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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  May 9, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's ham and these are the main stories this morning. labour's preparing to launch its european election campaign. here's the scene in kent ahead of the launch. the government's to cover the cost of replacing £200 million worth of unsafe building cladding similar to the type used on grenfell tower. prepare for the worst — a stark warning that some communities may have to move because of the threat of climate change and flooding. the broadcaster danny baker says he's been fired from 5 live for a joke on twitter about the duke and duchess of sussex's new baby. also this hour... tottenham reach the champions league
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final after an incredible comeback against ajax. this lucas moura winner in the dying moments of the game put them through to the final, where they'll face liverpool. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. jeremy corbyn will launch his pa rty‘s european elections campaign shortly. the european elections take place in the uk on 23rd of may, and the labour leader wants to appeal to both sides of the brexit debate. that launches happening in chatham in kentand that launches happening in chatham in kent and will be a crucial test of labour as jeremy in kent and will be a crucial test of labour asjeremy corbyn is asking voters to see beyond divisions over
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brexit and asking pro—eu and brexit supporters to vote for his party in those elections. we will be there as soon as that begins. let's move on to our other main story of the morning. the government will provide a £200 million fund to replace unsafe cladding on privately owned buildings, similar to that used on grenfell tower. ministers have identified more than 150 buildings that still need to be made safe following the fire in 2017, but work has stalled because of disputes over who should pay. the housing secretary, james brokenshire, has this morning been explaining the government's decision. ultimately it's about dealing with these exceptional issues of public safety, about this particular material that's been used on a number of private buildings, and seeing that the decision is made quickly. now, the pace of change has not been fast enough. many developers have done the right thing, have stepped in, and we expect them to maintain those
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commitments and they have done so. but ultimately, what's been driving me is that sense of public safety and indeed the interests of those living in those buildings, caught up in a situation that they didn't know about, that they didn't expect, and therefore it is that need to get on, make progress and really see that change is happening, people are safe, feel safe within those buildings, and can do so. we also spoke to alex di giuseppe in manchester, who lives in a block which still has the unsafe cladding on it. we're living in unsafe buildings, you know, if this was a car with an airbag issue, it would be recalled, and we don't understand why it's taken so long for the government to get to this point. it's been incredibly stressful. it's taken its toll on myself and a number of other leaseholders. we've had these huge costs placed upon our heads as well and, to be quite honest with you, like i say, the stress is insurmountable at the moment for us.
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joining me now is our correspondent sarah campbell with more background to this the work to replace this was delayed in disputes over who should pay for it- in disputes over who should pay for it — private building owners, leaseholders or freeholders. and the government had said it should be the private building owners, but they have changed their tune. why? you might because of the length of time. that's what james brokenshire was saying. —— that's what james brokenshire was saying. -- because of the length of time. there are around 30 buildings which haven't had the cladding removed. when we are talking about privately owned buildings, around 166 still have this cladding on the outside. building owners were saying, we are not going to pay it, we will pass the cost on to our te na nts, we will pass the cost on to our tenants, our leaseholders, people who live in these buildings, so the work simply wasn't happening. you
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have te na nts work simply wasn't happening. you have tenants and leaseholders currently doing things like paying forfire wardens to currently doing things like paying for fire wardens to go round their buildings, and of course, the stress, as you can imagine, of living in a building where you are co nsta ntly living in a building where you are constantly worried that something like the grenfell disaster might happen there, it's a huge amount of stress to live with the government has said they will put £2110 million forward to help with buildings in england only. two questions. moura, there is an issue of companies that have done it. will they ask for their money to be recouped? is it fair that they have had to pay for it and others now won't have to? and second, a lot of people are saying that £200 million sounds like a lot of money, but will it be enough when we are talking about such large buildings? in manchester, the group are calling this a partial win because there are other fire safety
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issues this won't cover. there is aluminium cladding similar to what was on grenfell tower. but there are other types, and our understanding is that government testing will be done on that type of cladding. 0ther types might be included in this, but that hasn't happened at the moment. if you are in a tower block that has cladding of any description, you wa nt to cladding of any description, you want to be sure that that has been properly fire safety tested, and if not, you want it replaced. thank you very much, sarah campbell. more than £1 billion a year will need to be spent to protect homes and infrastructure from the effects of climate change, according to the environment agency. it says more than five million people in england could be affected, with some communities having to move elsewhere. 0ur environment analyst, roger harrabin, explains. floods have wreaked havoc in the uk in recent years. 17,500 properties were flooded and several bridges collapsed in storms desmond and eva.
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the collapse of tadcaster bridge sent locals on a ten mile round trip to get from one side of town to the other. the environment agency forecasts more intense bursts of rain and continuing coastal erosion with climate change. it says currently two—thirds of properties in england are served by infrastructure that is at risk of flooding and it calculates that for every home flooded, around 16 more suffer problems with power, transport or telecommunications. we should invest heavily to protect properties, it says. we can't continue to wage a war against water by building ever higher flood defences and barriers. so we are preparing for resilience measures, bringing in a range of different methods for better protecting communities against flooding and climate change. house—building on flood plains to cope with the uk's growing population will mean properties built there will double over the next 50 years, the agency said.
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the government said it was taking the risk of climate change seriously and would be seeking evidence for its own flood policy in the autumn. roger harrabin, bbc news. well, earlier i spoke tojim hall, professor of climate and environmental risk at oxford university. he's an expert in flooding and coastal erosion. he started by giving me his reaction to the environment agency's flood strategy, which was published today. i think they are saying the right things, actually, that we need to look much more seriously at the risks of flooding and coastal erosion and put together a strategy which does a number of things at the same time. that's not easy for government. it involves joining up across planning, land use, agriculture, cities, but it's exactly what we need to do. and how do you compare this report to what you think needs to be done? are you singing from
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the same hymn sheet? this is the opening of a consultation. the environment agency have been working on this strategy for a while. what we've got now is an invitation for people to submit their responses to the consultation, but the way in which its framed, i'm actually very supportive of. what we need to look out for, of course, is how it's delivered and how quickly it's delivered, whether the government is prepared to face up to some of the tough choices that it implies. and whether the government is prepared, i guess, to divert more funds into the environment agency, because we all know there have been plenty of examples of communities in different parts of the country battling with the environment agency in some cases to get the money for schemes that they say would protect their areas. yeah, this isn'tjust about money. it's also about land use planning,
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what happens in buildings, how buildings are built, what happens in agriculture in rural areas, but you are absolutely right, it's about money as well, and part of it is about the ways in which money is spent. the environment agency traditionally, of course, spends its money on flood protection, coastal defences, maintaining rivers. i think, if they are going to be successful with this strategy, the government and the environment agency need to be ready to look at spending money on different things. one of the things which the strategy raises is the possibility of having to retreat some coastal communities, and that's going to take investment, it's going to take a lot of investment in time, and in helping people who are hardest hit so that they don't incur
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unreasonable losses. that was professorjim horne that was professorjim home from 0xford that was professorjim home from oxford university. some breaking news coming in. police in northern ireland investigating the murder of journalist lyra mckee in londonderry last month say they have arrested four people under anti—terrorism legislation. they are aged 15, 18, 38 and 51 and are being questioned ata 38 and 51 and are being questioned at a police station in belfast. the officer in charge of the investigation, jason murphy, said, as part of this morning's operation, detectives carried out searches of four houses in the city, and we think that refers to londonderry, and arrested four people in connection with the violence which was orchestrated on the streets of creggan on the evening of lyra mckee's murder. they are currently
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in custody and being questioned. la ra in custody and being questioned. lara mckee was shot while observing rioting in derry last month. police investigating have arrested four people under anti—terrorism legislation. nearly one in five police officers across the uk have symptoms of post—traumatic stress disorder, according to a major study by the university of cambridge. the research found that many try to continue working with the condition, and only a minority of staff have been clinically diagnosed. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw, reports. he's a policeman who runs towards danger. not afraid to break down doors or break up a fight. but pc lee jackson was floored by ptsd. post—traumatic stress disorder. someone tried to gouge my eye out and i was blinded for a short while. i dealt with that. thought i could, as i had done before, move on from it, but i was having flashbacks. i would wake up in a sweat, physically
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feeling like i was back living that moment again. a new survey of almost 17,000 police officers suggests that ptsd is far we are going to pull away from that report to go to the university of kent in chatham, wherejeremy corbyn is launching labour's european elections. nobody expected us to be holding these european elections, but the government's complete failure on brexit means they are going ahead against a backdrop of division and frustration. a vote for labour is a vote to bring our divided country back together. labour is the only party with a plan to unite our country and make it work for the many, not the few. we will end austerity, invest in our economy and our communities, and raise wages and living standards. labour's alternative plan for
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brexit, which protectsjobs, living standards and communities, would end the chaos caused by the conservatives and let us focus on the other big issues facing our country. it is a real and credible plan that would allow the next labour government to rebuild our manufacturing industries and restore pride and prosperity to parts of our country that have been neglected for far too long. that neglect was, i believe, a major reason behind the vote for brexit in the first place. three years of botched negotiations between the government and the eu have left everyone frustrated. 0ver 17 million people voted to leave the european union. as democratic socialists, we cannot ignore that. we voted to trigger article 50 in 2017 and promised to respect the
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referendum in our general election ma nifesto, referendum in our general election manifesto, and again at our party conference in liverpool last year. but we cannot respect the government's shambolic handling of brexit, which has caused huge uncertainty for people, businesses and jobs. when theresa may became prime minister, she didn't consult either parliament or the country. brexit policy was announced through a series of speeches, declared, never discussed. what we got was three years of the tories spending more time arguing with themselves than negotiating with europe. what the prime minister finally cooked than negotiating with europe. what the prime ministerfinally cooked up led to the biggest government defeat in britain's parliamentary history. it wasn't until that damaging deal had been defeated three times that
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the government, and the government had already missed its own deadline for leaving, that the prime minister finally admitted she needed to compromise. labour agreed to talks because we believed it was the right thing to do, to see if we could get a better deal in line with our plan. the needs of businesses and trade unions, a deal that would see us leave the eu but keep a close relationship with our major trading partners. so far, in those talks, there has been no bid offer, and the red lines remain in place. —— no bigger offer. it's actually quite difficult negotiating with a disintegrating government, with cabinet ministers jockeying for succession rather than working for an agreement. it is in the country's interest to try and get this sorted, one way or the other, but we can never accept the government's bad
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deal or a disastrous no deal. so, if we can't get a sensible deal along the lines of our alternative plan, ora the lines of our alternative plan, or a general election, labour backs the option of a public vote on it. applause iam...i applause iam... iam very applause i am... i am very worried about how divided our society has become. every week, i go to a different part of the country, campaigning, meeting people and spending a lot of time listening to people in all kinds of different places, factories, schools, colleges, on the street, ca re schools, colleges, on the street, care homes, hospitals. and, overthe last year, i have seen the divisions grow around brexit. in communities, infamilies, grow around brexit. in communities, in families, there are real tensions, realtensions. so how
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in families, there are real tensions, real tensions. so how do we go forward? we could all retreat to our respective side of the argument and let the bitterness drive us further apart. we could allow ourselves to be defined only as remainers or leavers, labels that meant nothing to us only a few years ago. but where would that take us? who wants to live in a country stuck in this endless loop? what's needed isa in this endless loop? what's needed is a bit of understanding, understanding of why so many people felt so frustrated with the system they voted to leave, and understanding why so many others believe that staying in the eu is the only way to protect our valuable, open and diverse society. some people seem to look at the
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issue the wrong way round. they tend to think the first question is leave or remain, as if either is actually an end in itself. i think they are wrong. the first question is, what kind of society do we want to be? on that, people can find so much common ground. labour, and only labour, stands on that common ground in this election. that's why we insist the real divide in our country is not how people voted in 2016. the real divide is between the many and the few. whether you are in tottenham or mansfield, stockwell stoke, medway or manchester, so many of the problems you face are exactly the same. and, while the government's incompetence and divisions over
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brexit have created this deadlock, the injustices in our society are deepening. those injustices aren't to do with backstops, implementation periods and all that rather strange and often obscure jargon. they are about whether your children will go toa about whether your children will go to a school that can afford the basics, or whether the teacher since begging letters to parents. whether your relatives will be treated quickly and safely on the national health service, or wait in pain and distress for months. whether your pa rents distress for months. whether your parents will get a helping hand in old age, or be left isolated and very afraid. and whether we, as a country, can end the burning injustices in our society. theresa may once talked about them but did
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nothing about them. austerity, insecure work, low wages because anger and disillusionment. some want to use that to stoke further division. but it wasn't the european union that slashed public services to pay for tax cuts for the richest, it was a tory government. it wasn't nurses and teachers who crashed our economy, it was bankers and hedge funds. and it wasn't immigrants who caused the biggest squeeze on wages since the napoleonic wars, it was bad employers. applause we need solutions, not scapegoats. when you blame your neighbour, rather than the powerful, for problems with the health system, or
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for overcrowded classrooms or lack of housing, you are letting those responsible off the hook. you haven't trained a doctor, you haven't trained a doctor, you haven't trained a nurse, you haven't opened a new school, you haven't built a house, you haven't secured a penny of extra investment. all you've done is fuel an atmosphere of division and nastiness in our society. applause it is only by coming together and working together that we can improve peoples lives. labour will stand up for all workers, black and white. and we will guarantee the rights of eu citizens and students in this
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country, and british people who want to work and study in the eu in the same way. we are internationalists to our very core. that's what our party was founded for more than 100 yea rs party was founded for more than 100 years ago. so, when we see the emboldened far right strutting its stuff across europe, and in this country, in the shape of ukip and its hangers on, our response is to strengthen our ties with working—class and progressive movements, both at home and abroad. applause the biggest... the biggest issues facing us like tax avoidance and the power of multinational corporations, our international issues that demand international solutions, and the biggest issue of all, and it is the
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biggest issue of all, and it is the biggest of all, the climate and environment emergency that threatens everyone's future. it cannot be averted by one country alone. climate breakdown, air pollution and the frightening, the terrifying loss of species, demand and require collaboration across national borders. and i am so proud that labour led the way last week to make the uk parliament the first in the world to declare an environmental and climate emergency. applause and...i applause and... i hope ouraction applause and... i hope our action from the opposition benches sparks a wave of declaration of climate emergency by parliaments and governments around the world. because we have to work
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together to confront the issues facing the whole globe. if we don't, we are all facing a very uncertain future. so we will always work and cooperate closely with progressive allies, in europe and all across the world. these elections are also a chance to challenge the poison being peddled by the likes of nigel farage. shouts of assent. he says brexit is being blocked by the elite. it's not true. the large majority of mps have voted for a brexit deal in one form or another. the brexit party is in fact the no deal party. and, for millions, no deal party. and, for millions, no deal would mean no jobs, deal party. and, for millions, no deal would mean nojobs, and economic shock threatening entire
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industries, and, here in kent, turning the m20 into a permanent lorry park, causing massive disruption and, of course, pollution. it would be an elite brexit that would only work for the richest. those who want to deregulate, slash public services, to deny rights of work and still further. it would be a donald trump brexit, leaving us at the mercy of a reckless and bellicose us administration. nigel farage's brexit is a brexit conspiracy theorists, for those who see muslims and migrants like george soros as their enemy. 0nly labour can see off their enemy. 0nly labour can see off the farage snake oil in this election. cheering and applause.
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and standby our shared values of respect, tolerance, openness, and be proud of our diversity. it's said that labour is trying to offer something for everyone over brexit. i make no apology for that. labour will never be the party of the 52 or the party of the 48. we are the party of the great majority who reject the politics of smear and scapegoating. applause we area applause we are a party of unity and social justice. 0ther we are a party of unity and social justice. other parties appeal to justice. other parties appeal to just one side of the brexit debate, because they are not really committed to taking on the tax dodgers, the big polluters or the financial gamblers who crashed our economy a decade ago. to transform our economy, our country and tackle
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injustice, inequality and the climate crisis, we need to unite the overwhelming majority of people and ta ke overwhelming majority of people and take on the privileged and the powerful. labour will address the inequalities that helped fuel the brexit vote by investing in our communities and people all across the country, ending austerity and creating a fairer society. and we will lead the fight against racism, at home and across europe, wherever it raises its ugly head. applause its labour that wants to bring our country back together. so, whether you voted leave or remain in 2016, i urge you to vote for labour in these elections, for the party that is determined to bring the many
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together and take on the entrenched power of the few. thank you very much. cheering and applause. thank you. we'll take some questions. first from the media, and will take them in groups of three. to begin with, we've got laura kuenssberg. thank you very much. mr corbyn, you say that leave or remain are unhelpful labels, but there are many people in your party, perhaps in this room, who would like labour to bea in this room, who would like labour to be a remain party, who would like
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you to try and stop brexit. can you tell voters if labour is now definitely a brexit party, or could you still be a remain party? and, if i may, on the cross—party talks, you sound downbeat about the prospects ofa sound downbeat about the prospects of a deal for the is there any chance of a deal now between labour and the tories to find compromise customer and can and the tories to find compromise customer and can we and the tories to find compromise customer and can we have ruby? isn't there a danger these elections could be even more toxic for you than the local elections because of confusion over your brexit policy? why should vote rs over your brexit policy? why should voters bother to turn out if they don't really know whether you are in favour of leaving the eu or remaining in it? and a question from a localjournalist, paul francis. would you accept that the confusion over the party's position on brexit
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cost it votes at the council elections, and what is your message to the 64% of voters in medway that you will deliver brexit? thanks for your questions. laura, your question about unhelpful labels —we your question about unhelpful labels — we are your question about unhelpful labels —we area your question about unhelpful labels — we are a party that contested the referendum in 2016 on a remain and reform programme. the result, as we all know, but what it was. we triggered article 50, respecting the referendum, and we have since continually put forward a view of a customs union with the eu, access to european markets and dynamic protection of rights obtained through eu membership to use as a floor for future labour government
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policies. we will put those forward, and that is what we are doing in the talks were having with the government at the present time. as you know, our manifesto includes the option of a public vote on the outcome of all of that process. the talks we are having with the government have been difficult because, as i said, the government is in some degree of disarray itself. they are still ongoing. 0ur point is that we want to protect jobs, protect trade and protect those rights we have obtained. and we will have a further meeting. honestly, the government has to move its red lines. we cannot keep going until there is a bill we have yet to actually see. if not, the issue has to come back to parliament at the earliest opportunity. 0n the question of the toxic nature of the
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debate, i am appalled at the remarks made by nigel farage and others that do create a degree of toxicity in our society. and we have to stand up against it, as i indicated in my speech. i don't want this to become some kind of toxic election. i have set out what voting labour will do. it will also be saying, we vote for a party that is serious about the kind of society we want to live in in this country, and that message will be put out very clearly. in future relationships with the eu, it will be one where we have trait, a similarity of rights and conditions. we fully sign up to the european convention on human rights, and we
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will remain to do that. the alternative being put forward by nigel farage and others, and a substantial right on the conservative party, is a sweet hot trade with donald trump and the usa, which would result in investor protection powers, which would result in damaging rights and conditions that we have in our society, and i'm sure you will have noticed that there are those in the us administration and others that are eyeing up the possibility of american health care firms coming in to ta ke american health care firms coming in to take over our national health service, which is not for sale to anybody. we will protect it and we will do everything we can to make sure we have this relationship with europe in the future. and we are quite prepared to put the issue to a public vote at the conclusion of the parliamentary process. at the moment, there has not been a majority in parliament to get any of these things through. 0n the message we are putting forward, i don't
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think it is confusing at all. i think it is confusing at all. i think it is a sensible message saying that we understand what has happened, we have seen it and the causes of it, and we are putting forward a view that would ensure we had the opportunity of improving the social divisions within our society. and that is what we put forward in the local elections and put forward in these elections. and i'm looking forward to putting forward in a general election, which cannot be that far away. you cannot go on forever having a government with no majority in its own party, never mind no majority across parliament asa mind no majority across parliament as a whole. and in that general election, our message will be an investment led unifying economy, dealing with social injustice and extreme levels of poverty, and giving young people hope of life in a country where they don't have to go into debt to get an education, and they get equally valued, whether they go into vocational or university education, giving hope to
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a younger generation, and a government that is serious about dealing with climate emergencies. i am proud of what our party policies are, what we have achieved over the past few years in putting them forward , past few years in putting them forward, and i look forward to putting them forward in this campaign and in a general election campaign and in a general election campaign just as soon as it comes. i'm ready for it — don't worry about that. cheering applause another three from the media? all of the mirror. reports suggest that hate crime is rising on britain's streets. is this election a watershed moment to tackle the far right in the uk? and do the police
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and the authorities have the necessary powers to deal with the rise of the far right? thanks. can we have liz piper from reuters? i'm wondering what labour's position is? is it the same as the government's in the sense that you don't want any elected labour meps to take their seats? and one more? heather stuart. from the guardian. you talked in your speech, jeremy, about how people who call themselves leaf supporters will remain supporters first are looking at the issue the wrong way round. you think that is the case about nigel farage. is it sometimes the case about the most ardent remains. there was a headline
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this morning saying a rude word about brexit. do you think that is helpful? you will tempt me into bad language! 0liver, thanks for your question. there is a horrifying rise in hate crime in this country and across europe, with attacks on synagogues, mosques, and racist abuse on the streets. there is also abuse on the streets. there is also a big rise in violent crime and knife crime on our streets, and my own constituency is not immune from that. there are issues here of policing and police numbers in relation particularly to knife crime and community security. the last labour government introduced the concept of safer neighbourhood teams and far more pcos. there have been 20,000 police officers lost since the tory government came into office
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in 2010 with the support of the lib dems, and clearly there has to be more investment in policing and resources , more investment in policing and resources, but above all community—based policing, policing by consent within the community. your point about the rise of the far right and the behaviour of the far right, whether rr sufficient powers to deal with them, the rise of the far right is one where there are openly racist and nazi organisations operating in parts of europe, where there is a rise of anti—semitic parties and language, particularly in poland and hungary and other countries, and i pay tribute to people, many of them very young, in all of those countries, and also germany, austria, netherlands, france and so on, who have done everything they can to bring communities together and stand up against racism. the young people of europe do not want to live in a continent that is divided by the power of the far right. do we need
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more powers to challenge racist behaviour? i think we need to look at that, and we probably do. do we need the police to have more powers to be active in dealing with racist language and activities? yes, we do. and also make sure that police have a duty to deal with that kind of hate crime and hate language where it occurs. when you talk to a group of muslim women, as i have recently, about their experiences of life on the streets of this country, it is not good. the abuse they routinely receive on buses, trains, streets and so on, is totally and absolutely unacceptable. and so on, is totally and absolutely u na cce pta ble. let and so on, is totally and absolutely unacceptable. let us during the month of ramadan be proud of the diversity of our society and respect each other‘s faiths, values and ideas. that surely is a very fundamental message. a country that allows itself to be divided on
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ethnic grounds anywhere is a country thatis ethnic grounds anywhere is a country that is going to be in serious difficulties. i'm determined we bring people together in all their strengths and all their diversity. applause is our message the same as that of the government? absolutely not. it is very different because the number —— a number of things. one is that we wa nt —— a number of things. one is that we want to invest in the future rather than continue tax breaks for the very wealthiest. we will end austerity. theresa may bizarrely claimed that the tory party conference that austerity was over and you should have seen philip hammond's face because he hadn't been told. and he sits next to her at prime ministers question time and still doesn't appear to have been told, because austerity is continuing. so, we fight these elections in order to make sure that whatever the relationship in the future with europe we are on the
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same page, on rights and regulations, and that we maintain that trading relationship. as i said in my contribution, a no—deal brexit would be disastrous for manufacturing and service industries across britain, and it would be disastrous for the job prospects of many people, and that is why we have successfully in parliament got the option of no deal taken off the table so far. and we also forced the government to finally concede that parliament will have a say on this. remember, when the first withdrawal bill was introduced, the bill actually gave powers that henry viii would have been proud of to the then brexit secretary david davis. remember him? which would have allowed essentially the secretary of state to decide everything. we have empowered parliament, and i'm proud of what we have achieved in doing that. on the message that heather asked about, what we want to do is
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bring people together. we want to get a message across about the kind of country and continent we want to live in. and we are contesting these elections with our candidates because we want them to be elected, and we want them to play their part in the european parliament as long as they are there. applause i thank the labour meps for the work they have done on the environment, on challenging the unaccountable power of multinational corporations, on dealing with the refugee crisis ina on dealing with the refugee crisis in a decent, humanitarian and human way, standing up against the far right in the european parliament and elsewhere. we are contesting these elections very seriously to get that message across. we will work with people across europe. since i have become leader of the party, i have spent a great deal of time meeting fellow socialist party leaders
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across the continent and working with the party of european socialists. whatever the outcome of this process, we will still work closely with them, because you won't deal with the climate emergency on your own. pollution blows across the channel both ways. applause thanks, jeremy. we will have three questions from the audience. if i can ask you to indicate if you have got a question and we will get the microphone to you. your self, down here. there we go. thank you very much. i know that brexit is important at the moment, but as far as i'm concerned, there are more pending issues on our doorstep, and thatis pending issues on our doorstep, and that is 4 million children plus living in abject poverty. i know we
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are not in government, but as a party, isn't there anything we can do to start improving the lives of these children, because it is totally not acce pta ble these children, because it is totally not acceptable at all? that gentleman there. the microphone is coming. as a remainder who doesn't think we should go for a second vote, what will you be putting a second vote to the people? i think it is going against democracy of the 70 million that voted to leave. that is my question. "17 voted to leave. that is my question. —— 17 million. voted to leave. that is my question. -- 17 million. while i was campaigning to become a local councillor, many people were angry because brexit didn't happen and they would rather have a no deal.
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what do we say to those people when we go and knock on their door again? what do we actually say to them? thanks for the questions. the first one, thank you. the problem with the debate over brexit has now gone on for so long in the british parliament that just about everything else gets drowned out in the debate and discussion. i have used prime ministers question time any time to ask questions about brexit, but some weeks ago, i decided i wouldn't do that. i asked her about knife crime, about the national health service and austerity and the problems faced across the whole country. and i had thousands of people saying thank you for giving a voice to those other issues. and i will continue to do that. applause your point about children and their opportunities in growing up — they
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only have one childhood, obviously, and if that is one where you can't get a nursery place, your primary school is underfunded, your parents and carers don't have enough money to feed you, and your idea of getting food isn't going to a supermarket but to a food bank, and you are growing up with hand—me—down clothes got from a charity shop or from the equivalent of a food bank foreclose, your life chances are pretty poor. there was report from the house of commons education select committee on the effects of nursery education, or nursery opportunities. and they pointed out that children that had nursery opportunity from the age of two to fourfor opportunity from the age of two to four for 30 hours opportunity from the age of two to fourfor 30 hours a opportunity from the age of two to four for 30 hours a week tended to do well in primary school and secondary school and go achieve apprenticeships, university and all the options they had got. those
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children that didn't get that opportunity were between 18 months and two years less educationally advanced than the others by the time they reached school leaving age at they reached school leaving age at the end of year 11 in secondary school. and that is happening now in this country. and so, we demand of the government to end the cuts to school budgets, to end the underfunding of schools, and in brief form, our policy is 30 hours of free nursery provision for all to — four—year—olds, wherever they are, no postcode lottery, so they all get that opportunity and chance. proper funding of primary schools with a free school meal for every primary school child eating together, so you don't have the segregation of those that get the meal and those that get the sandwiches. it's not right. bad message for those children. and an investment in creative education and skills education so that children,
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all children, through a pupil arts premium, getan all children, through a pupil arts premium, get an opportunity to learn musical instruments and develop the functional skills they need. it requires money and investment in schools. and further down the line, obviously ending, as i announced at the conference, sat for key stages one and two. and further down the line beyond that, raising corporation tax in order to end university fees so that there is a real choice of whether you go to university or whether you go to vocational training or whatever else. applause i will be giving real hope and real opportunity. in... jeremy corbyn answering a couple more questions at the end of his launch of the partyeuropean election the end of his launch of the pa rtyeuropean election campaign. listening to that, our assistant political editor norman smith in westminster. norman, jeremy corbyn said he made no apologies for having one foot in the camp of delivering
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brexit and one behind backing a second public vote in certain circumstances. how much is that a risky strategy, do you think, as labour heads into these elections? usually risky. the fear of some labour mps is that it is tantamount to sitting in the middle—of—the—road as to greatjuggernaut are coming towards you, one marked leave and one marked remain. a telling phrase in the conference was when mr corbyn said in response to questions about where labour stood, i don't think there is any confusion about our message. i suspect there is a degree of confusion, because mr corbyn again reiterated that the party would not ignore the result of the referendum. 17 million people voted for it, he reiterated that the party conference had confirmed that labour would respect the result of the referendum. and at the same time, he ta kes a referendum. and at the same time, he takes a tilt to try and appease
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remainers by saying, but don't worry, we are keeping on the table the option of a public vote. so, he is trying to keep both camps together. his hope is that that is a unity message, that it suggests that perhaps that is the way to bring the country back together, not to throw everything in with leave or remain supporters. as we saw during the local elections, the danger is that you end up satisfying absolutely nobody. and in the european elections, that is going to be extraordinarily polarised, because you have nigel farage and the brexit party piling in on one side, and you have change uk piling in on the other. and in european elections, tribal party loyalties don't count so much. people feel free to cast their votes around. i think there is a real danger that there is a lack of clarity in the labour message, and that could punish them. norman, for the moment, thank you very much. more from norman at 12, but let's
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get the business news with victoria. this £20 million. that was the bill the government was warned about last year, if it was sued over finding ferries at the last minute to carry freight if britain exited the eu without a brexit deal. in march, the government agreed to a £33 million settlement with eurotunnel. the government was accused of handing out contracts to three ferry operators without consulting the tunnel about what service it could offer. not so super. it's third time unlucky for the fashion brand as superdry warns yet again that profits will fall short of expectations. in april, the co—founder reinstalled himself at the top of the company in a bid to turn the firm around. julian dunkerton is scrapping a foray into childrenswear, increasing the number of products sold online & hoping to sell more at full price. claiming for delays and cancellations on train journeys is too difficult, so says the consumer group which. a survey of rail compensation
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schemes found that some rail operators ask for as many as 2a separate pieces of information before a claim can be made. rail bosses say this guards against fraudulent claims. the new boss of bt has unveiled plans this morning to connect millions of homes with full fibre by the mid—2020s if — and there's always an "if" — the regulatory conditions are right. the industry have been under pressure to connect more homes to full fibre as britain lags behind other countries with its older, slower copper network.there was good news too for those who own shares in the company. bt is keeping its dividend, or the income it pays to owners of shares, at the same level for the new financial year. there had been some speculation as to whether it would be raided in order to pay for big investment plans. this is an important time for the company. its recovering from an expensive accounting scandal in italy, pretty weak financial performance and enjoys a less than harmonious relationship with regulators.
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karen egan is a telecoms analyst at enders analysis. can bt afford to roll out more fibre to more people more quickly? can bt afford to roll out more fibre to more people more quickly7m thinks it can roll—out more aggressively over the coming year and the following year. it is targeting 4 million homes rather than 3 million previously. it says it can do that without cutting the dividend. it is keeping its powder dry on the 50 million target by the mid—2020s, saying it will only do that if the conditions are right. those conditions are demand for faster speeds, the cost of roll—out and the regulatory conditions under which it is allowed to do that. it is saying that at that point if they do decide conditions are right and they are going to go ahead with the 15 million instead of 10 million, at
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that point, they will decide how to fund it. the cut in the dividend is just one of the options on the table there. when you think -- do you think when it comes to broadband that we will see a divide between rural and that we will see a divide between ruraland urban areas? that we will see a divide between rural and urban areas? it is something 0fcom has been on top of in terms of fibre roll—out, and for the first time, it is treating the rural part of the country separately to the more urban part will stop so, for the 30% of the country that is considered to be largely rural, it will encourage bt to roll—out there back till by regulating bt‘s rate of return, and giving a decent rate. that will give the certainty required, even though the cost of roll—out will be more expensive. in terms of the urban— rural divide, it is likely to diminish with fibre relative to broadband products in the past. that's good news. ee will
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be launching 5g imminently. after the huawei scandal, leaks and who did what, where and why, what can we expect? they will launch in six cities imminently, they say. and in about 16 cities in the uk by the end of the year. the main thing we should be seeing when they launch is an increase in capacity, in particular an increase in capacity and very busy areas, places where we lose connection and speed, like train stations and stadiums. that is the big benefit we will see this year. this year, however, the handsets available for 5g are quite high end and it won't be a mass—market product. the real benefits we will experience in 2020. thanks very much. very comprehensive, karen. in other business news we've been following, the owner of debenhams has rejected all bids to takeover the retailer. it says, for now, it'll press ahead with its turnaround plan. the proposal would close 50
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stores across the uk. debenhams is the biggest department store in the uk and employs about 25,000 people. competitive. challenging. the words we hear from the high street are being bandied about today by a supermarket. morrisons differs from its rivals by producing around a quarter of its own—label merchandise. it uses its wholesale channels to make the most of that capability — selling into the likes of the convenience store mccolls as well as amazon.com and a string of petrol stations. that part of the business is doing well. the store sales, however, underwhelmed industry watchers. morrisons blamed lacklustre trade on ongoing political uncertainty. it also announced that its exclusive relationship with 0cado for online delivery, sealed in 2013, would come to an end. always read the small print. unfortunately for the proofers on australia's new 50 aussie dollar bank note — a little "i" in responsibility has gone amiss — much to the embarrassment of the national bank.
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46 million notes are currently circulating the economy with the typo. i wonder how edith cowan, australia's first female member of parliament, would feel about the "great responsibilty" to be the only woman in parliament" and later, misquoted on that fact, on a bank note. that's all the business news. now, it's time for a look at the weather. we have sunshine developing at the moment. this is the scene in devon at the moment — fairly pleasant but not the whole picture because there are heavy showers across southern england at the moment, slow moving and perhaps on the rear in the afternoon. for the midlands, wales, north—west england and up into northern ireland, showery rain and lots of cloud sticking around. some sunshine in the north—east and
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across the south—west, where temperatures will get to 15 celsius. elsewhere, temperatures of 8—13dc. tonight, we will keep the zone of cloudy weather from northern tonight, we will keep the zone of cloudy weatherfrom northern ireland down to east anglia, some showery outbreaks of rain here. temperatures close to freezing in the north of england. elsewhere, 5—8dc. 0n friday, further showers widely across the uk. they will be slow moving and heavy in places, but sunny spells in between. quite mild or warm sunny spells in between. quite mild orwarm in the sunny spells in between. quite mild or warm in the south much earlier in the north. goodbye. —— much chillier.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live. these are today's main stories: the government will pay for replacing grenfell tower—type cladding on private tower blocks in england, at a cost of £200 million. jeremy corbyn has launched his party's european election campaign. the labour leader wants to appeal to both sides of the brexit debate and says the party can "unite the country". the real divide in our country is not how people voted in 2016 but between the money and the few. new rules from the pope which mean it's now obligatory for clerics and church officials to report allegations of violence or sexual abuse. the radio presenter danny baker's been fired by the bbc after writing
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what he called "a stupid" tweet about the duke and duchess of sussex's new baby. a stark warning that england's planners in the uk must "prepare for the worst", as global temperatures rise. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the government has allocated £200 million to replace unsafe cladding, like that used on grenfell tower, on more than 150 private tower blocks in england. ministers had previously told building owners to pay, but they say the work isn't being carried out quickly enough.
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housing secretary james brokenshire has this morning been explaining the government's decision. ultimately it's about dealing with these exceptional issues of public safety, about this particular material that's been used on a number of private buildings, and seeing that the decision is made quickly. now, the pace of change has not been fast enough. many developers have done the right thing, have stepped in, and we expect them to maintain those commitments and they have done so. but ultimately, what's been driving me is that sense of public safety and indeed the interests of those living in those buildings, caught up in a situation that they didn't know about, that they didn't expect, and therefore it is that need to get on, make progress and really see that change is happening, people are safe, feel safe within those buildings, and can do so. 0ur correspondent sarah campbell explained more about the government's decision.
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in social housing, that work has progressed much more quickly, so there are only about 30 buildings, sorry, 23 blocks that have still got this cladding, but with privately owned buildings something like 166 still have this cladding on the outside, and what building owners we re outside, and what building owners were saying, hang on, we are not going to pay it, we're going to pass the cost on to our tenants or leaseholders, people who live in the buildings, so the work simply wasn't happening. so you've got tenants and leaseholders currently having to pay forfire wardens to leaseholders currently having to pay for fire wardens to go round their buildings, and as you can imagine the stress of living in a building in which you are constantly worried that something like the grenfell fire disaster might happen there, a huge amount of stress. so the government has rowed back and said they are going to put forward £200 million to help these buildings in england, so two questions to do with
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this. first of all, if there are companies that have done it, are they going to be asked for their money to be recouped? is it fair that they had to pay and others won't have to? second issue, a lot of people are saying that it sounds like a lot of money but, talking about that many large buildings, will it be enough? also, as a guest in manchester told me earlier, they are calling that a partial win because there are other fire safety issues that this fund won't cover. there are also different types of cladding, so this is particular to the aluminium cladding found on g re nfell tower, the aluminium cladding found on grenfell tower, and we understand that testing will happen on other types of cladding, so they might be included in it, but that hasn't happened at the moment. if you are ina happened at the moment. if you are in a tower block that has any sort of cladding, you want to be sure that has been properly fire safety tested and, if not, you want it
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replaced. here with me now is nigel glen, the ceo of the association of residential managing agents. you are in the middle of the building owners and the tenants, generally leaseholders, so you are trying to facilitate a good relationship. what do you make of the government decision, given that a few months back it said it should be building owners who pay for this new cladding? is welcome news and it's nice to have some positive news for a change. there were plans to try and make the owners pay for quite a lot of work was done behind—the—scenes, but it's happening too slowly, so i think the cove na nt has happening too slowly, so i think the covenant has rightly in to provide funding. whether it's the right amount isa funding. whether it's the right amount is a question to ask. you say the government has rightly stepped m, the government has rightly stepped in, but many people would argue the building owners should have stepped up building owners should have stepped up and paid for that work and not delayed any ability to get on with that work. the secretary of state was clear it was the morally right thing to do, but legally
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leaseholders are the people that would be obliged to pay, and we pointed this out to the secretary of state at the time, saying the private sector would have a difficult situation because that anachronism between who is responsible and who pays. so you think it's right that the taxpayer should fund this bill, although you don't know if this amount of 200 million is going to be enough? when we did a survey of our members, we had 2a locks, 2750 homes, and on average that was 2.2 million per block, so you could argue that 300 billion would be closer to the figure, but this is a good start, and it's going to get people safe, and it's going to get people safe, and our point was always that time is of the essence, get people safe and lets argue about who pays later. we've heard about concerns that, although clearly this money is designed to cover the type of cladding which was involved in the g re nfell cladding which was involved in the grenfell fire, this aluminium
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composite material, it doesn't cover other types of cladding, about which there may be concerns, and other issues, for example, whether fire brea ks issues, for example, whether fire breaks in buildings are up to standard. are you worried that, even if this cladding is replaced, that there may be other safety concerns remaining? . i talked there may be other safety concerns remaining? . italked with there may be other safety concerns remaining? . i talked with somebody at the ministry about this this morning, and the acm is all that's being covered. there are other flammable materials that we are aware of, and the problem is, once you take this acm down, you look behind for the first time and you might see compared miller —— you might see compared miller —— you might see compared lies asian is not white, and it's not designed to cover those. —— can pen —— compartmentalisation for the thank you very much. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, has launched his party's campaign for the european elections. 0ur assistant political editor, norman smith, is in westminster this morning.
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jeremy corbyn making no apologies, and saying he was effectively trying to be all things to all people, and arguing that labour can unite people in these elections, but given that there are other options for voters who are absolutely remain or leave, can it? it's a high-risk strategy, but great balancing actjeremy corbyn has been trying to manage may be trying to keep a garda supporters on site while not alienating remain supporters. at one point, mr corbyn said, there is no confusion over our policy, but that is precisely what his critics say there is. it was interesting big buckets of cold water he appeared to pore over the cross— party water he appeared to pore over the cross—party talks. listen to this. the talks that we are having with the government have been difficult, because as i said the government is in some degree of disarray itself. they are still ongoing. 0ur point is that we want to protect jobs, protect trade and protect
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those rights that we have obtained, and we met again yesterday and there will be a further meeting coming up. quite honestly, the government has to move its red lines. we cannot go on having mvi, mv2, mv3, and then coming on for possibly an mv4 or a bill that we've yet to actually see. so we will continue with that. if not, the issue has to come back to parliament at the earliest possible opportunity. so, why does this matter? it matters because the government is hoping to bring the legislation to push through mrs may's deal to parliament this week or next week, but that would depend on getting the green light from jeremy corbyn, and listening to that, that ain't happening. interestingly, listen to mr corbyn rebuffing suggestions that his stance on brexit is confused. on
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the message that we are putting forward , the message that we are putting forward, i don't think it's confusing at all. i think it is a sensible message, saying we understand what's happened, we've seen what's happened, we've seen the causes of what's happened, and we are putting forward a view that would ensure we have an opportunity of improving the social divisions in our society, and that is what we put forward in the local elections and put forward in these elections, and lam put forward in these elections, and i am looking forward to putting forward in a general election, which cannot be that far away. you can't go on forever with a government with no majority in its own party, never mind not even a majority across parliament as a whole. i'm joined by labourmp mary craig, parliament as a whole. i'm joined by labour mp mary craig, a support of a people's vote. how seriously do you ta ke people's vote. how seriously do you take the claim that labour risks being pummelled by both sides in the european elections, because people are not sure where it stands and its policy satisfies no one? we've had
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council elections last week, where we saw big gains for the lib dems and the greens but also some of the brexit party is and the independents, so in a way a vote for none of the above, and i think the lesson is that standing in the middle of the road means you get run over from both sides, and the option ofa over from both sides, and the option of a confirmatory public vote on any deal is what is supported, notjust by our members and voters but also by our members and voters but also by the majority of people in this country, who now know the true cost of brexit. is there any possibilityjeremy corbyn could ever back another referendum? he seems to have been pretty consistent, that labour has to result the referendum result, it is in the manifesto, the party conference, and was by the nec?m was agreed at party conference that we are keeping the option of a public vote, and actually it's not an option in this crisis, it is the solution to this crisis. these
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cross—party talks have been going on for over months and they are going nowhere. 0ur red lines are around a customs union and protecting the good friday agreement, and a customs union does not do that, and a customs union would also shrink our economy by £80 billion over ten years, which means a rise in income tax of 2.5 p in the pound for ordinary voters or big cuts to public services. when we are looking ata public services. when we are looking at a public vote, the only way the prime minister's deal has a stable majority in parliament is if she moves on the option of putting it back to the people. that is the only way this will be resolved. how seriously do you take the threat of nigel farage's brexit party in labour leave seats? the farage has he is targeting them. we've seen this playback —— playbook before from nigel farage, who has presented himself as a fully fledged populist consulting with far right european
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parties, and the option for labour vote rs parties, and the option for labour voters considering voting for smaller parties, given the system of proportional representation, do they wa nt proportional representation, do they want to risk waking up on the 25th of may, when the results are in, and seeing nigel farage topping the polls? the danger of voting for one of the smaller parties is we lose labourmeps, and by of the smaller parties is we lose labour meps, and by and large for the most part our labour meps are alongside the majority of the parliamentary labour party wanting to see the prime minister's deal being put back to the people. thank you for your time. we've had the labour launch. i think there is still a question over whether we are going to get a conservative party launch, because that would be an extraordinary difficult election launch. thank you for that. norman smith at westminster. more on today's main stories coming up on newsroom live here on the bbc news channel, but now we say goodbye
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to viewers on bbc two. the church of england has been strongly criticised for the way it handled allegations of child abuse in the diocese of chichester. 18 members of the clergy in the area were convicted of offences during a 50—year period. a report by the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse said the church's response had been marked by "secrecy" and its apology " remained unconvincing". 0ur correspondent andy moore is in central london for us with more details. that last comment from the enquiry is particularly damning, isn't it? that's right, some pretty serious criticism of the church in this
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report from the independent inquiry into child sexual abuse, the wide—ranging enquiry looking at sexual abuse in many areas of public life. last year, it took hearings on allegations of sexual abuse in the church of england, specifically in the diocese of chichester in southern england, where 18 members of clergy have been imprisoned over the last five decades, and against peter ball, the former bishop of lewes a nd peter ball, the former bishop of lewes and later of gloucester. he was jailed in 2015 for a string of sexual assaults against teenagers and young men. today, we got this 250 page report detailing what the enquiry found of what it heard, and the top lines, as you say, it says the top lines, as you say, it says the church's apology remains unconvincing. particular criticism for lord carey, former archbishop of canterbury he says that his compassion for peter ball was often much greater than for the victims.
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it goes on to say that the church's response to claims of child sexual abuse was marked by secrecy, prevarication and avoidance of reporting alleged crimes. there is also some criticism of prince charles. he was a friend of peter ball before he was convicted. he wrote letters in support of him. prince charles told this enquiry in a letter that he was wrong to trust ball and he hadn't meant to influence the course ofjustice. but this report says prince charles was misguided in those actions. thank you very much for that. the headlines on bbc news... the government will provide £200 million of funding to replace unsafe cladding on more than 150 private tower blocks. jeremy corbyn says his party can "unite the country" as he launches labour's european election campaign.
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sport now. we begin with the champions league, and how often do get two matches like that two in a row? i can't remember a time we've had something like it! the tottenham boss mauricio pochettino says he's expecting an amazing all—english champions league final, after his side were inspired by liverpool to stage their own incredible comeback last night. they looked dead and buried at half—time, three goals down on aggregate and outclassed by a brilliant ajax side. but then it all changed — two quick goals from lucas moura made the fans dream, but could that become a reality? well, spurs' dreams came true — moura's hat—trick goal came in the sixth minute of injury time and left his
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manager in tears. isaid i said before, isaid before, i i said before, i think i repeat, these sentences, i think they are superhumans now. to build the club to the finals of the champions league, i think is very close to a miracle. there was some great reaction from some of the players on social media, giving us a glimpse behind the scenes. moussa sissoko caught these pictures inside the spurs dressing room. sheer joy at a first champions league final. well, by this time tomorrow we could be looking forward to another all—english european final. arsenal play valencia in the second leg of their europa league semifinal. chelsea are in action too,
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they play eintract frankfurt but there could be very big problems though for chelsea next season. fifa have upheld their ban from signing players during the next two transfer windows, after they broke the rules regarding registering young foreign players. chelsea can appeal to the court of arbritation for sport but it should mean more opportunities to younger players like ruben loftus—cheek. we'd have to keep the squad we have and may be bringing of the loaned players back to give us an opportunity to play more. for me, that's not something i should use to get the opportunity to play. it should be from hard work and playing well. danny cipriani says he is honoured to be named player of the year by the rugby players' association. it's voted for by his fellow players, and cipriani wins after guiding gloucester into the play—offs. he says he's now targeting premiership glory with his club and a place in england's world cup training squad. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for
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you in the next hour. you may be aware that prince harry is in the netherlands today, with what he sometimes calls his other family, the invictus games family, the games he launched for injured service personnel, and he is there in the hague, and we can hear what he's been saying in the last few minutes. your real highness, competitors, supporters, families and friends, i'm obviously delighted to be here today to help launch the countdown to the invictus games in the hague 2020. when we launch the first invictus games in 2014, i knew that these men and women, who had given it their all in service to their country, would now do the same on the sports field, inspiring millions of people around the world and changing mindsets around disability for ever. i have seen
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first—hand the tra nsformative disability for ever. i have seen first—hand the transformative power of sport in helping people physically and psychologically recover, and i knew the invictus games would change our lives, ca ptu re games would change our lives, capture hearts and a generation. the invictus generation. now here we are, launching the countdown to the fifth invictus games, and i am absolutely thrilled that many more wounded, injured and sick servicemen and women will have the opportunity to continue theirjourney to recovery. 0ur mental fitness to continue theirjourney to recovery. 0ur mentalfitness is to continue theirjourney to recovery. 0ur mental fitness is the key because, without it, we fail to operate efficiently, but with it your physical performance and potential are exponentially improved, and we've witnessed this over and over again. right now, thousands of hopeful competitors around the world are training hard, putting the hours in, and aiming to represent their country once again at next year's games. 19 nations will be represented here are
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standing shoulder shoulder and showing the world what teamwork, friendship and loyalty really means. in these challenging times, these values are more important than ever. being here today meeting you and yourfamily and being here today meeting you and your family and friends reminds us not only what these games mean to the competitors but also the impact they have on the wider public. it is your resilience, your determination and your courage which draws crowds in their thousands. leaving them feeling more inspired, moved and proud than they ever thought possible. you have already proved anything is possible. the netherlands have supported the games from the very beginning, and i think we can all clearly remember seeing a sea of orange in the crowds at 0rlando, london, toronto and sydney, as well as hearing you.
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laughter applause and today's visit has given me a real taste of what competitors and theirfamily real taste of what competitors and their family and friends can expect exterior. i know that, once again, you will fully get behind the servicemen and women who have represented their countries so bravely, and i know everybody watching here and around the world will not want to miss a single moment of these games. make these games your own, and we chose it for a reason, not just games your own, and we chose it for a reason, notjust because like the colour orange thank you all for guarding the invictus spurs, and see you in 2020. prince harry launching invictus 2020 in the netherlands, andi invictus 2020 in the netherlands, and i spoke to the chief executive of the organisation a couple of days ago, and he said he'd be marking vince harry's new arrival, and during this launch, as you'll see in
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just a minute, the prince is presented with a baby grow for the new arrival, and invictus games baby grow, much appreciated by everyone there, i think, for archie harrison. that's his new son. yes, definitely a little bit too small for him. he looks very happy. broadcaster danny baker has been sacked as a bbc five live presenter after posting a tweet about the newborn son of the duke and duchess of sussex which included a picture of a chimpanzee. the tweet showed a black and white photo of a well—dressed man and woman outside a building, holding hands with a chimp in a suit, above the caption "royal baby leaves hospital". mr baker, who had a weekly show, said it was a joke about royals and circus animals. he later deleted the tweet, describing it as grotesque,
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and apologised. here's what he had to say on his doorstep earlier. where are you from? you mightjust as well record of these photos. we've seen your tweets. that's all you need to do. what did they say? bbc‘s... bleep. it's by mutual agreement. the fiancee of xavier thomas — the first person killed in the london bridge attacks two years ago — has told his inquest that she had a premonition of a terror attack on the day he died. the inquest has begun examining the circumstances of each of the eight people killed.
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0ur correspondent richard lister is at the old bailey. really ha rd really hard listening in these inquests, richard. is very emotional morning. we are two days into this process , morning. we are two days into this process, and we've had a summary of the ten minute attack by these three attackers in june the ten minute attack by these three attackers injune 2017, and now the coroner is hearing the circumstances of each of the eight individual deaths, with puri the first to die, so he is the first to be addressed, —— —— with xavier thomas the first to die for his fiancee said they had arrived for a few days of sightseeing and xavier thomas had arranged for them to go to the shard, and she had premonitions about terror attacks and she tried to get him to change his plans. but she said he persuaded her, he made
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all the preparations properly, and she was ultimately persuaded to go. she said, when she was on the bridge as they were walking across to the shard, she said the next thing she was aware of what is the blinding light of the van coming up behind them. she says she remembers little about moment apart from the lights from the van, then she remembers waking up, lying on the ground, and thinking that she had died. she said, the curtain had fallen over me, iwas said, the curtain had fallen over me, i was dead, i said, the curtain had fallen over me, iwas dead, i had no recollection of the crash, it was as though my world had gone black. she said, coming in and out of consciousness, she asked people what had happened to xavier thomas, but his body wasn't found for another three days. richard lister, thank you. police investigating the murder of the journalist lyra mckee in londonderry have arrested four people under anti—terrorism legislation. they are being questioned at a police station in belfast. ms mckee, who was 29, was shot
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during rioting in the creggan area of derry last month. eu leaders are meeting to discuss the future of the union at an informal summit in romania. the event, which was scheduled two years ago, was initially planned for the 27 countries to look ahead following the uk's scheduled departure from the bloc on 29th march. brexit is not on the agenda and britain is not formally taking part. leaders are expected to discuss plans for the eu's most senior positions when their current occupants retire later this year. 0ur brussels correspondent, adam fleming, is in the town of sibiu pron. although i'm just been told that we've lost that link, so we can't cross adam. we may able to get back to him later. i'm waiting to find out if we can reach him. we actually do have adam. he is covering that summit. hello, adam, glad we've
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managed to talk to you. a much lower profile role, shall we say, for the uk, with theresa may not attending this. yes, sorry i was a bit low profile there. another programme came across and tried to get me on, but i'm back. this was meant to be a big launch pad for the eu and 27 members with the uk gone. it was originally the idea ofjean—claude juncker, the president of the european commission, who wanted it to be the day after brexit day on march the 29th. but the uk is still a member of the eu, but theresa may has stayed away so that the 27 can talk about what their future is going to be like without the uk, and in the last few minutes the 27 leaders have published the sibiu declaration, which is ten grand
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principles going forward. there is nothing particularly surprising, with lots of stuff about how they need to remain united in the face of the world's modern challenges, what this meeting has turned into kind of launch pad for the european parliament elections, which take place in a couple of weeks. having said that, you can never really escape brexit in eu circles because, even though theresa may is not here, stephen barclay, the brexit secretary, is in town, attending a separate conference about the future of europe, and we caught up with him and he made some brief remarks. how are the talks going with labour? ongoing, in good faith, and we are making progress. when will they finish? a little glimpse of the post brexit future. the 27 leaders of the other eu leaders meeting at the top table in buildings like this, the uk still kind of involve but on the
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sidelines. an amazing moment a little while ago — all the leaders came out for their family photo little while ago — all the leaders came out for theirfamily photo in the square here, and the members of the square here, and the members of the public started applauding, so the public started applauding, so the leaders went over and chatted to the leaders went over and chatted to the members of the public, and we got our chance to stand and chat to angela merkel and emmanuel macron. i asked president micron if he was sad theresa may wasn't here, and he said, it's not my fault — the uk voted to leave. another glimpse of what the future looks like for the uk. adam, thanks. let's look at the weather forecast. not as changeable as yesterday, when there was frequent heavy showers, thunder and lightning. having said that, there are a few showers around today. not as many. one or two bolts of lightning in the south—east. the reason for this weather today is
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that the low pressure that brought the unsettled conditions yesterday is still close by. it is out in the north sea, so close enough to throw in some cloud and showers. to the far north onto the far south, the weather is generally dry some sunshine. if you look at the arrows, you can see they are coming from the north. that is colder air from the norwegian sea. clear skies in scotla nd norwegian sea. clear skies in scotland and the north—east of england will lead to a touch of frost. not quite so cold in the south. from friday, it settles down. into the weekend and next week, high pressure builds, and it will be dry and sunny. hello this is bbc newsroom live with annita mcvey. the headlines: the government will pay for replacing grenfell tower —type cladding on private tower blocks
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in england — at a cost of £200 million. jeremy corbyn has launched his party's european election campaign. the labour leader wants to appeal to both sides of the brexit debate — and says the party can "unite the country". severe criticism for the church of england over the way it handled allegations of child abuse in the diocese of chichester. 18 members of the clergy in the area were convicted over a 50—year period. the broadcaster danny baker's been fired from 5live after tweeting what he called ‘a joke' on twitter about the duke and duchess of sussex's new baby. four people have been arrested in connection with the murder ofjournalist lyra mckee. broadcaster danny baker has been sacked as a bbc five live presenter after posting a tweet
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about the newborn son of the duke and duchess of sussex which included a picture of a chimpanzee. the tweet showed a black and white photo of a well—dressed man and woman outside a building, holding hands with a chimp in a suit, above the caption ‘royal baby leaves hospital'. mr baker, who had a weekly show, said it was a joke about royals and circus animals. he later deleted the tweet, describing it as grotesque, and apologised. joining me now is our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba. when did news emerge after this tweet of the sacking? it first emerged when he himself tweeted that he had been fired by the bbc, and that was followed up very shortly afterwards by the bbc confirming that a senior 5live figure had talked to danny baker and told him he was being sacked as a result of
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this. opinion has been split in many ways on this particular issue. he himself, after he tweeted this last night, apologised and said he didn't realise at the time that it could have racial connotations. some people have taken that absolutely at face value and said he is not that kind of broadcaster or that kind of person. however, others have taken the view that a broadcaster and journalist of his experience should have realised that this could be the way it would be interpreted by many people seeing that on social media, particularly as the issue of racism against footballers has been very much in the news over the past few months. and then going on from that, it is the issue of what happened with his apologies. again, he apologised. the apology, or the commentary initially when he was confronted on his doorstep, seemed bizarre. yellow might even going back to the tweets where he made his apologies after deleting that
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initial tweet, he said these were stupid, unthinking tweets and he apologised. again, some people have taken that at face value. others have said that he has added onto those apologies. i guess it was my turn in the barrel and my mind doesn't work that way because i don't have a diseased mind. people have criticised him for almost trying to make himself a victim of all of this and not making up your unadorned apology and saying, this happened, i said this and shouldn't have, should have realised it had racial connotations, and that has been part of the particular issue here, in that now even after he has been sacked, he said they have got this pompous kind of attitude and false gravity towards it, and the bbc have thrown him under the bus. he had lots of other people out there, it must be said, have taken there, it must be said, have taken the opinion that he made a mistake, apologised and that should be the end of it. but the bbc and many
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others have taken the view that he is an experienced broadcaster and journalist and shouldn't have done it in the first place. and that is why they had a zero tolerance approach to this. thank you very much. the environment agency is warning that some communities in areas that are vulnerable to flooding or coastal errosion may need to move, because of the threat posed by climate change. the agency says britain needs to invest at least one billion pounds every year in flood and coastal defences. here's our environment analyst, roger harrabin. floods have wreaked havoc in the uk in recent years. 17,500 properties were flooded and several bridges collapsed in storms desmond and eva. the collapse of tadcaster bridge sent locals on a ten mile round trip to get from one side of town to the other. the environment agency forecasts more intense bursts of rain and continuing coastal erosion with climate change. it says currently two—thirds of properties in england are served by infrastructure that is at risk
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of flooding and it calculates that for every home flooded, around 16 more suffer problems with power, transport or telecommunications. we should invest heavily to protect properties, it says. we can't continue to wage a war against water by building ever higher flood defences and barriers. so we are preparing for resilience measures, bringing in a range of different methods for better protecting communities against flooding and climate change. house—building on flood plains to cope with the uk's growing population will mean properties built there will double over the next 50 years, the agency said. the government said it was taking the risk of climate change seriously and would be seeking evidence for its own flood policy in the autumn. roger harrabin, bbc news. the government has allocated two hundred million pounds
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to replace unsafe cladding — like that used on grenfell tower — on more than 150 private tower blocks in england. ministers had previously told building owners to pay but say the work isn't being carried out quickly enough. with me now is rachel loudain, who is part of the uk cladding action group and lives in a block clad with acm cladding. acm stands for aluminium composite material, the type of cladding on g re nfell tower. material, the type of cladding on grenfell tower. has there been a dispute in your block over who should pay for the change of cladding? in my blog, we are actually a fully acm clad building, and we have tried to go through the roots that the government had previously put out there as routes of helpful leaseholders that might help for leaseholders in this building, and they have not come to
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a satisfactory conclusion. no developer took responsibility, no freeholder, and we didn't have an option with insurance, and that is why we are in full agreement that the government has done the right thing for a proportion of people in the country. how stressful has it been living in a block which still has this type of cladding and having to go on top of that through this fight to try to get it changed? so, as part of uk cladding action group, we have been involved with a number of blocks around the uk. there are 166 affected by cladding safety concerns, and it has been hugely stressful for everyone involved. firstly, from a safety perspective. secondly, from a financial perspective. people have had bills that demand money instantly, and they do not and did not have the money to pay for these. and you have had to employ fire wardens for your block as well. who is paying for
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them? yes, although the government advice previously was that leaseholders shouldn't pay for this, they are the only ones in blocks that still have cladding to pay for these interim measures. do you think that £200 million — it sounds like a lot of money, of course — but do you think it is enough to do the work on the 150 blocks mentioned ? think it is enough to do the work on the 150 blocks mentioned? so, there are two angles to this. firstly, first night is not the only cladding that these properties have on. and then secondly, even those with acm are facing huge bills. for example, leaseholders are facing bills of up to 80,000, so 6 million or 7 million per block, and if you do the numbers, the 200 million figure seems like it won't be enough to cover and resolve the situation. with other safety issues besides the
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cladding, this particular cladding, it sounds like you have a battle to make sure the places were so many people are living and they will continue. absolutely. full support of what the government has announced today in terms of the fact that it will fund acm cladding buildings. but we need them to realise that there is a wider situation out there, not only non—acm but a whole number of fire safety issues, and we need to ensure that we campaign for eve ryo ne need to ensure that we campaign for everyone to be safe. on those other issues, will you still be trying to get the building owners to pick up the bill? i think this is down to the bill? i think this is down to the government. we have tried from every angle across every block to get the owners to pay, and it is why we sought the help of the government, because there was nothing we could do to ensure that building owners would pay. rachel, thank you for coming on to talk to
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us today. nearly one in five police officers across the uk have symptoms of post—traumatic stress disorder, according to a major study by the university of cambridge. the research found that many try to continue working with the condition, and only a minority of staff have been clinically diagnosed. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw reports. he's a policeman who runs towards danger. not afraid to break down doors or break up a fight. but pc lee jackson was floored by ptsd. post—traumatic stress disorder. someone tried to gouge my eye out and i was blinded for a short while. i dealt with that. thought i could, as i had done before, move on from it, but i was having flashbacks. i would wake up in a sweat, physically feeling like i was back living that moment again. a new survey of almost 17,000 police officers suggests that ptsd is far more common than thought. 90% of those surveyed said they had
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been exposed to traumatic events. one in five of those officers reported symptoms of ptsd far higher than in the general population. yet the vast majority of police said they would go to work as usual, even if they were suffering from stress, anxiety or depression. post—traumatic stress disorder is not a lifelong condition but it needs to be nipped in the bud and it needs to be addressed and this means a change to operational policing. the time for the british stiff upper lip is over. but policing remains unpredictable and dangerous. these four officers were stabbed by a man who lured them to a house in london with a false 999 call. a national police well—being service is being launched to provide more support across england and wales. it will be needed for officers with physical injuries and those with longer lasting mental scars as well. danny shaw, bbc news.
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the headlines on bbc news... the government will provide £200 million pounds of funding to replace unsafe cladding on more than 150 private tower blocks. jeremy corbyn says his party can "unite the country" — as he launches labour's european election campaign. severe criticism for the church of england over the way it handled allegations of child abuse in the diocese of chichester. train companies are making it difficult for passengers to claim compensation when their service is significantly delayed, according to new research. the consumer group ‘which?’ found that some train companies require passengers to submit 24 separate pieces of information. it says an automatic system for paying refunds is long overdue. our transport correspondent, tom burridge, reports.
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catch a train and if you arrive more than 30 minutes late, you might be entitled to half your money back. an hour and it could be a full refund. but getting the money you're owed often isn't easy. we had a lot of delays and cancellation with my trains all the time, but i've never claimed it, because there's no point claiming it. i heard that via someone on the train, talking to someone else. i thought i'd give it a go and a couple of weeks later, after i tried it, i got my money back. i don't really know how to go about it, like, how to get the compensation, i don't really know. so i'd probably think about it and then just forget and not actually go through with it. according to one survey, only around a third of eligible refunds are actually claimed back. the consumer group ‘which?’ says it's because the system is too complicated. it found that some train companies were asking claimants for as many as 24 separate pieces of information. when you're considering a system now that is asking for reams
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of information, 24 separate pieces of information, train companies often put forward the idea they're trying to prevent fraudulent claims coming through. the easiest way that could happen is now looking at automatic compensation being put in place. systems need to be updated. smart cards need to be introduced. these are all things these train companies should be getting to grips with, sooner rather than later. train companies say they're working to make compensation claims easier and that information from passengers is necessary to guard against fraudulent claims. some operators automatically pay compensation, but it's still the exception, not the norm. and passenger groups say that needs to change. tom burridge, bbc news. tottenham have set up an all—english champions league final with a stunning second—half comeback to beat ajax in the second leg of their semifinal in amsterdam. a hat—trick from lucas moura saw spurs recoverfrom 3—0 down on aggregate, to progress on away goals.
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they will play liverpool in the final in madrid, following their victory against barcelona on tuesday. we weren't going to beat city, we weren't going to beat ajax, we've done it, and now we're going to do liverpool. this is payback from 1962. unbelievable, unbelievable. i don't think i've ever cried at a football match before, and i did tonight. what time did i say we were going to score? 90th minute. you said we need a goal in the 90th minute, and what did we do? 96th minute! believe! well, with the all—english champions league final taking place in madrid onjune the 1st — the scramble for tickets is under way. the match is taking place in the wanda metropolitano stadium. it's athletico madrid's brand new stadium and has a capacity ofjust under 68 thousand. despite that, both liverpool and tottenham have been allocated just under 17 thousand tickets — around a quarter of the stadium's capacity per side. and they're not cheap — just over half of the tickets will cost more than 150 pounds.
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but the best seats will cost more than 500. as well as the ticket prices — those travelling to madrid will have to be willing to pay upwards of 700 pounds for flights — plus heavy premiums on accomodation. and with me now, i have two people very interested i'm joined keith sharp, lifelong spurs fan and member of the tottenham hotspur supporters trust. were you at the match?” were you at the match? i couldn't make it so i watched it on the box, andi make it so i watched it on the box, and i think the whole street heard me shouting in the 96th minute when the winning strike might went in. could you believe it? had you all but given up that the team were going through? i gave up as we got into the last minute of time added on. it looked hopeless because ajax
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had goal kick. there was great pass through to lukas moura and he banged it home. it was amazing. i had just about given up. had you watch the liverpool match the night before? no, i hadn't. iam very liverpool match the night before? no, i hadn't. i am very much a spurs fan, and! no, i hadn't. i am very much a spurs fan, and i do watch otherfootball but i prioritise watching spurs. fan, and i do watch otherfootball but i prioritise watching spurslj wondered if you watched it in hopes of there being an all english final to see what the opposition might be up to see what the opposition might be up to. are you desperate to get your hands on a ticket for this final? i'm sure you are. i'd love to, but as you said in the intro, only half of the seats in the stadium in madrid will be allocated to fans of spurs or liverpool, so if spurs have got around 17,000 seats, there are,
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i think, 40,000 season ticket holders alone at spurs, let alone others who would obviously love to get tickets, so i'm afraid it's going to be a desperate scramble. it's a real shame that only half of the stadium is made available for real fans. explained the stadium is made available for realfans. explained to us the stadium is made available for real fans. explained to us what the process is. if there are more season ticket holders, fans wanting to get their hands on those tickets, then there are tickets, is there some sort of ballot system? how does it work? it works on loyalty points which you build up over time, through attendance of matches, the length of time you have had a season ticket, and the more points you have, the more likely you are to qualify for, in this case, the champions league final. i've been trying to find out this morning what the likely threshold is of loyalty points, but somebody such as myself, i was on this season take it —— season ticket waiting list for 20
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yea rs, season ticket waiting list for 20 years, and then we got the new stadium and expanded capacity, so i finally got my season ticket a year or two ago, but it means i am relatively low down in terms of loyalty points, so my two sons are in the same boat as me, and we are very unlikely as it looks at the moment to be able to get tickets for the final, which is very sad and a bit frustrating. so you are trying to temper your expectations but you are not giving up hope yet, a bit like that match last night? not yet. if spurs can keep believing, i suppose i can keep believing i can get a ticket. but it looks a bit unlikely at the moment, sadly. i'm wondering if tottenham can open their terrific new ground and have some sort of limited capacity, showing the match on the big screen so people can go there and watch it. i know that in the old stadium at white hart lane, they did it, but whether they can do it now...
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whether i do get a ticket or not, there will be thousands of fans who would love to be in madrid who are not going to be there. that idea of opening up the stadium for fans who can't travel or get a ticket, that sounds like a great idea. you get that atmosphere at least of all those thousands of people being together. good luck in your hunt for tickets. maybe we'll talk to you at another point to find out how you got on. an ancient anglo—saxon burial site, discovered between an aldi supermarket and a pub in essex has been described as britain's equivalent of tutankhamun's tomb. the site is believed to mark the resting place of the brother of an anglo—saxon king. among the artefacts found were golden foil crosses and a painted wooden instrument. archaeologists believe this could be britain's earliest known christian royal burial, dating back to the sixth century. almost three quarters of the world's great rivers are no longer free flowing —
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that's according to the first ever in—depth report carried out by scientists. the study says that these rivers have been severed by dams, reservoirs or other man—made constructions, as ramzan karmali reports. the world's largest hydro—power project, the three gorges dam. it spans the entire yangtze river in china. it may be a major feat of engineering excellence, but according to the first—ever in—depth studies into long rivers, it has come at a cost. the yangtze is just one of those rivers 1,000 kilometres in length or longer that isn't free—flowing. that means it had some kind of construction that interrupts the flow. experts are worried about the impact this may have on earth's biodiversity. they provide valuable contributions to nature as well as human beings and we need to do a betterjob to protect these rivers going onto the future, looking at more than 4000 dams
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planned or under consideration worldwide. currently there are two billion people who rely on rivers as a source of drinking water. and 12 million tonnes of fish are caught from them each year. the worry for some scientists though, around 500 million people live near river deltas, which they say are sinking as dams starve them of sediments. and the problem is being acutely felt in europe — just two of 14 great rivers in europe that once flowed freely into the sea still do so. the danube is one of the most fragmented rivers, something that is common in populated areas. other fragmented rivers include the nile, the euphrates, the missouri, and the darling in australia. areas where free—flowing rivers haven't been impacted include remote regions of the arctic, the amazon and the congo. hydroelectric power may be significantly cleaner in terms of emissions than oil,
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gas or coal, but the study warns that, when building new dams, planners should be aware of the environmental impact they may have. ramzan karmali, bbc news. in a moment, it's time for the one o'clock news with sophie, but first it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. yesterday, we had a lot of these big shower clouds. further showers in the forecast today, this afternoon, but there won't be as many of them, andi but there won't be as many of them, and i don't think they will be as sudden as they were yesterday. some of us had to run for cover yesterday. there is a lot of cloud across the country today, and low pressure is still close to the british isles, you can see it spinning around in the north sea in the satellite image. you can see the extent of the cloud, from the midlands, the north—west of ingle, across the irish sea and into northern ireland. if you squint, you can see blobs of blue there, and
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thatis can see blobs of blue there, and that is where our pockets of rain, and one or two cracks of thunder. cold on the north sea coast. newcastle not warming up beyond nine celsius. overnight, the sky will be clear and it will be cold. the north—east of england, eastern and northern scotland, pretty chilly, temperatures of 0—3dc. in the south, not so cold, but nippy enough, six celsius in cardiff. tomorrow there will be sunshine and one or two showers. they will most likely break out across parts of the midlands, the north west of england, maybe one or two the north west of england, maybe one ortwo in the north west of england, maybe one or two in northern ireland and one or two in northern ireland and one or two in northern ireland and one ortwo in or two in northern ireland and one or two in central parts of scotland. it is all change as far as the weekend is concerned. high pressure will build, so for those of us looking forward to some fine, sunny, dry weather, it is good news. on saturday, it is looking quiet across most of the uk, but not completely dry. you can't miss the blobs of blue in north—east england, and one
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or two elsewhere. these are showers, so we might need brollies at some point on saturday afternoon with brewing showers throughout the day. on sunday, far fewer of them. brewing showers throughout the day. on sunday, farfewer of them. the weather systems are in the atlantic and can't progress because of the high pressure over us, and it will feel a little warmer as well, temperatures might be nudging up to 17-18dc in the temperatures might be nudging up to 17—18dc in the south, and less cold on the north sea coast as well. over the weekend and into next week, high pressure continues to build. it won't be worn immediately with high pressure. there is a bit of cold air left over, but eventually that wind from the continent will win.
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covering the cost of cladding — the government now says it will foot the multi—million bill for privately owned tower blocks in england. residential blocks with the kind of cladding used on grenfell tower will have it removed and replaced at a cost of £200 million. the government acknowledges the long wait for a safer alternative to be fitted has caused stress and anxiety for residents. also this lunchtime... the bbc broadcaster danny baker is sacked after tweeting a joke about the new royal baby showing a couple holding hands with a chimpanzee. labour launches its european elections campaign. jeremy corbyn criticises the government's handling of brexit and the cross—party talks. it's actually quite difficult negotiating with a disintegrating government, with cabinet ministers jockeying for succession rather

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