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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 5, 2019 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm shaun ley. the headlines at two. the prime minister appeals tojeremy corbyn to resolve their differences and help her deliver brexit. the shadow chancellor says a crucial factor, trust, has been damaged. in a word, a single word, do you trust the prime minister? no, sorry not after this weekend when she has blown the confidentiality she had. i actually think she has jeopardised the negotiations for her own personal protection. as israel exchanges fire with palestinian militants for a second day, the israeli prime minister orders the military to deploy in strength around the gaza strip. this is the scene in thailand as the king makes a grand procession in front of large crowds in bangkok, in his first public appearance since his
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coronation on saturday. it isa it is a very hot day. the police and prosecutors in england and wales are urged to rethink their policy requiring rape complainants to give access to their social media accounts and mobile phones. the illegal puppy trade exposed — the treasury recovers more than £5 million in unpaid taxes in an operation to tackle the black market trade. and in half an hour, we'll be looking back at the local elections, the shock sacking of the defence secretary, and the brexit talks. that's in the week in parliament. good afternoon, welcome to bbc news. labour's shadow chancellor has accused the prime minister of breaking the confidentiality and trust surrounding brexit
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negotiations between labour and the government. writing in a newspaper today, theresa may has called on labour leaderjeremy corbyn to "put their differences aside" and agree a brexit deal. the uk was due to leave the european union on 29th march, but it was delayed to 31st october after mps failed to agree a deal. our political correspondent, nick eardley reports. the most unlikely of brexit pairings, but could theresa may and jeremy corbyn unite and agree a compromise deal in the coming days? the prime minister hopes so, recovering after her party was thumped in the local elections. she believes the public now wants politicians to deliver. writing in the mail on sunday, theresa may appealed directly to labour leader jeremy corbyn, saying... "let's listen to what the voters said in the local elections and put our differences aside for a moment. let's do a deal." her party's scottish leader believes agreement is within reach. we need to start walking ourselves back to an agreement where we can get the majority of people in the house of commons on board, and i think there is a deal
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there to be done, i genuinely do. but it takes two to tango. talks with labour will resume on tuesday, but one of its key negotiators is less than impressed with the pm. do you trust the prime minister? no, sorry, not after this weekend, when she's blown the confidence i actually had. and i actually think she's jeopardised the negotiations for her own personal protection. labour has real concerns that even if it can secure its demands, whoever replaces theresa may could rip up the deal. trying to enter into a contract with a company that's going into administration and the people who are going to take over are not willing to fulfil that contract. we can't negotiate like that. and it's notjust labour mrs may has to convince. this morning, graham brady — the chairman of the committee of tory mps — warned accepting labour's demand for a customs union could lead to a split in the conservative party. the tories are worried, too, about losing further political ground to unambiguously pro—brexit
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parties. if they push forward with this, it will be seen as a coalition of politicians against the people, and i think millions of people would give up on both labour and the conservatives, i really do. labour also has a tough sell. dozens of its mps won't back a deal that doesn't include another referendum. they warn against a stitch—up, and fear losing votes to anti—brexit parties, even if labour secures a closer relationship. even that should be put back to the people. and that's the problem, i think, that particularly the labour party is facing, because on their side, a lot of their supporters are deeply angry. differences remain between these two and many other rows are wait in the wings. at fractured westminster, brexit solutions don't come easy. and nickjoins me now. i suppose for both sides were there to bea
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i suppose for both sides were there to be a deal this week, it would involve a certain amount of compromise and a lot of criticism for the main parties. is that the background where we see the remarks from john mcdonnell and even some of the conservative press as well? yes, absolutely. both sides have looked at the local elections and thought we need to get on with this. the prime minister is quite clear she thinks that is getting a deal over the line and there are some in the labour party who are sympathetic to that argument. it does seem the government is prepared to go some way to meeting some of labour's demand for a customs union of sorts, an arrangement close to a customs union, although you can safely bet they will call it something else to save face. but it is far from clear to me that that will be enough. we heard john mcdonnell talking about doing a deal with a company that is going into administration and that is the fear on the labour side. even
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if they agree something with theresa may, she has said she will stand down if a withdrawal deal goes through and the next prime minister, labourfear, through and the next prime minister, labour fear, could be through and the next prime minister, labourfear, could be a boris johnson, could be a dominic raab, and could rip that up. the newspapers were saying the suggestion is the government would offer a deal that would run until the next election two years away. that is fine, but how do you guarantee when the prime minister goes, how do you sign in blood as it we re goes, how do you sign in blood as it were that that deal would stand? that requires trust and that is the thing that has been eroded. absolutely and that is not a good omen for somebody who is wanting to get a deal. the labour party is worried it cannot trust the government, the government is worried about going too far and alienating its own site. i cannot emphasise enough how important party discipline is in theirs. if theresa
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may goes too far and goes too close to labour's proposal, she will lose potentially dozens of tory mps. on the labour side if they do not include a referendum in any deal, they potentially could lose dozens on their own side as well. that means it is possible a deal would not even get through parliament and if that were the case, there is very little point in doing it. iain duncan smith set the dogs running yesterday by suggesting that theresa may should name a date now when she is going to go and if not 1922 committee might move against her. is there any indication his call has picked up any resonance in that? there are some who sympathise, but what there has not been so far is what there has not been so far is what we see as the cacophony of calls for the prime minister to do something. some are holding their fire until after the european elections when the tories could do even worse than they did in the
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locals. but there is the question of if the prime minister comes back with a deal she has signed with labour that goes towards the opposition, many more will be furious. but if she does not get a deal done in time by the european elections, the voters will punish the conservative party again and then they might come calling. israel's prime minister has ordered the military to continue with massive strikes on the gaza strip and to deploy tanks, artillery and infantry forces around the territory. palestinian officials say seven people have been killed in gaza over the weekend. israel says it's responding to hundreds of rockets fired into southern israel. one israeli was killed in the town of ashkelon and several others wounded by the barrage. the bbc‘s middle east analyst alan johnston reports. on through the night it went, yet another israeli strike on gaza. and the militants there unleashed rocket after rocket.
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israel's air defence shield worked to try to intercept the missiles, blasting them out of the night sky. and israel struck repeatedly at what it said were militant targets like weapons caches all down the gaza strip. in the light of day the extent of the damage, the impact of the pounding, was clear to see. where people should be shopping and working, coming and going, there is rubble all around. and on the other side of the conflict in the israeli city of ashkelon a similar scene. a man in his 50s died here when a rocket from gaza slammed down on his home. israel's leaders are watching and making their plans. there is no talk of stepping back. translation: this morning i instructed the israeli defence forces to continue with massive strikes against terrorists in the gaza strip.
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and i also instructed that forces around the gaza strip be stepped up with tanks, artillery and infantry forces. hamas bears responsibility not only for its own attacks and actions, but also for those of the islamic jihad for which it pays a very high price. a funeral in gaza, it's very likely there will be more of these. behind the scenes egyptian and united nations diplomats will be trying to mediate. they may well seek a deal that eases israel's very tight economic blockade on gaza in return for calm from the militants. but for now at least there is no sign of any imminent truce. and alanjoins me now. this from the outside looks like a deteriorating situation. is that how you read it? we do indeed i'm
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afraid. we are entering into the second day and any hope that it might be brought under control quickly is fading fast, all the sides are bad at the moment. we have heard benjamin neta nyahu sides are bad at the moment. we have heard benjamin netanyahu saying earlier that there will be a continuation of what he called a massive bombardment, ordering up ta nks massive bombardment, ordering up tanks and the israeli army beginning to mass along gaza's border. in the last two hours we have heard of two more israeli deaths and there have been eight on the palestinian side. asi been eight on the palestinian side. as i say, the signs are that we are ina as i say, the signs are that we are in a dangerous position and no real hope of this being drawn to conclusion quickly. tomorrow ramadan begins for the people of gaza. there are major celebrations for israel's independence day coming up. it is the time anyway when things have the potential to be fraught. what is adding the fuel to the fire? we see
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these flare—ups again and again. a month ago there was a flare—up over an agreement regarding the easing of the blockade in return for a calmer situation from the militants. the blockade of gaza is the key issue at the moment. the blockade cripples economic life and makes miserable the lives of something like 2 million people in gaza. the israelis say they have to impose it to stop hamas threatening them. if you make people's lives more miserable, they are more attracted to the militants. there is an element of that. as we speak behind the scenes there will be un and egyptian diplomats negotiating for all their worth and they will be seeking an arrangement where they will be some sort of easing of the blockade of gaza in
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return for at least a degree of calm on the part of the militants. they seem to get something like thatjust about a month ago, but the palestinians are adamant the israelis have not kept their side of the bargain and that is why we see the bargain and that is why we see the latest flare—up i think. the bargain and that is why we see the latest flare-up i think. thank you very much. let's ta ke let's take a look at the scene in thailand in the capital bangkok on a very hot day, the temperatures reached 90 with much humidity. this isa reached 90 with much humidity. this is a huge procession that the new king has undertaken. king vijiralongkorn was crowned in an elaborate ceremony yesterday, becoming thailand's first new king in 70 years. the country has been in mourning for a couple of years for his father.
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this is meant to introduce the new king to his subjects. many have travelled there for hours. it is a fabulous site. he mostly lives in germany and does not spend much time in thailand. he returned with a fourth wife, now his queen, and the government has spent about $31 million to lay on the three day celebrations that began yesterday with the coronation and continue today with this procession. they are walking at 45 steps to the minute, no, 75 steps to the minute. there are 16 people carrying it. it is a strange mix of ancient tradition and new pictures. our diplomatic correspondent james landale reports. dawn in bangkok, and the streets brightened by a stream of royal yellow. thousands up early to get a good vantage point, all keen to catch a rare glimpse of their new king, their first for almost 70 years.
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king maha vajiralongkorn was crowned yesterday, so now it was time to show himself to his people. carried by 16 soldiers on a gilded palanquin, a cavalcade involving thousands of people, stretching some 500 metres long, slowly processing round the heart of the city. a chance for his people to pay homage and celebrate his ascension to the throne, but also a chance for many thais to see their monarch in person for the first time — a much remoterfigure than his much—loved late father, spending much of his time abroad. this elaborate three—day coronation is as much religious as it is ceremonial and, as the king processed, he visited sacred temples, where he could offer up prayers before golden images of buddha. in thailand, the monarch is revered as an almost godlike figure,
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the official protector of the buddhist faith, and even members of his family prostrate themselves before him as they receive their royal titles. but he's more than a spiritual leader and many thais wonder how the king will use his huge political influence as his divided country emerges from military rule. james landale, bbc news. we will bring you more of those pictures during the course of the afternoon here on bbc news. analysts believe that the weapon north korea test—fired from its east coast on saturday was a short range ballistic missile. in a special television broadcast pyongyang announced that it had conducted a "strike drill" of a tactical guided weapon. the test was supervised by leader kim jong—un. responding to the strike, president donald trump tweeted he believed mr kim would not jeopardise the path towards better relations. sixteen people have been killed, and thousands have been left
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homeless by cyclone fani, one of the most powerful storms to hit india in 20 years. more than 10,000 villages have been damaged by the cyclone, which made landfall on friday, but indian officials say the early evacuation of more than a million people saved many lives. the headlines on bbc news... let's do a deal — the prime minister appeals to jeremy corbyn to resolve their differences and help her deliver brexit. as israel and palestinian militants exchange fire for a second day, the israeli prime minister orders the army to deploy in strength around the gaza strip. this is the scene live in thailand this evening as the new king makes a grand procession in front of a large crowd in the city. it is his first public appearance since being crowned on saturday. police commissioners in england
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and wales are calling on prosecutors to scrap a controversial new form asking victims of crime, including rape complainants, to hand over their mobile phones or risk prosecutions not going ahead. the association of police and crime commissioners says the policy could undermine the criminaljustice system. andy moore reports. these are the new consent forms that could be used by the police, asking victims of crime — including rape victims — to allow their mobile phones and other data to be examined. campaigners have described them as a "digital strip search." support from the view that the police have gone too far has come from an unusual source — the police and crime commissioners who are elected by us to hold police forces to account. the forms were introduced after a series of scandals where vital evidence held on social media was not handed over to rape defendants. they were seen as an attempt to improve the thoroughness of investigations. police said data would only be examined where it was relevant to an enquiry. but the association of police and crime commissioners
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opposes the move. david lloyd, the organisation's lead on criminaljustice, told the observer newspaper: the police and crime commissioners say that in some cases, material unconnected to the rape case has been obtained by officers and used to undermine the complainant. the police say they are trying to balance privacy and justice. those whose job it is to oversee the police say that on this occasion they have got that balance wrong. with me now is our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford. this is turning into a serious row between different bits of the criminal justice system between different bits of the criminaljustice system who are supposed to work together to ensure that the complainants if they are
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genuine victims are protected. and also different bits that are responsible for the police forces. we have got the chief constables on the one side and then the police and crime commissioners who are there to oversee them. it was clearly necessary to change the rules as we moved into the 21st century. almost everybody has got some sort of digital device, phones, computers, with a lot of digital data on that which might or might not be releva nt. which might or might not be relevant. what the police chiefs have tried to do is to come up with a form which would be signed by victims of crime and that would include great complainants, allowing the police to go through their phone and look for new evidence that might be relevant to the prosecution or defence. but the problem is in rape cases that makes a rape victim think they have got someone going through their most private details on the phone and that might get into the
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hands of the person who raped them and might be used as evidence in court. the idea of a digital strip search was used. it is a very graphic phrase and it is entirely understandable why people should be uncomfortable about it. on the police side presumably their argument is we have a better chance of successful prosecution if we have all the information available to us. that is almost the nature of the crime that has been committed. there are two crime that has been committed. there a re two parts crime that has been committed. there are two parts to this. one is the police are insisting in response to this that they are only using this to pursue relevant lines of enquiry. something that has come up which might be answerable through going through someone's phone and that is the only time they will use this. there might be evidence that helps to secure the prosecution. but there has also been a lot of trouble in the last year where they have not
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properly gone through someone's phone and there has been evidence that might be useful to the defence and they have come close to miscarriages of justice and they have come close to miscarriages ofjustice in a couple of occasions, where people have been accused of something which turned out not to be accurate and the evidence was on the phone. it is to ensure a evidence was on the phone. it is to ensureafair evidence was on the phone. it is to ensure a fair trial process is the argument. is there a way out of this? at the moment there is not. the row will continue. the form will stay in use. but i thought has come out of the argument, which is perhaps private companies could be used to go through the phones and to assess what is relevant and then to only give to the police and the trial process those bits which are releva nt. trial process those bits which are relevant. photographs that are irreleva nt relevant. photographs that are irrelevant do not get into the hands of anybody and that might be the way forward , of anybody and that might be the way forward, but that is an incredibly expensive process and you are bringing in another party. and they
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have to be trained to understand what is relevant and not. these people are used in complicated terrorist cases, but if you say you need that sifting process in every case, that will be very expensive indeed. the problem is we all document our lives so much now. in that documentation there can be stuff that is relevant to a criminal prosecution. daniel, thank you. a 17—year—old girl who was murdered in wiltshire on friday has been named. ellie gould was pronounced dead after emergency services were called to an address in calne near chippenham. wiltshire police are continuing to question a 17—year—old boy who has been arrested on suspicion of her murder. dog breeders selling puppies on the black market have been forced to pay back more than £5 million in tax as part of a clampdown on illegal puppy farming. customs officers found fraudsters making huge profits by breeding puppies on a mass scale with little
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regard for their welfare. simonjones reports. distressed dogs kept in appalling conditions by breeders not paying their taxes, treating animals as a commodity rather than with humanity, selling them on in huge numbers. the impact of the illegal puppy trade on dogs is one of absolute misery and animal welfare problems, from disease to over—breeding, it really does cause suffering, and some of these people are moving dogs around, travelling great distances when they are sick and injured, and it really is a miserable trade. a task force from hm revenue and customs set up in 2015 has recovered almost £5.5 million in lost taxes. it identified 257 separate cases of tax evasion across the uk. one puppy breeder in scotland was handed a bill of £425,000. animal welfare groups say tens of thousands of puppies are being reared in unregulated conditions. the task force says it has made inroads into what it calls a brutal trade, but it is a growing problem. the government was unable to say how many of the breeders who had been
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fined were still operating. the advice from the rspca for anybody considering buying a dog is to do your research on the person selling it, or to consider a rescue dog. a new rehabilitation centre in the la ke a new rehabilitation centre in the lake district is looking to provide treatment and outdoor activities. it's a landscape which inspires adventure and for more than 40 years at the calvert trust has used lake district activities to challenge disability. the latest guest is the headway group, a charity for people who have experienced brain injuries. i have just been outdoors, i suppose it isa i have just been outdoors, i suppose it is a confidence boost as well. you lose a lot of that. then it is acceptance. i was involved in a car
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crash in 1997 which left me in a coma for two weeks and i have been in recovery ever since then. it is good to mingle with people with similar issues. it helps us be more confident and you just have a laugh with everybody. those positive benefits will now be transferred into a rehabilitation centre. more than £1 million raised to transform displays on the skirts of keswick. its new function is a uk first. for people with brain injury it is a complex injury. the brain needs lots of physical activity to get blood pumping around the neurons. the brain needs to learn new things in a physical way, so cognitive skills development. we know social interaction is a really important thing for the brain to recover and develop. we are looking to bring all those things together. it is a building site now, what will it look like when you finish this project?
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the inside will be very different, a ten bed facility initially. the u psta i rs ten bed facility initially. the upstairs will be the social space, kitchen, dining and treatment rooms. we wa nt kitchen, dining and treatment rooms. we want the building to remain characterful. we want people to be stimulated by being in the environment, by looking at the old beams and thinking about the heritage of the building and thinking about the interesting space they are in. more than 300,000 people suffer life changing injuries every year. it is hoped the space could play a significant part rebuilding some of those lives. could play a significant part rebuilding some of those livesm makes you feel good because you can actually achieve something and you can do things that you may be thought that you might not be able to. it is hope calvert re—connections will open its doors by the end of this year. meghan patterson, bbc news. a rare brooch has been uncovered in norfolk. the 800—year—old treasure features two lions and is studded with two pink stones. it was found in a freshly ploughed
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field by a newly qualified archaeologist but it wasn't his first find. tom lucking unearthed an anglo—saxon pendant worth £145,000 when he was still a student in 2014. that really is his name! a lucky man and a lucky museum a lucky man and a whoever gets it. now it's time for a look at the weather. it is pretty chilly out there. hard to believe that easter weekend that gave us temperatures in the 20s. a lot of cloud around and a few showers. not as windy as yesterday, not feeling as raw as it did yesterday. showery rain in northern scotla nd yesterday. showery rain in northern scotland with snow on high grounds. this evening and overnight this band of cloud and showers will drift southwards. there will be snow on high ground in scotland. many places hovering above freezing, but if the
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sky is clear, you could see a touch of frost. cloud and showers drift slowly southwards. the south of england and wales will have a day like today. beautiful blue skies in scotla nd like today. beautiful blue skies in scotland with a sprinkling of showers. just 9 degrees in aberdeen. pretty chilly by day and night, rain at times, breezy, but amidst all that some sunshine. hello this is bbc news with shaun ley. the headlines: the prime minister appeals to jeremy corbyn to resolve their differences and help her deliver brexit. the shadow chancellor says a crucial factor, trust, has been damaged. in a word, a single word, do you trust the prime minister? no, sorry not after this weekend when she has blown the confidentiality she had. i actually think she has jeopardised the negotiations for her own personal protection. as israel exchanges
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fire with palestinian militants for a second day, the israeli prime minister orders the military to deploy in strength around the gaza strip. crowds in bangkok brave a long wait in searing temperatures for a glimpse of their newly—crowned king. the police and prosecutors in england and wales are urged to rethink their policy requiring rape complainants to give access to their social media accounts and mobile phones. the illegal puppy trade exposed — the treasury recovers more than five million pounds in unpaid taxes, in an operation to tackle the black market trade. now it's time for the week in parliament.

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