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tv   The Papers  BBC News  May 7, 2019 10:40pm-11:01pm BST

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that conservative mps — who both support and oppose brexit — now believe that another referendum to break the deadlock is "invevitable". the daily telegraph reports that the spending watchdog set up in the wake of the mps expenses scandal a decade ago has been accused of trying to prevent greater openness. the guardian's top story is that police are investigating comments by a ukip candidate in the european elections that he would consider raping the labour mp, jess phillips. it's the same lead in the metro. it says the west midlands police received a report of "malicious communication". and finally, the daily mail asks if the new royal baby will get an american passport because meghan is from the states. a variety, but all brexit in some
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shape orform. a variety, but all brexit in some shape or form. but a variety, but all brexit in some shape orform. but can a variety, but all brexit in some shape or form. but can we start with you, the latest brexit target as deal prospects fade. a departure deadline has been set for august the 1st. talk us through this because let's not forget we were supposed to leave on march the 29th. and obviously be missed that and we will we we re obviously be missed that and we will we were given an extension until halloween. now the prime minister is eager to get us before that. insisting that it was possible for us insisting that it was possible for us to leave and not take part in the european elections, but that was impossible and they've confirm that today. so they will take place. then they had been hoping that at least would be out by the end ofjune, which would mean that any mps elected on the 23rd would not accept 01’ elected on the 23rd would not accept or take their seats on the
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parliament. but now, privately, they are accepting that is unlikely to put it mildly. we will have to put the legislation drew by the end of june so they are hoping now that we will be out by summer recess. we do not have the date probably the third week injuly, not have the date probably the third week in july, so not have the date probably the third week injuly, so that means that the country is leaving the eu and going to leave the following month. there is no guarantee that that will happen, and we will probably end up with the deadline, and what we might have another dealer another extension. i certainly think that there is not —— now the sense of distance, the parliamentary votes in the prime minister trying to get her withdrawal deal through, it'sjust
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every time this deadline seems to be getting pushed out and out, there seems to be less pressure to get it done and also, kind of a feeding chance that brexit will happen at all and increasing chance that will have to have something like a second referendum or a general election to try to break the deadlock. this is a third actually, the state being announced to date, we had to cross party talks, having not? between labour and the conservatives. can a deal be done? will it be done?‘ deal be done? will it be done?‘ deal can be done, but it will be done but it looks like they are going around in circles, quite frankly. every session, that both seniorfront frankly. every session, that both senior front benches frankly. every session, that both seniorfront benches on frankly. every session, that both senior front benches on conservative and labourare senior front benches on conservative and labour are getting into a room together for two hours, and labour are getting into a room togetherfor two hours, trying to find areas of compromise. a talking
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economics forever a month and there really has not been a sense of progress. you did little flurries of them saying that they are closer, there's potential in compromise, thatis there's potential in compromise, that is the main area of contention, where they don't want that, this a customs union would prevent them from having a trade policy, so to top out some kind of compromise so when they are saying that the governmentjust doesn't when they are saying that the government just doesn't want to when they are saying that the governmentjust doesn't want to be moving in the red lines, some more talks tomorrow which could be positive, if not completely collapsed and they‘ re positive, if not completely collapsed and they're still going to try to at least get a deal. but it does not look as if a breakthrough is about to happen. presumably, it is about to happen. presumably, it is more why would labour help theresa may? it does not make a huge amount of political sense. they
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really wa nt amount of political sense. they really want us to move on and talk about a bunch of other pressing issues, like schools and hospitals and if they can get into that territory at the time of the general election, they feel like they can get a good chance of beating the conservatives. however, both sites, evenif conservatives. however, both sites, even if theresa may and jeremy corbyn did feel that there was enough common ground for them to do a deal in both of them decided that they wanted a brexit with the customs union, it got huge amounts of pressure from their own parties did not do a deal that the conservative heartland brexiteers and even some of the more modern brexiteers are afraid of a customs union even if it is temporary, they simply will not vote for even a light version of this deal. there is 110 light version of this deal. there is no certainty, even if they did agree a deal, that would get to the house of commons. graham brady, the head
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of commons. graham brady, the head of the 1922 committee which is the representative of the conservative back benches, met theresa may. therefore the big question is, how long is she going to be around? do you have any sense of how that conversation went? a couple of weeks ago, the executive in the 1922 committee, the body that is in charge decided to, they would not change the rules so she could be challenged as soon asjune and vote no confidence. they would state the premise that you have to set out a timetable for your departure, either with or without a deal. because the rules dictate that she cannot be challenged until december. she said... she says she'll be leave leaving as soon as it's settled, but
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they still have not come back with an answer two they still have not come back with a n a nswer two yea rs they still have not come back with an answer two years on, so it will be possible for them to come up with some sort of deal at the moment, i do not think that was forthcoming, will find a little bit more tomorrow because i have to report back to the committee that will meet tomorrow to find a way forward. but no leaks. no leaks of the moment. but the goal was to go to theresa may and explain the strength of feeling in the conservative party and a lot of mps that really would like her to make it clear that she is going, regardless of whether she's got a deal or not. in the grassroots as well. because it's going to be an emergency meeting of grassroots
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activists that will have a no—confidence motion that will have a vote on whether that is an indicative vote of whether theresa may should stand down, but the 1922 committee that is in the meet tomorrow has another vote will aviv finely balanced as to whether they should change these rules in some suggestion that a few of those 1922 benches are wavering because the prime minister has been digging in, not sitting at a timetable in their thinking may we have to force her hand. especially because the local elections were horrendous, way beyond even the most gloomy forecasts i think they're going to try and exert more pressure on her. and the conservative elections. shall we move onto your the guardian. police inquiry into np rape threat by the utep candidate.
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sending a tweet to the labour np and this was back in 2016 saying that i would not even rape you and added to the comments and a recent video saying that with enough pressure, i might cave. now there is to be a police inquiry into this. tell us a little bit more. ukip actually knew about this when they made him a candidate. they knew about the original 2016 tweet and he was criticised at the time, but it has emerged that he has compounded what he said and sang with enough pressure that he might cave and do that and this is a labour np who has fought very strongly for women's rights, and not really someone who will take something like this quietly. no one should have to acce pt quietly. no one should have to accept this and she has been brave enough to come out and say how it has made her feel the effects of all
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of this abuse is, sang it made her break down crying in the streets, some of this awful material that she is been receiving and we have this confirmation that the police are going be looking into the threat. the interview that she gave on the bbc, it is interesting that in the guardian story that they also talk about that she was challenged by a member and the public about this today. just leaving westminster and a man ran down the street alongside her and talking about why cults should not be able to joke about that. saying i pay your wages and that's just remarkable, we talk about keyboard warriors and people saying stuff from the safer the living room. but when it spills over into the real world, people in the street shouting this issue, it shows how toxic political debate has
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become in this country. i ammo think they have the right to go and do that to another human being is absolutely beyond me. and this is become almost a lightning rod for this type of abuse. because she does not just get this from the this type of abuse. because she does notjust get this from the right but she also gets from the left. turning to the independent, the two journalists freed from the prison and myanmar after spending so much time injail. and the question really is, i have they been freed now? i think it is a part of a wave of pardons that has gone on and myanmar, and of course it is lovely to have good news stories on the front pages at this time of relentless brexit news and they have spent a year relentless brexit news and they have spenta yearand relentless brexit news and they have spent a year and a half injail and after a lot of campaigning by
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international human rights organisations and government around the world, they've been let go and pardon and i think they're going continue the reporting and the suffering of the rohingya muslims and miramar, do you motivate things being they are trying to secure, it was incredibly disheartening situation, it seemed like false charges they're just journalists doing it seemed like false charges they're justjournalists doing the job they're supposed to do and they are charged with what have you. and you will be interesting and i think obviously, there was a lot of, her image is gone from sainthood almost in the gutter, so she is trying to reclaim some of that after the damage cells done to her and
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clearly, the arrest was part of that, we'll have to see how this actions back up this positive step. it will be interesting to see if it leads to a new chapter and myanmar and how the rohingya muslims are treated going forward. we cannot mention —— not mention liverpool. i because you don't support them, but the telegraph says miracle on merseyside coming from a 3—0 down to 4-3. it merseyside coming from a 3—0 down to 4—3. it was an extraordinary comeback. no one gave them much other than the most die—hard supporters, it was all, they look like they had no chance but tonight, they got an early goal to make it and if even had barcelona scored, it
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would made it even more difficult for them to get through but that second half, they blew barcelona away and then they sought out a lot of supporters, and then they got through, there in the champions league final, we find out tomorrow night if they make it pass ajax, but they may should be barcelona a giant in the game. so to make it to the finalagain, in the game. so to make it to the final again, the chance of winning it for the second time. they must be exhausted but must boost their confidence to be ahead of such a weekend where they could win the premiership by probably won't. and many, to be more astonishing because it's still a manchester city's hands but all we can do is go out and went and hope that they managed to pull off an upset against manchester
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city. if i were to happen, it would be quite an incredible few days. city. if i were to happen, it would be quite an incredible few days! do you wish to add anything?” be quite an incredible few days! do you wish to add anything? i wish i had something clever to say, i know it looks absolutely amazing. flame to are the cheers going to the bbc news room. my neck people had the thatisit that is it for the papers this hour. kevin and rowena will be back at half past eleven for another look at them, and don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you — seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers — and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. thanks again kevin and rowena, i'm back at eleven with the day's main news. next it's the weather.
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hello. good evening. it is the first week of may and it is distinctly chilly. unfortunately, it will be staying that way through the next of this week as well. but hang on there, next week we should be talking about some warmer weather once again. for the next 2a hours, it will be all about the wet and windy weather as this area of low pressure rolls in from the atlantic. we will see pretty much all of england and wales getting off to a wet start to wednesday, with the cloud piling in and the rain to the southwest through the evening eventually into south wales. much milder though as a consequence for england and wales, the first thing on wednesday, scotland with clear skies and the risk of a frost particularly across the northern half of the country, not quite as sharp as when we got down to —6. however, plenty of cold air across scotland to the north on wednesday as the rain pushes from the south and we could see something wintry for a time. very strong and cold winds feeding in off the north sea,
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as the weather front rolls north and it will be biting across eastern scotland on wednesday and the winds particularly gusty to the central belt of scotland. dodging some the worst of the wet weather, the northeast of england is looking pretty soggy, some sunny spells but look out for some heavy thundery showers on wednesday afternoon. so basically that low bringing us almost every type of weather but the kitchen sink on wednesday. it will start to pull out into the north sea for thursday, however, the tail end remains across the northern half of the uk, still plenty of cloud around, wet weather and some wintry weather and the scottish mountains as well, but still disappointing temperatures that are nagging northerly wind on half of the uk. to the south, 15 degrees with some sunshine, but it should still feel reasonably pleasant. by friday, the pictures us to improve significantly by friday, the pictures starts to improve significantly as it goes out to the north sea, but the wind will start to become lighter and we should see
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more the way of sunshine. temperature is still lagging, i think it is below average for the time of year. but come the weekend, high pressure is going to start to build across the uk, a slow start but by the time we get to the middle of next week, many of us could be looking at the high teens in the low 20s.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11:00: families of the eight victims from all over the world who were killed in the london bridge attacks two years ago pay tribute to their loved ones as the inquest into their deaths opens. you are broken forever. there's horrendous, the pain that you feel. and we can't make her come home. and ijust want and we can't make her come home. and i just want to stop other people having this horrific grief. as brexit talks resume with labour, the government concedes the uk will now have to take part in the elections for the european parliament in two weeks time. reunited with their families — two reuters journalists jailed in myanmar 18 months ago after reporting on a massacre

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