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tv   The Travel Show  BBC News  May 11, 2019 5:30am-6:01am BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines: crucial trade talks between the united states and china in washington have ended after a 2—hour meeting. earlier, the us more than doubled tariffs on $200 billion worth of chinese goods. beijing says it will retaliate. the united nations says at least 65 migrants trying to reach europe from libya drowned when their boat capsized off the coast of tunisia. local fishermen rescued 16 survivors. a 24—year—old norwegian woman has died after contracting rabies from a stray dog in the philippines. beergitta kaleshtad was travelling when the puppy she took in bit her. she fell ill soon after returning to norway, and died at the hospital where she worked.
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now on bbc news, the travel show. it has been announced simon armitage will be the new poet laureate. he says he wants to use the world to pursue poetry and embrace our major global issues, including climate change. the salary is £6,000 per year, which the 55—year—old yorkshireman says he will give away. he has been speaking to our arts editor, will gompertz. simon armitage reading the present, his poem about climate change, a subject close to his heart and at the top of his poet laureateship manifesto. i definitely want to initiate something around the idea of climate change. i think it's absolutely essential
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that poetry responds to that issue and i'd like there to be some kind of platform or competition or award that recognises writing around those themes, those topics. simon armitage. cheering and applause. the new poet laureate wanted to be a rock star, now he's treated like one. from the very beginning, he believed in taking poetry to the people. time in the brain cells sweating like a nail—bomb, trouble with the heartbeat spitting like a sten gun, cut to the chase, pick up the pace; no such thing as a walkabout fun—run, shoot yourself a glance in the chrome in the day—room, don't hang about, your running out of space, son. what, simon, do you think the role of poetry is in 2019, contemporary society? my feeling is that it is more valuable and more relevant than it has ever been in this world that we live in, which is a very confused and confusing place — over—information, over—communication — that poetry is time out from that.
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did it cross your mind even for a moment when you were offered the post to say, actually, i don't think this is one at this stage, for a white male. maybe somebody from a different point of view or background would be better for this role at this moment? i'm completely sympathetic to all those issues. but i come from a sort of an outside position. i've got no formal education in english literature at all. you know, when i grew up in a terraced house on the side of a hill in west yorkshire, i did not feel like the chosen one. and when i went to a comprehensive school on the side of the hill in west yorkshire, with 1800 other kids, i did not feel as if i were being groomed for a life of literary lotus eating. and when i was a student at portsmouth poly doing geography, i didn,'tfeel any sense of entitlement there. i understand, to a lesser extent, what it means to come
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from outside the establishment, even if i have arrived at a certain established position. now on bbc news, the travel show. this week on the show, the remnants of france's nazi occupation. in some ways this place is immaculate. it feels in some areas as though the germans have just stood feels in some areas as though the germans havejust stood up feels in some areas as though the germans have just stood up and walked out. and a birds eye view of california. it is called the jug, when you do this. that one wasn't so good. it is incredible appear. —— up here.
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the normandy coast in north—west france. next month marks 75 years since it saw the biggest seaborne invasion in history. 156,000 american, british and canadian troops landed along five of these beaches on d—day. this was the
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bloodiest flashpoint of d—day, 0maha beach, where 43,000 american troops stormed the beaches straight into the teeth of the german guns, really well defended additions here. —— positions. it took ten hours of brutal fighting before the positions. it took ten hours of brutalfighting before the beach positions. it took ten hours of brutal fighting before the beach was secured. looking around today out this really peaceful scene it is incredible to imagine the horror of the day. there are museums here, but on the actual sounds there is no evidence left, except for these. slowly being reclaimed by mother nature now, these bunkers formed pa rt nature now, these bunkers formed part of the atlantic wall. a series of german fortifications which stretched from scandinavia, along the dutch and belgian coasts, and all the way around france. designed to repel an allied sea attacks, many of the bunkers are still in place. like this one. hidden behind db
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charts and under the dunes on sword beach, metres from where the british forces landed. has sentiment about these structures changed, since the end of the water today? would people after the war has been so keen to commemorate, do you think?
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but for the most visible bunker in the area, you have to go on land slightly, into this town. inside, it's five floors have been restored and put to use as a museum, showing what life would have been life inside this thick concrete shell. so, the story goes that this place was not liberated on d—day. it was three days later, the british forces came up thinking this was an ammunition bunker, a storehouse. when they blew the doors open, there was a voice calling down from u psta i rs was a voice calling down from upstairs saying, tommy, come up, we are waiting for you. upstairs, lo
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and behold, 50 german soldiers who had been hiding out. and they said, well, no, you come downstairs, actually. there is no lift to the roof. you climb in the same way that the soldiers stationed here would have done. how anybody did this underfire, have done. how anybody did this under fire, absolutely... from have done. how anybody did this underfire, absolutely... from up here, you can see sword beach where the british arrived. further along you have juneau, the british arrived. further along you havejuneau, to point out they we re you havejuneau, to point out they were the canadians landed. further along you have gold, 0maha, utah. quite an extraordinary site. in some ways, this place is immaculate. it feels as though in some areas the germans have just stood feels as though in some areas the germans havejust stood up feels as though in some areas the germans have just stood up and walked out of here. but it is not the only bunker in the region that has been restored. these ones, not
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farfrom dunkirk, has been restored. these ones, not far from dunkirk, have has been restored. these ones, not farfrom dunkirk, have become an art project. some have been covered with slogans and others have been decorated with hundreds of shards of mirrored glass. so when the sun shines, it becomes a beacon. and here, just across the peninsula from the landing beaches, there is this. a submarine base. it was the biggest structure in the atlantic wall. in fa ct, structure in the atlantic wall. in fact, it is the biggest germanic construction outside germany. there is enough space for 30 submarines inside. this place was designed to withstand allied bombardments, and looking around, it was pretty successful. the result is that years later it is almost impossible to destroy. so after a long time spent scratching their heads and wondering what to do with this payment on their doorstep, these city decided to put it to rather a different use. some of the site is already used by
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sailing clubs, and people come here for guided tours at weekends. but this spring, a company called hyd rofoa m this spring, a company called hydrofoam moved into one of the submarine base year. they turned it into a studio space and a concert hall, though it is virtually impossible to remove the history. that's impressive! it is a door? yeah. 15 metres. something like this, this is not an optional design feature, is it? this isn't moving? yeah. but it is very nice for when the people arrive here, they say, wow! everybody. that is a big door.
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this place has quite a dark past. has there been any controversy or sensitivity around using this place for a modern purpose? in the past, these fortifications
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held to many traumatic memories for them to be put to use in this way. but there is a new generation in charge now, who have a different relationship with the wall. this is the concert hall! yeah. i think it is lovely that this space which was built for not so good a purpose is actually now being used as a lovely cultural centre for people to enjoy themselves. it is a motivation for us. themselves. it is a motivation for us. the difference between the past and the future, here. it is a motivation for us every day. and the future, here. it is a motivation for us every daym and the future, here. it is a motivation for us every day. it is like a new life. a new lifeline, exactly. and if you are thinking of
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heading to northern france this summer, here are heading to northern france this summer, here are some heading to northern france this summer, here are some travel show tips that mightjust come in handy. france hosts the women's football world cup injune, and five of the nine host cities are in the north. rheims, in the heart of champagne country, is arguably the most eye—catching of those venues. there can't be many better ways to prepare for the opening group games than a tour of the vineyards and a good look around the city's incredible gothic cathedral. the region is not bad for surfers, either. the stretch of coast in brittany is a highlight if you are looking for waves and wa nt to if you are looking for waves and want to avoid the crowds. in south—west finisterre there are also great ocean rollers, but if you are going there in peak times it is worth going there early to get the best to yourself. this year, lille hosts lille 3000, a series of events, performances and exhibitions, a —— which take over the city every years. three this
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year the theme is el dorado, the medical city of gold. look out for the three big weekends that mark the cornerstone of the celebrations. the first ta kes cornerstone of the celebrations. the first takes place next weekend so you might have to move fast if you wa nt to you might have to move fast if you want to be part of it. and if you have been hooked on the new game of thrones season, then the new exhibit of bayeaux might just thrones season, then the new exhibit of bayeaux mightjust be the thing. a game of thrones tapestry arrives in town in september. it is 80 metres long, it has been embroidered bya metres long, it has been embroidered by a team at the ulster museum in northern ireland, and it depicts scenes from every episode of the fa ntasy tv scenes from every episode of the fantasy tv epic to date. if you are not a fantasy tv epic to date. if you are notafan, fantasy tv epic to date. if you are not a fan, then the world famous 11th century original work is pretty good too. still to come on the travel show. mike is in california seeing the impact of climate change and some of the world ‘s tallest trees. temperatures are increasing, it is trying things out as temperatures got warmer. that's a big consideration for this particular tree because they need so much
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water. so, don't go away. this week i have been exploring northern france. this is the brittany coast, not far from lorient. the countryside is glorious, green on a day like today. but we will find it here somewhere. many visitors to france will have tried crepes. they actually help from brittany. does mchale. which is the best one to order do you think?
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she is making me a gullet which you might use to having them with chocolate spread ice cream, these local vines are usually savoury. each province makes its own speciality. 0k, ok, so basically, a galette is a savoury version ok, so basically, a galette is a savoury version of a crepe. that's what you want to go for if you come to this part of brittany.
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we are hopping to the other side of that they dig now to meet some of the giants of the natural world. california's redwood trees of the tallest living things on earth. and among the oldest, too. they are five men vulnerable. mike has been to this area to find out climate change is causing danger for the species. here in western california, there are complex beings that have had for over a millennium. redwood trees have become an icon of the state. but some fear that our changing climate might threaten their survival. so i've come to the most southern tip of the range where change could hit the hardest. to joina change could hit the hardest. to join a scientist who's been working here to try and find some answers.
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it's absolutely amazing being out in the forest, i love it. listing to the forest, i love it. listing to the birds, watching the sun move through the canopy, it's beautiful. i feel lucky to be able to be out there and to just be amongst the trees, full of anticipation for the day to come in being able to go up into the canopy and hopefully see something that i haven't seen before. there is a presence to them thatis before. there is a presence to them that is really impressive, it's palpable when you are out there. and today will be climbing this. —— we will. it looks like it's ok. ready for the best yet? it's called the jug for the best yet? it's called the jug when you do this. that one
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wasn't so good. that's a lot more work and i thought it was going to be. just wait till you get to 70 metres. these are coast redwoods, thou the tallest tree species in the world. reaching currently about 380 feet of the tallest ones. they are incredibly tough and resilient, they are incredibly tough and resilient, they a re really incredibly tough and resilient, they are really important ecologically stop support the habitat and provide habitat for a lot of plants and animals and they are also just incredibly beautiful. they are iconic. i'm here to get a better understanding of how they are responding to climate change and how they might respond to future climate change. and how are they responding to climate change? as a climate changes, temperatures are increasing, it is trying things out as temperatures got warmer. distract drying. that's a big consideration because it is affecting the water
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balance in their ability to transport more water. it's time to get to work. first we need a sample of the trees call. this is the halfway mark here, and when we get to the ground will be able to pull that spoon out with the core on it. and the hidden secrets behind this bark will be ours, the knowledge will be ours. anthony showed me some of the secrets that a tree had already revealed. so these other rings here? one of those is an animal ring. so it really only grows animal ring. so it really only grows a couple of millimetres a year? sometimes less pending on how the conditions. so we're back hundreds of years right now. once we polish this up and sound it and get a better review of the rings, there could be 100, 200, 300, 400, 500,
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600... maybe he is here. so this hasn't seen sunlight for 600 700 yea rs ? hasn't seen sunlight for 600 700 years? so i have one end of the tape measure, we doing circumference measurement. rapid all the way around. so we are to seven .84 metres circumference. that's a big tree. 7.84 metres around, and we are five metres off the ground. the next plan is to go up to the top. upwards we go. to the top. this redwood stands at over 70 metres tall and climbing redwoods it
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is forbidden in most places but in this reserve we have special permission and what a privilege it is. 40 metres. i can't get over how beautiful this tree is. we have gotten beautiful this tree is. we have gotte n to beautiful this tree is. we have gotten to the canopy so there are burn marks at the top of these trees would boggles my mind. it's a credible appear. and as we entered upwards, jug by jug credible appear. and as we entered upwards, jug byjug i'm faced with more scorched bark. avenue told me that wildfires are another threat histories are increasingly facing in modern world. a birds nest. histories are increasingly facing in modern world. a birds nestlj histories are increasingly facing in modern world. a birds nest. i don't think there's anybody home though. there's a cyclist on the planet. i'm getting an appreciation for that right now. i'm also getting quite sweaty. it's not easy work. with
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anthony already at the top collecting samples, i make my final push upwards. this view is definitely one of the wildest, most incredible views i have seen in my entire life. i can't believe we're 71 metres off the ground right now. condors get this view, them and us. it's incredible. this is 700 years old, which is before the conway ‘s —— colonisation of america, it makes a felix pakistan in a sandbox. insignificant. it's a pretty humbling experience, isn't it? if the chart —— if the climate change conditions dry things out significantly, they might not go as well, they might not get as tall, they might start to die back and that's what they're trying to figure out. do i feel the
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that's what they're trying to figure out. do i feelthe tree that's what they're trying to figure out. do i feel the tree shaking a little bit? yes, it shaking. that's normal, i assume? what that's it for this week, coming up what that's it for this week, coming up next time... lucy is in new york for a special look at a brand—new museum dedicated to one of the world ‘s most recognisable names. museum dedicated to one of the world 's most recognisable names. liberty either receives nearly four and a half million visitors each year, as many as 25,000 people come over on a busy day. right now we got it all to ourselves. this is incredible. and we go off grid in norway to meet the man with an island all to himself. when we came around, we turned off
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the engine and i said, this is it. this is the place. our dreams became reality. that looks great. and meanwhile you can catch up with us in social media. and feel free to tag us in your travel posts, too. from now come back for now, for the troubleshooting, from france. hello there. gradually it's an improving picture this week. we've got high pressure moving in which will kill the showers. we'll see more sunshine around and it will turn a little bit warmer for most of us as well. but there's no heatwave on the horizon.
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it'll feel a lot better than we've experienced over the past week or so. low pressure, which brought wet weather to southern parts of the uk during friday night, will clear away. we could start off with early showers, particularly across the south—east. these will tend to fizzle out. many places starting off this morning on a chilly note, but bright and with plenty of sunshine. then we'll get the showers going again. in the afternoon they're likely to develop in the northern isles, one or two across scotland, otherwise plenty of sunshine here. quite a chilly breeze across northern coasts. most of the showers will be across central and eastern england. the odd heavy one, maybe the odd rumble of thunder too. the best of the temperatures here in that north—westerly wind. i think we'll see highs around 15—17 degrees. the showers fizzle out tonight, but it will turn chilly. largely clear, a bit of mist and fog. likely a touch of frost across parts of scotland, but less cold in the south and south—east. sunday, high pressure
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right on top of us, keeping all these weather systems far away from us. so it looks like it's going to be a fine and largely dry day. it will start off chilly, mind you, especially in the north, with light winds and plenty of sunshine. those temperatures will begin to rise in the afternoon. could see some fair weather cloud developing here and there, and just the outside chance of an isolated shower. but most places will stay dry. temperatures reaching into the upper teens. next week we still have high pressure with us but what it will be doing, certainly as the week wears on, is tapping into cooler air off the north sea, whereas further west it will be tapping into warmer air from the bay of biscay. so it looks like next week, though it will be largely dry with sunny spells because of high pressure, it's more likely to be cooler in the east and a little bit breezy as well, especially along north sea coasts. this is the picture on monday. largely dry. a fairly cool feeling. through the afternoon temperatures will be rising nicely. we should see highs of around 18, maybe 19 celsius in the warmer spots
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across western areas. generally speaking, the further south and east you are over the next few days, it will be cooler, especially on the coast. inland it is always a few degrees warmer, with temperatures further west doing much better. in fact, the north—west of scotland could fare best.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and tina daheley. 0ur headlines today: concerns over climate change could restrict air travel in the future — and raises questions around heathrow expansion plans. the prime minister could give a clear timetable for her departure from downing street when she meets conservative mps this week. after a week of drama in the champions league, it's time for club rugby's equivalent, with saracens and leinster bidding to be crowned kings of europe in newcastle this evening. and i've been trying taekwondo ahead of the world championships — which kick off in
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manchester on wednesday. good morning. many

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