Skip to main content

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  May 8, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

2:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2... the first glimpse of baby sussex. proud parents harry and meghan show off their son to the world. they say he's been "a dream". it's magic. it's pretty amazing. i have the two best guys in the world, so i'm really happy. the baby has been meeting his great grandmother the queen for the first time — but we still don't have a name... will the doctor see you now? the first sustained fall in the number of family doctors for half a century. no way for huawei. in london, us secretary of state mike pompeo is expected
2:01 pm
to warn the uk about allowing the chinese firm access to critical infrastructure. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — jane dougal... one story in town. indeed, one of the greatest games and field has ever seen. liverpool overcome all of the odds to beat barcelona for a place in the champions league final. and ben rich has the weather? yes, it was rain that made a spectacular comeback in the weather. we needed that weather, it has been dry lately. all of the details on that. plus, really dramatic pictures from australia. that's coming up. ben and the thank you. thanks ben. also, we'll have more on the story of the falklands veteran who is planning to sue the ministry of defence for the return of his service medals, taken off him in 1993 because he was bisexual.
2:02 pm
hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. our top story — and the world has had its first glimpse of the duke and duchess of sussex‘s son. the two—day—old was revealed to the cameras at windsor castle in the last couple of hours. and looks remarkably like... a baby. harry says his son has already got some facial hair, whilst a beaming meghan said she had the best two guys in the world. baby sussex has already met his great—grandmother, the queen, and she probably knows what we don't — the baby's name. we are expected to bring that to you live during the next few hours. annita mcveigh is in windsorfor us. simon, thank you. yes, baby sussex was behaving impeccably for his introduction to the world, one stills photographer, three television cameras, including one from a us network and a reporter to see the royal couple with their new
2:03 pm
baby. harry and megan looked fantastic, didn't they? they were clearly basaltic with their new son. albeit with a slightly dazed, somewhat weary expression, as new pa rents. somewhat weary expression, as new parents. as you mentioned, we are still awaiting the name of baby sussex, royal tradition has it that royal babies have several names but we do not know any of them yet. some suggestion that perhaps after this meeting with his great—grandparents, the queen and the duke of edinburgh, the queen and the duke of edinburgh, the name may be released but as of now, we are still waiting. this report from our royal correspondence, nicholas witchell. inside windsor castle a proud mum and dad, with their two—day—old son, presented him at the first of many photo calls. his names have still to be publicly disclosed so for the moment we can
2:04 pm
say that the infant is known as baby sussex and remained happily unaware of all the interest in him, fast asleep in his father's arms. first some photographs. and then a few impressions about what it is like to be parents. it is magic, it is pretty amazing. i have two best guys in the world so i'm really happy. tell us a bit about your son. is he sleeping well? good baby? he has the sweetest temperament. he is really calm. i wonder who he gets that from! he isjust a dream and it has been a special couple of days. who does he take after? we're still trying to think of that. everyone says babies change so much over a couple of weeks so we are monitoring the changing process over this next month.
2:05 pm
his looks are changing every day. baby sussex was heavily wrapped up and rather hard to see. not unreasonably the photographers wanted a clearer view of his face but this was the best that was possible. he already has a bit of facial hair as well! wonderful! thank you all so much. thank you and thank you everyone for all the well wishes and kindness. it means so much. and that was it, baby sussex had an appointment with his great grandmother, a chance for the queen to see her eighth great—grandchild who brings both an anglo—american and multiracial heritage into the heart of the british royal family. with me here at windsor is our correspondence, helena wilkinson. it wasn't exactly an intimate setting but a very regal and grand setting for this introduction to the world's
2:06 pm
media, bound to impress royal watchers, especially in the states. yes, a lot of american networkers, here, the setting is significant. they had that photocall. in st george's hall, the main hall in windsor castle. that is where some banquets —— state banquets happen. meghan and harry had their reception there nearly a year ago. in terms of there nearly a year ago. in terms of the room, it was grand. when they came out it was fairly understated. they looked a little tired as you would expect. having a two—day—old baby but prince harry, with baby sussex in his arms, and clearly overjoyed at their newborn baby. we still do not know the name. a lot of speculation and business for the bookies. what are the odds for the names that are the most popular suggestions? so, alexander, think thatis suggestions? so, alexander, think that is top at the moment. that is
2:07 pm
one of the top names for the baby. albert is another. arthur as well. haps they may bring in the name spencer, diana's made a name. and potentially they could have a name that reflects meghan‘s from america. that may be a name to do with america. we have to wait and see. will they choose just one name or three orfour, is will they choose just one name or three or four, is tradition for members of the royal family. three or four, is tradition for members of the royalfamily. we hope to get the name sometime this afternoon. helena, thank you. we do not know if that meeting with the new baby and his great—grandparents is over yet. at windsor castle here behind me. it was funny, when meghan, the duchess of sussex, mentioned as they were on their way to meet the cameras, they bumped into the duke, as you do in castles! we are hoping the name welcome out in the next couple of hours and to find out what so many people have
2:08 pm
been waiting to learn. of course, tomorrow, prince harry is back to royal duties, to his other baby, as it is called, the invictus games. he founded them to help with injured servicemen and women. going to the launch of invictus 2020 in the netherlands, he was meant to go today but of course that part of the trip was cancelled and no doubt, when he arrives there, they will be celebrating with him and a present oi’ celebrating with him and a present or two for the new baby from the invictus games foundation. as sooner we get the name we will let you know. right now, back to you, simon. studio: exciting, isn't it? to you later on. —— back to you later on. the nhs is seeing its first sustained fall in the number of family doctors in half a century. research for the bbc shows the number of gps entering the profession isn't keeping up with the number leaving.
2:09 pm
five years ago there were 65 doctors per 100,000 people in the uk — that's now fallen to 60. another study says many gps believe they are seeing far more patients than they think is safe. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports. it's eight o'clock in the morning and doctor carmel irvine hasjust arrived at her practice in plymouth. i'm looking to a busy day with complex consultations. no time to reflect. high demand. with more than 8000 patients in the books, her time is precious. so most patients are consulted over the phone. how can i help today? i'm just feeling quite faint. feeling a bit sick. basically last tuesday i got run over by a car. only the most pressing cases get seen face—to—face. people like janet, who struggles with high blood pressure. it's been off and on probably for quite a while. a growing number of people like janet with long—term conditions need to be seen. but gps can't keep up.
2:10 pm
retirements, burn—out, and a lack of fresh recruits are hitting numbers. you can't get an appointment. you can't. not routinely. not unless it is weeks in advance and who knows when you are going to be ill a few weeks in advance? i've got one appointment left, two weeks today. there is a crisis in general practice. it's very real. it's the worst crisis since 1948. the future is injeopardy, there is no doubt about that. so at the ashton medical centre in wigan, they are trying new ways of working. nurse practitioner trudy law now treats patients that once were seen by a doctor. minor illness, minor ailments and looking at management of chronic illness as well. we work alongside the gps and it also absolutely looks at hospital avoidance. extra money has been promised for general practice. and there are efforts to encourage more doctors to make a career as a gp. and using the skills of staff like trudy is seen as part of the solution.
2:11 pm
that doesn't mean we are not committed to making sure that we have the right number of gps in this country to look after our patients as they change over the years. but we are also bringing in additional health care professionals to support those gps and nurses as well. it comes up with what you should do as a result of what your findings are. at the ashton practice, an advice session for new mums is all about prevention, helping them look after their own health and those who depend on them. the face of general practice is changing and the way care is offered to these young patients as they grow up is likely to be very different. dominic hughes, bbc news, wigan. to talk more about the challenges facing gps we are joined by dr carmel boyhan irvine — a gp who has worked at the north road west medical centre in plymouth for 26 years. thank you forjoining us. in that time, how has yourjob changed? and there welcome are the pressures on gps in the average working day have
2:12 pm
increased exponentially. this is through an explosion on demand and some of that is demographic led, people living longer which is a good thing that some of it is politicians lead, with political sound bites that were not accompanied by parallel funding about access and some of it is due to secondary care work shift left shift, which is dumping secondary work into primary ca re dumping secondary work into primary care because secondary budgets are reducing. how much of that is because we have earned older population? a significant proportion, and that is a wonderful thing but in terms of managing the extra volume of work, you need an extra volume of work, you need an extra cohort of clinicians. the government has actually invested, or is about to invest heavily, in practice but as a discipline of medicine it is significantly underfunded. we only have 8.1% of the nhs budget. we should have ii%,
2:13 pm
according to the bma. and contacts across the country day in, day out. and yet we are still significantly underfunded and have been for the next ten years. this investment in general practice has now been seen asa general practice has now been seen as a perfect storm. everybody respects their local doctor and has huge admiration for their work but what about the patients in all of this? the core of the problem, the core of the issue, the patients are the ones essentially potentially being short—changed. potentially diagnosis is delayed, and we have reduced and more complications coming on. more medications when the patient is diagnosed, and it creates downstrea m patient is diagnosed, and it creates downstream pressure and pressures on out of care services. access is very important. given the training that gps have and for many of them it is a vocation. in making that decision
2:14 pm
to leave being a gp, where do they go? 8796 of silly qualified gps take up go? 8796 of silly qualified gps take up the partnership, we have some incentive schemes and golden hellos to encourage those gps to bed into general practice as a full—time practitioner, a lot of people when they are given more financial control, that is down to them and the practices are not working. i do not think that is correct, the gps coming on screen are not happy with the workload and not happy to consult 50, 60 or 70 patients per day. in europe, the average consultation deemed safe is 25 per day. this intense style of consultation does not leave time for qualitative edison in practice and gps are rightly saying that we do not want to do that style of medicine. we want to do part—time roles and perhaps want to be
2:15 pm
temperate doctors. they are not taking the full principal positions that were there before senior gps we re that were there before senior gps were departing in increasing numbers. if you put it in the past, it's on the turn. how do you see gps services working in five or ten yea rs. services working in five or ten years. the government has embedded a huge amount of money, 3.5 billion in primary care. 1.8 billion coming down to floor level and to create extra allied health care posts. those are paramedics, physios and physicians associates and pharmacists. we would say that some of that funding in general practice, some of the core funding, which is about how much a practice gets to manage the population, we would say that needs to be revised, and that discriminates, particularly with practices operating in areas of high
2:16 pm
deprivation. practices, like in mine, operating with needy populations, they are not properly funded to manage the extra disease burden in that population. doctor carmel, thank you for your time. you can see more on this on panorama, tonight at 7.30 on bbc one. and in the next half an hour we'll be hearing from a gp practice in colchester about how they're trying to tackle the problem. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines... the first glimpse of baby sussex.. proud parents harry and meghan show off their son to the world.. they say he's been a dream. will the doctor see you now? the first sustained fall in the number of family doctors for half a century. no way for huawei — in london us secretary of state mike pompeo is expected to warn the uk about allowing the chinese firm access to critical infrastructure. in the sport, an incredible night for liverpool as they topple the spanish champions to get to their second successive champions league
2:17 pm
final. who they face will be decided tonight. putnam trail 1—0 as they ta ke tonight. putnam trail 1—0 as they take on the giant killers, ajax. —— totte n ha m take on the giant killers, ajax. —— tottenham trail. chelsea have lost their appeal against fifa's decision to ban them from signing players during the next two transfer windows. and prince william is one of a host of famous faces drafted in to announce the england women's squad ahead of this summer's world cup. i'll be back with more on those stories after half—past. theresa may's future as prime minister will be discussed by backbench tory mps later this afternoon. many want to rewrite the party's rules on changing their leader. it comes as talks with labour continue, to try to break the brexit deadlock. our chief political correspondent, vicki young is at the central lobby in the houses of parliament. i know we are waiting to see what the baby is called but the focus is on theresa may and how long she has got? i cannot remember when we weren't saying theresa may's leadership was not under pressure,
2:18 pm
she can be challenged again, before december, and brexit at the root of all of this, talks ongoing. no sign ofa all of this, talks ongoing. no sign of a breakthrough but they are talking and that will continue later. speculation as to whether theresa may well layout a timetable as to when she will go but this lunchtime, a downing street spokesman, sticking to what she has already said. that the prime minister has made a generous and bold offer to the 1922 committee, the backbench conservative mps. he had to deliver brexit in phase one and will leave and make way for new leadership after that. the question is, how long will this take and is it damaging the party? let's speak to robert halfon. this is a critical thing. is theresa may leadership's
2:19 pm
finish? she should layout a proper timetable, and it needs to be done ina timetable, and it needs to be done in a dignified way. she has served out in a dignified way. she has served our country and done her best but we do have deep—rooted expectations, and we had a terrible result last week in the local elections. we need to be honest. we are losing over 1300 councillors. people are worried about local services and austerity and the cost of living. the increased cost of living. and we faced the brexit party tsunami. the public are incredibly angry and frustrated that we did not get over the line on the 29th of march like we promised. do you think nigel farage's new party can do a lot of damage to your party? they were not standing in local elections but they will be in european elections? the brexit party, this is not the nigel farage of old or even the ukip party
2:20 pm
of old, it's a different nigel farage. i'm a proud conservative and always will be but they will be a disruptive force to the labour party as well. they are going to have a dramatic impact on british politics because the public in my own constituency of harlow are really frustrated and really angry that we do not have brexit delivered. not just in harlow but across the country. i say that as someone who has voted remained that kept my promise to do everything in parliament to deliver the referendum result. and what about the mood in the grassroots of the conservative party? losing 1300 councillors will not help that. these are people who deliver leaflets and campaign for your party. we lost 1300 councillors, in harlow we were lucky and kept our council seats with a good majority, thanks to the hard
2:21 pm
work of local councillors but people are miserable across the board. there is a lot of uncertainty. public want a final decision done on brexit. the local party members want a proper decision on brexit. we need to show more empathy and support to those activists who lost theirjobs, some frustrated that a decision was made to sack the defence secretary the night before the local elections. why that needed to be done at that time is beyond the wit and understanding of most ordinary folk. who were campaigning hard day and night to try and fly the conservative cause in their local area. “— conservative cause in their local area. —— my conservative conservative cause in their local area. “ my conservative cause. conservative cause in their local area. —— my conservative cause. i think that whoever was responsible, the numberio think that whoever was responsible, the number 10 machine think that whoever was responsible, the numberio machine or think that whoever was responsible, the number 10 machine or whatever it may lead to a need to look long and ha rd may lead to a need to look long and hard and say, do they care about activists? it was a selfish action done the night before the local elections and there has not been
2:22 pm
enough empathy and support shown to our defeated councillors. we need to realise that we are in an existential threat to our existence asa existential threat to our existence as a conservative party and potentially we could be losing a lot more seats unless we get our act together and have radical change. and talks with labour, is that the way to deal with brexit? it is not just brexit, we need to address the social injustices that the prime minister said she would when she stood on the steps of downing street. on unemployment and apprenticeships and taxes, but there isa apprenticeships and taxes, but there is a lot of social injustice in our country and the public want us to address these domestic issues, and they want us to get brexit delivered. i do not mind whether the prime minister is talking tojeremy corbyn or the leader of north korea. we have to get brexit over the line one way or another and i voted for the prime minister is pounds deal
2:23 pm
the prime minister is pounds deal the last couple of times. all of us have the responsibility to do everything we can to make sure we keep the promise after the referendum result in 2016. thank you very much indeed. conservative mps won during prime ministers questions, openly saying that it was time for the prime minister to leave. she insists she will deliver the cause but how long will her party give her to do that? is anyone discussing the name of the baby? nobody is, simon! ! the green party have launched their campaign for the european elections on may 23rd with the message "yes to europe, no to climate change". after gaining a hundred and 85 council seats in last week's english local elections, the party is hopeful of improving on the three meps it secured in 2014.
2:24 pm
it's time to say yes to europe, yes to investing in communities and no to climate chaos. it's also about saying a very loud no to a failed brexit project and yes to transforming our society to one that puts people first. our government is at a standstill and the 2—party system is broken. both the conservatives and labour have embraced brexit and refused to see it cannot succeed in solving any of the problems of our country. the us secretary of state mike pompeo is in london today for talks with the prime minister and foreign secretary. mr pompeo is expected to raise american concerns about the possible involvement of the chinese telecoms giant huawei in helping to build britain's 5g network. the latest tensions over iran will also be discussed. our diplomatic correspondent jonathan marcus is here. this comes as iran says it may increase your own enrichment. it is upping the anti here. what will theresa may's view be on this. mike
2:25 pm
pompeo will have his? they have different views, both will be opposed to what iran is doing that the americans have left this agreement a year ago and they wanted the agreement swept away because they believe it is simply a bad deal. britain, along with other key european countries, want the agreement to continue and they believe it does do a job in constraining iran's nuclear activities and they will be urging the iranians to come back into full compliance with it. the difficulty is, iranians want something from the europeans and they want the europeans and they want the europeans to give iran some sort of economic lifeline because they are suffering under us sanctions, and the wider effects of those sanctions. a problem for the europeans, i do not think there is a nyway europeans, i do not think there is anyway that they could match the damage or address that damage that has been done to the iranians economy. it is difficult to see where they go from here. the choice is, america or iran? i think it
2:26 pm
comes down to that. it is more compensated because the europeans do not want to see iran leaving the agreement —— that complicated. not want to see iran leaving the agreement —— that complicatedm has rolled in the region more widely. they fundamentally differ on the ticket agreement, something the american government has turned its back on foley and is doing all it can to undermine. that will be difficult for theresa may, as is the discussion for huawei, and the americans are clear on this? absolutely, and the issue of security where the americans have taken a clear and firm line. they do not want to see huawei technology involved in the five g networks in any of their key western allies, they think there are huge security risks in that. britain has tried to play a nuanced role, and tried to
2:27 pm
steer a course between china and the us. that is going to be very uncomfortable as well. perhaps the only area where mrs may and mike pompeo could see i too i is brexit, insofar as the trump administration being a huge supporter of brexit but there is not much they can do about that. they want to know where the process is going. and we don't want to set the americans? -- upset the americans. one of the key thing is, if it happens, is a trade deal with the us under the most advent arduous terms possible. -- advantageous terms possible. -- advantageous terms possible. -- advantageous terms possible. jonathan marcus, thank you. it's been found to help with mental health, boost the immune system and even reduce stress hormones but you won't find it at a chemist. we're talking about ‘creativity‘ — anything from writing a song, appearing in a play or evenjust doodling. now the bbc as part of its get creative festival has commissioned some research in to why it's so good for us.
2:28 pm
our arts correspondent, david sillito has more. i've got two kids. i've got a seven—year—old and a two—year—old and i live in north london. i work full time and i'm pretty busy. having a few days ofjust sitting and looking at a view and focusing and drawing and creating... itjust lowers everything, and you feel a certain level of calmness but also a level of focus. botallack in cornwall. cliffs, old tin mines — it's all very poldark around here, and a gift for the amateur painters of the newlyn art school. and while everyone here has their own style, they all agreed on one thing. this was good for them. my partner has parkinson's, and i am a full—time carer, and so... this is something for me that i can lose myself in. what has happened to day to day worries when you are here? they are not here. they go.
2:29 pm
where have the worries of the world gone? um, i think they are all there, and they will be there when i come back out of my nice little session on the cliffs or wherever i am. but they can do without me for a while. it has been long known there are therapeutic benefits of creativity, but this new research tells us a bit more about why all this is good for the brain and body. the data comes from 50,000 people who have taken up a creative activity. previous research has shown it can help anxiety, even a physical condition such as inflammation. but for dr daisy fancourt, this gives a glimpse as to why even a bit of serious doodling can be good for us. we have known for a while that engaging in creative activities is beneficial for mental health. but what this new large study has
2:30 pm
shown us is that there are three particular ways that creative activities help to regulate our emotions. they help to distract us from stresses in our lives. they give us the space to actually reassess our problems and make plans. and they also help us to build our confidence and self esteem so we can tackle new challenges. what it also suggests is that you don't have to be any good and even a small amount has real effects, not just for us but for those around us. david sillito, bbc news, cornwall. if there's any hint of a name, i will bring it to you! nothing happening at the moment, this is how i keep happening at the moment, this is how ikeep an happening at the moment, this is how i keep an ion things and if it appears here, i will you straightaway! time for a look at the weather. here's ben rich. have you seen the film the mummy? there is a most amazing effect which you are about to show me and this is for real. yes, this is fact, from down under, from australia, have a look at this. it looks like a suburban scene.
2:31 pm
would you mind stepping back a bit so we can get the full effect?m would you mind stepping back a bit so we can get the full effect? it is a dream, well, you will get to see it again in a moment so we can talk it again in a moment so we can talk it through properly, it is showing a dust storm sweeping across this town in victoria. strong when speaking up dust and sand. we can talk you through it. here we go, a big wall of dust just through it. here we go, a big wall of dustjust blowing across this small suburban area. it is not night—time, it is actually 5pm. it is light. you can see the light returning as soon as the cloud of dust goes through and it starts to raina bit dust goes through and it starts to rain a bit and eventually the sun comes out again and it is as if nothing ever happened. amazing. it is incredible and the bureau of meteorology in australia... i will go again! the bureau of meteorology in australia claimed it was wind gusts of 154 mph which kicked up all the dry, sandy dust and blew it around. the reason for this, the
2:32 pm
reason why it has happened, and the director is telling me i can come back, so i welcome i'm going to show you something less interesting which is why i'm allowed back into the shot. this is the reason why, this stripe of cloud which is a cold front, frontal systems bring rain, we know about that but ahead of it, the strength of the wind blowing off the strength of the wind blowing off the dry land, it is that that picked up the dry land, it is that that picked up all of the dust and sand and blew it around and caused those spectacular scenes. they get sandstorms in that part of australia but locals say this is the most dramatic one they have had for quite some time. remarkable. back here, pretty remarkable as well, those poor people at windsor waiting for the knees have been getting soaked! they have indeed, notjust windsor, lots of parts of the uk as well. have a look at this little rubber duckin have a look at this little rubber duck in west yorkshire! why does he have headphones on?” don't really know. there will be a pun in there somewhere but i'm not quick enough. you've got an hour! something about rain... anyway. don't do it! let's move on. come
2:33 pm
back at 3:30pm, who knows what will happen. lots of rain around across many parts of the uk today. will it stick around ? it looks many parts of the uk today. will it stick around? it looks like things will dry out a bit as we get to the weekend but this is what is happening at the moment, a swirl of cloud on the satellite, an area of low pressure drifting across the southern half of the british isles, driving this band of cloud northwards which has been bringing quite a lot of rain. this is the radar picture, the british isles somewhere underneath this, you can see the rain drifting northwards, some heavy, thundery showers pushing towards the south of england and south wales and as we speak, and as we go through the rest of the opening of the cloud and rain will shift further northwards. cold enough for snow across the northern half of the uk, and a mix of sunshine and heavy showers towards the south. the cloud and rain and also a brisk wind, so if you are in newcastle or hull with the wind coming off the north sea, the cloud and the rain, temperatures this afternoon, 7—9, which does not feel too pleasant. as we go through this evening and tonight, the cloud and
2:34 pm
rain will continue to drift northwards. notice how the rain really piles in across south—east scotla nd really piles in across south—east scotland and north—east england, and to the west of the pennines, with some shelter, not as much rain for north—west england. for most of us, a pretty mild night but the north of scotla nd a pretty mild night but the north of scotland sticking out into some cold weather because we will have most of the clear skies here. into tomorrow, low pressure still with us, this low pressure slowly trundling eastwards under way but a couple of different frontal systems tied up with it which will enhance the rainfall once again across parts of south—east scotla nd again across parts of south—east scotland and north—east england, also a frontal system bringing some showers across northern ireland. to the south of that, the midlands, south wales and southern england, a mixture of cloud, sunny spells and some hefty showers. the northern half of scotland probably seeing the best of the dry weather but even here, one or two showers, 10 degrees in aberdeen, may be up to 15 in london, no great shakes for this time of year. looking ahead to friday, another day of sunny spells and showers. showers perhaps concentrated around these central parts of the country, not as many in
2:35 pm
northern scotland, not as many down towards the south—west of england. but again, temperatures languishing a bit, then— 16, not too impressive for the time of year. into the weekend, things start to change because high pressure is going to start to build its way in from the west. initially, as we start the weekend, that will allow some cold airto be drawn weekend, that will allow some cold air to be drawn down from the north but as the weekend wears on, looking increasingly likely we will start to tap into something a bit warmer. by the time we get to the end of the week at the weekend, it should turn a bit drier and warmer but the more aid to come before that. —— read more rain to come.
2:36 pm
this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the duke and duchess of sussex have shared the first glimpse of their newborn son. the couple confirmed they will introduce the queen to her eighth and newest great—grandchild this afternoon. we arejust, we'rejust so thrilled to have our own little bundle of joy. we hope to spend some precious times with him as he slowly starts to grow up. there's been a significant drop in the gp to patient ratio in england over the past four years. research by the health think—tank the nuffield trust found on average each gp now has 125 more patients than they did in 2014. the american secretary of state mike pompeo has met theresa may at downing street. mr pompeo is expected to warn against allowing the chinese telecoms firm huawei to have a role in developing britain's 5g mobile network.
2:37 pm
sport now with jane dougall. evenif even if you are not a liverpool fan, andi even if you are not a liverpool fan, and i was listening to the radio last night, you just felt this amazing sense of it being history andi amazing sense of it being history and i am wondering if it had sunk in and i am wondering if it had sunk in a liverpool yet? and i am wondering if it had sunk in a liverpoolyet? it and i am wondering if it had sunk in a liverpool yet? it was such a credible feet, wasn't it? coming back from 3—0 down against one of the best sides in the world and to beat them 4—0 in the second leg, i don't think many people believed liverpool could pull this off, other than the fans in the stadium who never stop singing all night. who will liverpool face in the final? the second leg of the other semifinal is tonight. tottenham are in amsterdam to take on ajax — and perhaps they can take inspiration from liverpool. they're only 1—0 down from the first leg. spurs need two goals, after last night, that sounds easy. but don't forget this is a tough ajax side. their youngsters have put out both
2:38 pm
juventus and real madrid in this competition. we look forward to that tonight. indeed, now, let's talk about women's football and the world cup and the fa have chosen rather unique way of announcing who is in the squad. it's been incredibly innovative. the names have been revealed one by one on the lionesses twitter feed today, but the fa have asked celebrities to announce each name in a series of videos, starting with one of the most recognisable and the president of the fa, prince william. fittingly, he announced the captain steph houghton. no surprise at her inclusion there. and in fact, not that many surprises in the squad seletion. sadly, houghton's former city team—mate izzy christiansen doesn't make the squad after she was injured at the shebelieves cup in february. and the names kept coming. james corden, david beckham, actress emma watson, ian wright amongst those getting involved.
2:39 pm
the full squad is on the bbc sport website. england kick off their campaign against scotland on the 9thjune, and manager phil neville says despite a tough group his players are ready. scotland are a fantastic team. their manager is a great coach. we have got a really difficult group, argentina, scotland and japan, three really dangerous teams. we are going to have to absolutely be at our best. we are the third ranked team in the world at the moment. there will be a lot of expectation on us. but i think our performances in the la st but i think our performances in the last 16 months i've been really good. i think there is still more to come from the players. chelsea's transfer ban remains in place, which means they wont be able to sign any new players for the next year. having breached rules on signing foreign players under the age of 18 they've been prevented from signing players over the next two transfer windows. after appealing, they've been permitted to sign players under 16 from within the uk. that will do little to boost the first team squad, who've qualified for next season's champions league, but they
2:40 pm
could lose star striker eden hazard in the summer. chelsea say they will appeal again, this time to the court of arbitration for sport. in the last half an hour, it's been announced that bolton wanderers are to be put into administration. owner ken anderson says he has been left with "little or no choice", with a winding—up petition still hanging over the club. bolton have been relegated to league 1 this season, and administration would mean starting next season with a 12—point deduction. and rain has delayed the first of five one—day internationals for england against pakistan. it's just getting under way. england won the toss and put pakistan into bat at the oval. jofra archer has just taken the first wicket. joe rootjuggling a catch from fakhar zaman at slip. pakistan currently 17—1. follow that on our website, with in—play video highlights and commentary from the test match special team. that's all the sport for now. we will be back later. thank you very much. welcome to your
2:41 pm
first offence to afternoon live. —— your first appearance. the duke and duchess of sussex have shown their baby to the world two days after their son was born. the child is seventh in line to the throne and the queen and the duke of edinburgh's eighth great—grandchild. the couple have been speaking about their joy at becoming parents. it's magic, it's pretty amazing. you know, i have the two best guys in the world, so i'm really happy. tell us a little bit about your son. what's he like? is he sleeping well, good baby? yes! he has the sweetest temperament. really calm, and... i don't know who he gets that from! and he'sjust been a dream! it's been a special couple of days. who does he take after, does he look like anyone? we are still trying to figure that out. people say that babies change so much over two weeks. we will basically monitor how the changing process happens over the next month, really. but his looks are changing every single day.
2:42 pm
so who knows? and how are you finding parenting generally? is it still a special moment? it's great. parenting is amazing. it has only been, what, two and a half, three days... yeah. but we are just so thrilled to have our own little bundle ofjoy and to spend some precious times with him as he slowly starts to grow up. and i hear you are off to see two special people in a minute? yes. the queen and the duke. yes, wejust bumped into the duke as we were walking by. he was so nice. it will be a nice moment to introduce the baby to more family. and my mum is with us as well, so... it's really, really... really good. another great—grandchild! can we have a peek? we just can't quite see his face. wow. he already has a bit of facial hair as well! wonderful! thank you.
2:43 pm
thank you all so much. thanks for your time. thank you. thanks a lot. and thank you, everybody, for all of the well wishes and the kindness. it's amazing, itjust means so much. thank you. there is still no name. oh, hang on, what's this? hold on... no, we've done that. i will keep an eye on what is happening there and any news on it, i will bring it to you. back now to a story we'll be focusing on throughout afternoon live today. research for the bbc shows there's been a fall in the number of gps per person in england for the first time in nearly 50 years. the study, by independent think tank the nuffield trust, found last year there were only 60 local doctors for 100,000 patients — compared with almost 65 in 2014. let's here more on this from our health correspondent nikki fox, who's in colchester
2:44 pm
at a so—called super gp surgery. that's right, this is the cranfield medical centre which serves around 30,000 patients. what is a super surgery? it is bright and airy and it doesn't just contain surgery? it is bright and airy and it doesn'tjust contain gps. it has a range of health professionals, and it is basically a one stop shop for a lot of people'shealth needs. over in the corner, we have an on—site pharmacy. there's also paramedics here and upstairs, they do blood tests. over here, we have a lady from the council who is touring different gp surgeries to teach people how to use online booking. why is she doing that? it takes the pressure off reception staff. it means they can do some of the gp paperwork instead of just means they can do some of the gp paperwork instead ofjust doing reception tasks. that is going on at the moment. if ijust walk over here, ican the moment. if ijust walk over here, i can speak to two of the staff that work at the practice. one of them is billy gp at the surgery.
2:45 pm
and also, alison is are in charge of the care navigators. what is the purpose of a super surgery? we know it isa purpose of a super surgery? we know it is a one—stop shop. how does it help you? the way it helps me is firstly, it is not necessarily a one—stop shop, it's about making sure we've got lots of different practitioners, health—related and non—health related, on one side. we will have physiotherapy, pharmacists, assistant nurses and people from social care working in the same building. it means that when i'm up there, consulting with patients or patients come to the desk or they speak to one of the triage team, there is a myriad of people i can go to for help rather than necessarily just me people i can go to for help rather than necessarilyjust me myself working by myself. allison, there's no such thing as reception staff any more, is there? it is care navigators. what do they do and why do they do it? the idea is that they ask the patient to get a brief idea
2:46 pm
of the problem. the idea is that they triage them and they put them with somebody, other than maybe a gp, they don't always need to see a gp, they don't always need to see a gp, so that could be an advanced nurse practitioner or health care assistant, may be something the pharmacy can deal with. if it is something medical related, we would send them to the clinical pharmacy. —— medication —related. send them to the clinical pharmacy. -- medication -related. did people come here for things that gps really shouldn't be dealing with? yes, people turn up for dandruff, head lice, minor eye problems. they need to be going to see the opticians rather than the gp. but again, everything we do, we try to, you know, direct people to the correct places or to see other clinicians. they don't always need to see a gp. that is quite unbelievable, isn't it? they come in here for dandruff. how do people receive this? do they mind telling you their health problems, when traditionally, they are more used to speaking to a gp?‘
2:47 pm
lot of patients don't like it, they get quite aggressive over the phone. they tell the staff that they are not clinical, it is none of our business. but we have to explain to them that the gps request that from us and the idea is that patients that genuinely need to see a gp could get those appointments duff should get those appointments and patients that other clinicians can deal with, the advanced nurse practitioners can deal with minor problems so they are pushed onto them. there are 6296 of gp practices in this area that have recruitment issues, so it is hoped that this surgery can be a blueprint for the future. something that will really help gps, take the pressure off them. we will be back later this afternoon to talk to other professionals, like paramedics, who are working here. thank you forjoining us. you can see more on this story throughout afternoon live. and a special report on panorama tonight at 7.30 on bbc one. the first images have been released of the proposed temporary home for mps during restoration
2:48 pm
work in parliament. architects plan to recreate the current chamber of the house of commons, including the green benches on which mps sit, at a new venue in westminster. the move to richmond house, the former home of the department of health, will not happen until 2025 at the earliest. our political correspondent iain watson is in our westminster studio. this is going to be their home for a while. it is, actually, simon, we are always first with the news, it won't be happening until 2025. the images you have all been made —— are waiting for, never mind windsor, ta ke waiting for, never mind windsor, take a look at westminster and what the house of commons will look like in the middle of the next decade, they are building a whole new commons chamber, effectively what is happening is that mps are getting turfed out of the palace of westminster while it gets refurbished. they think it is in danger of all sorts of things happening to it like damp, fire and so on. mps are getting moved out and into a commons chamber that looks remarkably like the current one, a bit more sleep with a bit more daylight, but effectively, still an
2:49 pm
adversarial chamber, mps on both sides of the house facing each other, and also sitting on the green benches. the overall cost of doing this and providing office accommodation for mps in this building which is effectivelyjust across the road from the palace of westminster is estimated to cost somewhere in the region of £1.6 billion. a bit earlier, i asked the lib dems mp tom brake, wearing his current act as a spokesman for the house of commons authority on this major project, i asked him if the cost was justified. well, first of all, i would say that overwhelmingly it is staff and visitors to the palace of westminster who will benefit from this, not members of parliament. the other point to underline of course is that this is a world heritage building, and government has responsibility for ensuring that it is maintained to an appropriate standard. we have seen the consequences, perhaps, of notre dame, of where, perhaps if that, if the works are not done frequently enough, a huge backlog emerges
2:50 pm
with additional risks. so we need to tackle this. this will be an investment for the country as a whole, in fact, for the world, who want to come and see the palace of westminster in a secure, accessible way, and that is what we are offering people. so the idea is that mps will move into this new temporary home in 2025 but the actual refurbishment of the palace of westminster would not be completed until the early 20305, the £1.6 billion cost i refer to is effectively the temporary home and things around it but it is likely to cost in the region of £4 billion or more to refurbish the palace of westminster itself. pla n5 more to refurbish the palace of westminster itself. plan5 go out to consultation but fundamentally, the decision has been taken that the temporary home will be in london, not outside. if you want to comment on rethinking the whole project, i'm afraid that is of the agenda. billions of pounds for refurbishment, the same —— there's hope for you and me! thank you for joining us. a falklands veteran is planning
2:51 pm
to sue the ministry of defence for the return of his service medals. they were taken off him in 1993 because he was bisexual, and he was forced out of the royal navy. at the time, lgbt people were banned from serving in the armed forces — a ban that wasn't lifted until several years later. our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports. i loved life in the navy because of the comrade5hip. 150 people on board a vessel and you all knew each other. joe ou5alice served in the royal navy for nearly 18 years. and his work was praised by his 5enior5. when hejoined up in the 19705, there was a ban on lgbt people serving in the armed forces. and joe says, throughout his career, he hid the fact that he was bisexual. it was a double life i was living. i was watching, every day, what i was saying, what i was doing. joe served in the falklands war. he also did tours of duty in northern ireland and conflict spots in the middle east. but in 1993, an allegation involving another sailor,
2:52 pm
which he's always denied, ended his career. and during the disciplinary proce55, he says he was forced to disclose his sexuality. this is a medalfor northern ireland, that one for the south atlantic. joe was allowed to hold on to two of his medals, but he was stripped of the medal he'd been awarded for long service and good conduct. that medal is proof to me that i was good enough for all those years, and yet somebody could just come and take it away from you. in a statement, the ministry of defence said... joe says that because that he was dismissed from the navy, he's also lost out on his pension. but he's never fought for money. at the age of 68, he just wants his medal back. june kelly, bbc news.
2:53 pm
charlotte i5 charlotte is here. uber project5 have brought the streets to a standstill. big protest here and in the us, they are having in london, nottingham, birmingham and glasgow, 50,000 uber cars in the country would actually, if you live in a city, does not sound like a huge amount because they are everywhere in london, for example but in a rural area in london, for example but in a ruralarea in in london, for example but in a rural area in the uk, you'd probably find it quite hard to order a uber. drivers are prote5ting over pay and working conditions. unions in the uk wa nt working conditions. unions in the uk want the commission that is going to uber to be cut from 25% to 15% and they want theirs to be increased to £2 per mile from £1.25 per mile. they also making their debut on the stock market this week. a big for them. samira hussain is in new york. what do they want in new york? they are similar conditions they are prote5ti ng are similar conditions they are protesting against. absolutely, in
2:54 pm
new york, and in the us, the uber drivers are considered contract workers, they don't have any health care, they don't get any sick leave, and of course, they are also protesting their wages. they also wa nt protesting their wages. they also want to see an increase in the amount of wages. right now, i'm outside penn station in midtown and just behind me, you can see a taxi line. you will see that there is actually not a lot of people standing in line waiting for a yellow ca b. standing in line waiting for a yellow cab. but just a few hours ago, the line went all the way down the block and around the corner. that was because it was in the middle of a protest by uber drivers. from 7am to 9am local time, nobody could get a uber or a lyft and that had an impact on the number of taxis available to passengers. sounds like it is causing quite a bit of disruption where you are. uber i5 preparing to float this week, making
2:55 pm
its debut on the stock market, quite considerable amount it is being valued at as well, which is not bad given that it has not quite made a profit yet. and it doesn't intend to make a profit. i think that is what was so surprising when we saw the initial papers that they filed with regulators here. we are not expecting to see uber make a profit for a very long time, if ever, and despite that, there is still a huge amount of investor interest. that is very true. thank you. should we have a look at the markets? quite interesting also because liverpool, what a night, but they are owned by dragons and. guess, fenway sports group which also any boston red socks baseball team, they have been credited, partly credited for the success of liverpool because of the way they have managed a team and injecting quite a bit of cash to but iju5t got to injecting quite a bit of cash to but i just got to pull away injecting quite a bit of cash to but iju5t got to pull away because jeremy hunt and mike pompeo are about to give a news conference at the foreign office and we can hear
2:56 pm
from them right now, the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt. good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen, i'm delighted to welcome secretary mike pompeo to the foreign office for the first bilateral visit to britain. it is a privilege to reaffirm the strength of the friendship between our two countries. the anglo—american alliance wa5 countries. the anglo—american alliance was forged in the greatest struggle against tyranny the world has ever known. we will soon commemorate the 75th anniversary of the normandy landings, when britain and america join forces with our allies to begin the liberation of europe. we look forward to welcoming president trump to mark that occasion and it is fitting that secretary pompeo should be our guest on ve day. i am proud to say that in defence and security, britain and america cooperate more closely than any america cooperate more closely than a ny two america cooperate more closely than any two countries in the world. we keep our people 5afe. we entrust one another with intelligence that saves lives on both sides of the atlantic. just last year, when the russian
2:57 pm
state used a chemical weapon in salisbury, america responded by expelling 60 russian officials, more than any other country, an act of friendship for which i repeat my thank5. we stand together in defence of the values upon which our nations we re of the values upon which our nations were founded. today, secretary pompeo and i met faith leaders including the archbishop of canterbury, to discuss how we can better protect freedom of religion ina better protect freedom of religion in a world where people of all faith5, including 245 million christians, face persecution for practising their beliefs. thi5 christians, face persecution for practising their beliefs. this is an i55ue close to both our hearts. the recent atrocities in new zealand and sri lanka remind usjust why. i am thankful that today we have a glimmer of light with the news that asia bibi will be able to embark on a new chapter of her life. i welcome the government of pakistan's commitment to uphold the rule of law following the decision of its supreme court to confirm her acquittal. britain's primary concern has a ways been the safety of asia
2:58 pm
bibi and her family has a ways been the safety of asia bibi and herfamily and we have been in contact with our partners to help ensure 5he in contact with our partners to help ensure she gets the freedom and security 5he ensure she gets the freedom and security she deserves. today, the prime minister and i have had excellent discussions with secretary pompeo on a range of global challenges, including china and the 5ituations challenges, including china and the situations in yemen and iran. let me focu5 situations in yemen and iran. let me focus on two of those, first, iran, the uk and us work incredibly closely on iran, including to counter iran's de5tabili5ing activity in the middle east. whilst we both agree that iran mu5t activity in the middle east. whilst we both agree that iran must never be able to acquire a nuclear weapon, it is no secret that we have a different approach on how best to achieve that. the uk has continued to support a nuclear deal, which is a key achievement of the global nonproliferation architecture, because we believe it is in our 5hared security interests. but because we believe it is in our 5hared security interests. bi tehran because we believe it is in our share its ecurity intere5t5. bi tehran because we believe it is in our share its ecurity intere5t5. b! t the n
2:59 pm
3:00 pm
3:01 pm
3:02 pm
3:03 pm
3:04 pm
3:05 pm
3:06 pm
3:07 pm
3:08 pm
3:09 pm
3:10 pm
3:11 pm
3:12 pm
3:13 pm
3:14 pm
3:15 pm
3:16 pm
3:17 pm
3:18 pm
3:19 pm
3:20 pm
3:21 pm
3:22 pm
3:23 pm
3:24 pm
3:25 pm
3:26 pm
3:27 pm
3:28 pm
3:29 pm
3:30 pm
3:31 pm
3:32 pm
3:33 pm
3:34 pm
3:35 pm
3:36 pm
3:37 pm
3:38 pm
3:39 pm
3:40 pm
3:41 pm
3:42 pm
3:43 pm
3:44 pm
3:45 pm
3:46 pm
3:47 pm
3:48 pm
3:49 pm
3:50 pm
3:51 pm
3:52 pm
3:53 pm
3:54 pm
3:55 pm
3:56 pm
3:57 pm
3:58 pm
3:59 pm
4:00 pm
4:01 pm
4:02 pm
4:03 pm
4:04 pm
4:05 pm
4:06 pm
4:07 pm
4:08 pm
4:09 pm
4:10 pm
4:11 pm
4:12 pm
4:13 pm
4:14 pm
4:15 pm
4:16 pm
4:17 pm
4:18 pm
4:19 pm
4:20 pm
4:21 pm
4:22 pm
4:23 pm
4:24 pm
4:25 pm
4:26 pm
4:27 pm
4:28 pm
4:29 pm
4:30 pm
4:31 pm
4:32 pm
4:33 pm
4:34 pm
4:35 pm
4:36 pm
4:37 pm
4:38 pm
4:39 pm
4:40 pm
4:41 pm
4:42 pm
4:43 pm
4:44 pm
4:45 pm
4:46 pm
4:47 pm
4:48 pm
4:49 pm
4:50 pm
4:51 pm
4:52 pm
4:53 pm
4:54 pm
4:55 pm
4:56 pm
4:57 pm
4:58 pm
4:59 pm
5:00 pm

77 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on