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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 5, 2019 10:00pm-11:02pm BST

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this is bbc news.
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i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 10:00pm: 41 people have died as a russian passenger plane caught fire and was forced to make an emergency landing not long after take—off. the prime minister appeals tojeremy corbyn to resolve their differences and help her deliver brexit, but the shadow chancellor says trust has been lost. in a word, a single word, do you trust the prime minister? no, sorry not after this weekend when she has blown the confidentiality she had. i actually think she has jeopardised the negotiations for her own personal protection. israel and militants in the gaza strip engage in a deadly exchange of rocket fire, as tensions between the two sides continue to escalate. roads in the centre of edinburgh close to traffic, as the cityjoins a worldwide movement to reduce air pollution. and at 10:50pm and again at 11:30pm we'll be taking an in—depth look at the papers with our reviewers, parliamentary journalist tony grew
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and caroline frost, entertainment journalist and broadcaster. stay with us for that. 41 people are reported to have died after a russian passenger plane made an emergency landing at moscow's sheremetyevo international airport after a fire broke out on board. the aircraft had 78 people on board and, as it came to a halt on the runway, dramatic pictures show its fuselage engulfed in flames. passengers were seen using escape chutes to get off. the plane had just taken off from moscow on route to the far north—west city of murmansk when the crew issued a distress signal.
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sylvia lennan—spence reports. this is the aeroflot flightjust moments after landing. thick black smoke rising into the sky. it spews engulfed in flames. sukhoi superjet—ioo the had just taken off from moscow heading towards murmansk, just moments after theyissued towards murmansk, just moments after they issued a distress single —— a signal. by the time the plane landed, the entire tail section was on fire. emergency vehicles arrived immediately to try to put out the flames. passengers escaped the burning aircraft on inflatable emergency chutes. initial reports suggest an electrical fault may have caused the flyer while the plane was in the air. aeroflot is russia's national carrier and this particular aircraft was reported to be
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relatively new, only two years old. a criminal investigation has been opened into the incident. our moscow correspondent, steve rosenberg, gave us this update. something happened shortly after take—off, we don't know what yet, but it forced the plane to turn around and make an emergency landing at sheremetyevo airport. there are reports that suggest the plane hit the runway twice, possibly three times, on landing. we believe that the fire broke out on landing and there is some dramatic amateur video footage we have seen, showing half of the claim, the back—up of the plane, engulfed in flames as the aircraft sped along the runway before it came to a stop. once it stopped, the emergency crews were on the scene very quickly, trying to get people out of that burning plane. the emergency chutes were activated, people were
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getting out, but of course the back—up of the plane, which was particularly damaged, we know that the emergency teams have spent some time trying to locate and help people who may have been stuck on the back half of the plane. the shadow chancellor has accused the prime minister ofjeopardising brexit talks between the government and labour, saying he no longer trusts her, after details of the negotiations appeared in the press. john mcdonnell also likened the government to a company about to go bankrupt because of potential successors to theresa may waiting in the wings. the prime minister has urged jeremy corbyn to put "differences aside" and agree a brexit deal. our political correspondent, chris mason reports. every sunday begins with church for the prime minister, and ends with questions about the potential for progress on brexit. "let's do a deal," she said to labour today. but after apparent details
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about the private talks became public in the sunday times... do you trust the prime minister? no. sorry, not after this weekend, when she's blown the confidentiality, and i actually think she's jeopardised the negotiations for her own personal protection. and that's not the end of it. labour fret that even if they can do a deal with theresa may, it could get ripped up by her successor. try to enter into a contract with a company that's going into administration, and the people who are going to take over are not willing to fulfil that contract. we can't negotiate like that. but the conservative leader in scotland reckons a deal is still within reach. we need to start walking ourselves back to an agreement where we can get the majority of the people in the house of commons on board. and i think there is a deal there to be done, i genuinely do. look, though, who is waiting in the wings, returning to the stage, a man who frightens plenty of tories contemplating compromise. if they push forward with this,
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it will be seen as a coalition of politicians against the people, and i think millions of people would give up on both labour and the conservatives, i really do. and from the unambiguously pro—brexit mr farage to the unambiguously anti—brexit liberal democrats, now the proud owners of smiles of victory after the english local elections. i think it's now very, very clear that british politics is now going to have to be remade. i mean, it's clearly failing in all kinds of ways, not just the mess around the referendum but the fact that as a country, we're just not getting to grips with really big challenges. mrs may and mr corbyn share the anguish of leading parties divided over brexit. and that's still the biggest blockage to the two of them sharing a brexit deal. chris mason reporting there, and a little earlier he told me
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that the two main parties were not that far apart in terms of brexit policy. the curiosity here is when you look at the granular detail, the official position of the two main parties is not i position of the two main parties is noti million miles apart. you look at some of the things they have been talking about, like environmental standards, security and workers' rights, and the gaps are probably bridger bowl. this is all about a numbers game, trying to assemble a majority in the house of commons. therefore it is notjust the official that matter, it is what the tribes behind the leaders think that matters, as well. there are two really big issues. so, plenty of conservatives hate the idea of a permanent customs union, that is something labour would like. the problem from the labour side is that plenty of labour mps and lords of their activist simply wouldn't want
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to sign up to anything that didn't allow another public referendum. the prime minister is absolutely opposed to that. so, how do they find agreement, given those huge blockages? very quickly, obviously, you have the deadline of the european elections looming and the hope that they can reach an agreement before the elections themselves. yeah stop not a hope in themselves. yeah stop not a hope in the heck is probably the polite way of putting it. the time has probably run out for that to any student of this brexit process will recall that deadlines come and deadlines go. those european elections are going to happen. in all likelihood, if the local elections in england and the opinion polls are any indication, the two big parties could take a real whacking. and we'll find out how this story and many others are covered
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in tomorrow's front pages at 10:50pm and 11:30pm tonight in the papers. our guests joining me tonight are the parliamentaryjournalist tony grew and entertainment journalist and broadcaster caroline frost. israel's prime minister has ordered the military to continue with what he called "massive strikes" on the gaza strip and to deploy tanks, artillery and infantry forces around the territory. palestinian officials say 15 people have been killed in gaza over the weekend. israel says it's responding to hundreds of rockets fired into the south of the country. four israelis have been killed in the town of ashkelon and several others wounded by the barrage, according to officials there. tom bateman reports. singled out in a packed gaza city street, this was a targeted strike, killing a palestinian israel says was a money—laundering for militants.
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air raid sirens have hardly stopped in southern israel, more than 500 rockets have been fired from gaza since yesterday, the israelis said, one of the worst flare—ups in years between old enemies. israel hasn't seen this number of casualties from rocket strikes since 2014. some hit homes. israeli deaths have prompted talk of fierce response from the country's prime minister. translation: i have instructed our forces to continue with massive strikes against terrorists in the gaza strip and the forces around the gaza strip will be stepped up with tanks, artillery and infantry. powerful explosions hit gaza, warplanes struck, israel said it hit hundreds of militant sites. the escalation had started on friday when one of gaza's smaller militant groups, islamichhad, shot and wounded two israeli soldiers. the death toll has been rising in gaza. militants are among those killed. now, high emotions are
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adding to the political pressure on both sides. israel and hamas were last in a full—scale conflict five years ago. the un and others are desperately working to avoid a repeat. for now, neither side seems ready to back down. a fresh manhunt is under way for joseph mccann after the women were forced into a black fate pintojust before seven o'clock this evening. a 17—year—old girl who was murdered in wiltshire on friday has been named by police. ellie gould was pronounced dead after emergency services were called to an address
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in calne, near chippenham. a 17—year—old boy has been arrested on suspicion of her murder. a 13—year—old boy has died after getting into difficulties in the sea off llandudno in north wales. the coastguard pulled the child from the water at pigeon‘s cove just after 9:00pm last night. he was airlifted to hospital in bangor, but died there. police are not treating the death as suspicious. three teenagers have been badly injured after falling from a cliff in cornwall. they fell around 70 feet at parc trammel cove near porthleven late last night and were airlifted to derriford hospital in devon. police are appealling for witnesses. dog breeders selling puppies on the black market have been forced to pay back more than £5 million in tax as part of a clamp—down on illegal puppy farming. customs officers found fraudsters making huge profits by breeding puppies on a mass scale, with little regard for their welfare. simonjones
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reports. distressed dogs kept in appalling conditions by breeders not paying their taxes, treating animals as a commodity rather than with humanity, selling them on in huge numbers. the impact of the illegal puppy trade on dogs is one of absolute misery and animal welfare problems, from disease to over—breeding, it really does cause suffering, and some of these people are moving dogs around, travelling great distances when they are sick and injured, and it really is a miserable trade. a task force from hm revenue and customs set up in 2015 has recovered almost £5.5 million in lost taxes. it identified 257 separate cases of tax evasion across the uk. one puppy breeder in scotland was handed a bill of £a25,000. animal welfare groups say tens of thousands of puppies are being reared
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in unregulated conditions. the task force says it has made inroads into what it calls a brutal trade, but it is a growing problem. the government was unable to say how many of the breeders who had been fined were still operating. the advice from the rspca for anybody considering buying a dog is to do your research on the person selling it, or to consider a rescue dog. us president donald trump says special counsel robert mueller should not testify in congress about the investigation into russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. president trump said on twitter that democrats in congress were seeking a "redo" of mueller‘s report. the document did not say whether the president's efforts to hinder the investigation amounted to an obstruction ofjustice. crowds gathered in thailand today to watch the newly crowned king being carried through the streets of the capital bangkok in a four—mile royal procession. king vajiralongkorn was crowned
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in an elaborate ceremony yesterday, becoming thailand's first new king in 70 years. our diplomatic correspondent james landale reports. dawn in bangkok, and the streets brightened by a stream of royal yellow. thousands up early to get a good vantage point, all keen to catch a rare glimpse of their new king, their first for almost 70 years. king maha vajiralongkorn was crowned yesterday, so now it was time to show himself to his people. carried by 16 soldiers on a gilded palanquin, a cavalcade involving thousands of people, stretching some 500 metres long, slowly processing round the heart of the city. a chance for his people to pay homage and celebrate his ascension to the throne, but also a chance for many thais to see their monarch in person for the first time — a much remoterfigure than his much—loved
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late father, spending much of his time abroad. this elaborate three—day coronation is as much religious as it is ceremonial and, as the king processed, he visited sacred temples, where he could offer up prayers before golden images of buddha. in thailand, the monarch is revered as an almost godlike figure, the official protector of the buddhist faith, and even members of his family prostrate themselves before him as they receive their royal titles. but he's more than a spiritual leader and many thais wonder how the king will use his huge political influence as his divided country emerges from military rule. james landale, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: at least 13 people have died as a russian passenger plane caught
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at least 41 people have died as a russian passenger plane caught fire and was forced to make an emergency landing not long after take—off. let's do a deal — the prime minister appeals to jeremy corbyn to resolve their differences and help her deliver brexit. israel and militants in the gaza strip engage in a deadly exchange of rocket fire, as tensions between the two sides continue to escalate. the sultan of brunei has said people in same—sex relationships or those who commit adultery will now not face the death penalty, in effect reversing a recent decree. following global protests, the country's ruler, sultan hassa nal bolkiah, said a 20—year—delay on the death penalty would be extended. edinburgh closed its some of its streets today to motorised traffic allowing the public to enjoy the city by foot or bike. it's the first uk city to join the ‘open streets' movement, which is committed to improving air quality in a number
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of the world's biggest cities. joanne macaulay reports. it is not usually possible to play badminton in the middle of edinburgh. today, pedestrians enjoyed a new—found freedom, whilst traffic was banned from several streets in the historic centre. it is part of a plan to make the city less car dominated. it allows people to see how the cities can operate, and put a greater emphasis on health outcomes, people walking and cycling, being healthy in their own city, helping to reduce air pollution. the council is planning to repeat this on the first sunday of every month. over time, the number of streets around here which are traffic free will increase. the council hopes traffic free zones will give residents and visitors a glimpse of what edinburgh was like before the arrival of the car full stop and also
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an idea of what it could be in the future. for people that need to use their cars, this is for them as well. people with reduced mobility or residence or deliveries, that can still happen and happen more easily if the streets are not as congested as they are just now. many cities around the world are already involved in the open streets movement, but edinburgh is the first in the uk to make a regular commitment to it. a rare brooch has been uncovered in norfolk. the 800—year—old treasure features two lions and is studded with two pink stones. it was found in a freshly—ploughed field by a newly qualified archaeologist, but it wasn't his first find. tom lucking unearthed an anglo—saxon pendant worth £145,000 when he was still a student in 2014. earlier, tom explained why the brooch was so special. this find was made during
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an organised gathering which is paid for the weekend when you get access to a farmer's field and the proceeds go to a charity of the farmer's choice. this was on a particular field of his. there was a moat in one corner of the field, which drew a lot of attention and it was in this same field where this brooch came up, about 150 metres away from the moated site. when did you realise you might have something of particular historic interest? when i first dug it out, i saw the back of it. i wasn't sure of what it was. when i saw the two amethyst settings staring at me, i thought it was probably medieval. then i knocked a bit of the dirt off and saw the two lines and realised it was a nice example of a medieval brooch. a lot of the silvergilt examples that are medieval, the gilding has gone and on this one, most of the gilding survived,
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it is like new, almost. in a few minutes' time, viewers on bbc one willjoin us for a round up of the day's news with mishal husain and at 10:45pm we'll take our first look at tomorrow's papers in the paper review. time now though for a look at the weather with matt taylor. good evening. enter bank holiday monday, a lot of you will stay dry, but there will be a lot of cloud around. with some clear skies around into tonight, particularly in parts of england and wales, temperatures will take a tumble. we have a weather from pushing its will take a tumble. we have a weatherfrom pushing its way southwards, with showers pushing towards northern scotland later in the night. as skies clear across the highlands, away from the towns and cities, widespread frost. the frost will be hit and miss across england and wales. this weather front is where we are most likely to see
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showers during the day, starting into southern scotland, drifting into southern scotland, drifting into northern arm, then northern england, the midlands and east anglia through the afternoon. either side of that we will see sunny spells. after a solid start, cloud will increase. it will be mostly dry. across scotland, particularly southern scotland, lots of sunshine through the day. showers will be continuing into the night, here and there. there will be a touch of frost again and be start the day with what we finish with. as temperatures limped through the day, some of those will become slow moving and on the heavy side. temperatures up to 15, but then went towards the south—west. this area of low pressure will push on towards france is to go into wednesday. mild airon the france is to go into wednesday. mild air on the southern edge of it, but cold winds blowing into the northern half of the uk on wednesday.
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in the mail day, we could see thundery downpours, but the chilly easterly wind could bring more persistent rain, just robbie meredith at the moment, and eastern parts of england. scotland and northern ireland will avoid most of the rain. sunshine and showers here on wednesday but we will the cold wind. it could hit 14 or 15 celsius between the showers further south. as for the rest of the week, wednesday will be the wettest day of the week. showers will come and go. it will be cooled by night and by day, as well. see you soon. goodbye.
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at least two children are among the dead. we'll have the latest from moscow. also on tonight's programme: labour says it's lost trust in the prime minister after details of the brexit talks appeared in the press. she's blown the confidentiality i had and i actually think she's jeopardised the negotiations
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for her own personal protection. israel strikes targets inside gaza as rockets are fired by militants onto israeli territory in two days of escalating violence. in northern ireleand, the long shadow cast by the abuse of prescription drugs. up in the air. could be six. is six! and england's cricketers warm up for this month's world cup with a convincing win over pakistan. good evening. at least 40 people have been killed in the crash of a russian passenger jet at moscow's main airport, after an aeroflot plane burst into flames as it made
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an emergency landing. the aircraft had issued a distress call shortly after taking off from the same airport. in dramatic scenes, passengers were seen escaping from inflatable slides. our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg reports. caught on camera, the final dramatic moments of flight 1492. the aeroflot jet exploded in a fireball during an emergency landing at moscow's sheremetyevo airport. by the time it had come to a standstill the plane was engulfed in flames. on board the burning aircraft, 78 passengers and crew. there was a desperate rush to escape from the inferno. at the front of the plane the inflatable slide saved some. people leapt onto the chute and ran to safety. but not everyone got out of this alive. it's feared that more than 40 people may have been killed.
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dimitri survived the crash. asked whether he thought the plane had been hit by lightning, he replied, "yes, maybe. "i saw a white flash." emergency teams fought the blaze and helped the injured. the plane, a sukhoi superjet, had taken off from moscow airport bound for murmansk, but very quickly developed technical problems. the crew had issued a distress signal. the pilots had decided they had no choice but to bring the aircraft down. tonight president putin offered his condolences to the families of the dead. the kremlin leader ordered a full investigation to find out why this flight had ended in disaster. within the last few minutes, russia's investigative committee has said it believes only 37 people
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survived this accident. doing the maths, that means 41 people were killed. as far as the cause of the tragedy is concerned, a number of those people who survived say they believe the plane was struck by lightning, and that is possible because there had been storms in the moscow region this afternoon. but whatever happened up in the air, the deadly consequences are visible down on the ground. moscow correspondent, steve rosenberg, thank you. labour'sjohn mcdonnell has accused the prime minister ofjeopardising the cross—party brexit talks — saying he no longer trusts her after details of the negotiations appeared in the press. the shadow chancellor likened the government to a company facing bankruptcy — but said that the effort to find a brexit compromise would resume on tuesday. the prime minister has urged jeremy corbyn to put "differences aside". our political correspondent chris mason reports. every sunday begins with church for the prime minister, and ends with questions about the potential
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for progress on brexit. "let's do a deal," she said to labour today. but after apparent details about the private talks became public in the sunday times... do you trust the prime minister? no. sorry, not after this weekend, when she's blown the confidentiality, and i actually think she's jeopardised the negotiations for her own personal protection. and that's not the end of it. labour fret that even if they can do a deal with theresa may, it could get ripped up by her successor. it's like trying to enter into a contract with a company that's going into administration, and the people who are going to take over are not willing to fulfil that contract. we can't negotiate like that. but the conservative leader in scotland reckons a deal is still within reach. we need to start walking ourselves back to an agreement where we can get the majority of the people in the house of commons on board. and i think there is a deal there to be done, i genuinely do. look, though, who's
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waiting in the wings, returning to the stage — a man who frightens plenty of tories contemplating compromise. if they push forward with this, it will be seen as a coalition of politicians against the people, and i think millions of people would give up on both labour and the conservatives, i really do. and from the unambiguously pro—brexit mr farage to the unambiguously anti—brexit liberal democrats, now the proud owners of smiles of victory after the english local elections. i think it's now very, very clear that british politics is now going to have to be remade. i mean, it's clearly failing in all kinds of ways, not just the mess around the referendum but the fact that as a country, we're just not getting to grips with really big challenges. mrs may and mr corbyn share the anguish of leading parties divided over brexit. and that's still the biggest blockage to the two of them sharing a
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brexit deal. and that's despite the fact the official position at least of the two parties isn't1 million miles apart. on some issues, like in the environment and workers' rights and security, it's probably reachable, but this is all about stacking up the numbers in there on the backbenches will stop there are two huge roadblocks. firstly, labour would like a customs union. for plenty of conservatives, that's a no—go. and plenty on the labour side would like a referendum. and on the conservative side, that's a no—go. what happens if these talks break down? there is talk potentially of so—called indicative votes, and a mechanism to ensure that something is arrived at amongst mps. and if that fails, well, who knows? answer, no one. chris mason at westminster, thank you. israel's prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, has
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ordered his armed forces to carry out "massive" strikes on gaza, amid an escalation in violence over the last two days. it began with the deaths of two palestinian militants and the wounding of two israeli soldiers on friday. since then rockets fired into israel — and its military striking targets in gaza — have led to the deaths of at least 15 palestinians there and four civilians in israel. it's the most serious escalation in fighting for years, as our middle east correspondent tom bateman reports. singled out in a packed gaza city street, this was a targeted strike, killing a palestinian that israel says was a money—laundering for militants. air raid sirens have hardly stopped in southern israel. more than 500 rockets have been fired from gaza since yesterday, one of the deadliest flareups in years between old enemies. since they last fought a war in
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2014. israeli deaths have prompted talk of fierce response from the country's prime minister. translation: i have instructed our forces to continue with massive strikes against terrorists in the gaza strip and the forces around the gaza strip will be stepped up with tanks, artillery and infantry. powerful explosions hit gaza, as warplanes struck. israel said it hit hundreds of militant sites. people's homes and lives were lost as well. a tower block was hit. israel says a militant commander was based there. translation: this was a direct hit on a civilian building, nothing to do with militants or factions. this is what we get from the israeli occupation. that's what this local man said. tonight officials in gaza said residents we re officials in gaza said residents were among the dead. israel and hamas were last in a full—scale conflict five years ago. there are signs
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hamas has been losing its grip on some smaller militant groups, partly what triggered the latest flare—up. it also what makes what happens next how to control. tom bateman, bbc news, jerusalem. police in cheshire say a suspected serial rapist being hunted by detectives in london is believed to have abducted two women in congleton this evening. joseph mccann is believed to have forced two women into a black fiat punto in the town centre. police officers spotted the car a short time later and pursued it, but it collided with another car and the driver got away on foot. wiltshire police have named a teenager who was killed in calne on friday. they say 17—year—old ellie gould was at school in chippenham. a 17—year—old boy has been arrested on suspicion of murder. crowds gathered in bangkok today to watch the newly crowned thai king being carried through the streets of the capital, in a four—mile royal
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procession. revered as an almost god—like figure, he was crowned in an elaborate ceremony yesterday. even family members must show their respect to thailand's first new king in nearly seven decades. concern is growing in northern ireland about the extent of drug—related deaths, which have increased significantly in the last decade. many are linked to powerful prescription drugs, which one coroner has said are available to teenagers on the street and in school. our ireland correspondent chris page spoke to one mother who lost her son to prescription drug abuse. i adored alan. he was my best friend. we were soulmates. but loving my child was never enough. in lisa mclaughlin's home, the sense of loss is unmistakable. her son alan took his own life, three years after he was first given the drug pregabalin, also known as lyrica. a doctor initially prescribed it for nerve pain when alan had a broken cheekbone. but he became addicted. it really ruined his life. and at the end of the day,
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he just got that down that he couldn't cope any more. because there is a big black, hopeless hole and they're alljust falling down into it. anyone who's suffered from an addiction can identify with those feelings of loneliness, vulnerability and helplessness. take the experience of a drugs worker who was once dependent on lyrica. it gave you the sense of like a drunk feeling but not being totally out of control. you start off as using the prescription that the doctors give you but that quickly isn't enough. i was maybe taking my month's prescription in four days. this lethal problem is a particularly difficult issue in northern ireland. here, the majority of drugs—related deaths are linked to the abuse of prescription medication. this coroner has heard disturbing evidence about how teenagers have got the drugs. we've had families coming in, telling us about young people, as young as 16, 17, younger sometimes. these are young people who have not
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received a prescription from a gp but are buying prescription drugs, that would normally be available on prescription, on street corners, within communities, receiving them from friends in school. an older generation came through the troubles here, which has left a legacy of physical and mental health needs. but people who work in addiction services believe too many drugs are being prescribed. there's a higher prevalence potentially on prescribed drugs because of the conflict. but we're 20 years on from the peace process, and across the board in northern ireland they're still dispensing and prescribing more of those types of medications than any other region in the uk. the stormont department of health says prescription drugs are "potential poisions" and it's working to reduce availability, raise awareness and provide treatment. to help to prevent more tragedies, lisa mclaughlin's hoping for a dedicated rehabilitation facility. i would like to see a rehab centre where kids aren'tjudged for becoming addicted to these drugs.
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getting help and education and putting people on the ground instead ofjust putting it down as figures. because my son wasn't a figure. he was a person. he has a child of his own. he has a brother and a sister and a mummy and a daddy. and everyone loved him. but now he's just a statistic. lisa mclaughlin, ending that report by chris page. the venezuelan opposition leader, juan guaido, has insisted to the bbc that he's gaining support, despite appearing to fail in his efforts to persuade the country's military to back him. he'd urged supporters to rally in large numbers outside military barracks to demonstrate against president maduro. but local media say only a small number turned out. our correspondent nick bryant sent this report from caracas. the passion is still in evidence, it's the numbers that are dwindling. this demonstration took place under the statue
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of america's first president, george washington — the leader of a successful uprising. but venezuela's self—styled operation liberty is clearly losing momentum. "we have to wait a little bit longer," said this student, "and see if we can reach our goal." "we want the government to leave," said this woman wearily. "we don't have anything, we can't be happy." protesters presented petitions to the security forces, words demanding change, that were quickly reduced to cinders. midweek, they were calling for the largest demonstrations in venezuelan history. by the weekend, they've been reduced to these roadside protests. another indication of how this popular uprising has petered out. for a fleeting, fiery moment this week, it looked like the uprising might succeed. but in what has essentially become a battle for the hearts and minds of the military, the key power player in venezuela,
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the armed forces remain brutally loyal to the president. so, no wonder the mood of triumphalism from nicolas maduro,. this sea of green fatigues at a fortress in caracas, proof that he's survived yet another crisis. this is the opposition leader who's seeking to oust him —juan guaido. the last seven days just didn't go to plan. juan guaido, was this the week when you missed your chance, when you botched your chance? translation: the only person hurt this week is maduro. he's losing again and again, he's increasingly weak, increasingly alone and has no international support. on the contrary, we gain acceptance, support and future options. every afternoon on a mountain overlooking the capital, this cannon is fired in honour of president maduro's mentor, hugo
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chavez. nothing this week has disrupted that martial routine. for the military has reasserted its dominance in venezuela, and for now, it's upholding the status quo. nick bryant, bbc news, caracas. with all the sport now, here's john watson at the bbc sport centre. good evening. thanks, mishal. so many talking points in a dramatic day in the premier league. if you're waiting for the results on match of the day you might want to avert your attention for the next few moments. it was one in which manchester united miss out on champions league qualification. they needed a win at huddersfield to keep their faint hopes alive, but drew 1—1 against a side already relegated, it means they'll play in the europa league. that's a tournament arsenal are still in and will have to win if they're to secure another route to face europe's elite next season. a disappointing 1—1 draw at home to brighton all but ending their chances of qualifying via the league. they'll need an eight goal swing and hope tottenham
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lose on the final day next weekend, to pip them to fourth, chelsea moving above them with victory over watford today. norwich city have been crowned champions, as derby secured a play—off place on the last day of the championship season. with rivals middlesbrough winning, frank lampard's side had to beat west brom. substitute mason bennett scoring their second in a 3—1win, to clinch the final play—off spot, keeping their promotion hopes alive. england beat pakistan in a one—off t20 in cardiff — their first match on home soil ahead of a packed summer of cricket. bowlerjofra archer staking his claim for inclusion in their world cup squad, which begins at the end of the month. andy swiss reports. they'd emerged with high hopes, but england's bowlers were soon in something of a hole, literally. just watch this. david willey‘s foot crashing through a drain cover. one of cricket's more bizarre moments, tha nkfully of cricket's more bizarre moments, thankfully the only damage was
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to the pitch. indeed, the hosts soon hit their stride again, especially jofra archer. born in barbados, he has only recently qualified to play for england, but two wickets and a stunning run out proved his potential. pakistan are the world's top ranked t20 side for a reason though and they still set a testing target of 174. it seemed a challenge, but england's batsmen rose to the occasion. joe root‘s invented 47 put them in sight before an unbeaten half—century from eoin morgan... powered them over the line. not a morgan... powered them over the line. nota bad morgan... powered them over the line. not a bad way to win it. the odd slip up, then, but england's world cup summer is off to a promising start. andy swiss, bbc news. british rider piggy french won the badminton horse trials for the first time, in what proved a tense finish. compatriot oliver townend held the advantage heading into today's show jumping, but french pipped him by the smallest of margins to win eventing's most prestigious competition. and after four days of racing,
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the tour de yorkshire finished on the streets of leeds this afternoon. greg van avermaet won the final stage. chris lawless in the blue leader's jersey won the overall classification for team ineos, formerly team sky, to mark a good start to life for the rebranded team. there's more on the bbc sport website, including the latest from the world snooker championship final. but for now, that's all from me. mishal. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. now on bbc one it's time for the news where you are.
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welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing tomorrow. i've just changed your title! entertainment journalist. chuckles we will chat in a moment. let's take a quick look at some of the front pages. the telegraph leads with awem pages. the telegraph leads with anjem choudary, meanwhile the ft focuses on the row between spot if i and apple over its app store service. the
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i features cross—party talks over brexit. and the guardian claiming jeremy corbyn won't be able to get enough labour mps to back a deal without a second referendum. the daily telegraph, the daily mail, even, says three quarters of maternity units have no consultants on duty at night. those are the front pages, let's ta ke those are the front pages, let's take a look at some of the headlines. we will start with something everybody is talking about, and it's got nothing to do with brexit. .. line about, and it's got nothing to do with brexit... line of duty. it's finished! 15 minutes ago the nation discovered who h was. we promise to be spoilerfree for discovered who h was. we promise to be spoiler free for those people who haven't seen it. such as me. chuckles you are both fans? it's been amazing. he did the
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same thing with bodyguard last summer, but i think this is his real passion project. i think we will see more seasons. how has it compared to the bodyguard? bodyguard was a lot more popular, started on bbc whereas line of duty started on bbc two, where he could really get to develop his characters. adrian dunbar has become the man of the hour. so we have another series? probably. chuckles lets go back to politics. and the guardian. labour mps went back brexit deal without a second referendum, are we hearing anything soon? the labour party is involved in negotiations with
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the government. she has not laid out exactly what she will do. jeremy corbyn is frustrated and says that she has broken promises, and all that stuff. the local elections, the labour party lost seats rather than gained. the labour party lost seats in some fairly leave areas of the country. but that is simplistic in the way of how people voted. the second referendum is coming into view. there was some hope that the government and labour would have come to a compromise and put it to their respective parties. the problem now is that mps on both sides, labour and tory, problem now is that mps on both sides, labourand tory, are problem now is that mps on both sides, labour and tory, are saying they would be unhappy. labour mps, a significant number of them, it says on the guardian, three quarters would refuse to back a deal unless a second referendum was attached to it. the idea of
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another referendum would be severely and liked by most of the conservatives. you are saying new proposals, like the customs union. really, how far together can they get? the whole point about a customs union until the next election is a red herring. if things we re election is a red herring. if things were to proceed as we expect them to, the uk would leave the eu and enter intoa to, the uk would leave the eu and enter into a transition period of about 18 months. that would take us to being part of the customs union until we leave that transition period. so she's offering nothing. the other stuff is to do with workers' rights, keeping in line with europe, so they are quite close, but that's not the problem. we've developed a new problem. a significant number of labour mps won't be voting for anything unless a second referendum is on the table. let's stay on the subject. front page of the daily telegraph. secret discussions that theresa
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may is having on, again, the second referendum. right at the end there isa referendum. right at the end there is a tory mps whatsapp group, that struck me. there are dozens of them. are we being governed by whatsapp? s! are we being governed by whatsapp? 5! that are we being governed by whatsapp? s! that is where most of the gossiping and backbiting goes on. dozens of different groups. —— yes! i don't think decisions get made there. no, just chatting. idon't think there is a cabinet whatsapp. not any more! secret discussions over. . . not any more! secret discussions over... just add to the british public‘s confusion on this, a three—way second referendum. what do you understand by that? what could go wrong? it is detailed here, isn't it? i cannot actually see... deal, no deal, or couple two remain,
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that's my understanding. yell emeka simple. discussions have started. —— simple. discussions have started. —— simple. but they are going to make this great deal this week. you think we are getting some clarity! don't expect clarity any time soon. a bit ofa expect clarity any time soon. a bit of a business story now, the front page of the ft, brussels are looking at spotify‘s fees, what is this about? apple charge 30% from about? apple charge 3096 from spotify. spotify claim they are using their advantage to both take that money from them and to advantage their own streaming services. it comes as spotify has announced they have millions of paying customers. 30%
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of a huge amount of money is going elsewhere. apple are using themselves as both platform and equally a for that content. apple have fingers in many pies. they are becoming one of those great behemoths of the creative industry. they are starting —— they we re industry. they are starting —— they were just meant to be the doorway into the shop, but now they are selling so many of those goods on offer in the shop and that is seen as unfair. brussels have taken the call and are investigating. very quickly, is any of this unusual in the digital commercial world? the issue here is apple don'tjust dominate, they own 50% of the market in the uk. the other 50% is owned by an android. that's the issue. we will have a much longer paper review
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in the 11 o'clock hour. hopefully you can both join in the 11 o'clock hour. hopefully you can bothjoin me for that. thank you can bothjoin me for that. thank you forjoining me. 11:30pm, another look at the papers, but for now the weather... as we go into bank holiday monday, a lot of you will remain dry, but there will be a fair amount of cloud tonight, there certainly was. that has been broken up through the second half of the day. clear skies around into tonight. particularly across parts of england and wales where temperatures will tumble. thick cloud over scotland. the focus for some showers pushing towards southern scotland through the night. still a breeze to the far north east. skies clear in the highlands. a widespread frost. the frost will be hit and miss over england and wales. let's just focus on this weather front, because wales. let's just focus on this weatherfront, because this is wales. let's just focus on this
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weather front, because this is where weather front, because this is where we are most likely to see showers today. starting in southern scotland, drifting into northern ireland, then across parts of northern england, the midlands, and east anglia through the afternoon. either side, sunny spells. southern counties, after a sunny start and frosty start, cloud will increase, isolated showers, temperatures around 13 degrees. for southern scotland, lots of sun, and showers in the northern areas of scotland. temperatures in single figures here. showers vary through the night. not much wind around, there will be a touch of frost, and we start the day as we finish, but this time showers drifting northwards, and as temperatures lived through the day they could become slow moving and on they could become slow moving and on the heavy side. temperatures up to 15, then rain towards the south—west. it is linked into this area of low pressure which will push into france as we go into wednesday. milderairon into france as we go into wednesday. milder air on the southern edge of it but pretty cold winds blowing in across the northern half of the uk
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for wednesday. in that milder air, we could see slow moving and heavy thundery downpours developing, but a chilly easterly wind, and we could see more persistent rain in areas where we need it, eastern parts of england. 15 millimetres of rain quite widely. scotland and northern ireland avoiding most of the rain. sunshine and showers here on wednesday but you will have that chilly wind, some in eastern —— are some areas of eastern scotland and north—east england, struggling to get warm. wednesday looks like it'll be the wettest day of the week. showers will come and go. should be cool by night and day, as well. see you soon. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 11: at least 41 people have died as a russian passenger plane burst into flames as it made an emergency landing in moscow. fugitive joseph mccann, wanted for the abduction and rapes of three women in and around london is believed to be connected to the abduction of two other women in cheshire this evening. the prime minister appeals to jeremy corbyn to resolve their differences and help her deliver brexit, but the shadow chancellor says trust has been lost. ina single in a single word, do you trust the prime minister? no. sorry. not after this weekend. i think she has jeopardised the negotiations for her own personal protection. israel and militants in the gaza strip engage in a deadly exchange of rocket fire as tensions between the 2 sides continue to escalate. and at 11.30 we'll be taking
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another look at the papers

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