in a primary flight display. in the flight primary flight display. in the flight deck of a commercial aeroplane, pilots care about things like altitude, airspeed, heading, pitch and roll. those indicators are in the flight deck today. airspeed and altitude in particular are the releva nt and altitude in particular are the relevant items around these two
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cases. those are signals in the cockpit today. those are things that provide audible warnings to the pilot including things like stick shaker. that is where we focus on the training effort going forward. you have said that the system, the angle of attack connecting to just one sensor, that natural process and yet the fact that it is only plugged into one sensor and could fail seems really like something that should have been foreseen. when you talk about re—establishing credibility with flyers, they are reading about reports that whistle— blower after whistle—blower reports that whistle— blower after whistle— blower have reports that whistle— blower after whistle—blower have come forward to the faa and congress to say that there were problems with the certification process, concerns about the system. you have stopped short of saying that there was a mistake made in the process. how do
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you win back trust when there are some that feel you have a credibility issue, when boeing has not come out and said we didn't do this right? i think those are very fair questions. we have probed on those same questions ourselves. we have gone back and looked at both accidents, we have done deep assessments of aeroplane and the design and confirm that the system as originally designed did meet our design and safety analysis criteria and our certification criteria. there is our standard processes that have worked for decades and will continue to work. that said, when we design a system, these planes are flown in the hands of pilots and in some cases our system safety analysis includes not only the engineering design but also the actions that pilots would take as pa rt actions that pilots would take as part of a failure scenario. that is all baked into a system and analysis. that all said going forward we have identified a way to improve this make it a dual sensor feed. that is a change we are making
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with the software update. i‘m confident that will create an aeroplane that is one of the safest in the airto aeroplane that is one of the safest in the air to fly. you have said it is operated as designed, you couldn't have possibly designed a syste m couldn't have possibly designed a system that would activate 21 times, pushing the nose of the plane down to the point of an unrecoverable dive. if you take a look at the end to end system procedure that is assigned with this, in the case of a failure scenario there is something called a runaway stabiliser procedure which is a memory item in the cockpit. if that kind of scenario the cockpit. if that kind of scenario occurs the cockpit. if that kind of scenario occurs and you go through the check list, that check list was published as part of the recent ethiopian preliminary reports, if you look through it it calls out actions that would be taken around power management and pitch management of the aeroplane. it also refers to the cutout switches that after an activation that was not pilot induced, that she would hit the cut—off switches. in some cases those procedures were not completely followed. there were three cases where the pilot struggled with
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process, either recognising what was happening or implement in those steps. the first flight there was a jumpseat captain which told the flight jumpseat captain which told the flight crew what to do. the second it doesn't appear what —— that they did that at all, ethiopian folks who follow that check list were not able to recover. were you overly confident in the ability of pilots given the circumstances, particularly when they didn't know the system was there in the first place? we looked at both accidents, and this is common to most outline accidents that have occurred over history, is a chain of events, multiple country beating factors. there are factors we can control in the design and in this case that common link related to the system and its activation. we are going to break that link and this will event accidents like this from happening again. unlike with the accident happen without the system?m again. unlike with the accident happen without the system? it is a chain of events, there is no single
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item. i think it‘s really important that we all focus on letting the investigation process run its due course. 0urjob is to focus on safety not on speculation. we will continue to support the investigation process and i would suggest that that is the right way to handle this in the long run. this industry is safe because of the integrity of the safety process. and the way these investigations are done. it is a continuous improvement process that over the last couple of decades has continued to dramatically improve our safety. it is the safest form of transportation in the world because of the integrity of the process. we will support the integrity of that process and make sure the max is the safest plane out there to fly. a lot of airlines have lost a lot of money because of the grounding of the max. how will you compensate them? we are actively engaged with all of our airline customers and we deeply regret the impact of their operations and customers. i know it
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is difficult. i have personally took too many of our customers and our tea m too many of our customers and our team is deployed with the customers ona team is deployed with the customers on a daily basis. i won‘t comment on individual discussions by airline. but we understand the difficulties that this has caused. 0ur partnerships with our airline customers are strong. we will be working together on recovery efforts. the first focus is safely getting the max back—up and flying and then we will address the following issues. today again you have repeated this message that the certification process and the design process for the system was followed as per usual, consistent with what you have done. but forget about the process, the final design of the syste m process, the final design of the system was deeply flawed. your engineers are affixing it and testing the fix today. fixing very specific floors which are clear in the flights. can you admit that the
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design was flawed? never mind the processes you went through and did the best you could, but what you came up with in the end was flawed, was it not? going back to what i said earlier, we have designed the max to have the flying qualities desired in the pilots. di mcas system is pa rt desired in the pilots. di mcas system is part of that. with the engineering analysis, we followed exactly the steps in our design and certification policies that consistently produce safe aeroplanes. in this case, as with most accidents, there is a chain of events that occurs. it is not correct to a tribute that to any single item. we know there are some improvements we can make to one match, and we will make those improvements. the reason this industry is safe is that we never stop making safety improvements. we never claim that we have reached the end point. we are continuously,
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across all aeroplane programmes, improving safety every day. we a lwa ys improving safety every day. we always look for opportunities to improve. that culture that is unafraid to go and make safety improvements over time, that is what is that if has driven this to be an incredibly safe industry. we are going to pull away from that. trying to bolster confidence in the company. that is his first interview, in effect, news conference, since the crashes of the 737 max, which has triggered the grounding of the jets, 737 max, which has triggered the grounding of thejets, a number of lawsuits and investigations. issuing once again that safety is a priority for boeing. we will have much more analysis of that later on, but that was live in chicago, as the boeing executive dennis muilenburg was talking to shareholders and then to the press. nationwide is coming up shortly. first, a look at the
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weather. an east—west split sums up the weather. in the west, whether france will try to use squeeze in, bringing more cloud and outbreaks of rain. —— weather fronts. in the next few hours, i am hopeful things will actually brighten across wales on the south—west of england. still cloud and rain for northern ireland. by the end of the night, and weather front bumps into this feature that has been lurking in the west through today. wet prospects for northern ireland to get tuesday under way. elsewhere, dry, cloud coming from the north sea again to coastal regions. some mist and fog developing across eastern counties of england and scotland. definitely you can see the east—west split for tuesday. perhaps as the front slides into the irish sea we will see some brighter skies for northern ireland through the afternoon. rain pushing into western scotland and north western england, and north wales. just barely in double figures where we have the rain, up to 19 in a sunnier south—east.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines... four boeing employees raise safety concerns about 737 max jetliners — as the company‘s chief executive faces shareholders for the first time since two fatal crashes in an accident occurs, we feel it deeply across our company, because we all understand that lives depend on what we do. we hold ourselves to the highest standards of safety, quality and integrity in our work, because the stakes could not be higher. rape victims are to be asked to hand over their phones to the police — or risk their attackers not being prosecuted. campaigners are concerned. the united nations says the situation in northern mozambique is worse than thought — days after cyclone kenneth ravaged the country, killing 38 people.
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now the sport. we are still talking about cricket. the england squad is one man down? alex hales, having been removed from the squad, all but ending his international summer. it was reported he failed a recreational drugs test. lastly, a spokesman confirmed he had been suspended following what they said was an off field incident. his club said it was for personal reasons. they would not expand on that. alex hales accepted at the time it was right he was suspended. the ecb said it was in the best interests of the team to ensure there were no distractions. big year coming up. how much of a blow is this what england? he would not have opened the batting, all started, but he was an integral
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figure in the squad. basically due to his batting, especially in the shorter formats. to his batting, especially in the shorterformats. he to his batting, especially in the shorter formats. he now to his batting, especially in the shorterformats. he now looks set to his batting, especially in the shorter formats. he now looks set to miss out, in a tournament which england are favourites for. batsmen ben duckett and milan have been added to the squad, with james vince included in the squad for the series against pakistan. former celtic player stevie chalmers has died at the age of 83. he scored the winning goalfor has died at the age of 83. he scored the winning goal for celtic in the 1967 european cup final against inter milan 1967 european cup final against intermilan in 1967 european cup final against inter milan in portugal. the team we re inter milan in portugal. the team were later dubbed the lisbon lions. they have also been mourning the passing of their captain who died last week. ajax have arrived ahead of their clash with tottenham tomorrow night. the dutch league cancelled last week and‘s fixtures to give them extra time to prepare for the game. tottenham lost to west
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ham ina for the game. tottenham lost to west ham in a tough london derby on saturday. the manager says they will not use that as an excuse. the most fair way is to have the same time to prepare for both teams. but it is not an excuse, i only described the situation. what happened for me, it‘s going to be a fantastic semifinal. and of course we are going to try to win. but it never is there going to be an excuse, because we didn‘t have the same days to prepare as ajax. raheem sterling has been named the football writers player of the year. he was also named the pfa young player of the year. he is the first city player to win it since 1969. virtual van dijk was voted in second place. the writers differed from the players as well.
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ali carter is through to the quarterfinals of the world snooker championships. he beat the young chinese hopeful, who looked at one stage as he was going to win the frame to stay in the match. but after potting the pink he wasn‘t able to follow that up with the black, which gave carter the chance to progress. he was not going miss that opportunity. the two—time finalist, neatly putting that one away. wilson went through in easier circumstances. he made a break of 132 as he beat barry hawkins by 13-11 132 as he beat barry hawkins by 13—11 frames. he was trailing 9—7 at the start of the session. he put on a great run and goes on to play in the quarterfinals. that is all from the quarterfinals. that is all from the bbc sports centre. plenty more sporty to come on bbc news throughout the rest of the
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afternoon. —— more sport to come. now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide — and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to nick 0wen in birmingham to tell us about a national conference which is being held by the birmingham—based windrush movement — a year on since the windrush scandal. anne davies is in nottingham to tell us about a solar cooker that heats food by concentrating the sun‘s rays and can be used inside the home following new research by nottingham trent university. if you are intrigued, i certainly am. this conference in birmingham, it isa am. this conference in birmingham, it is a year since the windrush scandal. 0ne birmingham family, highlighting the real problem is that we are now all fully aware of? yes, this is the fletcherfamily from erdington in birmingham. mum of three gloria was the main breadwinner in her family. three gloria was the main breadwinner in herfamily. thejob paid the mortgage after her husband
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derek suffered an injury at work. 0ne derek suffered an injury at work. one day about eight years ago, seemingly out of the blue, she was told that she was out of a job u nless told that she was out of a job unless she could produce her passport. she didn‘t have one. she had the right to remain here, but no documents to prove it. she had come here as a ten—year—old in 1970. she had been working 36 years. 17 of them were in the job from which she was sacked, helping people with learning difficulties. suddenly they we re learning difficulties. suddenly they were unable to play their mortgage and a situation caused enormous tensions in the family. it had a dramatic effect on gloria. she suffered a mental breakdown. her husband, derek, said her hair went from black to white in just three weeks. the home office apologised and admitted the treatment of the windrush generation was appalling. now there is the chance of compensation. what would that mean to gloria? i would be able to pay for the house. because we nearly lost our home so many times because of what has been going on, because i was the main breadwinner. we paid
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our mortgage every month. now the house doesn't belong to us, you know? you want your life to be able to move on? i really do. there is still a problem. to claim compensation, gloria has to fill in a45 compensation, gloria has to fill in a 45 page application form without legal advice. that is how it seems at the moment. there are said to be £200 million available from government funds and around 5000 people expecting some kind of pay—out. it is claimed if applicants get it wrong, they can‘t do it again. the home secretary says compensation will not reverse the damage that was caused, but should go some way to address the wrongs that were experienced. stories like those show what a scandal that was. let‘s go over to ann davies. we are
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talking about climate change and ways to reducing emissions. a solar powered oven, how on earth does that work? well, i'm going to be very scientific now. it is essentially using submarine technology, in the same way a periscope works. it reflects light from outside to inside the home. it captures sunlight on the outside of a property, and then it concentrates it with fresnel lenses. it is reflected in to a small space in the ce ntre reflected in to a small space in the centre of a highly insulated oven, fitted with thermal breaks. a sensor provides live data on the temperature. and then the level of heat can be controlled by reflecting some of the light away, essentially. that is very scientific! yes... the question why is never far away. but also, you look outside at the moment, would we ever get enough sun to get this working? is it not 80
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degrees in london? it is beautiful here! i guess the why is environmental. in a hot country where there are sun all year round, it can change the way people cook, doing away with electricity, wood and gas. in somewhere like kuwait, three fresnel lenses, about that big, could provide an oven temperature of 200 celsius, according to researchers. the professor who led the team said that it could change the way that millions of people cook at home, and so millions of people cook at home, and so could dramatically reduce the world's carbon footprint. it can also help those that don't have access to electricity or gas, and hopefully at an affordable price. so many countries could use it for cooking. it would reduce the effect on the environment in terms of
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carbon emission. as far as we are concerned, you could probably cook an egg in the summer, but on the hell you are going to need ten rather than three of the lenses. i think you might have seen the pictures of the egg being cooked, the reporter said it took about 20 minutes. ina the reporter said it took about 20 minutes. in a hot country it will ta ke minutes. in a hot country it will take five. the team have not patented the intellectual property rights, so it is freely available. if you are doing nothing on the bank holiday, you could set up a couple of fresnel lenses, you have got an ovenin of fresnel lenses, you have got an oven in your house. it could be a storm out there and i would still manage to burn it. thank you both. that is nationwide tonight. if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them in the bbc iplayer. we go
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nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4.30 on afternoon live. eight—year—old freddie payne has become the youngest person to be fitted with a bionic "hero arm" — a prosthetic that can be made to look like a favourite superhero‘s arm. the arm and hand, made by bristol startup 0pen bionics, is made with 3d printing which allows for more precise and delicate movements than alternatives. at £10,000, it‘s also significantly cheaper than other bionic multi—grip systems, which can cost up to £100,000. let‘s speak to freddie now, who joins us from home in berkshire with his mum, suzy. first, let‘s look at it. you are moving out yourself. what can you do now that you couldn‘t do before? well, i basically couldn‘t pick up stuff. what sort of stuff? well,
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basically balls, action figures. i would basically use blu tack. i have to hold it in my middle arm bit. do you know how it works? yes. it's all done by the muscles. there are three more sensors on each side of it. what are your friends say? they say it is pretty cool, and i give them high fives. i could never do high fives with it, so now i can do high fives. and i can shake hands. show mea high fives. and i can shake hands. show me a high five. that‘s amazing! and you are able to eat a burger properly for the first time? no, actually, i was able to eat that one up. susie, he was born without an arm, and!
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up. susie, he was born without an arm, and ijust wonder if you ever thought that you would be sitting there with him able to do what he can do now? well, no, because we didn't have a lot of hope when he was first born, we were told there wouldn't be anything available for quite a numberof wouldn't be anything available for quite a number of years. so, when i saw this ijust thought, wow, it looks amazing. he has been desperate for something for such a long time. and now he has got it. so he is a happy boy. the beauty of this system is that it is much cheaper than other prosthetics. sorry, what is that? we may have lost the line, actually. i keep asking. you saw this on television, this particular product, how did you make it happen? i actually saw it on instagram. it wasjust one of i actually saw it on instagram. it was just one of the adverts, i actually saw it on instagram. it wasjust one of the adverts, for open bionics, actually. for the next
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stage up arm. and i contacted them to see what the process was, how we get on the programme. they introduced me to the orthopaedic centre. it went from there, really. they did have an age threshold, that he was too young for. but because he was nearing the eighth birthday, they accepted him. he is the youngest person in the world to have it, which is amazing. what was that? i‘m on the newspaper! it, which is amazing. what was that? i'm on the newspaper! he's quite happy with the news covering him. i‘m afraid the picture has frozen, we heard all of that. freddie, if there was one word to sum up what this means to you, what would it be? oblivion! oblivion! it is a good word. go and check that one in the dictionary and we will talk to you
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again another time. thank you for talking to us. it describes this place much better than his place. jamie is here with the business news in a moment, first, the headlines. four boeing employees raise safety concerns about 737 max jetliners — as the company‘s chief executive faces shareholders for the first time since two fatal crashes. rape victims are to be asked to hand over their phones to the police — or risk their attackers not being prosecuted. the united nations says the situation in northern mozambique is worse than thought, days after cyclone kenneth ravaged the country — killing 38 people. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. fewer british holidaymakers have booked a summer holiday in the european union this year amid continuing brexit uncertainty, that‘s according to holiday firm thomas cook. it says almost half of the holidays it sold up until the end of february
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were to non—eu destinations, up 10% last year. boeing‘s chief executive is to face shareholders later for the first time since the second of two fatal crashes involving the firm‘s 737 max plane which killed a total of 346 people. dennis muilenburg will have to try to boost confidence in the planemaker after a difficult two months. nearly a third of graduates are overqualified for theirjob. the latest figures — they date from two years ago, 2017 — from the office for national statistics, show the incidence of overeducation was highest in the those aged between 25 and 49. this isn‘tjust a case ofjumping into any old job the moment you graduate. around 30% of graduates were still overeducated for their job five years after graduation. lets look at the markets. boeing
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will be the big story. the shares haven‘t moved very much. as you pointed out, the headline, the story, the reports coming out that there were four whistle—blowers who said there were safety concerns over the 737 max. also, dennis muilenburg was asked if he was resigning, and he gave an evasive action. —— answer. i can go under a lot of pressure? and he looked at, a lot of pressure. what he said about this system, the mcas system, he has a tricky position when he says there isa tricky position when he says there is a problem with that, but he can‘t admit that it was responsible for the crash. we don‘t know, because the crash. we don‘t know, because the investigation hasn‘t finished. he says they are fixing the problem. but if you are fixing it, why are
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you fixing the problem? well, it didn‘t cause the crash, so why are you fixing it? you are in a difficult, contradictory situation. his way out is by saying that there are his way out is by saying that there a re lots of his way out is by saying that there are lots of causes. there were lots of things influencing these particular events. and no one is saying yet whether it was the mcas system that actually caused the crash, in the end. let‘s go over to richard, from aberdeen standard investment group. the share price hasn‘t really been affected, remarkably? it is down a little bit from what had been high peaks before the two crashes. we will hear more today at the agm on the ongoing investigations. we will hear more on the details of the results, the profits in the last quarter announced last week were down just over 20%. so it has had quite a big financial impact, the company
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deciding to suspend the share buy— back. it was deciding to suspend the share buy—back. it was buying back its deciding to suspend the share buy— back. it was buying back its own shares, giving money back to shareholders and it decided to suspend that while the investigation is ongoing, to conserve cash for whatever eventuality might come. it was a very uncertain outlook. as you noted in your preamble, quite a lot going on. a more positive story, about spotify. some very impressive figures coming out of spotify, growing very fast? yes, well, they put on 4 million customers, principally in the us, over the last quarter, taking them up to 100 million customers. quite impressive, much better than investors were expecting, and not very much promotional activity. it looks like theyjust had a genuine tail wind behind them, helping them along. they have obviously been doing a lot to expand their business into podcasts, getting a bit more control of the content. but very strong subscriber numbers, not feeding through to profits yet, but nevertheless, a lot of revenue, the
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potential for profits in future. they haven‘t made a profit, they had one profit in several years. closer to home, thomas cook, business shares are up today, but it is the destinations that is interesting, not the european union? well, it is not the european union? well, it is not the european union? well, it is not the european union this time round. 10% lower than this time last year. greece, turkey, still strong, and spain, but not as strong as the european union destinations where before. it is a tough market, brexit overhangs it. sterling overhangs it, and the tragedies we saw in places like sri lanka, it continues to overhang some of the destinations. interesting to see turkey back on the holiday— maker agenda, a interesting to see turkey back on the holiday—maker agenda, a very weak currency and much safer and more settled than perhaps we have seen over more settled than perhaps we have seen over the past few years. these things ever and flow, but a difficult market to operate in.
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thank you very much. the markets? a quick glance, those are the european markets. standard & poor's, the 500, a broad index in the united states, that is at a re cord the united states, that is at a record level. that really has been a hangover from the good figures we had on gdp, the economic growth in the us at the end of last week. surprisingly good. boeing, do we know? boeing shares, up about half a cent, when! know? boeing shares, up about half a cent, when i looked 20 minutes ago. not a huge amount of movement. jamie, thank you very much. more than 100,000 people have watched the moment that a london marathon runner, dressed as big ben, got stuck trying to cross the finish line. i‘m glad to say that the runner, lukas bates, has finally escaped his costume, and he‘s been speaking to us about that moment when he hit the finishing line. so i was running down the mall, and i saw 800 metres to go, 400 metres to go, 200 metres to go.
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i really wanted to be up that finish line. at no point i think there was going to be a problem at the finish line. it was only when i got there and literally ran up to the finish line, and felt a thud, and heard a thud coming from the top of my tower, as my costume got snagged. literally hit the side of the finishing chute. so, yeah, i stopped and a kind gentleman from the london marathon, he helped me my costume forward. he advised me to go down a lot lower, which was quite awkward, but i squatted down pretty much on my bum, angled my torso forward. i think i first of all tried going sideways, and then tried going forwards. i think because my legs were so fatigued, i didn‘t realise how far i needed to go down. so it was a case ofjust keeping trying to go lower to the point i could get through. so, yeah, we managed eventually. and i was very appreciative
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to the gentleman who helped. i shook his hand at the end. i was so pleased to be over that line and not have to wear that costume any more. that is it from your afternoon live team. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with susan powell and east— west split is the best way of describing the weather across the ukfor of describing the weather across the uk for tuesday and wednesday full east, high pressure will keep things settled. in the west, weather fronts will try to squeeze in, meaning more cloud and some outbreaks of rain. we outbreaks of rain. had a front looming across the course we had a front looming across the course of the day. it‘s actually going to clear into the evening. by the end of the night, another system will merge with it to bring a wetter system. chilly in one or two spots, quite murky in the north sea coast, for conforming underneath that as well. there is the weather front
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towards the west. quite slow progress, it will basically slope its way into the irish sea through the course of the day. the cloud along the north sea coast will pull away, and we will see some decent brightness in most eastern counties on tuesday. by the time we get into the afternoon, much more grey for western scotland with rain around. the central lowlands as well. northern ireland is brighterfor the second half of the day, but brain element lorraine pushing into wells in the south—west. further east, with the sunshine, we could get up to 19 degrees in london. tuesday, into wednesday, our front tries to slowly its way further east. maybe the odd heavy thundery downpour in one or two spots. right in the west, chilly in belfast. 16 or 17 in the east. rain for most areas on
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thursday. first thing for scotland, then clearing, heavy downpours across england and wales later in the day. then cast your eye towards the day. then cast your eye towards the north. you might have noticed those temperatures have been sliding away, but by thursday afternoon, for northern scotland, colder air starting to slide down behind that rain, behind this cold weather front, all the way to the south of the uk by friday. a chilly northerly breeze on friday, and definitely a very different feel to the weather as we bring the week to a close. going into a bank holiday weekend, ona going into a bank holiday weekend, on a positive note, high pressure looks like it will stay close by. there should be a lot of settled weather, temperatures will creep back up to average ones.
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today at five — the head of boeing defends the safety of the 737 max aircraft involved in two recent disasters. addressing shareholders and journalists for the first time since the crashes in indonesia and ethiopia, boeing‘s chief executive said he was sorry for the loss of life and insisted the company has a duty to eliminate risk. we know every person who steps aboard one of our airplanes places their trust in us. we will do everything possible to earn and re—earn that trust and confidence. it comes as us aviation regulators receive calls from four whistle—blowers — current and former boeing employees who‘ve questioned the safety of the 737 max. the other main stories on bbc news at 5... rape victims are being told to hand over

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