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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  April 29, 2019 5:00pm-6:00pm BST

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today at five — the head of boeing defends the safety of the 737 max aircraft involved in two recent disasters. addressing shareholders and journalists for the first time since the crashes in indonesia and ethiopia, boeing's chief executive said he was sorry for the loss of life and insisted the company has a duty to eliminate risk. we know every person who steps aboard one of our airplanes places their trust in us. we will do everything possible to earn and re—earn that trust and confidence. it comes as us aviation regulators receive calls from four whistle—blowers — current and former boeing employees who've questioned the safety of the 737 max. the other main stories on bbc news at 5... rape victims are being told to hand over
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their phones to the police or risk their attackers not being prosecuted. campaigners say they're concerned. it's massively intrusive. it really has an impact on victims of rape who may be severely traumatised already by what's happened. it's another violation, in effect, of traumatised victims. the us warns it will rethink its information sharing with western allies if they use the controversial chinese telecoms giant huawei in their 56 networks. cheering. spain's socialists celebrate victory in the country's general election — though they may need the help of other parties to govern. and fewer british holiday—makers are booking summer breaks in europe, according to a new report, amid brexit uncertainty.
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the boss of the american plane—maker boeing has faced his shareholders for the first time since the two crashes of its 737 max aircraft — with a combined death toll of almost 350 people. dennis muilenburg, the company's chairman and chief executive, said boeing was "sorry for the loss of lives" in indonesia and ethiopia. the company is now facing lawsuits from both some of its shareholders and the families of victims. it comes amid news that four current and former boeing employees have called a confidential hotline, raising safety concerns about the company. mr muilenburg said they were continually learning from recent accidents. when an accident occurs, we feel it deeply across our company, because all of us understand that
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lives depend on what we do. we hold ourselves to the highest standards of safety, quality and integrity in our work, because the stakes could not be higher. our talented test pilots have made 146 737 max flights, totalling roughly 246 hours of airtime with the updated software, and nearly 90% of our 50—plus max operators around the globe have experienced that software update themselves during one of our simulator sessions. with the certified software update implemented, the 737 max will be one of the safest aeroplanes ever to fly. all of us at boeing are deeply sorry for the loss of life, and we offer our sincere condolences. we feel the immense gravity of these events, and recognise the devastation to families and friends of the loved ones who perished. it was the first time the boeing boss had faced journalists since the two crashes. here, he's pressed on admitting
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whether or plane's design is flawed. forget about the process. the final design of mcas was deeply flawed, and your engineers are fixing it and testing the fix today, fixing very specific flaws which are clear in the flights. so can you admit that the design was flawed? never mind the processes you went through and you did the best you could, but what you came up with in the end was flawed, was it not? getting back to what i said earlier, we have designed the max to have the flying qualities that were desired in the hands of the pilots. the mcas system is part of that design effort and we have gone back and confirmed again as we do the safety and engineering analysis that we followed exactly the steps in our design and certification processes that consistently produce safe aeroplanes. now, in this case again, as in most accidents, there
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is a chain of events that occur. it's not correct to attribute that to any single item. we know there are some improvements that we can make to mcas, and we will make those improvements, but the reason this industry is safe is that we never stop making safety improvements. we never claim that we have reached the end point. our correspondent samira hussain is in chicago. he faced some tough questions from journalists there. absolutely facing very tough questions, not only from journalists, but also previously from boeing's shareholders, who were asking questions about the close relationship between airline regulators and with boeing officials, and who also asked the same officials, and who also asked the sa m e safety officials, and who also asked the same safety questions. and again, he was grilled byjournalists, asking very pointedly, who is to take
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responsibility for what happened 7 and again, the press conference ended quite abruptly. you could see a sense from the ceo that a lot of these directed questions were coming at him, and he had a real difficulty in saying forthright who was meant to ta ke in saying forthright who was meant to take the blame. among the questions was one simple one — would he resign7 questions was one simple one — would he resign? indeed, and that was not something that he answered directly. he skirted the question, so to speak. importa ntly, he skirted the question, so to speak. importantly, one of the votes that shareholders were voting on was whether to split the role of mr muilenburg into two different positions, to have the ceo role splits from the chairman of the board role. and that was voted down, which is a clear indication that actually, investors have not lost confidence in him. this is such a
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huge crisis for boeing, facing multiple lawsuits and even now, more whistle—blowers coming forward with claims that some of the plains' safety design is not safe? there is no doubt that this is a company that is in crisis. and part of this event, opening up the shareholder meeting to media, holding a press conference, really being welcome to the media, was an attempt for boeing to try and control the narrative. but the fact remains that this is a company that has not outright taking responsibility for what happened and it is now still trying to control the story of what happened. thank you very much. let's talk now to aviation expert sally gethin, publisher of gethin‘s inflight news. how big a crisis do you think this is for boeing, and can they restore trust amongst the flying public in
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their 737 max? basically, this storm is just their 737 max? basically, this storm isjust going to their 737 max? basically, this storm is just going to gather pace as the year goes on because they haven't introduced a software fix yet. and should they even be rushing something like that out when the final report of the ethiopian airlines crash hasn't been released yet, they are on the back foot completely. and they are putting a foot wrong in every single way with this. he is facing shareholders. he has got three different roles in one, chairman, presidentand has got three different roles in one, chairman, president and ceo. obviously, that is incompatible, evenif obviously, that is incompatible, even if shareholders are prepared to go with that in the short term. he said again and again that they are trying to learn the lessons of these disasters. you don't accept that? they shouldn't be learning lessons afterwards. the public puts their faith in an aeroplane manufacture of the mansion chewed of bowing to have addressed those concerns beforehand
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—— with a company of the magnitude of boeing. what is coming out in the forthcoming federal probes, the investigations, possibly a criminal justice probe into them, as to what they knew at the time. if troubling things emerge, then it is too little, too late. it doesn't matter if they bring in a software patch. and in any case, even if they do, the faa may prove that, but what about other countries' regulators7 other countries are dismayed that the faa, america was the last country to ground at 737 max following the last disaster. they have lost faith in the united states of america when it comes to aviation. as we said earlier, massive losses that the company is facing. can boeing survive this? massive losses that the company is facing. can boeing survive this7|j think facing. can boeing survive this?” think it's going to be a rocky road ahead. having said that, they do own the wide—body market with the 787 dreamliner aircraft and the triple seven x which is due to come out next year. so they need to focus
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production on that. the more they focus on rushing the 737 max out into the air, the worse it will be. but they have to face the music and this is the first time today. they may be trying to control the narrative, but actually, the narrative, but actually, the narrative belongs with the travelling public and regulators and also the shareholders. they all want a nswe rs. also the shareholders. they all want answers. thank you. the united states has delivered a fresh warning about what it believes is the "unacceptable risk" to security posed by any country allowing the chinese technology firm, huawei, to be involved in building a new 56 data network. the us believes huawei is a security threat because of its links to the chinese government — and last week it expressed serious concerns that britain had agreed that the company could work on non—core elements of the high speed network here. we can speak to our security correspondent gordon corera.
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a pretty stark warning from the americans7 a pretty stark warning from the americans? yes, they have been worried about this for some time, but coming after the leak of the supposed uk decision to involve huawei in the building of 56, it ta kes huawei in the building of 56, it takes on a different tone. i have been speaking today to a deputy assista nt been speaking today to a deputy assistant secretary of state in charge of this field of policy, and he has reiterated that us position, that they will have to look at how they share information with any ally that uses huawei in its networks. he is not necessarily saying they were cut of intelligence sharing with the uk, but that they will certainly have to look at it if huawei are involved in the uk. it is also worth saying that the league last week suggested that the uk would try and keep huawei out of the most sensitive parts of the network, the so—called core of the network. today ambassador strayer was saying the us doesn't recognise the distinction. he thinks the presence in any part
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of the network poses an unacceptable risk. so there is a clear sense of a real difference between the us and the uk on how to deal with huawei. but the uk and the us are very close allies when it comes to sharing intelligence. this would be a major step if they were in any way to cut off the uk in terms of intelligence. it would, and that's why we have to be careful when they are talking about what would actually happen. the chances that there would be a real end to intelligence sharing are very low. but you can see the us wa nt to very low. but you can see the us want to make a point, particularly to other allies as well, that there might be consequences to taking on board huawei. what those are, we don't know yet. a lot of countries are looking at the uk to see how it plays it, and the fact that the uk looks like it is willing to take a managed risk approach may lead to others following suit. that could annoy washington, so we will see how they respond if that is the outcome. many thanks. victims of rape and other crimes are being told they must hand over their mobile phones
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to the police — or risk prosecutions not going ahead. police forces in england and wales are rolling out consent forms, which ask for permission to get access to messages, photos, emails and social media accounts. it's a response to the collapse of a string of rape and sexual assault cases, after crucial evidence emerged on mobile phones at the last minute. our legal correspondent, clive coleman, reports. there's going to be evidence in everyone's phone... liam allan was falsely accused of rape. the case against him only collapsed when text messages from his accuser, which proved his innocence, were disclosed days into his trial. he favours complainants being asked for their consent to hand over their mobile devices. i can't consider it an invasion of privacy because there is something in there that will either assist the case or assist the defence and that needs to be...the police need to have access to that, otherwise there is no right to a fair trial, that's gone. to ensure our fair trial system,
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the prosecution has to disclose to the defence any evidence gathered by the police that either assists the defence case or undermines the prosecution's. and because of the way we all live our lives today, a lot of that evidence is found on these things. following a series of collapsed trials, a number of reviews revealed a system—wide disclosure problem. at its core was the ability of police and prosecutors to get on top of unprecedented amounts of digital evidence. under a national disclosure improvement plan, all cps prosecutors and 93,000 police staff have received specialist training. disclosure champions have been appointed and management systems used in complex terrorism cases are now being used in all rape cases. but most controversial are new forms under which witnesses and victims, including victims of rape, are asked if they will consent to have their devices examined. if they don't, it might
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halt a prosecution. will they cooperate7 i'm optimistic that, if properly explained and communicated, the reference point of what we're calling a "consent form" for access to digital data, where it is reasonable and necessary in any given case, will succeed. and the reason i'm confident is that the people of this country, historically, have always supported criminal investigation and prosecution. but campaigners are worried. it's massively intrusive. it really has an impact on victims of rape, who may be severely traumatised already by what's happened. it's another violation, in effect, of traumatised victims. and what's more, the danger is that it will deter victims from coming forward. striking the balance in the digital age between protecting victims and the accused's right to a fair trial is complex. but if the correct balance is not
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found, the future of our fair trial system is in jeopardy. well, we can speak now to dame vera baird, the police and crime commissioner for northumbria. so do you think this is a violation of traumatised victims, or does it help ensure a fair trial? it doesn't make any difference to a fair trial, i'm afraid. the documentation in the liam malone case was there already. it had nothing to do with having got it from the complainant. what you see here is not a new position. all police forces have had the individual forms, police forces have had the individualforms, some requiring much disclosure, some requiring little. you may think that in itself says a lot about views on relevance. now this is a universal form for all police forces, which has levelled it up police forces, which has levelled it up to the top of disclosure, so that
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consent is requested. it is made clear that it is full disclosure of the whole contents of the phone, plus the deleted mails, which is the second level, plus work that can be done at a laboratory to get further material, which is the third level. so the basic bottom level is to download the lot. and you are given the explanation and it is made clear that they are looking for material that they are looking for material thatis that they are looking for material that is relevant to the case. but still, we have seen many cases, and even cps agrees that there has been over disclosure from rape complainants in the past, and we have seen appalling cases where material from long have seen appalling cases where materialfrom long ago in a have seen appalling cases where material from long ago in a young woman's history is brought off a mobile phone. it has nothing to do with the case, but it might not make her look particularly likeable. it is disclosed to the defence and it is disclosed to the defence and it is thrown at her in cross examination. that is not a way to
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pursue a examination. that is not a way to pursueafair examination. that is not a way to pursue a fair trial. the difficulty is not handing over your phone, it is not handing over your phone, it is what is done with the contents of it. officers have historically felt free to ensure absolutely through. this is done in no other case but rape. why is it necessary? so you don't believe when the director of public prosecutions says that digital devices will only be looked at when they form "a reasonable line of enquiry", you're saying you don't accept that that is what will happen7 accept that that is what will happen? he will be sticking to his principles, quite appropriately, and i don't want to question that. but from our experience in northumbria in particular, we have a pilot of legal representation for complainants in rape cases to look at disclosure issues, and i can tell you that police say they have done an enquiry. they have pursued all reasonable lines. they may have found some small matter by asking
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the complainant, how long did you know the man, and looking at what is on her phone, if there are any exchanges there. they have sent the case to the crown prosecution service, who have come back and said, sorry, you need to download the whole lot and such spirit, or we won't even consider charging. —— search through it. if max is to say this is about fair trials, he has to alter the culture in his own organisation to stop that from happening, because that is exactly what your interviewee was saying a few minutes ago. it is about putting the woman on trial because of the earlier content, quite irrelevant, of her phone, which might be disclosed to the defence if the police think that it should. in no other kind of case is that kind of control of a person's background ever gone through. why is it in rape that it should be so?” ever gone through. why is it in rape that it should be so? i hear your concerns, but at the same time do you not accept that we have had a real problem in the communaljustice system with a whole string of rape and sexual assault cases that
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collapsed after criminal evidence emerged at the last minute? i'm sorry to say that that is not the right approach. a large number of cases collapsed and a very small number of those were rape and sexual offences. most of them had nothing to do with rape and sexual offences. those were appalling cases, all of them, including the rape ones. a releva nt them, including the rape ones. a relevant material must be disclosed. but a licence to dredge through somebody‘s entire background is evidenced on the mobile phones, which we all live on now, is very farfrom confining the investigation to what is relevant. the material in those rape cases was in the possession of the police already. it has nothing to do with needing modric only in powers to extract it from victims. police have been able to extra ct from victims. police have been able to extract that relevant material from the victims since the 1996 act which set out the requirement that
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they should do all reasonable lines of enquiry. i'm afraid this is a significant intrusion into rape complainants' significant intrusion into rape complaina nts' privacy, significant intrusion into rape complainants' privacy, which is likely to prove a deterrent to them making a report or if they find, having made a report, that even if the person may turn out to be a serial rapist, the cps are not prepared to prosecute him, however powerful their case is, unless they hand over their entire life history on their phone. good to talk to you. that is dame vera baird, police and crime commission for northumberland. the headlines on bbc news... the head of boeing defends the safety of the 737 max aircraft, saying he is sorry for the loss of life and insisting the company has a duty to eliminate risk. the us warns it will rethink its information sharing with western allies — if they use the controversial chinese telecoms giant huawei in their 5g networks. rape victims are being told to hand over their phones to the police
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or risk their attackers not being prosecuted. campaigners say they're concerned. in sport, alex hales is out of the world cup picture after england withdrew other batsmen from their squad. it follows the off field incident that led to a suspension. stevie chalmers, the scorer of celtic‘s winning goal in the 1967 european cup final, has died at the age of 83. he got the second in the lisbon lions' victory over inter milan. and ali carter are through to the quarterfinals of the world snooker championship after beating long. kyren wilson is also through. more on those stories just after 5.30. in spain, the socialists are celebrating after winning the country's third election in four years. they're the largest party, though they fell short of a majority, and will need the help of others
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to form a government. for the first time since military rule ended in the 19705, a party of the far right is set to enter parliament. from madrid, james reynolds reports. after this country's third vote in four years, spain has a winner. voters picked their way through a collection of fractured parties and gave the governing socialist party more seats than any other group. this is what relief looks like. in the centre of madrid, spain's socialists celebrated their victory. their leader, the pro—european prime minister, pedro sanchez, saw off a conservative opposition, which included a rising movement from the far right. translation: we made it happen. the socialist party has won the election and, in doing so, the future has won and the past has lost.
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pedro sanchez argued during the campaign that he was the only spanish leader capable of stopping the advance of the hard right. and the numbers show that he has done so. he must now form a lasting coalition of his own. we have seen different things in the world. we've seen trump in the states. we've seen different things. we've seen brexit — i'm sorry! and sometimes, you have to get together and say "this is what we want". and you don't want those things, you don't want trump or brexit7 oh, my god, no! we don't want franco to come back, all those old ideas, so i think it's a good thing to be here tonight and to support our president. the far right party, vox, the first significant movement of its kind since the end of general franco's fascist regime four decades ago,
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ended up on the losing side. but they did win enough votes to enter parliament in opposition. translation: we now have a voice in congress and we can tell everyone in spain that vox are here to say. thank you to all our two million supporters. by contrast, the winners, pedro sanchez and the socialist party, will continue to lead this country, probably in partnership with a number of smaller left—wing and regional parties. the exact shape of the new administration may take weeks to decide. james reynolds, bbc news, madrid. caroline gray is a lecturer in politics and spanish at aston university. shejoins me from our birmingham studio. what is going on in spanish politics at the moment? well, this election campaign wasa at the moment? well, this election campaign was a real divide between
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the left and right. it was a divisive election and a polarised campaign, and at the end of the day it was a question of whether the left or right were going to win, and the left has managed to triumph, beating expectations in many ways. they triumphed, but they can't form a government without the help of other parties unless they have a minority government. definitely. the word is that they are going to try and form a minority government, and therefore rely on shifting alliances with different parties depending on the legislation in question. but they have done much better than they did in the previous elections, and bearin did in the previous elections, and bear in mind that everyone knew it was going to be a fragmented parliament. in this scenario, they have done better than expected. the real question was, with the two parties on the left, podemos and the socialists, would they beat the three parties on the right combined, which is your centre—right citizens party, the conservative party and the far right vox. and those two left—wing parties combined deadbeat the three right—wing parties. let's
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talk about that far right party, vox. it is the first time the far right have entered parliament since the days of franco. what do you make of that? actually, it's not the first time the far right has entered the parliament. the far right has a lwa ys the parliament. the far right has always existed as part of the mainstream conservative party, the people's party, which lost a lot of seats yesterday. so a lot of the support for vox has actually come from disillusioned pp voters. bear in mind that your conservative party had always embraced the full spectrum of right—wing views, from your moderate right and centre right through to your far right. what we have seen recently is that those on the furthest right of that conservative party have become increasingly disillusioned with the party after corruption scandals, after the catalan secessionist crisis. therefore, they now form pa rt crisis. therefore, they now form part of a new party, as it were. and it is the supporters of the furthest right sections of the people that have now voted for vox, by and large. but we have seen the rise of
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populism in other european countries. are you saying we are not really seeing that in spain? not so much. vox didn't do nearly as well as it had hoped, or even as well as poll suggested. it got 10% of the vote. that is not 10% of a new far right vote. some of those voters have been far right members of the pp previously. on the left, the left—wing populist party, podemos, has done worse this time than it did in 2016. your mainstream socialists have won back some of the votes from the left wing podemos. so actually, this election shows a triumph of a mainstream socialist party. the socialists haven't died in spain. good to talk to you for your analysis. heavy rain and high winds are hindering rescue efforts in northern mozambique as the second cyclone in a month continues to affect
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remote communities. cyclone kenneth struck on thursday night and the un says it's predicted to dump twice as much rainfall as cyclone idai did last month. around 700,000 people are thought to be at risk. a new report has proposed that the social care system in england — which helps older and disabled people with tasks such as washing and dressing — should be funded in a similar way to the state pension. the plan, by the former conservative cabinet minister, damian green, says people should pay for a basic safety net, and then be allowed to pay extra if they want additional help. with more of us living longer, the demand from people needing help with day—to—day tasks like eating, getting dressed and washed is increasing. councils that provide that support have also had their budgets cut. it means the care system is under huge pressure. today's report says the need for reform is urgent, to provide a safety net to end the lottery of who gets state funded care and who doesn't. the report calls for a nationally
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funded pension style scheme. it proposes a universal care entitlement to provide anyone who needs it with a decent standard of help. people would pay a care supplement on top if they wanted a more expensive level of support. the report also says the underfunding of the current care system must be tackled. we need universal care provision that is better than it is now. so it will involve spending more taxpayers' money. we'll have to find £7 billion extra a year. we'll have to find £2.5 billion extra a year. but also on top of that, we need to allow people, if they can, and many people can, particularly if they own property, they'll be able to actually buy an insurance policy or something like an annuity that will, when it's all pooled together, put a lot more money into the system. the government says it has put extra money into social care and plans for the future will be published at the earliest opportunity. alison holt, bbc news.
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time for a look at the weather, with helen willetts. hi. nota hi. not a bad start to the working week. high pressure is with us across eastern areas, but there is normally a but, and today it is this weather front, giving normally a but, and today it is this weatherfront, giving drizzly rain for the west of wales. yet it will p9p up for the west of wales. yet it will pep up overnight and get wet through the night and into tomorrow. for many of us, under starry skies, as last night, it will turn a bit chilly. we could see the return of the fog coming off the north sea into the central lowlands, the odd pocket elsewhere to watch out for. it should go quickly, and again, as today, a lot of dry and bright weather. good spells of sunshine coming through. that is where we will see the highest temperatures. for northern ireland, another pretty wet day. it hopefully dries up into
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the afternoon by that stage, where the afternoon by that stage, where the rain is pushing into the west of scotland, western fringes of england and wales. holding the temperatures up, we could see 16 or 19 in the sunshine further east. we will be seeing 16 and 19 by friday. temperatures really plummet, with an arctic wind bring a blast of potentially night—time frost. i will have more on that for you later. this is bbc news. the headlines... the head of boeing defends the safety of the 737 max aircraft, saying he is sorry for the loss of life and insisting the company has a duty to eliminate risk. rape victims are being told to hand over their phones to the police — or risk their attackers not being prosecuted. campaigners say they're concerned. the us warns it will rethink its information sharing with western allies — if they use the controversial
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chinese telecoms giant huawei in their 5g data networks. spain's socialists celebrate victory in the country's general election — though they may need the help of other parties to govern. those are the headlines. now we can look at the sport. alex hales has been removed from england's provisional world cup squad all but ending his chances of playing at the tournament this summer. last week a spokesman for the batsman confirmed he'd been suspended following an off field incident, his club said it was for personal reasons, with hales accepting it was right he was suspended. the ecb said his withdrawl is in the best intrests of the team, to ensure they're free of any distractions.
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it's not the first suspension he's faced, following the punishment handed down from the ecb following a fight outside a nightclub. it isa it is a serious matter. i think they had no option, partly because of his back story, the involvement in that for a back story, the involvement in that fora car back story, the involvement in that for a car with ben stokes, which, in the end, he was acquitted of any legal matter. —— the fracas. but he was penalised by the cricket board and he is still under a suspended sentence from the english cricket board, the independent disciplinary review body, that had a look into the case. he was already on borrowed time, if you like. it was his second offence. i don't think they had much option. i suspect they may have wa nted option. i suspect they may have wanted to keep this issue out of the public domain. but once it is in the public domain. but once it is in the public domain, everybody knows about it and public domain, everybody knows about itandi public domain, everybody knows about it and i don't think they had any option. england have made some changes.
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this afternoon england have called up batsmen ben duckett and dawid malan for the one day international in ireland and twenty20 match against pakistan. but james vince seems to be best placed to take hales' place for the world cup. the hampshire captain has been added to england's squad for the odi series against pakistan. the former celtic player stevie chalmers has died at the age of 83. chalmers scored the winning goal for celtic in the 1967 european cup final against inter milan in portugal. the team later dubbed the lisbon lions have also been mourning the passing of their captain billy mcneil who died last week. ajax have arrived in london ahead of their champions league semi final first leg with tottenham tomorrow night. the dutch league cancelled last weekend's fixtures to give the team extra time to prepare, while tottenham lost to west ham in a london derby on saturday. manager mauricio pochettino says they wont use that as an excuse. the most fair way is to have the same time to prepare for both teams. but it is not an excuse, i only described the situation.
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what happened for me, it's going to be a fantastic semifinal. and of course we are going to try to win. but it never is there going to be an excuse, because we didn't have the same days to prepare as ajax. ali carter is through to the quarter finals of the world snooker championship in sheffield beating the young chinese' hopeful zhou yuelong, who very much looked like he was going to win the frame to stay in the match— but after potting the pink he wasn't able to follow it with the black — leaving the chance for carter to progress. and the 2 time finalist didn't miss it. kyren wilson went through in style. he made a break of 132 as he beat fellow englishman barry hawkins by 13 frames to 11. he was trailing 0—7 at the start of this afternoon's session.
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he plays david gilbert in the quarterfinal. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. there is also much more coming up in sportsday at 6.30. victims of crime are going to be asked to allow police to examine their mobile phones, or risk prosecution is not going ahead. it's a response to the collapse of a string of rape and sexual assault cases, after crucial evidence emerged on mobile phones at the last minute. lets discuss this with sandra paul. the majority of her work concerns defending allegations of sexual offences. what do you make over these consent forms, where people will be required to hand over their social media accounts and mobile
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phones, a lot of data information about their lives? so, as with all things, it is about how it is implemented and explained. the reality is that our criminaljustice system relies on having the best quality information to make a decision, particularly in cases such as these where often there are only two people available to give an account. this sort of evidence can often find an objective way to describe what happened and in what order. so, whilst there is understandably some concern about the balance between privacy and the integrity of the criminaljustice system, what i would hope is that most of us would say the integrity of the criminal justice most of us would say the integrity of the criminaljustice system is of great importance, and so there is a balance that needs to be struck. you talk about that concern, i think you are listening to my interview with dame vera baird, he was very much opposed the idea, saying it is a
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licence to dredge through the lives and personal data of people who say they were raped 7 and personal data of people who say they were raped? we have to make a decision. at that point in time, all you have a somebody that is suspected of an offence, and summary thatis suspected of an offence, and summary that is a complainant that says they have been the victim. —— somebody. how can we come to a decision about where the balance on the truth lies without treating both parties fairly7 in every case i have defended an allegation of sexual misconduct, the first thing that police would do is to keep possession of my client's phone, even when they have gone to the police station as a volunteer, the refusal to hand over the phone is a reason for them to be arrested. so we are going to say that we will treat both parties as fairly as we can. but a rape victim that has been through that trauma, reporting it, and then the trauma of having to hand over their phone and all of their social media accounts, their e—mails and pictures?
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their social media accounts, their e-mails and pictures? what we have to do is make that less traumatic and be in a position to be as transparent about them about what information is for, where it is going to go, he will see it, how long it will be retained for. so they have the right context for why they have the right context for why the information is needed. i have never seen in nearly 18 years worth of practice a whole download of a complainant's phone. what i see is the bits that i deem to be relevant, considering the defence that has been submitted. the other concern is that it will deter people from reporting rape and other sexual offences in particular, at a time when the number of prosecutions is already falling. home office figures show the proportion of rape cases being prosecuted nationally has dropped to a low ofjust1.7%. we actually afford to deter people from coming forward? we absolutely shouldn't, and we can't afford to deter people from coming forward. equally, we can't afford to have a
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criminal justice system equally, we can't afford to have a criminaljustice system where there isa criminaljustice system where there is a real risk that people who are convicted, that we can't be sure about whether the conviction is sound or not. there is a balance to be struck between those things. it is not beyond the wit of our criminal justice system is not beyond the wit of our criminaljustice system to find the right balance. you say it has been out of balance and effectively we are re—tilting that7 out of balance and effectively we are re-tilting that? i am saying that we are treating the evidence as evidence, not evidence that comes from a suspect or a complainant, it is the neutrality of it that we are trying to protect. thank you very much for coming in. sandra paul, a partner at a law firm. a new report has highlighted the critical role that soil plays in climate change. there's more carbon stored in soil than in all the world's trees — and it's being released into the atmosphere by deforestation and poor farming. the scientists behind the study say that already, nearly half the world's population is suffering because of the way that land is degraded. here's our environment analyst roger harrabin.
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soil erosion — a double problem. here in the east of england, this isn't smog in the air, it's soil on a hot windy day. losing soil like this lowers our ability to grow crops. it also releases carbon trapped in the earth, and that contributes to climate change. in parts of the south of england, some carelessly farmed fields are steadily running into the rivers. soil degradation is a problem said to affect almost half the world's people. look at this tsunami of dust last year in phoenix, arizona. it's the result of a spectacular storm. for most farmers, soil loss is a creeping problem that's only noticed it too late. soils are really important for climate change as well, because they store a lot of carbon. there's three times more carbon stored in soil and there is in the atmosphere. so imagine if all that carbon was released from the soil into the atmosphere, we'd have the runaway climate change that people are concerned about.
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so, what to do? well, we know cows' burps are a problem for climate change, but their dung also helps put carbon back into the soil. so, this mobile dairy in the south of england may prove part of the solution. it means cows spread their dung across the fields, not leave it in the farmyard. that way, nutrients and carbon from the pasture return to the soil. we were worried that the soil was becoming dead. there was no vitality in the soil, no resilience in the soil. so we realised we need to put grass back into the system, and manage the grass with bought some dairy cows. here's the evidence. this field, with its light, stony soil, is depleted from crops grown with chemical fertilisers. see the much darker, carbon rich soil in the far ploughed field, previously fertilised by cows.
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the simplest way of combating climate change and improving the soil is to turn all this farmland into woodland. but that wouldn't feed the people, would it? perhaps a form of farming like this can be gentler on environment, while keeping milk on the table. we've got to radically cut the number of cattle on earth, scientists tell us. is there a role for pasture fed cows like these that burp out methane but also help the soil? we don't have a clear answer yet. the leader of the scottish conservative party leader ruth davidson has called for politicians to set aside their differences and work on a deal for brexit. speaking to the bbc on her return to politics after maternity leave, she said that it was up to all parties to make compromises to honour the result of the referendum. it is time for politicians to start compromising. it is time for a deal to be done and it's time for the united kingdom to look at what
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happens next. does that include the brexiteers in your own party? they should compromise as well? brexiteers in your own party? they should compromise as well7m includes everybody, i don't restrict it to my party, but i include my party in that. there are talks going on in london right now. we need the politicians in the house of commons to coalesce around a common position, to leave in an orderly fashion, which is what 17 million people voted for. the headlines on bbc news... the head of boeing defends the safety of the 737 max aircraft, saying he is sorry for the loss of life and insisting the company has a duty to eliminate risk. the us warns it will rethink its information sharing chinese telecoms giant in their 5g networks rape victims are being told to hand over their phones to the police — or risk their attackers not being prosecuted. campaigners say they're concerned.
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schools and nhs services say they are struggling to deal with mental health problems in children. it's estimated that every year1 in 10 young people experience some kind of mental health problem — such as anxiety or depression — with children from low income families are four times more likely to face these challenges. our education editor branwen jeffreys has been to blackpool where they are trying to equip themselves with better coping skills to help their young people. iam i am corey, i am 15 years of age and i am helping blackpool become a more resilient town. as a young person growing up in blackpool, it is hard. there are the darker sides of blackpool. however, once you realise it's not all bad and we all help each other, you are not afraid to call blackpool your home. cory is
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pa rt call blackpool your home. cory is part of a push to build an emotionally stronger community. they are calling it a resilience revolution. it is backed by research and lottery cash. resilience is the capability to bounce forward through tough times and persevere. this is why perseverance might be needed. there are up to 2500 children whose pa rents there are up to 2500 children whose parents use drugs. in under 24s, self harm rates are three times the nationalfigure. for drugs self harm rates are three times the national figure. for drugs and alcohol, it has the highest hospital admissions in england. but instead of focusing on problems, blackpool is working with its biggest asset, people. armed with a list, they start simple. how to shop for a meal. a stepping stone to learning to cook for their family. can you think ofan to cook for their family. can you think of an example where you have been able to be resilient yourself7
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my been able to be resilient yourself7 my dad was starting to get really ill. so i cooked pasta for them all. my ill. so i cooked pasta for them all. my sister, my dad, my little sister, and my stepmum. ifelt proud of myself, all of my siblings were hungry, my mum couldn't make it, so i made them pasta. every school is doing something different. teenagers are helping design and deliver changes. so, what makes this different7 changes. so, what makes this different? this is about equipping a whole community. one parent, one child at a time, with the skills they need to cope with life. so, instead of treating people as though they are helpless, you get them to see that they can push through life's setbacks. i was going through grief, my child had moved to her dad's house, i was involved in the social services that i hadn't been involved with before. lisa was at a
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low point after her dad died. a single mum, her mental health was under pressure. we have family time from 5.30 until 6.30, and we also have some family time before they go to school, because they get up early. after a course for parents, she has a plan, agreed with the teenage daughters. the telephones 90, teenage daughters. the telephones go, they are plugged in and get them backin go, they are plugged in and get them back in the morning. how has it made things different as a family? we sit down and talk more now. giving up their phones at tea—time, that is a block where if they have anything on their mind, they can tell us about it. i was one of these doing everything for them. i thought, we need to share it here. simple suggestions for living, one big idea to encourage yourself and each other. i have been trying to speak to you about things in school. in this school, older pupils are paired with new arrivals. they call them
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heroes. mental health, first aid to intercept worries before they grow. are you happy now, is there anything bothering you? no. there are students who feel the need to self harm, a cry for help, attempted suicide etc. it's not a daily thing, but they are very real and apparent. so, what happens when this project ends7 so, what happens when this project ends? the challenges here won't disappear. the hope is that some resilience lingers on. brexit uncertainty is deterring many people from planning summer holidays in the eu — according to one of britain's main package holiday companies. let's get all the details from our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith who's at manchester airport. welcome to manchester tonight. if
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you can see beyond me, just beyond those yellow gates, that is the tarmac of the airport runway itself. this side of the gates is the headquarters of thomas cook. as you say, one of the uk's biggest tour operators. 19 million of us will be taking a thomas cook flight at some point during this year to a holiday destination. they are a company that have been struggling over the last year. they have not had brilliant results, they have not had the kind of bookings they were hoping for. they are largely blaming brexit uncertainty for that. the kind of bookings that they are seeing have been changing this year, with nearly half of all of their bookings now going to outside of the eu as a final destination. that is an increase of 10% on the same figures from last year. in terms of the destinations that we are actually flying two, spain is number one. we cannot kick that spanish habit in the uk. but the second choice destination is now turkey, leapfrogging destination is now turkey,
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lea pfrogging above greece. destination is now turkey, leapfrogging above greece. it is not only outside of the eu, but outside of the euro zone, meaning that people are getting a bit more for their pound if they are exchanging it. we have been asking other holiday companies if they are saying the same kind of thing that thomas cook are talking about today. the website comparison sky scanner say they are seeing a big increase in people booking longer for flights. the post office say they are exchanging a lot more travel money for destinations like japan, indonesia, egypt. interestingly, the website last minute have said although european destinations are still popular, they say that people are staying closer to home, with the biggest destination this summer being jersey. thank you very much indeed.
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a new study of nearly 3 million adults in the uk has highlighted the risks of being obese. it found even slightly overweight people are twice as likely to get type 2 diabetes. public health england says sustained action is needed to tackle the problem. prada, gucci, kate spade and mulberry — designer names you'd normally associate with stores in london paris and new york. but now high end fashion brands worth thousands of pounds are on sale for a fraction of their usual retail price — at a humble charity shop in kent. a mystery donor has given them to the mind store in tunbridge wells — and shoppers there can't believe the bargains now on offer. our reporter claudia sermbezis went to take a look. mulberry. prada. paul smith. kate spade. it's a charity shop which has spent the last 20 years helping people with mental health issues.
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today, they've done a week's takings. well, it's absolutely amazing because to get this quality and quantity in, itjust ups the ante to a whole new level, where people say, "this is normally what you only get in london". well, you don't have to go to london now, you can come to me and you can buy it in our shop for our charity in tunbridge wells — save the train fare! hang on, now we're talking! where my purse? miu miu! here we are, miu miu. best coat ever. many of these things are actually still on sale online today. so, for example, this afternoon if i scroll down, there it is. this dress here, there it is, £1,390, please. 0r650. i'm all for sustainable fashion anyway and getting as much out of things. i'm a big believer in buying things that are pre—loved. i could never afford to buy fashion at that high end, but i love getting a bargain, like anyone.
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oh, i can't pronounce that one! i know it's a good one, though. apologies. many of the clothes have even got the original sales tickets. so, i'm buying a whistles black, frilled skirt. yes. what's it like coming in and getting all these designer clothes? it's incredible. it's absolutely incredible. i mean, this is the best charity shop that we've got in this area, i think. a bit expensive for me, i think, but if you had the money, obviously, it would be nice, wouldn't it? i actually came in trying to find something, dare i say it, for a fancy dress outfit. and then i've just walked in and seen this incredible designer wear section, which, yeah, i'm very intrigued to have a good rifle all the way through. philosophy! bought from the designers, this whole horde would set you back a cool £60,000. but from the charity shop, umm, well, £20,000 is a bargain, isn't it?
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time for a look at the weather, with helen willetts. as ever, the weather has been pretty fashionable recently, hasn't it? it gave us some lovely weather across the easter holiday. i wonder if it can do the same across the bank holiday weekend. let's take a look what is happening out and about at the moment. it's been a fairly decent day, considering we had storm emma over the weekend and a fairly brisk wind yesterday. fine start for most of us. behind that, it gets colder with some night—time frost. i am hopeful that will disappear by the time we get to the bank what a weekend. high pressure in the east at the moment. this waterfront has been making its presence felt across the western side of the uk. for parts of wales in the south—west it has been a dreary, cloudy day. lots of sunshine still on offer elsewhere. and it is fine if you are heading out and about. overnight, the temperatures will fall away
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again. notice the low cloud coming back onto the shores of eastern scotland, down through the north sea as well. we will see some pockets of fog in land, and it's going to be quite chilly overnight, with temperatures falling to within a few degrees of freezing. in the west, it really starts to turn much wetter for much of an island, then northern ireland as we approach dawn. lots of spray and standing water for the drive to work in the morning. some fog to clear elsewhere. once it does, lots of sunshine, except in the west. a different day for western scotland tomorrow. we are hoping the rain will clear for a time for northern ireland. where we have had the sunshine today, it will be much cloudier, damper and also quite cool tomorrow. eastern scotla nd quite cool tomorrow. eastern scotland still does quite well, along with central and eastern england. higher temperatures than today. some dry weather for a time in northern ireland. for the irish sea, it turns quite dreary into the afternoon. the weather frontjust hangs around through tuesday night and into wednesday, starting to make its way slowly eastwards. some dry
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weather returning to northern ireland before we get showers back in. wednesday sees the best of the sunshine. a slimmer slice, eventually the showers do arrive. in the sunshine at this time of year, we will see high temperatures, 16, 17 or 18 degrees. it is going to get colder. quite considerably colder for the beginning of may, as we see this arctic blast taking shape through the course of thursday. with it, the risk is there of wintry showers, snow over the hills and some night—time frost that i hinted at earlier. we will see temperatures tumbling away through thursday and friday, single figures in the north. then there was temperatures do recover with some sunshine. i hope, we hope, over the bank holiday weekend. see you later.
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victims of crime will be asked to let police go through their mobile phones, or risk prosecutions not going ahead. the move in england and wales comes after a number of cases, including rape trials, collapsed after important evidence on phones wasn't shown to the defence. it's massively intrusive. it really has an impact on victims of rape, who may be severely traumatised already by what's happened. it's another violation, in effect. also on the programme tonight: grounded after two fatal crashes — now the boss of boeing vows to make the company's troubled 737 max the safest plane in the skies. teaching children to be resilient — how one community in blackpool is hoping it will more people deal with stress and anxiety.

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