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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 10, 2019 6:00am-8:30am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: ambulance, emergency. is the patient breathing? £3 billion overspent and yet more delays. how a critical overhaul of the emergency services radio network has gone badly wrong. sunshields in space and making clouds over ice—caps — scientists call for radical new ways to fix the climate. good morning. we will be finding out inafew good morning. we will be finding out in a few hours about the ups and downs of the recent uk economy. i am ata downs of the recent uk economy. i am at a playground where they say brags that stockpiling could be at play.
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good morning. it's a full english. with chelsea and arsenal into the europa league final, for the first time there'll be four teams from the same country in the european showpiece finals. there has been a huge decline in the number of swans visiting britain in the last few years. research suggests that the answer could lie with hunters in russia. suggests that the answer could lie with hunters in russiali suggests that the answer could lie with hunters in russia. i be taking a dive this morning. cloudier went out there some of you today. the weekend could be turning drier and brighter. join me next all the details. good morning. it's friday the 10th may. our top story: a new radio network for britain's emergency services is set to go over budget by more than £3 billion. the national audit office also suggests the target date of 2022 for replacing the current system may not be met. ramzan karmali reports.
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the government wants to modernise the communication system used by our emergency services, but not only is it likely to be delayed, it's going to cost a lot more. the current system, airwave, was meant to be replaced this year by the emergency services network. that has been delayed until 2022. but even that a target date looks unlikely to be met. it's also going to cost a lot more, 3—point line billion pounds more, 3—point line billion pounds more, which means the total cost of implementing the new system will be £926 billion. the national office ‘s report is highly critical of the home office. bacchin 2016 the home office expected to be able to deliver this programme by 2019, that has not proved possible. as a consequence of the home office failing to manage the risks that existed in the programme at that time. according to the report, key technology is yet to be properly tested and work has yet to be started on upgrading control rooms oi’
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started on upgrading control rooms or providing coverage for police helicopters and ambulances. the report also reveals that ministers are expected to approve a decision which will mean that the new system will not be as resistant to power cuts as the existing one. but the home office is competently new system will transform the services offered by the emergency teams that will mean faster and better treatment for victims. , will mean faster and better treatment forvictims. , bbc news. —— ramzan karmali, bbc news. radical new ways to repair the climate and reverse global warming are being considered by scientists at the university of cambridge as part of a new research centre. among the ideas it will consider is a scheme to re—freeze polar regions, by reflecting sunlight away from the earth, using water sprayed into the atmosphere by ships. this report by our science correspondent pallab ghosh. a scorched earth where people are poorer and have less food because of severe droughts. there will be more flooding and all the coral has gone. that's what we are headed
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for unless we do more to cut emissions of carbon dioxide. scientists at cambridge university fear that reducing co2 emissions on its own won't be enough. the man who's led efforts at the heart of government to combat climate change for 20 years is helping to set up a new research centre. its role will be to repair the damage that's already been done. we are looking for processes that are scalable, by which i mean processes that can take out billions of tons of greenhouse gases each year. with trillions of tons of ice gone from both the earth's poles, the new centre will look at ways of refreezing them. one idea is to have boats spray seawater into the clouds above the ice to reflect sunlight away from them. another is to develop forests of artificial trees to absorb carbon dioxide — just like real forests, only better. and some think releasing shiny discs
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into space might act as a planetary pa rasol, reflecting sunlight and cooling the earth. the scientists here believe the earth's climate can be repaired but they say new solutions need to be found and implemented within the next 10 years otherwise it may be too late. pallab ghosh, bbc news, cambridge. armed police were sent to a mosque in east london after a gun was fired during ramadan prayers. the incident is believed to have taken place outside seven kings mosque in ilford late last night. there were no injuries or damage caused and is not being treated as terror—related. it's being reported by many of the newspapers this morning that the comedian, freddie starr, has died at the age of 76. a post on the freddie starr official facebook page said that he had passed away at his home in spain. but the bbc has been unable to verify the details.
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freddie starr was one of britain's most well known performers during the 19705, but in recent years had suffered ill health. the united states has more than doubled tariffs on billions of dollars of chinese goods. it comes after negotiations in washington aimed at salvaging a trade deal between the world's two largest economies broke up without agreement. the talks are due to resume later today. let's speak now to our china correspondent robin brant. good morning, robin, good to see you. this is going to be interesting how this plays out, because donald trump is very much pitched this as a business deal and he has been playing hardball, business deal and he has been playing hard ball, hasn't business deal and he has been playing hardball, hasn't he? he so are the chinese. changing the position significantly in the last week. that led to what the president described as them breaking the deal and that led to the imposition of this new round of tariffs. they will more than double from 10%, a 10% extra charge, to 25%. that covers about $200 billion worth of goods going from here in china to the united states. there is a ray of hope that talks will continue into
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tomorrow. some stock markets in china seeing that as a fairly positive sign. there were many who thought, frankly, the whole thing could collapse. what does this mean to you if you are watching in the uk? if you work for a company that is looking to invest in china, the biggest market in the world, if you're trying to sell boxcars into china, the kind of instability and uncertainty that this trade what is about and the effects it may well have on consumers is all very negative and is bound to have an effect on your business decisions in the demand for british goods here. robin, thank you very much for explaining that to us. robin brant. care homes in england will receive more support from the nhs to help prevent residents being given too many medicines. care home residents are prescribed an average of seven medicines a day, with many taking ten or more, costing the nhs an estimated £250 million each year. nhs england says the move is designed to cut hospital stays and reduce over—medication. school breaks in england have been getting shorter over the past 20
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years as teachers try to pack more lessons into the day. researchers at university college london believe that it could have an impact on the wellbeing and development of pupils. the government says it gives schools freedom to decide what they do with break times but expects them to include at least 60 minutes of time for exercise in the timetable each day. american multi—billionaire jeff bezos has unveiled a model of a lunar landing craft that he says could be used to take scientific equipment, and eventually people, to the moon. the amazon founder said his private space company blue origin, could help nasa deliver president trump's goal of sending humans to the moon's south pole by 202a. the reusable blue moon vehicle will be able to carry scientific instruments, satellites, and rovers. i have low do something today. they did not know that the moon had poles. north and south, did you know that? a bit of greenery is always nice
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in the office, but at one company in gloucestershire has gone a step further — with a 300 foot long pot plant. des brannan bought the plant from a store a decade ago, but it quickly outgrew his own home. so he took it to work where it has since thrived from the heat of the computers. the heat of the computers has helped it. iam not the heat of the computers has helped it. i am not a great gardener, i'll admit that. when does a planned stop being a plant and become a weed? when is that not a weed? i'd just think it looks nice. a weed is a plant, isn't it? when it ever grows like that, because technically, i don't know the definition of a weed, isn't it something that bothers all the other plants, like ivy is often seen. . . the other plants, like ivy is often seen... when does it become a tree? it is only a problem when it becomes
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interleaved with the computer wise and electronics and stuff like that. otherwise just enjoy. the other way it could cause a problem is if you have seen it day of the triffitt 's. i'm not trying to frighten anyone in that office. i have never seen it. haven't you ? that office. i have never seen it. haven't you? i am not into scary films. you should avoid it then. what they really enjoyed yesterday evening, not enjoyed, but a put enjoyed yesterday evening, i could not enjoyed, but aboltina bulot and social media for someone to keep me up—to—date, it was this game does make an appeal out on social media. i cannot remember we like it in football. what has happened now? the champions league, and all england final. europa league, when the fa cup, of course, both finals will be between english teams for the first time ever. the first time ever they will be from the same country. that
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is the first time ever. that in itself is billing. but the drama of the matches we have seen, liverpool versus barcelona, spurs, ajax. and last night it was chelsea who provided the most drama. let's start with a dramatic night at stamford bridge. and it ended with chelsea's eden hazard scoring the deciding penalty in a shootout that sent them to the europa league final. and they'll play arsenal, after a pierre—emerick aubameyang hat—trick helped them beat valencia. in tennis, world number one naomi osaka, is out of the madrid open, beaten for the second time this year by switzerland's belinda bencic. and england's matthewjordan breaks the course record with a round of 63 to lead after the first day of the british masters golf at hillside in southport. any papers at the moment i have even more football drama for you. we were trying to look through the papers. they managed to lose all my papers this morning. we can free style
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than. it is coming together, gradually. do you like optical illusions? matt has a good one. look at that. don't do it! mike has had experience of falling intervals. it has never gone well. what is going on there. this is remarkable. very good morning. we arejust on there. this is remarkable. very good morning. we are just outside broadcasting house in london. a stunning piece of 3—d street art. let mejust leap stunning piece of 3—d street art. let me just leap over to the other side. it is to launch bbc get creative festival which will start tomorrow. this amazing piece of street art has been done byjamie lawrence, the artist. they will bring him into have a quick chat. good morning, jamie. thanks for joining us this morning. first of all, how long did this take to do mozela took two artists two days to do. fantastic. how difficult is it for someone to create a 3—d artwork
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in 2-d? when you have done a few of them it is quite easy. when it takes two people, one makes 12 months and the other tells them what to do. it is bit of a complex process. definite teamwork that. what got you into this? was good at art in school. they met joe into this? was good at art in school. they metjoe and max to do this as well —— eye was good at. we thought this was a fantastic way of getting a message across. thought this was a fantastic way of getting a message acrossm certainly caught my imagination this morning. a stunning piece down in the plaza in london in broadcasting house through this morning. the festival gets under way through tomorrow. not quite sure it is paul weather out there. another cool start. but, bear with weather out there. another cool start. but, bearwith me, weather out there. another cool start. but, bear with me, this is what happens this weekend, through the weekend noticed the temperature charts started to warm up in colours and by next week, certainly across the northern half of the country it is going to feel substantially
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warmer. we will see temperatures into the low 20s with some parts of scotla nd into the low 20s with some parts of scotland in particular. it is too cold to you at the moment things will gradually improve as high pressure m oves will gradually improve as high pressure moves then. at the moment it is low pressure on the cards. one area pulling away towards parts of denmark and another approaching from the south—west. we are left with light winds today and a zone of cloud and showers around. it extends across northern ireland, northern england, north wales, the midlands in particular. a rather damp starcom outbreaks of rain. sungshan around. fog patches across the south midlands this morning, particularly, after they have examples of yesterday evening. through the day across central and southern england, simm heavy showers, maybe the odd thunderstorm developed. they will be fairly slow—moving because there's not much wind around. they could dropa not much wind around. they could drop a lot of rain initials elizovo. tom taylor the country, sunshine, temperature gossi northern half of the uk up to 16—17. into tonight, the uk up to 16—17. into tonight, the showers will start to become fewer in number. what we will see is
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mist and fog patches form we have seen mist and fog patches form we have seen the rain, the midlands, wales, north—west england especially. maybe a touch of frost if you get skies clear for long. a touch of frost if you get skies clearfor long. most a touch of frost if you get skies clear for long. most places should be frost free as we head into the start of the weekend. as i said, gradually improving weekend. if it is rain that you don't want. there will be showers soar around on sunday. the degree across eastern scotland. a developing northerly breeze. the developing the rain will have cleared away. the best of the sunshine across the west. a better day for wales, the west of scotland, northern ireland. still on the cool side with a northerly airflow. that will gradually ease as we go through into saturday night. a sunday, some mist and fog patches around eastern areas. most places will be dry. winds later. the fog will lift. the odd isolated showers in the east. the vast majority will be dry on sunday and with winds lighter already starting to feel the benefit of that sunshine as things turn a touch warmer. it is really into next
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week that the temperature started to climb. that is how it is looking. i'll be back in half—an—hour. back to you. thank you very much, really enjoying that very clever bit of artwork. the deckchairs are real, aren't they? you will have to find out. join me later. let's take a look at today's front pages. several report that the comedian freddie starr has died at the aged of 76. the entertainer, who rose to fame in the 19705, was found dead on thursday afternoon, according to the daily mirror. the daily star also leads on reports of his death, writing that he was found in his apartment in the costa del sol. it is worth saying the bbc has not been able to confirm this
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independently at this stage. the telegraph says victims of crime may no longer have to pay to phone the police, after the home office announced it would review the charge for non—emergency 101 calls. the paper also carries a picture of prince harry wearing a new "daddy" jacket in honour of his son, archie, during his trip to the netherlands. the guardian reports that at least five people have been murdered injamaica since march last year after being deported from the uk amid the windrush scandal. the main picture there shows david beckham leaving court after being banned from driving for six months, after using his mobile phone at the wheel. mike has had a look at some of the inside pages and sport is front and centre this week. i have something to trump tottenham and liverpool, albeit on a small scale, then hoddle celebrating the comeback, the leader
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's comeback, of course —— glen hoddle. what we are focusing on here is the headline here. it says forget spurs, this team had to win by ten goals to clinch the title and did it. you have a team in west yorkshire, level on points at the top of the table with a team with a vastly superior goal difference. to win the title they had to win by ten. they beat their opponents 20—2, to come back and win the title. so they only needed ten and they had 20. so that was pretty good. and a big european final in rugby union, lei nster big european final in rugby union, leinster versus saracens, and two lions team—mates on opposite sides. furlong for leinster, but the pre—match build—up focuses on their time sharing a room with the lions,
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and apparently vunipola is horrendous at snoring. and there are some excellent match—ups coming. don't they get their own rooms? some excellent match—ups coming. don't they get their own rooms7m is probably part of the team effort to engender team spirit. the lionsault when all the home nations playing together so one of the traditions is you share a room, often with somebody you haven't met before —— lions. often with somebody you haven't met before -- lions. i think that would impinge performance. really? i am very much a fan of having your own room. especially if you are a snorer. room. especially if you are a snorer. i talk in my sleep, i am terrible, so i would be a nightmare. but also you just want your own space. may be in terms of a bonding moment, this might be your cup of
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tea. what are you saying about mike? we are at the royal academy of arts in london and a group of naturist getan in london and a group of naturist get an opportunity to have a look around. and of course, they are naked, as they wish to be. does it help their appreciation of the art? i don't know whether it improves the experience or not, but it is quite a nice picture, isn't it? this is quite a nice picture. we will see you later on. thank you very much. the bewick‘s swan is one of britain's smallest and rarest breeds, but in recent years, the numbers migrating here has fallen sharply. breakfast‘s john maguire is in gloucestershire this morning, finding out why. good morning to you, john. that's notjohn. good morning to you, john. that's not john. good morning, charlie,
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good morning, naga. we are looking ata good morning, naga. we are looking at a bewick's right there, and that isa at a bewick's right there, and that is a bewick's swan, when he puts his head up you will get a better idea of how they look. they are smaller than this swans you are more used to seeing down at your park or local rivers or something like that. the bewick's swan much smaller, and over the past 20 years we have seen a 30% decline in their numbers. we are in gloucestershire, on the banks of the river severn. let me show you these information boards, which give you an idea of how you can tell the difference. they are quite subtle differences, especially when you think of the differences between the bewick's swan and the hooper swan. this is the mute here, the beak is the other way around, more yellow at the other way around, more yellow at the front and that large knob in front of its temple. the issue has
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been... the difficulty notjust in us been... the difficulty notjust in us being able to identify them, but crucially on their migratory path down from russia, russian hunters being able to tell the difference between bewick's and other breeds. it is all research which was based on the flight of the swans we saw. we covered it on the programme extensively a couple of years ago, the amazing research done when an environmentalist flew along the migratory flight path of the swans to find out what was going on and talk to people in russia about what was happening. we spoke to you a couple of years ago when sasha came back, and the idea was you would look at her data, try to find out how to better protect this species. what are we finding out now? where are we now? we know that swans are unfortunately shot many countries from the uk to hear. our recent research has focused on the russian
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arctic, where sasha started her flights, and we have been talking to hunters, as sasha did during her trip. we find that the bewick's swan is at risk of accidental hunting, when they are misidentified for two other swan species, the mute and the hooper, which have much less legal protection. and the numbers are quite stark, 14% of the hunters could tell the difference. unsurprising, we are close to them today and it is not that different. it is quite difficult, even to the trained eye. the differences are subtle and when you bring in inclement weather and poor visibility things can get really challenging. we also found that 18% of hunters were simply not aware that the bewick's were protected, so there are some crucial knowledge gaps we have to try and plug. because we can once you get used to it see the difference between the mute and the bewick's at the difference between a bewick's and a hooper is very difficult, isn't it? on the left we have the bewick's, on
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the right to hooper, and they are very difficult to discern. especially from a distance, when hunters are out in the field, and with poor visibility, fog and mist, these are remote areas with very changeable weather, it is a very difficult business, actually. so we would advocate anything big and white with a long neck, tojust not shoot them at all. and you are finding you have some friends in the north, there are people in russia that have come on board and realised the importance of trying to protect this species, despite the fact, of course, that they are being hunted and even being eaten. what is wonderful is this research has really galvanised the support of the arctic immunities. when i say arctic communities, it is a whole range of people from different levels of society, from indigenous leaders to hunting tourism agencies, activists and local government. they have all come together and they all regard themselves now as swan champions, so this is the swan champion project which aims to prevent the illegal hunting of swans in this particular
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pa rt of hunting of swans in this particular part of their flyaway. good to see you, thank you forjoining us this morning. 70 years ago the number of bewick's swan were increasing year—on—year and we have seen that decline over the last 20 years or so. decline over the last 20 years or so. a worrying trend so hopefully this vital research which is being done by the wwt will establish some sort of breakthrough to better protect bewick's in the years to come. that the sun shining down on you, it just looks such come. that the sun shining down on you, itjust looks such a tranquil location. does it feel really peaceful? i think that is a yes. look at that. that is enjoying your job. later this morning we'll get the latest statistics on how the economy measured for the first three months of the year, and we're expecting a bump. but it's all work and no play for nina who is at a playground manufacturer in cumbria. good morning to you. good morning,
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how are you doing. we are at a playground maker in cumbria. have a look at these, these big wooden slabs. what happens to them as they go through this massive, massive jigsaw cutter, they are cut into pieces that end up on playgrounds, and matt and adam smith them out, and matt and adam smith them out, and eventually they turn into... i thought this was a bear, i am being informed of this caterpillar. they shouted at me for that. let's have a quick chat with matt. sorry to interrupt you, good morning. so how many things do you make per day? how many things do you make per day? how many items which will end up on playgrounds? we make about two, three, four of them in our we playgrounds? we make about two, three, four of them in ourwe can churn out, something about 15 or 20 sheets a day depending on the complexity of the stuff. some of it is small. that is pretty impressive. they have lots of detail on them,
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also. you have to smooth out the edges. 50% of the items made here go abroad, so obviously the bosses here worrying about brexit, they have had to stop buying extra stock for eight months. later we will be talking about the extent to which stockpiling has impacted the uk economy. first, the news, travel and weather wherever you are watching this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. a man has been arrested 17 years after a shooting which left another man confined to a hospital, before his death more than a decade later. marvin couson was left unable to communicate after he was shot at the lime in london bar in shoreditch in 2002. he died in 2015. a ao—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of possession of a firearm with intent to endanger life. a woman from hertfordshire has started a photo campaign to highlight what real people with cancer look like. vicky saynor, who was diagnosed with breast cancer last year.
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she says she became frustrated with what she has described as glossy and insensitive tv awareness campaigns. she has produced a series of photos with people who have different forms of cancer. this pink, fluffy, happy, very glamorous photo shoots plays into the fact that it's a sort of hokey, happy, supporting supportive environment, and it's not, you feel very alone —— huggy. i don't feel the truth is given to the public as to how much it changes your life. a major music festival planned in north london has been given the go—ahead, despite objections from locals. field day will be held on the meridian water regeneration site in edmonton injune. organisers reached an agreement with tottenham hotspur to avoid a clash with match days, and also made changes to address safety concerns. the rapper skepta will be one of those performing. let's take a look at the travel situation now.
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there is a good service on the tubes this morning. turning to the roads — the approach to the blackwall tunnel heading northbound is already quite busy. in ladbroke grove, there are two lanes closed westbound on the west wayjust before the northern roundabout. so expect delays there. finally, in ilford, the high road is partially blocked heading eastbound due to a police incident from cameron road to st albans road. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. there should be a bit more sunshine around today then we saw yesterday, but again there's lots more heavy showers in there's lots more heavy showers in the forecast. some thunder and some lightning always possible. now, because of all the extra moisture in the airfrom because of all the extra moisture in the air from yesterday's rainfall, it's quite a misty, murky start to the morning. some fog patches out towards western home counties. that cloud will clear off towards the east, celebrate but rather chilly
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start to the morning. lots of sunshine around for the first half of the day and then we will see the shower spring appear here and there through the late morning into the afternoon. and where we get the showers, there could be rather slow—moving. so they will last for some time because of the late wind. top temperatures today of 16 or maybe 17 celsius. through this evening and overnight, plenty of cloud around. temperatures will tend to bea cloud around. temperatures will tend to be a bit milder than they were last night. also some showers, particularly into the start of the day tomorrow. we will begin the morning between seven and nine celsius. and tomorrow again some showers around. quite a bit of cloud but some sunshine breaking through into the afternoon. by sunday things will settle down. it will feel warmer into next week. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. good morning. coming up: school break times are getting shorter and pupils miss out on the chance to make friends according to new research. we'll ask if stress in the classroom is a result of a squeeze on playtime.
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he's back on the road with some sublime silly stand—up. bill baileyjoins us to talk about two decades of finding the funny in everything from politics to philosophy. life after the death of your husband doesn't sound like sitcom material, but the bafta—winning mum is back for a new series. two of the show‘s stars will tell us what's in store for cathy and her family. our main story 's this morning: a new radio network for britain's emergency services is set to go over budget by more than £3 billion — almost 50% more than planned. the national audit office also suggests the target date of 2022 for replacing the current system may not be met. the home office says the new technology will transform the service offered by police, firefighters and ambulance workers. radical new ways to repair the climate and reverse global warming are being considered by scientists at the university of cambridge as part of a new research centre. among the ideas is a scheme to re—freeze polar regions,
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by reflecting sunlight away from the earth, and spraying water from ships into the atmosphere. it's feared that current approaches to tackle global warming won't go far enough to stop irreversible damage to the planet. we can't fail. it is our duty to future generations that we succeed in this task that has been put upon us. in this task that has been put upon us. and that means that we need to very carefully analyse, create the evidence base so that sensible informed decisions can be made today that will last generations into the future. armed police were sent to a mosque in east london after a gun was fired during ramadan prayers. the incident is believed to have taken place outside seven kings mosque in ilford late last night. there were no injuries or damage caused and is not being treated as terror—related. it's being reported by many of the newspapers this morning that the comedian freddie starr has died at the age of 76. a post on the freddie starr official facebook page said that he had passed away at his home in spain.
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but the bbc has been unable to verify the details. freddie starr was one of britain's most well known performers during the 19705, but in recent years had suffered ill health. the united states has more than doubled tariffs on billion5 of dollars of chinese good5. it comes after negotiations in washington aimed at salvaging a trade deal between the world's two largest economies broke up without agreement. the talks are due to re5ume later today. care homes in england will receive more support from the nhs to help prevent re5ident5 being given too many medicines. residents are prescribed an average of seven medicines a day, with many taking 10 or more. our health correspondent, rob si55on5 reports. it's a simple idea. it's been tested at this care home, derby5hire house in nottingham5hire, and has reduced hospital admissions and cut the drugs bills. a gp practice buddies up with a care home5 so residents' health can be checked by a doctor more. rachel visits every two weeks. is there anything urgent
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that we need to deal with initially? erm, yeah... and what began as an experiment here in nottingham5hire is now being rolled out across england's care homes. the major benefit is that the patients here get continuity of care which we know is a problem across the nhs. we get to know the patients more, we get to know the families more, we can get more involved in understanding what they would want to happen should they become acutely unwell. acro55 england, around 400,000 people live in 17,000 care homes. on average, re5ident5 take seven medicines a day. for many, it's more than 10 a day. charities have voiced concern for years that some residents may be on too much medication, criticising an overreliance on antip5ychotic medication for dementia patients as chemical co5h. the key thing from our perspective is to make sure that the right drugs are given at the right time and that people don't have drugs unnecessarily because we know that that is not good for health.
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now the nhs england long—term pan involves recruiting thousands more clinical pharmaci5t5. the aim is for every care home to have access to one. rob sisson5, bbc news. american multi—billionaire jeff bezos has unveiled a model of a lunar landing craft that he says could be used to take 5cientific equipment, and eventually people, to the moon. the amazon founder said his private space company blue origin, could help nasa deliver president trump's goal of sending humans to the moon's south pole by 202a. the reusable blue moon vehicle will be able to carry 5cientific instruments, satellites, and rovers. blue moon is catchy. micah, you will ta ke blue moon is catchy. micah, you will take us through another night of engli5h take us through another night of english football success. out of this world. the first time ever, not
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ju5t this world. the first time ever, not just from england, but for everyone, all four teams competing, so the europa league final and each of his leg final, will be from the same countries —— country. leg final, will be from the same countries -- country. how long have this conditions been going? countries -- country. how long have this conditions been going7m countries -- country. how long have this conditions been going? it gets more complicated, used to be the cup cup, the uefa cup, and then the european cup. in its existence at the moment the uefa champions league, it is the first time. the latest instalment of an incredible week of football. so arsenal will play chelsea in the europa league final on may 29th in baku, after yet another remarkable night for english sides in europe. joe lyn5key reports. thi5 this was the night league got its full house. for the first time, two european finals will have four engli5h team5. chelsea and arsenal will have theirs in baku. but the
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logistic5 will have theirs in baku. but the logistics and start when the singing i5 logistics and start when the singing is over. in this remarkable week of football, no semifinal pa55age would be easy. chelsea thought they had control at 1—0 against eintracht frankfurt. at the german side were here to express themselves stop their equaliser took this tie to the limit. stamford bridge face down penalties, but for chelsea's goal keeper that was just as well. he made the pivotal 5ave keeper that was just as well. he made the pivotal save by hardly moving. and with another to his right it was setup moving. and with another to his right it was set up for the big finish. this might be eden hazard's la5t kick in blue at stamford bridge. he was never mi55ing la5t kick in blue at stamford bridge. he was never missing it. it's chelsea in the european final! for now eden hazard says he does not know if you will move this summer. from high in the missed a, the final was just 5till from high in the missed a, the final was just still in reach for valencia. especially when they scored first against arsenal. one more goal would have sent them
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through. but this would be a node for the gunners' superstar strikers. a fieldway golfer arsenal. they 5tre55ed a fieldway golfer arsenal. they stressed out their lead. —— stretched out. in the end, this was a night when arsenal came together and run away with it. aubameyang would finish an emphatic hat—trick. thi5 would finish an emphatic hat—trick. this year the europa league comes down to a london derby and for premier league 5ize winning abroad it takes you back to the neighbours. joe lyn5key, bbc news. naomi osaka blamed her defeat at the madrid open on thinking about holding on to her world number one ranking. she was a setup against switzerland's belinda bencic, but lost in three. bencic will face simona halep in the semi—finals — and halep could replace osaka at the top of the rankings if she wins the tournament. and roger federer made the last four with victory over gael monfil5. he'll face dominic thiem, with in the semi—finals. novak djokovic play5 marin cilic in the other semi—final. chris froome won't ride in this year's giro d'italia,
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because he wants to focus on the tour de france. froome missed out on last year's title — after a stunning performance by team—mate geraint thoma5 — but froome is looking for that record—equalling fifth tour victory. i'd just feel as if i'm in such a privileged position now. to have the opportunity and the backing of such an amazing team, to go in and try to win number five, an amazing team, to go in and try to win numberfive, i mean, this is what dream5 win numberfive, i mean, this is what dreams are made of. and i've got that opportunity right here in front of me. chris froome being interviewed there. it is a great place. a lot of them do their training out there. the brazilian grand prix will have a new home from next year. it's been held at interlagos, just outside sao paolo, since 1990. but the country's president says they're building a new track in rio de janiero. brazil is the only south american country to host a grand prix. engli5h golfer matthew jordan lead5 going into day two of the british masters, after breaking the course record at hillside in southport.
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he had nine birdies and no dropped shots, in a round of 63 in what only is his 12th event as a professional. he's two shots clear of the field. that is incredible. apparently he 5ay5 that is incredible. apparently he says halfway around it became clear that he was doing well because people started following him and cameras appeared. it made him wobble for a couple of holes. you know what it is like. i am not a professional golfer. a play there on wednesday. i've played with clare balding and apra was ollie fisher. just had a brilliant time and we won. you know how good a 63 i5 brilliant time and we won. you know how good a 63 is around there. none of us shot anything like that. it is hard. and it is cold. it is on the coast. thank you. we will see you later on. with parliament so far having failed to agree a brexit deal, the uk is due to take part in european elections on the 23rd of may. in the run up to the vote, we're speaking to each of the main parties. this morning, we'rejoined
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from cardiff, by the plaid cymru leader, adam price. a very good morning to you, mr price. good morning. first of all, with this election now imminent, it i5 with this election now imminent, it is official, it has been accurate curiou5 time in the run—up to, but the european elections are happening. tell us what you're picture5, what plaid cymru'5 big messages. our simple and clear messages. our simple and clear message is this. if you want a final 5ay message is this. if you want a final say on the referendum, a people's vote in wales is a plaid cymru vote. we are the leading remain party here. we are the only one that has a chance of winning 5eat5 here. we are the only one that has a chance of winning seats in this election. particularly, we are appealing to labour voters that feel badly let down byjeremy corbyn, not to stay at home but to lend their votes to us. i think labour's position break that has been a ma5ter position break that has been a master class in political dishonesty, it seems to me, they are trying to be all things to all
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people but the people aren't that dumb. ye5, people but the people aren't that dumb. yes, the referendum is there a5 dumb. yes, the referendum is there as an option in their manifesto, but there are more hurdles to jump than in the grand national. we are at a time and a place where people are very interested in clarity and politics. so is plaid cymru a remain party? absolutely. you know, people might not agree with me, but i hope they will appreciate my honesty when i say this, exit will ripley heart out of the welsh economy. andy love my country too much to lie about that. so we have to be clear, you know. ye5, that. so we have to be clear, you know. yes, i was in the minority in wales and across the uk three years ago. but in a democracy there are two things that you can do when you are on the losing side. you can either give up or you can du5t yourself down and you can get out there and try to change people's mine5. iam there and try to change people's mine5. i am not are giving up type. wales voted to leave. why are you not respecting the majority of the
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people in wales who voted that way? well, you know, we had a referendum in 1979 on creating a welsh parliament. we lost that one. did we give up? no, we got back out there and we try to persuade people that there was a better way. they understand why people in wales voted for brexit. many of them because they were deeply exasperated at the westminster political establishment. and who can blame them? but it was the wrong answer to the right question. the right question is how do we prai5e our5elve5 question. the right question is how do we prai5e ourselves out of this rut of poverty that we have found our5elve5 rut of poverty that we have found ourselves in in wales for generations? we're not there because of anything bru55el5 did or did not do, it is because of westminster. look over the last year also, the they have ignored wales stop railway rectification in wales cancelled, will the cancelled, the political class in westminster, they would cancel chri5tmas class in westminster, they would cancel christmas in wales if they could get away with it. the answer i5 could get away with it. the answer is not to put our faith
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could get away with it. the answer is not to put ourfaith in could get away with it. the answer is not to put our faith in the same political parties that got us into this mess, although free '5 pinstriped stockbroker. the scottish people voted for scotland for the be5t pa rt people voted for scotland for the best part of the last 15 years. we need to do the same for wales. there are four wealthy i5 need to do the same for wales. there are four wealthy is that people will be voting for. there are eight parties now in all. in amongst those who have the welsh liberal democrats, they are acro55 who have the welsh liberal democrats, they are across the uk, of course, a major political force. and they are a remain party. people could vote for them, if they want to remain. we now have change uk, who are also new, you could vote for them. are you concerned that if people are wanting to remain that tho5e votes are now going to be split more and why have you not come to some arrangement to make sure that those remain vote are in one place? you are absolutely right, charlie. there is a danger that the remain vote could fracture. that's
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way remain united, the independent organisation 5et way remain united, the independent organisation setup by gina miller has urged people to vote for the leading remain parties acro55 has urged people to vote for the leading remain parties across the uk. in wales they are urging people to vote plaid cymru because we are the one who has the best chance of winning 5eat5. we did reach out to the green party in wales to see if we could put a joint li5t together and unfortunately they rebuffed that. so we are left in the position where we have to appeal to as many remain voters in wales to come behind us so we can send a clear message that we want to remain as a country at the heart of europe, but we also reject the failed brexit policie5 labour and conservative. we also reject the failed brexit policies labour and conservative.- a price, thank you for your time this morning. at a price as leader of plaid cymru, 5peaking this morning. at a price as leader of plaid cymru, speaking to us from cardiff. we will be speaking to all the main parties ahead of the elections coming up. you can find out more about who is running in the european elections on the bbc news website. all the information you need is
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there. here is matt with a look at this morning's weather. he is in london outside broadcasting hou5e, chilling by the pool. when i was working there i did not get such luxuries. demands, i have managed to get my way at last. daly friday morning, you have to put your feedback. i could do with a bit of sunshine, but where better place to be than by the pool. it is an amazing bit of 3d artwork done by the artist jamie lawrence to mark the artist jamie lawrence to mark the start of bbc‘s get creative festival. there are 1500 events across the uk. go to our website for all the details. but not quite cool weather around at the moment. staying on the chilly side for some of you today. but if it is too cold for you, watch what happens through the weekend and into next week. could start to warm things up a little bit, especially acro55 could start to warm things up a little bit, especially across the northern half of the country. by early next week we could see
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temperatures acro55 part5 early next week we could see temperatures acro55 parts of scotla nd temperatures acro55 parts of scotland get above 20 degrees, a big change to what we have at the moment a5 change to what we have at the moment as we swap change to what we have at the moment as we swap high pressure from the low pressure we have got. low pressure to the east of the uk bringing wet weather this week. another one approaching to the south—west. we are between weather systems at the moment so not a huge amount of wind around but 20 of cloud and if you are acro55 we5tern scotland, northern ireland, northern england, the midlands, towards east anglia, the5e england, the midlands, towards east anglia, these are the areas like yesterday mo5t prone to heavy burst of rain here and there. either side of rain here and there. either side of its mi5t of rain here and there. either side of its mist and fog patches for the morning commute, a bit of sunshine across the south coast of england and the far north of scotland as well. through the day we will see a more showers well. through the day we will see a more shower5 crop well. through the day we will see a more 5hower5 crop up well. through the day we will see a more showers crop up across well. through the day we will see a more 5hower5 crop up across central and southern pa rt5 more 5hower5 crop up across central and southern parts of england, 5ome of those like recent days heavy and thundery. in between, those with a bit of sunshine could hit 16 or 17 but the northern half of the uk around 11 celsius at best. the wind than they have been. through the night 5ome showers will continue and wetter weather pushing through the engli5h wetter weather pushing through the english channel, affecting mainly
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the channel islands but coastal counties could see some heavy and persistent rain. that will keep the temperatures up further north of you get gap5 temperatures up further north of you get gaps in the cloud, mi5t temperatures up further north of you get gaps in the cloud, mist and fog could form and a small chance of a touch of frost. it will be a chilly start to the weekend. gradual improvements this weekend. we will 5till improvements this weekend. we will still see showers on saturday, cloud across still see showers on saturday, cloud acro55 pa rt5 of still see showers on saturday, cloud acro55 parts of england and eastern scotla nd acro55 parts of england and eastern scotland to begin with, the odd shower into eastern parts of wales a5 shower into eastern parts of wales as well. the further west you are, high pressure builds on, lots of 5un5hine developing, and with light wind5, already starting to feel a touch warmer, even if the temperatures don't suggest it. in the sunshine in the west it will feel more pleasant. fewer showers into sunday, mo5t feel more pleasant. fewer showers into sunday, most places will be dry. showers likely to be acro55 pa rt5 of eastern dry. showers likely to be acro55 parts of eastern england and eastern scotland, very light, few and far between. the cloud bubble5 up through the day, but dry and sunny
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weather, the best of which in the west, and temperatures again starting to creep up into the mid to high teen5 acro55 we5tern areas by this stage. a5 high teen5 acro55 we5tern areas by this stage. as i mentioned, into next week, things will warm up a little bit as well, with increasing amounts of sunshine and most places will be dry stop perfect conditions to get out and enjoy. the menopause i5 life—changing for all women, and difficult for many, but it has been discussed for only one hour and 17 minutes in the whole of parliamentary history. the first full debate took place earlier this year, but every day next week, we will be asking you to wake up to the menopause. hold onto your hats, ladies. there i5 hold onto your hats, ladies. there is something we really need to discu55. we are in doncaster to talk about, ladies? menopause! you are all 5ister5. you old 5ister5 about, ladies? menopause! you are all 5ister5. you old sisters and you are all going it. so those of you on
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the other side, what have you told tho5e the other side, what have you told those of you who are at the beginning. should wejust those of you who are at the beginning. should we just pressed pause for a moment? press pause to consider the pause? you are so pleased that the periods have 5topped, pleased that the periods have stopped, and then the madness begins. that is what we will do all next week on breakfast, with real women in the best experts. how has your menopausaljourney women in the best experts. how has your menopausal journey been? women in the best experts. how has your menopausaljourney been? it's terrible, and even now, at 68, i'm 5till menopausal. terrible, and even now, at 68, i'm still menopausal. it is still going. so hot sweats... when did it start? when i was a0. i was diagnosed with it from the doctor, and i will make now i am 68. it from the doctor, and i will make now! am 68. how is it, darling? it's very hot. the mood swings, i am slamming the door. you can like somebody one day and hate them the next. as well as the symptoms, we will talk about the solutions, and the very latest science. will talk about the solutions, and the very latest sciencelj will talk about the solutions, and the very latest science. i say plaid
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-- hrt, the very latest science. i say plaid —— hrt, and you say... cool. the very latest science. i say plaid -- hrt, and you say... cool. you are eithera -- hrt, and you say... cool. you are either a survivor or a victim, and i ama either a survivor or a victim, and i am a survivor. we will talk about a time of life which comes to us all, which shouldn't be feared, which can, with help, be conquered. hello, ladies. hello. menopause. i have been there, done it, and got the t—shirt. and i was very lucky, my sister was always, well, she sailed through her menopause. are used to forget lines and i wondered if i was having that sort of panic attack as an actress. then i realised it was the menopause. i could literally put my phone in the fridge. what i am learning is how to embrace it. so you are not afraid of what is ahead? iam not you are not afraid of what is ahead? i am not afraid of what is ahead. it i5 empowerment, and we are a fantastic 5pecie5, so onwards and upwards. high—5, si5ter. forsome,
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it might be a white knuckle ride, but always remember. it will pass. you have come out the other side. how is it? it's great, feel human again. i am still happy, and i am still here. just keep going, girls. just keep going. ladies, we're going to get through this. aren't we? we can this. —— we can do this. we will be talking about the menopause all next week. we will tell you about the latest research into treatments, and how best to cope with the symptoms. please do join the conversation and share your experience of it. later this morning we will get the latest statistics on how the economy measured for the first three months of the year, but it's all work and no play for nina, who is at a playground manufacturer in cumbria. good morning, charlie. iam letting
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you have a look at all this beautiful timber fresh from scandinavia. it 5mell5 absolutely gorgeous and it will be turned into picnic benches, 5wing5 gorgeous and it will be turned into picnic benches, swings and slides that we know and love very much, especially when the kids are kicking off. today we are talking gross domestic product, which is basically everything we make, everything we do, the net income for the entire country, if you like. the expectation is that for the first quarter of the year there was a slight increase of 0.2%, higher than the tail end of last year, which is surprising, because everyone was worrying about brexit towards the end of march. the irony is that perhaps people were buying more things from abroad, they were stockpiling, getting ready in case we left the eu in a hurry. barry is one of those people. good morning to you. as we run up to the end of march, what was going through your head, and what practical measures did you take to make sure you didn't run out? going back some eight months, nina, we were concerned. we put a big action plan in place, at
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board level, looking at supply chain, looking at the logistics, making sure that we could have this continuity of service. 50% of the product5 going abroad, we couldn't have them delayed at port5. product5 going abroad, we couldn't have them delayed at ports. so how much extra outlay did you have to spend much extra outlay did you have to 5pendin much extra outlay did you have to spend in order to be ready for the month5 spend in order to be ready for the months ahead? so in pounds and p, raw material, an additional 10% of 5tock raw material, an additional 10% of stock we are carrying. and that was the equivalent of hundreds of thousands of pounds for you, wasn't it? that sounds really annoying, especially when come mid—march they kicked it into the long gra55 again. ye5, kicked it into the long gra55 again. yes, it is frustrating. we can't unwind that stock as yet and the plan is just continuing. unwind that stock as yet and the plan isjust continuing. that puts the pressure on, then. any bonu5e5 from stockpiling? there is a pressure. from stockpiling? there is a pre55ure. that pressure has led to this business probably performing better than it has for a number of years. so may is going to be our be5t output, or the best may for several best output, or the best may for several years. i think the businesses felt the pressure across the board. that's interesting, so
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you perform better because of that pressure. kyle is an expert in economics. good morning to you. we expect a slight growth for the first quarter of the year. is that about brexit stockpiling alone? it is not about stockpiling alone but we definitely think it will have an impact on the growth figures. but also consumer spending has held up relatively well in the first quarter. we have seen lots of spending on things like clothes where there have been big discounts, in the beginning of the year, but also spending on eating out and drinking in march when the weather is good, so that will boost the economy as well. it is amazing the weather has that much of an impact. are there concerns that that will suck the growth from the next quarter? might we see that? that is very much the case. we would think of growth from stockpiling as borrowed growth. so you ramp up growth now but once you have to run down these stockpiles that will be a
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drag on gdp growth in the future. and we will be finding out those figures at about 9:30 a.m.. they are expected to be a bit better than expected to be a bit better than expected because of brexit stockpiling and lots of other things at play. we will be discussing them at play. we will be discussing them a little bit later, no pun intended, but first the news, the travel and the weather wherever you are having your breakfast. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. a man has been arrested 17 years after a shooting which left another man confined to a hospital before his death more than a decade later. marvin couson was left unable to communicate after he was shot at the lime in london bar in shoreditch back in 2002. he died in 2015. a a0—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of possession of a firearm with intent to endanger life. a woman from hertfordshire has started a photo campaign to highlight what real people with cancer look like. vicky saynor, who was diagnosed with breast cancer last year, says she became frustrated with what she has described as glossy and insensitive tv awareness campaigns. she has produced a series of photos
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with people who have different forms of cancer. this pink, fluffy, happy, very glamorous photo shoots plays into the fact that it's a sort of huggy, happy, supportive environment, and it's not. you feel very alone. i don't feel the truth is given to the public as to how much it changes your life. a major music festival planned in north london has been given the go—ahead despite objections from locals. field day will be held on the meridian water regeneration site in edmonton in june. organisers say they've made changes to address safety concerns, and will avoid a clash with tottenham match days. the rapper skepta will be one of those performing. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. turning to the roads — the approach to the blackwall tunnel heading northbound is already quite busy. in ladbroke grove, there are two
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lanes closed westbound on the west way, just before the northern roundabout, so expect delays there. finally, in ilford, the high road is partially blocked heading eastbound due to a police incident from cameron road to st albans road. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. there should be a bit more sunshine around today than we saw yesterday, but again, there's lots more heavy showers in the forecast. some thunder and some lightning always possible. now, because of all the extra moisture in the air from yesterday's rainfall, it's quite a misty, murky start to the morning. some fog patches out towards western home counties. that cloud will clear off to the north—east, so a fairly bright but a rather chilly start to the morning. lots of sunshine around for the first half of the day, then we'll see the showers spring up here and there through the late morning into the afternoon. and, where we get the showers, they could be rather slow—moving, so they'll last for some time because of the late wind.
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top temperatures today of 16 or maybe 17 celsius. through this evening and overnight, plenty of cloud around. temperatures will tend to be a bit milder than they were last night. also some showers, particularly into the start of the day tomorrow. we'll begin the morning between 7—9 celsius, and then tomorrow, again some showers around. quite a bit of cloud, but some sunshine breaking through into the afternoon. by sunday, things will settle down. it will feel warmer into next week. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: ambulance, emergency. is the patient breathing? £3 billion overspent and yet more delays. how a critical overhaul of the emergency services radio network has gone badly wrong. sun shields in space and making
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clouds over ice—caps. scientists call for radical new ways to fix the climate. good morning. what is at play when it comes to unexpected growth in the uk economy? i am ok playground ——at a playground factory in cumbria. it's a full english. with chelsea and arsenal into the europa league final, for the first time there'll be four teams from the same country in the european show—piece finals. the number of buicks and swans migrating to the uk has plummeted over recent decades, could one of the reasons be that hunters in russia just can't tell the difference between difference one species? and i will be taking a dive into all things bbc creative, as well as looking at the forecast this weekend and always gets dry and eventually warm up. today, more heavy showers around. all the details here on
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brea kfast. good morning. it's friday the 10th may. our top story: a new radio network for britain's emergency services is set to go over budget by more than three billion pounds. the national audit office also suggests the target date of 2022 for replacing the current system may not be met. ramzan karmali reports. siren. the government wants to modernise the communication system used by our emergency services, but not only is it likely to be delayed, it's going to cost a lot more. the current system, airwave, was meant to be replaced this year by the emergency services network. that's been delayed until 2022. but even that target date looks unlikely to be met. it's also going to cost a lot more, £3.1 billion more, which means the total cost of implementing the new system will be £9.6 billion. the national audit office's report is highly critical of the home office. back in 2016, the home office
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expected to be able to deliver this programme by 2019, that's not proved possible. and it's a consequence of the home office failing to manage the risks that existed in the programme at that time. are you diabetic? according to the report, key technology is yet to be properly tested and work hasn't even started on upgrading control rooms or providing coverage for police helicopters and air ambulances. the report also reveals that ministers are expected to approve a decision which will mean that the new system will not be as resilient to power cuts as the existing one. but the home office is confident the new system will transform the services offered by the emergency teams that will mean faster and better treatment for victims. ramzan karmali, bbc news. radical new ways to repair the climate and reverse global warming are being considered by scientists at the university of cambridge as part of a new research centre. among the ideas is a scheme to re—freeze polar regions, by reflecting sunlight away from the earth, and spraying water from ships into the atmosphere. it's feared that current approaches
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to tackle global warming won't go far enough to stop irreversible damage to the planet. we can't fail. it's our duty to future generations that we succeed in this task that has been put upon us. and that means that we need to very carefully analyse, create the evidence base so that sensible informed decisions can be made today that will last generations into the future. armed police were sent to a mosque in east london after a gun was fired during ramadan prayers. the incident is believed to have taken place outside seven kings mosque in ilford late last night. there were no injuries or damage caused and is not being treated as terror—related. it's being reported by many of the newspapers this morning that the comedian freddie starr has died at the age of 76. the sun newspaper broke the story it said he was found dead at his home in spain. but the bbc has been unable to verify the details.
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freddie starr was one of britain's most well known performers during the 19705, but in recent years had suffered ill health. school breaks in england have been getting shorter over the past 20 years as teachers try to pack more lessons into the day. researchers at university college london believe that it could have an impact on the well—being of pupils. students social lives have been hit as well with fewer of them visiting a friend's house after school compared to 12 years ago. care homes in england will receive more support from the nhs to help prevent residents being given too many medicines. care home residents are prescribed an average of seven medicines a day, with many taking ten or more, costing the nhs an estimated 250 million each year. nhs england says the move is designed to cut hospital stays and reduce over—medication. the united states has more than doubled tariffs on billions of dollars of chinese goods.
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—— american multi—billionaire jeff bezos has unveiled a model of a lunar landing craft that he says could be used to take scientific equipment, and eventually people, to the moon. the amazon founder said his private space company blue origin, could help nasa deliver president trump's goal of sending humans to the moon's south pole by 202a. the reusable blue moon vehicle will be able to carry scientific instruments, satellites, and rovers. the thing they have learned this morning is that the moon has poles. there is one called the south pole. it is five minutes past seven. the united states has more than doubled tariffs on billions of dollars of chinese goods. it comes after negotiations in washington aimed at salvaging a trade deal between the world's two largest economies broke up without agreement. the talks are due to resume later today. let's speak now to our china correspondent robin brant. good morning to you, robin. quite a lot at stake. where are we asked in this process? a huge amount at
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sta ke. this process? a huge amount at stake. specifically here, $200 billion worth of trade, that is good is coming from china and going to the us will be hit with more than a doubling of tariffs. moving up from 10%, an extra charge that people importing will have to pay up to 25%. we also now know because there was a brief statement from china's ministry of commerce within that happening that china will respond. it said china deeply regrets that it will have to take necessary countermeasures. there will be countermeasures. there will be countermeasures from the chinese imposed on american goods stop we don't know what that will be. will it be proportional? that is very important. there is far less coming from the states to china. china's options are somewhat limited. historically it has done other things. nontariff barrier measures. there might be applying for licences, importing and exporting, they may find it suddenly becomes harder to do that. if you're watching that in thinking what
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impact does that have on me in the uk? if you british investor or company looking to sell into what is in almost all sectors the world's biggest market in china, this trade boys bring more instability and uncertainty and pressure on consumers. that is bound to have a negative effect on anyone selling or investing, including from the uk. robin, thank you very much. robin brant reporting from meeting this morning. it's the "blue sky thinking" that mightjust save the planet. a new research centre at the university of cambridge will look into some potentially bold and radical solutions to global warming and see if they actually work. so what sort of theories will they be testing? one idea is to have boats spray sea water into the clouds above the polar icecaps to reflect sunlight away. another is to develop forests of artificial trees to absorb carbon dioxide — just like real forests, only better. and some scientists think that releasing millions of shiny disks into space might act as a "planetary parasol", shielding the earth from the sun. the government's former chief advisor on climate change, professor sir david king, is helping to set up the centre. he joins us now from
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our london newsroom. thank you very much for talking to us thank you very much for talking to us this morning. it is quite inspiring hearing some of these ideas stop they may seem a wacky tucson but we are at that stage now where that is needed, aren't we? we are at that stage. it is rather desperate. what we do over the next 10-12 desperate. what we do over the next 10—12 years will really determine the future of humanity. we have already gone too far. we are emitting 50 billion tons of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere every year. and we now have to learn first how to take the greenhouse gases that we have already put up their out of the air to bring average temperatures down, to stop sea average temperatures down, to stop sea levels rising, to stop the polar
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ice caps from melting and sea levels then rising as ice from land such as greenland enters the ocean. all of these are situations that would challenge our ability to survive into the future. so at cambridge we are setting up a centre for climate repair, in which we are going to look at all of these potential technologies which may be available to deal with each of these problems. but let me say, we are not only looking at the science and technology, we are looking at the social and political consequences of utilising these technologies, of bringing them into play in the marketplace. ok. how receptive are those with the money to radical ideas? i think there are many people who understand the nature of the challenge and to have access to
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funds. the response that we have received so far to the kuyt announcement we have made prior to me coming on television and radio this morning has been exceptionally good —— quiet. we are looking for philanthropic funds, we are looking for government support, and they don'tjust mean the british government, we are looking more broadly at countries abroad. and we also are getting a lot of support from the business community. i think that the understanding of the challenge is now penetrating. it is getting through the media, such as yourselves, we are in the process of setting up what are considered to be a critical centre. it will be a global centre based here in cambridge in the uk. we will have scientists, technologists, economist, social scientists from around the world coming to meet us to discuss how we can manage this. a5 to discuss how we can manage this. asi to discuss how we can manage this. as i said, and we went through a few
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of the wacky, of the wall, however you want to describe it, these ideas, but radical solutions, perhaps. what is the timeframe? say, for example, this parasol in space thatis for example, this parasol in space that is being suggested, what would be the timeframe of someone saying here is the money, let's get it done. how quickly can be done with yellow i think what you are describing as parasols in space could be done alarmingly quickly, by which i mean that the consequences of reflecting sunlight away from the planet's surface really need to be examined very, very carefully. the basic idea that has been put forward as these parasols is to put sulfates up as these parasols is to put sulfates up into the stratosphere. one of the major issues there is what that does to the ozone layer and we know that if the ozone layer is removed from the stratosphere we ourselves will be unprotected from ultraviolet radiation, severe skin cancers around the world. so how quickly
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could that be done? give me a timeframe. say it is approved tomorrow, the government, or a philanthropist says this is the money for it, when could they be in space? that could be in space the next time a rocket is launched. but let me tell you, i am not in favour of that technique. if you asked me what about the technique of salting the clouds over the north pole, i would say that's something we have to work on for about five years, do a demonstration, see what the consequences are, then we would be ready to go. and five years, frankly, is quite a good time period. we need to have all of these technologies available. but let me quickly say, the first thing we are pushing for is a massive reduction in emissions. we're not going manage this problem if we continue emitting anything like 50 billion tons of greenhouse gases every year. so our
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first task is persuading everyone to stop emitting very much more quickly thanis stop emitting very much more quickly than is happening now. the second and third tasks are, on, remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and two, then we look at the climate repair such as preventing melting of theice repair such as preventing melting of the ice caps. it has been very interesting talking to you, professor sir david king. thank you very much. thank you. it is 13 minutes past seven. time to look at the weather. matt has the details. here is on the edge. always on the edge. a very good morning to you. come out to a new fall outside broadcasting house. a fantastic bit of 3—d street artwork pa rt fantastic bit of 3—d street artwork part of the abc creative festival. done by jamie lewis part of the abc creative festival. done byjamie lewis —— bbc. it took two days for them to do this. you can say it as part of the creative
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festival which starts tomorrow night. we have seen temperatures rather disappointingly cool. there has been wet weather around. to take you through what is happening this weekend, look at how the temperature mapped out to warm up a little bit. by mapped out to warm up a little bit. by the early part of next week temperatures across the northern half of the uk get into the low 205. that is a few days away. high pressure is to move in to bring that little bit more warm. for the time being. we are almost in between them at the moment. not much anyway of wind around. when you start the day with you might end up with by the end of the day. if you are a part of western scotland, northern ireland, northern england, wildca rd western scotland, northern ireland, northern england, wildcard muggy sanglah, further outbreaks of rain coming and going through the day. very cloudy. either side of that mister fog around. —— very cloudy. either side of that misterfog around. —— mist and fog. some southern counties will see
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showers brew. it may start dry. there could be one or two heavy or thundery showers later. avoid them and you will see sunshine and temperatures up to 17. further north, even though winds continue, still a cool day 7—11. further showers across northern scotland once again as well. through tonight we will see the pressure pushed through the english channel. that will bring wet weather to the channel islands and the southern coastal counties of england. some showers continuing elsewhere. where you see gaps in the cloud for any length of time you could see mist and fog and there could be a touch across to take us into the start of the weekend. can forecast isn't looking too bad. we will still have showers on saturday. parts of eastern scotland, maybe some wales in particular. some showers around. the odd everyone to begin with. across the west, northern ireland, western scotland, a fine day two, sunshine. that sunshine is gaining
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strength day by day and will start to make you feel warmer. there will be more of that around into sunday. any showers we see will be few and far between mainly across eastern england and eastern scotland. most places will be dry. they are bubbling up into the afternoon. good, long sunny spells for the vast majority of you. temperatures are starting to creep up day by day. into next week we could see the temperatures hit around 22 degrees across some parts of northern scotla nd across some parts of northern scotland in particular. that is how it is looking. back to you. mid—may, ami mid—may, am i wrong in thinking it should be a bit nicer? and it should bea should be a bit nicer? and it should be a little bit drier, but we have to balance that with the fact we had such a dry month with the rain in some parts of the country. so what are you going to do about it, matt? let's make it sunny and warm? spending time in the playground is just as important
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for the wellbeing and development of pupils as sitting in lessons, yet a new study has found that breaks in england are shorter now than they were a ten years ago, and children are missing out on making friends and exercise. so should they play out for longer? we asked some former pupils for their thoughts. primary school, two short legs and a longer break. secondary school, at least one short break and probably a decent long break. i think children spend too long in front of x boxes and gaming consoles, and become isolated. so i think it's good that they do spend time with other children at home, and we learn to socialise. it is not good for, like, socialise. it is not good for, like, social skills and general mental health. because you need time outside, you need time for fresh air, and to play when you are a kid. school isn't everything. no, ithink they could do with a few more. i
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think kids need to have a lot more shorter breaks and shorter concentration time. so yes, perhaps a few more. and work alongside other children and play alongside other children and play alongside other children from a variety of backgrounds, it is actually essential. they don't have time to do that in class, and playtime is important to do that. let's discuss this now with parent and broadcaster angela epstein, and vivian hill, an educational psychologist at university college london, who is in our london newsroom. ifi if i can start with you, vivian, people have their own thoughts, anecdotally, about this. what is the evidence? the research evidence is suggesting that our youngest children, stage one children at primary school, have lost about a5 minutes from their playtime over the last 20 years, and in secondary schools it's actually over an hour. it is quite a significant reduction
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in opportunities for children to socialise, to develop their emotional connections with one another, to develop their sense of well—being. and i think as some of the people in your earlier commentary mentioned, we are worried about screen time. lots of children go home to homes where there is no outside play facilities, certainly nowhere that safe, so there is a real sense of the impact of this reduction on children's overall mental health and well—being, things that we are very concerned about right now. you can see the logic in that, but is it tangible, is it measurable, if you like, the harm that can be done? for example, we know that children working for sustained periods, their attention and concentration reduces. so actually having short breaks allows children to focus better and improve their learning. i think our concern is that this study has identified what has really been a shift in the
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amount of play opportunities children have over time, without any clear policy directive. and if we think about some of our current concerns, which are to do with children's mental health and well—being in a school setting, but also childhood obesity, this is the one opportunity for many children to have safe opportunities to play and socialise, and it's being really quite significantly eroded. angela, what is your experience? you are a mum. how many children do you have? four, at the last count. all these things make absolute sense, children need to be outside, we need to get them away from screens, break time compels them to have fresh air and without being umbilical locked to an ipad. i always found break time rather miserable as a kid, because you are chucked outside, it is freezing cold, there will be a sour faced miserable teacher in the corner clutching a coffee while you run around. all of these things are
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absolutely true. i always get a bit concerned when we start throwing terms like mental health around, which is a very serious issue, and co nflate which is a very serious issue, and conflate them with the idea of having break time stop i think it is a great shame that children don't play out more, and there are lots of social and security issues while parents feel uncomfortable about that. but those are two different points, one is after—school and one is during school. and what is wonderful about break time is because they don't have these devices and things they have no choice but to go outside. but i think there is a question about what happens at break time as well. of course we have to let them make their own friends, they have to learn the laws of the jungle, but being released into the back garden, like a pet, and running around this huge concrete area, i think it would be nice if schools had more facilities that kids could play on or play with outside, as opposed to just being a patch of ground where they run about. i suppose, vivian,
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they run about. i suppose, vivian, the point that angela makes is it is the point that angela makes is it is the quality, it is what you do. you are saying some children don't, angela, have devices. some children in some schools, that is when they are allowed their devices. so it is not just the are allowed their devices. so it is notjust the time, it is notjust the quantity, it is the long phrase, but it is quality that matters. absolutely, and what we feel is that it is absolutely crucial time for children's psychological and it is absolutely crucial time for child ren's psychological and social development, learning how to deal with conflict, being creative, developing games and activities, and we would certainly support the idea of children having more control over the kinds of activities that they have access to in the playground. but it really is so important for their development to have that opportunity to play and have self—directed, free playtime.” opportunity to play and have self-directed, free playtime. i am just looking at the comments ofjeff barton, the general secretary of the association of school and colleges leaders, he said timetables are bursting at the seams because of pressure to prepare children for
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high—stakes pressure to prepare children for hig h—sta kes tests pressure to prepare children for high—sta kes tests and pressure to prepare children for high—stakes tests and exams. in a way, teachers might say, do you know what? if you want your kids to do really well in all the test and the exams which we are told are so important and we have to do, then something has got to give, and maybe it is that time that has to give, which you might not agree with, but maybe that is the reality. yes, there is absolutely a place for break time. it is critical. children need enough time to get their lunch at lunchtime. some children report there isn't enough time to queue up, get theirfood, et there isn't enough time to queue up, get their food, et cetera. there isn't enough time to queue up, get theirfood, et cetera. i there isn't enough time to queue up, get their food, et cetera. i am saying yes, you are absolutely right. yes, there is a lot of pressure. we have stuffed kids with so pressure. we have stuffed kids with so many expectations, stats and various things now. and also this idea that it is a kind of binary thing, because if they have enough break time they will do better at school, or if there is enough lesson time... it feels like schools get it in the neck either way. it is a no—win situation. if you speak to a child who says, and ijust remember from bringing up my own kid, there was always someone from bringing up my own kid, there was always someone who didn't have a
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friend in the playground and break time was a miserable experience. at my daughter's school they had something called the friendship stock, and if you didn't have someone stock, and if you didn't have someone to play with, you went and sat there and someone would come along and help. this isjunior school, as i said before, you can't wrap them up in cotton wool. also, we have to look at how best we use the time rather than saying you get another five minutes a week and it will make a massive difference to how well you do when your a—levels, or whatever, if you want to do. thank you for your time this morning. a breed of swans are now in such serious decline that a group of grassroots champions are springing up in an attempt to save them. breakfast‘s john maguire is in gloustershire and can tell us more. the tzar bewick's swan. i don't know the difference between bewick's swan and what the regular swans are. ——
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these are bewick's swan. that is the bewick's swan swimming away from us. i suppose the easiest way to discern the difference between that and mute swa ns, the difference between that and mute swans, particularly, which is what they have the majority of here at slim bridge, in gloucester, on the banks of the seven river, is that the because the other way around. it is black at the end, more orange towards the end, and more of a profiled head as well, and you will hear him squawk away. the mute swan closer to us, the big is closer to the skull, and the more yellow when they are younger, and they are larger as well. why are we having an issue with bewick's? we talked about sasha's amazing flight of the swans that took place a couple of years ago, the research done in russia. now we're starting to find out
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exactly why the population has been so exactly why the population has been so threatened, the migrating population, in recent years. what going on? they are unfortunately declining. what we do know is they are being shot at in a number of countries across the flyway, and research has shown there is potential for accidental shooting when the bewick's swan is misidentified for the mute swan and the whooper swan, which have weaker legal protections in the russian arctic. yes, because it is difficult to tell, isn't it? we're struggling a bit here, but if they are flying overhead or in a white snowbound ground, very difficult, and the whooper swan are even more similar to the bewick's swan. it is very challenging, even to the most experienced eye, particularly, as you say, foggy or misty weather. it is difficult to distinguish these species, but also 18% of hunters in these regionsjust species, but also 18% of hunters in these regions just simply species, but also 18% of hunters in these regionsjust simply didn't realise that these birds are protected. and hopefully the work that we are doing finding out and educating people on the ground is going to make a difference. is that the objective? what is really brilliant is this issue has really galvanised support among communities in the arctic who now regard
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themselves as a swan champions. there are a number of activities being rolled out to improve hunter identification of species, including a memo for hunters, various outreach programmes to improve the situation. you can tell us lots more about that later in the programme, all after the news, travel and weather where you are watching brecht this morning. —— breakfast this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. a man has been arrested 17 years after a shooting which left another man confined to a hospital before his death more than a decade later. marvin couson was left unable to communicate after he was shot at the lime in london bar in shoreditch back in 2002. he died in 2015. a a0—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of possession of a firearm with intent to endanger life. a woman from hertfordshire has started a photo campaign to highlight what real people with cancer look like. vicky saynor was diagnosed with breast cancer last year. she became frustrated with what she has described as glossy and insensitive tv awareness campaigns. she has produced a series of photos
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with people who have different forms of cancer. this pink, fluffy, happy, very glamorous photo shoots plays into the fact that it's a sort of huggy, happy, supportive environment, and it's not. you feel very alone. i don't feel the truth is given to the public as to how much it changes your life. well, breast cancer now has since removed the video we showed there and issued an apology. a major music festival planned in north london has been given the go—ahead, despite objections from locals. field day will be held on the meridian water regeneration site in edmonton injune. organisers say they have made changes to address safety concerns and will avoid a clash with tottenham match days. there is a good service on the tubes this morning.
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turning to the roads — the approach to the blackwall tunnel heading northbound is already quite busy. in ladbroke grove there are two lanes closed westbound on the west way, just before the northern roundabout, so expect delays there. finally, in ilford, the high road is partially blocked heading eastbound due to a police incident from cameron road to st albans road. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. there should be a bit more sunshine around today than we saw yesterday, but again, there's lots more heavy showers in the forecast. some thunder and some lightning always possible. now, because of all the extra moisture in the air from yesterday's rainfall, it's quite a misty, murky start to the morning. some fog patches out towards western home counties. that cloud will clear off to the north—east, so a fairly bright but a rather chilly start to the morning. lots of sunshine around for the first half of the day, then we'll see the showers spring up here and there through the late morning into the afternoon. and, where we get the showers, they could be rather slow—moving, so they'll last for some time
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because of the late wind. top temperatures today of 16 or maybe 17 celsius. through this evening and overnight, plenty of cloud around. temperatures will tend to be a bit milder than they were last night. also some showers, particularly into the start of the day tomorrow. we'll begin the morning between 7—9 degrees celsius, and then tomorrow, again some showers around. quite a bit of cloud, but some sunshine breaking through into the afternoon. by sunday, things will settle down. it will feel warmer into next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. good morning. thanks forjoining us. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. a new radio network for britain's emergency services is set to go over budget by more than £3 billion — almost 50% more than planned. the national audit office also suggests the target date of 2022
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for replacing the current system may not be met. the home office says the new technology will transform the service offered by police, firefighters and ambulance workers. radical new ways to repair the climate and reverse global warming are being considered by scientists at the university of cambridge as part of a new research centre. among the ideas is a scheme to re—freeze polar regions, by reflecting sunlight away from the earth, and spraying water from ships into the atmosphere. it's feared that current approaches to tackle global warming won't go far enough to stop irreversible damage to the planet. the united states has more than doubled tariffs on billions of dollars of chinese goods. it comes after negotiations in washington aimed at salvaging a trade deal between the world's two largest economies broke up without agreement. the talks are due to resume later today. it's being reported by many of the newspapers this morning that the comedian, freddie starr, has died at the age of 76. a post on the freddie starr official facebook page said that he had passed away at his home in spain.
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but the bbc has been unable to verify the details. freddie starr was one of britain's most well known performers during the 19705, but in recent years had suffered ill health. care homes in england will receive more support from the nhs to help prevent residents being given too many medicines. care home residents are prescribed an average of seven medicines a day, with many taking ten or more, costing the nhs an estimated £250 million each year. nhs england says the move is designed to cut hospital stays and reduce over—medication. one last story for you now. a bit of greenery is always nice in the office but at one company in gloucestershire has gone a step further — with a 300—foot long pot plant. we don't have any here. do not see the plans, they are all behind us. —— plants. des brannan bought the plant
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from a store a decade ago, but it quickly outgrew his own home. so he took it to work where it has since thrived from the heat of the computers. it is magnificent, isn't it? it is. u nless it is magnificent, isn't it? it is. unless you are terrified as a child by the day of the triffids. good for hanging things off.” by the day of the triffids. good for hanging things off. i was asking earlier when it becomes a weed. because if that was japanese knotweed or something, a problem. many people are telling me that a weed is a plant in the wrong position. anyway, look, this week in terms of foot all, it is unprecedented. the first time ever we have the finalists of the europa league now in the champions league all from the same country and they all from the same country and they all happen to be from england. the
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premier league. eye on what the odds we re premier league. eye on what the odds were on premier league. eye on what the odds were on that. especially halfway through the champions league. on tuesday you said will liverpool come back at barcelona? especially after halftime. and then this. they wonder what the odds were.” halftime. and then this. they wonder what the odds were. i can't imagine. you'll be very wealthy. real drama last night. arsenal and chelsea will play in the europa league final on may the 29th in baku. chelsea were taken all the way by eintracht frankfurt. ruben loftus—cheek put them ahead, before the german side equalised. and it went to extra time and eventually penalties, where eden hazard struck the winning spot kick, in what may have been his last game at stamford bridge. and arsenal made it to the final with a comprehensive victory over valencia. pierre—emerick aubameyang scored a hat—trick to complete a a—2 win on the night, 7—a overall. after an incredible week for english sides in europe attention now turns back to the premier league. a thrilling duel between manchester city and liverpool will come to a head on sunday when one of those teams will be crowned champions.
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we're joined now by the new york times' football correspondent rory smith. hi, rory, unprecedented success for english teams in europe and two record breaking pace setters in the title race in the premier league. what is behind all this? there are probably a load of factors. the one for me is three or four years ago the premier league clu bs four years ago the premier league clubs decided to stop investing quite as much in players and they had this somewherejurgen klopp, jose mourinho came back, antonio co nte we nt jose mourinho came back, antonio co nte went to jose mourinho came back, antonio conte went to chelsea. they seem to have realised that what matters are the ideas, rather than just have realised that what matters are the ideas, rather thanjust stuffing us was full of super sub players. think we are seeing the benefits of that now. it has been a remarkable season domestically —— superstar. certainly the case for spurs. missing harry kane. the best teams out there did not have a chance. and then pochettino's passion. those
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tears after that much. that was fantastic. the managers are definitely making their mark. and the emotional connection, that pochettino and juergen clubhouze with their players, squads, and fans. —— jurgen klopp with their players, squads, and fans. ——jurgen klopp have with. that emotional connection is important. if you saw pochettino after the game. they came back out to celebrate. floods of tears. he is quite an emotional man. cold in terms of the decisions he makes. you talk about destiny, universal energy, he really feels the bond with his plays, i think. that is crucially important in moments like that we need something extra. you work for the new york times.” that we need something extra. you work for the new york times. i do. you look from the outside and look at english clubs in the event finals. can we now officially say that english club football is the best in the world? can you do that now? can you look at it and they obviously? look at who is in the
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game? i think we premier league have been saying that a long time, of the evidence. this season you have to say that the premier league has clearly become the strongest opposition at the top. what i am really reluctant to do is say what stood for the big clubs isn't necessarily good for everyone else. there are teams going out of business, i think bolton may cease to exist. if you look lower down the premier league there are problems in terms of the competitive balance of the competition. it has been wonderful to watch manchester city a liverpool win every week, but that doesn't suggest it is a really healthy league teams are kind of cruising through. olive think we should celebrate the achievements of the super clubs and the fact that we get to see them is a real privilege, we should maybe stop short of saying it shows great health for all —— while i think. is a testament to the quality of the top of the premier league and the pace and the stamina that tottenham had enough in reserve to got a very late goal. they do the end these teams, don't they? and
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liverpool played at a speed at barcelona could not cope with. they could not match it. disposed people 's physicality, without harry kane, the end of the long season, they can't win away at the premier league back can go away and when in europe —— and expose people '5 physicality. manchester city just about him —— and expose people '5 physicality. manchester cityjust about him poll position. liverpool hosts wolves. can you see any way that manchester city will slip up against a brighton tea m city will slip up against a brighton team that are safe now? it has been probably the most dramatic week of the season in recent seasons. the surprises maybe stop you. think we have had our fill. surprises maybe stop you. think we have had ourfill. they seemed to have had ourfill. they seemed to have that as a sign, that is the last major challenge, they are through. they should retain the title. for anyone not into football, andi title. for anyone not into football, and i am not a massive football fan, there are really good stories out there. so hopefully this will help to appeal to those who have been turned off from football for quite a
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long time because of the ugliness around it. exactly. not everyone has to like football. it is personal taste. but for sheer drama, in to like football. it is personal taste. but forsheer drama, in the 96 minute, as a journalist you hated. but for sheer drama you cannot beat it. that is why it is so popular. because that can happen by good to see you here. thank you very much. mike, thank you very much as well. on breakfast we often do a thing where we jump from one subject is something very different. they are mindful of how much we have been talking about football this weekend and subjects must navigate talked about. the menopause is life—changing for all women, and difficult for many, but it has been discussed for only one hour and 17 minutes in the whole of parliamentary history. the first full debate took place earlier this year, but every day next week we will be asking you to wake up to the menopause. by way of an introduction, breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been meeting women who not only have survived, but also thrived.
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hold onto your hats, ladies. there is something we really need to discuss. we are in doncaster to talk about — ladies? menopause! whoo—hoo! you're all sisters. you're all sisters, and you're all going it. some on the other side. so those of you on the other side, what have you told those of you who are at the beginning? should we just press pause for a moment? press pause to consider the pause? you're so pleased that the periods have stopped, and then the madness begins. that is what we will do all next week on breakfast, with real women and the best experts. how has your menopausal journey been? it's terrible, and even now, at 68, i'm still menopausal. it is still going. so hot sweats... when did it start? when i was a0 i was diagnosed with it from the doctor, and now i'm 68.
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how is it, darling? it's very hot. the mood swings — i'm slamming the door. you can like somebody one day, and hate them the next. as well as the symptoms, we will talk about the solutions, and the very latest science. i say hrt, and you say... cool your attitude is really important. how you see it yourself. you're either a survivor or a victim, and i'm a survivor. we will talk about a time of life which comes to us all, which shouldn't be feared, which can, with help, be conquered. hello, ladies. hello. menopause. i have been there, done it, and got the t—shirt. and i was very lucky. my sister was always, well, she sailed through her menopause. i used to forget lines, and i wondered if i was having that sort of panic attack as an actress. then i realised it was the menopause.
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i could literally put my phone in the fridge. what i am learning is how to embrace it. so you're not afraid of what is ahead? i'm not afraid of what is ahead. it's empowerment, and we're a fantastic species, so onwards and upwards. high—five, sister. for some, it might be a white—knuckle ride. but always remember — it will pass. you have come out the other side. how is it? it's great, i feel human again. we are tough. it took years. i'm still happy, and i'm still here. just keep going, girls. just keep going. ladies, we're going to get through this, aren't we? we can do this. really loving the atmosphere around
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the discussion, which will be going on all next week. we will keep it positive. often you talk about menopause and people will say it will be awful. we have good ideas about coping with it, with the symptoms, we will tell you about the latest research into treatments and how best to cope with the symptoms. please do join the conversation and share your experience of it using the hashtag #bbcmenopause. here is matt with a look at this morning's weather. here has a swimming pool. how delightful. i think it is a hint. here has a swimming pool. how delightful. ithink it is a hint. if you after southern parts of spain and portugal this weekend you are in for a treat if you like the heat. temperature scoring —— soaring into the 205. what better way to start your friday morning, maybe an early morning dip. this, as you are aware, is not real. it is a stunning piece of 3—d artwork done by the artist jamie lawrence. it is here to mark
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the start of the bbc creative season which starts tomorrow. 1500 events across uk. go to the website if you wa nt across uk. go to the website if you want any more details on that. but the weather will improve. if you are one of the people who want to get out and enjoy it, maybe not this weekend. if you look at what happens through the weekend and into next week the temperature charges going to start to warm up in colours. and by the time we hit the early part of next week the northern half of the uk will have the benefit of that strengthening sunshine. temperatures into the low 205. not quite as one further south. it will be drier than we have at the moment. low pressure close by. the one that brought wet weather mid—wickets to the east of us. another project was the southwest. it will mainly affect france rather than us. we are stuck between. we have the remnants of an old weather fronts traded across northern ireland, northern england, the midlands, in north—east england. there are outbreaks of rain. either
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side of that there is dry and brighter weather around, sunshine at times after morning mist and fog. through the midlands, southern england, but otherwise, big thunderstorms will develop later on. slow—moving. not much wind around. parts of northern scotland moore see some showers as well of david drysdale. temperatures best in the sunshine. it is still unusually cool for this stage in may. a5 sunshine. it is still unusually cool for this stage in may. as we go into tonight, showers will continue. something went through the english channel. the channel islands especially. inaudible. apologies to our viewers there. i'm goingjump in. we apologies to our viewers there. i'm going jump in. we are having some technical problems, as you could hear or not here with the microphone. i think here was saying, basically, it will get better. we we re basically, it will get better. we were a bit upset at how cold it has been. it will get better, about 17-18 been. it will get better, about 17—18 next week.
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we have some very talkative guests with us right now, do we not? what a lovely atmosphere this morning. the uk's first text messaging service aiming to tackle the country's mental health crisis is looking for thousands of volunteers to help. the duke and duchess of cambridge launched the appeal, along with prince harry and meghan, the duchess of sussex. the shout crisis line, in conjunction with the royal foundation, will provide free, 2a—hour support. prince william has been talking about the importance of the scheme. shout is a new text line that supports people who need advice in a tough moment. it operates 2a/7, it connects people to train volunteers who provide help at a time when it is most needed. enabling them to move from crisis to calm, and to find longer term support. as texting is private and silent, it opens up a whole new way to find help. it provides instant support. you can
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have a conversation anywhere, and any time. at school, at home, on the bus, anywhere. iam incredibly excited to be launching this service, knowing it has the potential to reach thousands of vulnerable people every day. we arejoined now by fiona pienaar from the charity mental health innovations. also here are carol keith and michael kitching, who are both volunteers at shout. very good morning to you both. i was saying, we were chatting before, there is a lot to talk about here, and that is kind of the point, is conversations, and different ways that people can keep in touch about important issues. just tell us a little bit about how in practice this will work. ok, so someone takes in of their phone, and they go into the crisis text... sorry, the shout system the crisis text... sorry, the shout syste m — — the crisis text... sorry, the shout system —— texts in. and they are passed through to a crisis counsellor, a crisis volunteer, and thatis counsellor, a crisis volunteer, and that is me. michael is the
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supervisor, and imagine someone is in crisis, i am texting them back, but i've got a supervisor there all the time, which is fantastic. and so you are never on your own, as a volunteer, you are never you are never on your own, as a volunteer, you are never on you are never on your own, as a volunteer, you are never on your own. you have got a supporter, you have got a supervisor there. so you have got a supervisor there. so you have been doing this, this has been in practice so far? i have been there a year, and i was the first responder, i got the first text. what did it say? actually, it was awful. i suppose this is what i want to get to, and michael, you can shed some light on this, what does crisis look like on a text message? well, a crisis can mean five different things, and it is across the whole age gamut. we started with just young people, but we expanded across the whole aids gamut. for me, i have seen a the whole aids gamut. for me, i have seen a lot of young people with
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suicide, self—harm, a lot of people with homelessness, drugs and alcohol —— age gamut. so to get volunteers is what we need, but let's not beat around the bush here. there is some stuff going on that is quite difficult sometimes. how much more effective is having this text ability, you know, to communicate via text, rather than say calling the samaritans and talking to someone the samaritans and talking to someone directly? it feels like it isa someone directly? it feels like it is a delayed response, because if you get to that point you text and you get to that point you text and you are just waiting. actually, we get to people really quickly, the aim is to get to those people most at need in under five minutes and over the years the service has been running in the united states, the artificial intelligence has obviously picked up which other words that are most likely to lead to imminent risk for lead to needing some sort of more active rescue. it pushes those conversations to the top of the queue, so we get to those that are most in need really
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quickly. and i think what is fantastic about the service is it is so fantastic about the service is it is so immediate. if someone is in crisis, no matter where they are, they can text. there is no need to download an app, or anything, they have got that on their phone. and when they get through, they get to our trained volunteers, who have gone through this really good online training, have been supported by a coach, i got the supervisors on the platform. they develop amazing skills, and we hearfrom our volunteers. these are skills that help them in their professional life, their personal life, so i think it is a win — win for people who really need support immediately, ina who really need support immediately, in a crisis moment, and for volunteers. now, obviously these areas of confidentiality around this, but can you give us an idea of a text conversation that has taken place, and how it works? a5 a text conversation that has taken place, and how it works? as you say, you get a message and it could be someone you get a message and it could be someone in real crisis. what is the first step, what is the first thing you say? i guess if you are meeting someone, you say? i guess if you are meeting someone, the first thing you say is
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you just listen, that is the first thing. but texting is a bit different, because you have to say something. it is, it is about building that report, and i thought that might be quite difficult to do via text, but it is not. if someone comes through and they are saying i am suicidal, or i have huge anxiety and depression or i am struggling, there is something about saying, do you know, i always put hi, i'm carol, i'm right here for you, and the something about knowing someone is there, someone is notjudging you, it is a safe place, you create a safe place for them, and also they are being heard, and there is something about being heard.” are being heard, and there is something about being heard. i am really interested in that. if you have established that rapport at a moment in time, how can you make sure that carries on? the next day they could have another problem, someone they could have another problem, someone else might be in the seat, if you know what i mean? absolutely, so if you know what i mean? absolutely, so there is a few crisis volunteers we have now, so there is... if an
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individual text back in, they might not get who they had. but there is continuity, we always treat them like they are texting for the first time. we don't want to make any preconceived ideas, so wejust let the texter. when it comes to volunteers, how easy is it to train them? what volunteers, how easy is it to train them ? what kind volunteers, how easy is it to train them? what kind of requirements are neededin them? what kind of requirements are needed in terms of hours, training and support for the volunteers as well, when they are hearing quite traumatic experiences? so basically you have to be 18, and then there is an application process. during the application process, we do ask people who are interested to think very carefully if this is the right form of volunteering for them stop you have to think about can you offer empathy for someone? can you listen to any issue that comes up without judging people? have listen to any issue that comes up withoutjudging people? have you got the time to do the 25 hours', basically, online training? which is
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well supported by a coach, you get an individual coach who looks after you through the training and onto the platform. a5 you through the training and onto the platform. as i say, it is not for everybody, but it is a fantastic opportunity for people. thank you very much. later we will find out how the economy is doing. but it's all work and no play for nina, who is in cumbria for us. good morning, nina.” good morning, nina. i am not allowed to play, because it could be pretty dangerous, not least because there are not any ladders to get to the top of the slide. talking about ups and downs of the uk economy because of gdp, gross domestic product, the net income for the whole country when you take in what we do and what we make. the expectation is it will be up slightly, and have a look at these pictures outside. this is partly why. stockpiling in the lead
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up partly why. stockpiling in the lead up to brexit, the first quarter of the year, what we thought would be the year, what we thought would be the date we left the eu, businesses bringing in lots of extra supplies and that gave a small boost to the economy. one of the people who made the to stockpile is that this playground factory. you said brexit has been one of the challenges of the last few years, but austerity has been your biggest challenge. we know councils have lost half of their budgets and these other kinds of playground equipment we would see in council playgrounds. the market in play areas is down by about aa% in the ten years, which is what made us make the decision to look globally, now exporting to over a9 countries, heavily supported by the department of international trade, because we had to do that to continue to grow. and you described brexit as just another bump in the road earlier. it is a bigger bump than the usual bumpjust road earlier. it is a bigger bump than the usual bump just another challenge to businesses. if the expected growth does happen, it
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could be because of lots of different elements, one of which is the fact that our wage growth keeps growing. we are earning more and inflation is a little bit lower. basically more money in the pocket and to how much things are costing us. jill works for the cumbrian tourism board. doesn't it smell fabulous? are you seeing a bit of a loosening in spending on tourism?” think in the last two months we have seen an increase think in the last two months we have seen an increase in terms of visitors that are coming and staying here, certainly compared to last year. but remembering, last year was a difficult time with beast from the east. there has been a slight rise in terms of occupancy but visitors have been cautious in terms of their spend. so a slight increase in spending on last year but you are not getting the ice creams in just yet. what our members are telling us is that we can see some of the impact of staycation, and people tend to be repeat visitors. when
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times are uncertain, that is not good for businesses, so what we want is stability. a slight release in terms of spending. you have the nationalfigure. if as terms of spending. you have the national figure. if as we expect, the figures are 0.a%, is that good news, bad news, how does it compare with other european economies? news, bad news, how does it compare with other european economie57m news, bad news, how does it compare with other european economies? it is relatively good news for the uk. france had 0.3% growth in the first quarter, and germany has had some difficult performances in terms of growth. the performance is a relatively good one, but it is somewhat boosted by that stockpiling effect. and lots of people will say the remoaners said the economy would collapse. do we need to stop worrying about brexit? it is important to remember that brexit hasn't happened yet, so all the trading relationships continue as they were before the referendum, so we will see more of an effect after that, and it is important to keep in mind the effect on business
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investment. that is something we have been monitoring over a longer period, an investment has declined in four consecutive quarters, the worst performance since the financial crisis. are complicated picture. we are expecting slight growth, we get those figures at 9:30 a.m..i growth, we get those figures at 9:30 a.m.. iwish growth, we get those figures at 9:30 a.m.. i wish you could smell it in here, it is beautiful. the news, travel and weather where you are watching this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm tolu adeoye. a man has been arrested 17 years after a shooting which left another man confined to a hospital, before his death more than a decade later. marvin couson was left unable to communicate after he was shot at the lime in london bar in shoreditch back in 2002. he died in 2015. a a0—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of possession of a firearm with intent to endanger life. a woman from hertfordshire has started a photo campaign to highlight what real people with cancer look like. vicky saynor was diagnosed with breast cancer last year. she became frustrated with what she has described
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as glossy and insensitive tv awareness campaigns. she has produced a series of photos with people who have different forms of cancer. this pink, fluffy, happy, very glamorous photo shoot plays into the fact that it's a sort of huggy, happy, supportive environment, and it's not. you feel very alone. i don't feel the truth is given to the public as to how much it changes your life. well, breast cancer now has since removed the video we showed there and issued an apology. a major music festival planned in north london has been given the go—ahead, despite objections from locals. field day will be held on the meridian water regeneration site in edmonton injune. organisers say they have made changes to address safety concerns and will avoid a clash with tottenham match days. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service
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on the tubes this morning. turning to the roads — the approach to the blackwall tunnel heading northbound is already quite busy. the m25 has one lane closed anticlockwise between junction six for godstone and junction five for the m26, due to broken—down car. mile end road is closed heading out of town due to watermain work from mile end underground station to rhondda grove. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. there should be a bit more sunshine around today than we saw yesterday, but again, there's lots more heavy showers in the forecast. some thunder and some lightning always possible. now, because of all the extra moisture in the air from yesterday's rainfall, it's quite a misty, murky start to the morning. some fog patches out towards western home counties. that cloud will clear off to the north—east, so a fairly bright but a rather chilly start to the morning. lots of sunshine around for the first half of the day, then we'll see the showers spring up here and there through the late morning into the afternoon. and, where we get the showers, they could be rather slow—moving, so they'll last for some time
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because of the light winds. top temperatures today of 16 or maybe 17 celsius. through this evening and overnight, plenty of cloud around. temperatures will tend to be a bit milder than they were last night. also some showers, particularly into the start of the day tomorrow. we'll begin the morning between 7—9 degrees celsius, and then tomorrow, again some showers around. quite a bit of cloud, but some sunshine breaking through into the afternoon. by sunday, things will settle down. it will feel warmer into next week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. ambulance, emergency, is the patient breathing? £3 billion overspent and yet more delays —
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how a critical overhaul of the emergency services' radio network has gone badly wrong. sunshields in space and making clouds over ice—caps — scientists call for radical new ways to fix the climate. good morning. the unexpected buzz around brexit. how has that been cutting through to economics. i'm at a factory in cumbria where they have been spending a lot on the stockpiling. in sport it is a full english with chelsea and arsenal into the europa league final, so for the first time there will be four teams from the same country in the european showpiece finals. the number of swans has followed by a third, new research suggests hunters in russia unable to determine those as opposed to other swa n determine those as opposed to other swan species. and i'm not only diving into the bbc get creative festival but also the weekend forecast which looks drier and brighter than we have seen over
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the past few days. get the umbrella ready today, there is more rain around. i will have the forecast on brea kfast. good morning, it is friday the 10th of may. our top story. a new radio network for britain's emergency services is set to go over budget by more than £3 billion. the national audit office also suggests the target date for 2022 for replacing the current system may not be met. ramzan karmali reports. siren wails the government wants to modernise the communication system used by our emergency services, but not only is it likely to be delayed, it's going to cost a lot more. the current system, airwave, was meant to be replaced this year by the emergency services network. that's been delayed until 2022. but even that target date looks unlikely to be met. it's also going to cost a lot more, £3.1 billion more, which means the total cost of implementing the new system will be £9.6 billion. the national audit office's report is highly critical of the home office.
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back in 2016, the home office expected to be able to deliver this programme by 2019, that's not proved possible. and it's a consequence of the home office failing to manage the risks that existed in the programme at that time. are you diabetic? according to the report, key technology is yet to be properly tested, and work hasn't even started on upgrading control rooms, or providing coverage for police helicopters and air ambulances. the report also reveals that ministers are expected to approve a decision which will mean that the new system will not be as resilient to power cuts as the existing one. but the home office is confident the new system will transform the service offered by the emergency teams that will mean faster and better treatment for victims. ramzan karmali, bbc news. the united states has more than doubled tariffs on billions of dollars of chinese goods. this comes after negotiations in washington aimed at salvaging
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a trade deal between the world's two largest economies broke up without agreement. the talks are due to resume later today. let's speak now to our china correspondent robin brant. i suppose donald trump is going to be delighting in this kind of back in business mode. well, let's see what the talks bring tomorrow. they are going to continue and for some in china that is a bit of a ray of light but he has lived up to his pledge, $200 billion worth of trade, stuff coming from the us to china is going to see tariffs on it... sorry, the other way, china to the us come important to get that right, will see a tariff imposed on it, the tax imposed double from 10% up to 25%, so imposed double from 10% up to 25%, soa imposed double from 10% up to 25%, so a significant change there. what's interesting is that there have been in the months leading up to these talks some concessions and conciliatory mood music from china, they want to give the us what it once in terms of more protection is
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here for intellectual property. they are also willing to open up some of their key markets, automotive and financial sector, for american business, who want in on that. but when it comes to the big structural stuff, this is the way america thinks the chinese market is basically just thinks the chinese market is basicallyjust unfair because it subsidises lots of its own companies here while china is not willing, it would seem, to give ground on that. the key issue of disagreement, and it appears to be continuing to be the key area of disagreement, is who can decide, if there is a deal, if changes are going to be made in china's economy, who is going to decide if they are made and if they are being implemented and if they are being implemented and if they a re really are being implemented and if they are really going through. there is an issue for china on sovereignty and a big gap between what america wa nts and a big gap between what america wants and what china is willing to give at the moment. the other important thing is china will retaliate, there will be counter measures which it said after the tariff— hike came in. but we don't know what they will be. interesting,
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thank you my robin. radical new ways to repair the climate and reverse global warming are being considered by scientists at the university of cambridge as part of a new research centre. among the ideas is a scheme to re—freeze polar regions, by reflecting sunlight away from the earth and spraying salt water from ships into the atmosphere. our science correspondent, pallab ghosh reports. a scorched earth, where people are poorer and have less food because of severe droughts. there'll be more flooding and all the coral has gone. that's what we are headed for, unless we do more to cut emissions of carbon dioxide. scientists at cambridge university fear that reducing co2 emissions on its own won't be enough. the man who's led efforts at the heart of government to combat climate change for 20 years, is helping to set up a new research centre. its role will be to repair the damage that's already been done. we are looking for processes that are scalable, by which i mean processes that can take out billions of tonnes of greenhouse gases each year.
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with trillions of tonnes of ice gone from both the earth's poles, the new centre will look at ways of refreezing them. one idea is to have boats spray sea water into the clouds above the ice, to reflect sunlight away from them. another is to develop forests of artificial trees to absorb carbon dioxide — just like real forests, only better. and some think releasing shiny discs into space might act as a planetary parasol, reflecting sunlight and cooling the earth. the scientists here believe the earth's climate can be repaired but they say new solutions need to be found and implemented within the next ten years, otherwise it may be too late. pallab ghosh, bbc news, cambridge. it's being reported by many of the newspapers this morning that the comedian, freddie starr, has died at the age of 76.
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the sun newspaper broke the story it says he was found dead at his home in spain. but the bbc has been unable to verify the details. freddie starr was one of britain's most well—known performers during the 19705, but in recent years had suffered ill health. school breaks in england have been getting shorter over the past 20 years as teachers try to pack more lessons into the day. researchers at university college london believe that it could have an impact on the well—being of pupils. students social lives have been hit as well with fewer of them visiting a friend's house after school compared to 12 years ago. care homes in england will receive more support from the nhs to help prevent residents being given too many medicines. they are prescribed on average of seven medicines a day with many taking ten or more, costing the nhs an estimated £250 million each year.
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nhs england says the move is designed to cut hospital stays and reduce over—medication. american multi—billionaire jeff bezos has unveiled a model of a lunar landing craft that he says could be used to take scientific equipment, and eventually people, to the moon. the amazon founder said his private space company blue origin, could help nasa deliver president trump's goal of sending humans to the moon's south pole by 202a. the reusable blue moon vehicle will be able to carry scientific instruments, satellites and rovers. it's 8.09am matt has the weather for us in a few minutes. but first... one in four teachers in england say they have witnessed pupils being removed, often in an attempt to artificially boost a school's performance, and in turn pushing them up league tables. the schools watchdog, ofsted, has been looking into what is known as off—rolling which it says is becoming more prevalent — despite being illegal. amanda spielman is ofsted's chief inspector and she joins us from our central london studio.
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good morning to you. thank you for your time this morning. why is this acceptable? it absolutely isn't acceptable, that is a very clear answer. we must look properly at what's happening and why it's happening. people are aware that children can be excluded from school through formal processes but this is about what is happening through the back door without being reported in statistics, without anybody having a clear picture of what is going on. what we are talking about today is the need to get a proper understanding of all the reasons why children may leave school when it isn't their best interests, so that we can make sure every child, particularly those with the toughest job to get on in life, to get the ca re job to get on in life, to get the care and education they need. as i understand it, ofsted identified 300 schools with high levels of off—rolling. this is specifically where pupils disappear from the school register just where pupils disappear from the school registerjust before gcses. that's a lot of schools and it's a
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lot of pupils. what has happened to those schools, if you know who they are, what has happened to them? this isa are, what has happened to them? this is a flag where we get schools of unusual levels of pupil movement, it doesn't definitively mean they are off—rolling, but it means we ensure when we expect no inspect then we have a conversation specifically about this area and look at the children who have left and discuss the reasons why they have left, and in several cases we have found clear evidence of off—rolling and reported on that. it is something that makes people uncomfortable to talk about but we think it's very important that it's discussed. the language you are using is interesting, you have a conversation, you discuss it, you have clear evidence. what do you do? what changes? you have the evidence and you know it's happening. it's illegal. what happens? our role is only to report. we report in words and often in the
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judgments that we make that something unacceptable is going on. so, for example, it may lead to the leadership and management judgment of the school being awarded the lowest g ra d e of the school being awarded the lowest grade and at that point it is the people responsible for the school to take action. people listening to this will think, no disrespect to you, a slightly u nsatisfa ctory a nswer disrespect to you, a slightly unsatisfactory answer because clearly the problem is increasing, not going away, because it is not being addressed. this is like so many things, there are not simple a nswe rs many things, there are not simple answers here but i think we all realise there are far more children than we have necessarily focused on who leave school before the end of compulsory education. children who are formally excluded are only one small piece of that so we are working our way to get a better view. for example, the department for education has planned a new register of children who are not in school. that will be helpful to make sure that everybody understands the set of children we are talking about and we are doing our best to make
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sure that inspection becomes a really constructive force in this by making sure that we discuss and surface places where the unacceptable is happening. we can make sure that schools that act with integrity also know that they will be rewarded for that. we have got to make sure that schools really understand that ofsted, in inspecting, we value and recognise the schools that do the right thing for children. is something going fundamentally wrong in the system whereby, and you can understand it on an individual basis in a classroom if there is an unruly pupil and it has gone on over a period of time, that is very hard for a school to manage and they have a responsibility to educate those children and the pressure on exam results, is there a fundamental problem here that the schools cannot do both things? they are obliged to keep up with the ever increasing demands on standards, so it's easier to shift the kids out of the way. that's a horrible but practical reality choice they are making. we must not forget here that schools
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have the power to exclude. they have those powers, they can be used and often a re those powers, they can be used and often are used absolutely properly, and some children do need a specialist education in alternative provision, pupil referral units, and if that is done the right way visibly and clearly, that can be absolutely justifiable. what we are talking about here is children who are moved out without those kinds of processes that are designed to protect children's interests being properly used. so this isn'tjust about schools being under intolerable pressure. this is about doing the right thing to make sure that children's interests are explicitly considered and put first. amanda spielman, thank you for your time this morning. amanda spielman is the chief inspector for schools. it isa is the chief inspector for schools. it is a 15 am. thank you forjoining us on breakfast. matt has the weather this morning and he is by a pool. don't fall in!
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by by the pool this morning, what a way to start your friday morning. it's not real, of course, it's part of the bbc‘s get creative season, starting tomorrow, an amazing bit of 3d street art work, it's a bit of a sensation, 3d street art, draws you in and captures you and falls the eye as well. to tell us more about this particular piece of artwork, let me bring in the artist himself, jamie lawrence. good morning, thank you forjoining us. first of all, how long did this amazing piece of artwork take to do? it took two of two days to do. what got you into doing this amazing sort of 3d artwork? i was always good at art, artwork? i was always good at art, art was the only thing i was any good at at school and i was doing a regular art job good at at school and i was doing a regular artjob and i good at at school and i was doing a regularartjob and i bumped into the guys from 3djoe max who do these and they said come and work for us. how do you do it? how do you get the depth in what is just a 2d piece of paper? it is false perspective and it takes two people,
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one person sketching it out and the other going left a bit, write a bit, it is all done by eye and false perspective. when you have done a few of them it is quite easy and it's difficult to explain. it draws in the public. absolutely. thank you for joining in the public. absolutely. thank you forjoining us. , brilliant piece of artwork, we have enjoyed working with it. stunning pool but not really the weather for it at the moment but things are about to change a bit. the temperature chart for this weekend into next week, the warmer colours start appearing on the chart, by the early part of next week we could see temperatures in the northern half of the uk in particular get above 20 degrees, a big change from what we have at the moment, still low pressure on many of the weather charts either side of us, one to the east of the uk, one approaching to the south—west, we are almost in between both of those so are almost in between both of those so there isn't much in the way of wind around and so what you had yesterday you have quite likely got it again today so across parts of east anglia, northern england, north
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and midlands, northern ireland, this is the cloudiness zone, outbreaks of rain all day long. either side of that, some dry weather, sunshine, mist and fog clearing, but across the midlands, southern england and wales we will see some slow moving, heavy and thundery downpours, could go from lovely conditions to a deluge of rain in a short space of time. a few showers across scotland too but some will stay dry, south—east scotland, parts of the south coast of england best favoured to enjoyed sunshine throughout. temperatures highest in the sunshine in the south, 17 degrees, a cool day of the north of the of the uk, 7— uk, 7-11dc. tonight, of the north of the of the uk, 7— uk, 7—11dc. tonight, we will see wetter weather in the english channel, the channel islands, southern coastal counties of england, still a few showers elsewhere but if you get clearer skies further north, few mist and fog patches could form and there could be a touch of frost forjust one or two going into the morning. into the weekend, i promise you it will get drier, if you are not enjoying the cool and wet weather,
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showers around on saturday in england and scotland, more of a breeze in the south—east and east anglia compared to what we have today but the showers become fewer in numberand the today but the showers become fewer in number and the western half of the uk, it's going to be a dry day with some good sunny spells and feeling that little bit warmer. a chilly night to take us through saturday night into sunday. but most will be dry by sunday. any showers light, isolated, mainly across eastern parts of england but even here most will be dry through the day. a bit of cloud bubbles up but in the sunshine starting to feel a touch warmer and as i said, naga and charlie, things will warm up further into next week. the northern half of the uk in particular during tuesday and wednesday could see temperatures above 20 degrees. back to you both. thank you, matt, the time is 8:17am. the comedian freddie starr has died at the age of 76, according to reports.
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he rose to fame in the 19705 and was a regular fixture on light entertainment shows for more than 30 years. the sun newspaper says he was found at his home in spain. the bbc has not been able to independently verify his death at this time. but many of the newspapers as charlie said are leading with this. let's speak now to one half of the comedy duo cannon and ball, the actor bobby ball who has known starr for more than four decades. thank you for talking to us this morning bobby ball. you have heard the news, what is your reaction? my reaction when i heard the news? yes. i was shocked, i knew freddie well so i was shocked, i knew freddie well soi i was shocked, i knew freddie well so i was shocked, very sad, he was a great talent, a very great talent, so great talent, a very great talent, so very shocked, yeah. you worked with him overfour decades. tell us about him, tell us what this man is like, because obviously we have seen the headlines, we have seen him recently in various shows, but what was he like when you first knew him?
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he was in a group when i first knew him and he was always funny. he was a great fellow for me. his talent wasn't used enough on tv for me. always had a little bit of banter. i loved it, it was great. looking at the humour, obviously comedy has changed a lot. he was famous for one of those skits where his trademark hitler in wellies skit on opportunity knocks and that rather risque humour, he grasped it and ran with it and he wasn't afraid of subverting what traditional comedy was seen as. subverting what traditional comedy was seen as. the difference between a comedian and a comic, one tells
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funny stories and the other is a funny stories and the other is a funny man. he didn't even have to speak, it was his body language, wonderful. i loved him. how easy was it in those days to be anarchic? to break the rules of comedy. say it again, sorry. i'm in spain are doing again, sorry. i'm in spain are doing a show. what do you think freddie starr will be remembered for if these reports come and we haven't been able to verify them, that he has passed at the age of 76? he will be remembered for what you said, when you think of freddie you think of him walking across the stage. bobby ball, thank you for talking to us this morning after the news of many reports this morning that freddie starr, the comedian, has died at the age of 76. apologies for the sound quality. it was worth talking to him and getting those
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memories. the time is 8:21am. the bewick's swan is one of britain's smallest and rarest breeds, but in recent years the numbers migrating here has fallen sharply. breakfast‘s john maguire is in gloucestershire this morning, finding out why. morning, john. good morning. we are keeping an eye out for the bewick's this morning, it is difficult to discern between the different swan varieties and it's difficult at slimbridge on the banks of the river seven at the wetland trust centre this morning. the bewick's are different once you get used to how they are different, their beaks and they are different, their beaks and the shape of the head are different, and they are smaller but the issue being that they are being hunted when in russia on their migratory flight when in russia on their migratory flight down. we covered this extensively on the programme a couple of years ago, the flight of the swans expedition with the environmentalist flying from russia
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from the northern arctic all the way down here back to slimbridge to follow their migratory path and to talk to people along the flight way to try to get a picture of exactly what's been going on. the data she gathered has been crunched byjulie. good morning, again. tell us what we found, what the expedition threw up in terms of the information you have gathered about what is happening to the bewick's especially? the latest research has shown illegal hunting isa research has shown illegal hunting is a big issue for the species. shooting occurs in several countries across the flyway, from russia to the uk and in between, command the latest research has really identified that bewick swans can be shot accidentally when they are mistaken for hopers and mute swans which have less legal protection. they look very similar to hooper‘s. we have a picture that can illustrate just how similar they are. it is a little bit easier at
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this level to discern the difference with the mute swan. let's look back in the lake, run through the difference, these are mutes we are seeing here. the mutes are generally bigger and they have quite long curly necks and an orange black bill, and they are substantially bigger than the bewick ropes one, they are much smaller, have shorter necks and they have a lovely black and yellow bill pattern. the bewicks tend to be the noisy ones, well, they are the geese at the moment! this is the sort of thing you have been handing out in russia, isn't it? it basically tells hunters what they can and cannot hunt. my russian isn't very good, i will admit, but you seem isn't very good, i will admit, but you seem to have red crosses on all swa n you seem to have red crosses on all swan species, so what's the thinking behind that? the good news is this issue has galvanised support among the communities who really want to reduce shooting in this region of russia, and this is mmo for hunters
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that has been distributed to 3000 hunters across this remote region, and it simply is identifying which species are protected, so which species are protected, so which species you shouldn't shoot because we found 18% of hunters we spoke to we re we found 18% of hunters we spoke to were just simply not aware that bewick swans are protected so it's important to get this message clearly across that they shouldn't be shot. they decline has been something like 30% over the last 20 yea rs something like 30% over the last 20 years in the number of bewicks heading to the uk. it is substantially declining and although there are reasons for the decline are not completely clear, there is an issue of hunting and we need to reduce the pressure on hunting. thank you forjoining us. very interesting subject and research that came from that incredible expedition. i must admit, we have done pretty well this morning identifying and managing to find bewicks but at the moment i'm struggling to see one. can you help me out? can you see one? there is one on the far shore. yes, they are
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a little smaller, their head looks more like a goose, i suppose, and the beak is the other way around, it is black at the end and yellow in the middle, whereas the mute swans the middle, whereas the mute swans the other way around. these are the ones you are more likely to see in your parks and rivers. i hope you have found it interesting this morning. it is good the work that has been done and the data gathered and also interesting to hear that people in russia too are on board with trying to help to enhance and save this increasingly endangered wild bird. studio: for people who don't know, the place you are standing, is that how close regular visitors can get? you are really close to the birds and everything there. the important thing to stress, charlie, as these are all captive birds. so they stay here all year round and live at slimbridge. we are talking about the bewicks and migratory swans, the one that will go right up to the top of the world up go right up to the top of the world up to northern russia and then fly back every year to breed, to come to
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the feeding grounds and things like that. absolutely, slimbridge and other sites around the uk, those are the bewicks there, just going right to left, as you can say, with a different type of beak. you can get as close as this. we also have some goslings at our feet as well as we have been talking. studio: such an expert. absorbing information. do you think it was a bewick that came near you when you fell in there? idid when you fell in there? i did have an incident when i fell in the water. i was a child but clearly overexcited and went straight in. it was last week! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will see you shortly. hi there, good morning. an unsettled day today but things becoming drier, brighter and warmer.
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today, a mix of some sun and sunshine and some showers. some could be heavy with some hail and thunder. this is the pressure chart this morning. this area of low pressure will just this morning. this area of low pressure willjust brush and perhaps trouble southern areas of the uk later on today. for most of us, a dry start. some showery rain affecting northern england and into northern ireland. we will see de showers developing across wales, eastern england, drifting northwards. heavy and thundery in places. still some showers across scotla nd places. still some showers across scotland and northern ireland this afternoon. maximum temperatures getting up to 13—17 degrees. later today, this area of rain brushing southern coastal counties throughout the night. it would tend to clear away but quite a wet night for the channel isles. overnight, simpler spells, temperatures getting down to 3-6 spells, temperatures getting down to 3—6 degrees into saturday morning. while saturday may start off with some showers across the east, and a few mist and fog patches, though
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showers will tend to ease off a little bit. plenty of dry and bright weather across the uk and temperatures getting up to about 11-15 temperatures getting up to about 11—15 degrees, so becoming just a tad warmerfor 11—15 degrees, so becoming just a tad warmer for many of us. but into sunday this area of high pressure becomes quite well—established across the uk. with this big area of high pressure, we are looking at light winds. there could be some mist in the morning, some fog, but it would tend to clear away. some cloud developing as the day goes on. could be the odd isolated child. for most of us, it is dry and fairly bright, with temperatures widely getting up into the mid teens, perhaps even the high teens in southern areas. those temperatures will rise further into next week. bye— bye.
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this is business live from bbc news with victoria fritz and maryam moshiri. live on bbc news. global trade and economic growth at risk as the trade war escalates between the world's two biggest economies. live from london, that's our top story on friday 10th may. beijing says it will retaliate, after the united states more than doubles tariffs on $200 billion worth of chinese imports. we'll cross live to shanghai. also in the programme... an $82 billion price tag — but it's never made a profit. investors pile aboard uber for the biggest stock market

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