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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 11, 2019 7:00am-8:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and tina daheley. our headlines today. concerns over climate change could restrict air travel in the future — and raises questions around heathrow expansion plans. the prime minister could give a clear timetable for her departure from downing street when she meets conservative mps this week. after a week of drama in the champions league, it's time for club rugby's equivalent, with saracens and leinster bidding to be crowned kings of europe in newcastle this evening. and i've been trying taekwondo ahead of the world championships — which kick off in manchester on wednesday. good morning. many of us have had a good morning. many of us have had a good dose of rain from the showers with much—needed rainfall for the gardens. but that we can see drier
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coming progressively in. showers around andi coming progressively in. showers around and i will fill you in on all the details in a quarter of an hour. it's saturday 11th may. our top story this morning. concerns over climate change might restrict the growth of flying in the uk, the government has admitted. a senior civil servant has said ministers may have to review its aviation strategy — including plans to expand heathrow. the advisory committee on climate change recently said the uk's planned increase in aviation would need to be curbed to restrict c02. roger harrabin has more. flying is on the up and the government has been planning for it to continue to grow. what about climate change, you might ask? under current policy, industry will have to come more greenhouse gases so aviation can expand. but the government is now considering a plan to virtually eliminate emissions by 2050. and a civil servant has admitted
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in a letter to a green group that it may have to take note of advice from the independent climate change committee, saying that although people could continue to fly while meeting climate change targets, it was not possible for aviation to keep on expanding. in the end, i think the logic of this is completely inevitable. we know that we have to reduce our emissions urgently and radically and expanding them is going in the opposite direction. itjust does not make sense and i don't think the public want to see the government committing to a plan that is inconsistent with a safe and prosperous future for all of us. any policy change may affect controversial plans to expand heathrow. it definitely means the government will have to think hard about whether aviation can continue to grow at a time of what parliament calls a climate emergency. theresa may is expected to answer questions about her departure
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when she meets with conservative mps next week. the prime minister has promised to stand aside after the brexit withdrawal agreement passes through parliament, but is facing increasing pressure to go after disappointing local election results. 0ur political correspondent jessica parker can tell us more. i'm not entirely convinced that we will hear a timetable next week. we have spoken about this so much and theresa may has not yet been us an indication of when she is planning to leave. the main indication as you mentioned there is that she will go as soon as the first phase of wax thatis as soon as the first phase of wax that is done and dusted and ratified by parliament. big question as to whether or not that will happen. some say she needs to set a more unconditional timetable and third graham brady, the chair of the 1922 back bench conservative committee says that he understands to some extent why the prime minister is reticent on this issue. i don't
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think it is an intention of staying indefinitely as prime minister or leader of the conservative party. the reticence is the concern that by promising to go at a certain timetable it may make it less likely that she would secure parliamentary approval for the withdrawal rather than more likely. theresa may is meeting senior backbenchers later this week and sir graham brady has said he believes it would be strange if that meeting did not result in what he called a clear understanding on her departure plans. but let's face it, theresa may is not one to spill the beans if she does not have to and we know she is keen to secure a brexit legacy before she leaves downing street. and you can hear more of that interview with graham brady on the week in westminster at 11am today on bbc radio 4. labour has announced plans to abolish the ‘youth rate' minimum wage and extend its real living wage of ten pounds per hour
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to under 18—year—olds. they say it will leave the average young worker more than £2,000 a year better off, but the federation of small businesses has accused politicians of competing tit—for—tat over wage increases. the united nations says the houthi rebel group in yemen is planning to withdraw its forces from three key ports over the coming days, in the first major step since a ceasefire was agreed in december. the un general overseeing the deal said the rebels intended to redeploy their forces over four days. the yemeni information minister has dismissed the houthi offer as misleading. president trump says us—china relations remain "very strong" despite washington escalating the trade war between the two countries. the united states has begun the process of extending tariffs to almost all chinese goods after more than doubling them on many other products yesterday. beijing described the negotiations as "honest" and "constructive"
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and confirmed that further talks would take place. last night's episode of the tv panel show, have i got news for you, was pulled by the bbc after it was decided that it risked falling foul of 0fcom's pre—european election rules. the pre—recorded episode featured change uk acting leader mp heidi allen. in a statement the bbc said: "the bbc has specific editorial guidelines that apply during election periods." "because of this it would be inappropriate to feature political party leaders on entertainment programmes during this short election period, which does not allow for equal representation to be achieved." in repsonse hat trick productions, which makes the show, said: "we tried everything we could to get the bbc to broadcast it". broadcasting regulator 0fcom's election rules state, among other things, that neither candidates in elections, nor representatives of those candidates, are allowed to "act as news presenters, interviewers or presenters of any type of programme during
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the election period". and that is the reason. an event aiming to reunite families separated between mexico and the united states has been cancelled after organisers said the american authorities refused to give permission. the gathering, called "hugs not walls", allowed families to meet in an area between frontier crossings near the texas city of el paso. the organisers have blamed president trump for the cancellation. david willis reports. along the dusty border that separates mexico from the united states, families are separated. migrants who enter the united states illegally would face arrest if they attempted to cross here, an annual event offered some respite and a brief chance of reunion, until now. called hugs not walls, families met at this canal between the mexican state
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of chihuahua and the american state of texas. but us border patrol has denied permits, and this weekend's event have been cancelled. translation: this is the real impact of trump's policies on the border. the agencies we have worked with have been inflexible. maria was one of many who had registered to take part in the event. translation: i would have liked to have seen the family on mother's day. i have to accept, i can't cross the border, ijust have to accept things. thousands of migrants have arrived in mexico in recent months, most of them from central american nations where poverty and violence is rampant. president trump has declared them "threat to national security", and it was announced that $1.5 billion has been allocated from the us defence department to help fund his much—vaunted wall along the southern border.
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a boycott of social media companies may be the only way to force them to take down images of child abuse, that's the view of the uk's most senior police officer with responsibility for child protection. chief constable simon bailey argues that platforms have failed in their responsibility to keep children safe and, for the likes of facebook, even substantial fines are "little more than a drop in the ocean". simon armitage has been named as the new poet laureate, a role that lasts ten years. he has pledged to give away his salary of 6000 pounds a year. he says he wants to use the role to ensure poetry embraces major global issues, including climate change. here's our arts editor, will gompertz. simon armitage reading the present, his poem about climate change, a subject close to his heart
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and at the top of his poet laureateship manifesto. i think it's absolutely essential that poetry responds to that issue and i'd like there to be some kind of platform or competition or award that recognises writing around those themes, those topics. time in the brain cells sweating like a nail—bomb, trouble with the heartbeat spitting like a sten gun, cut to the chase, pick up the pace; no such thing as a walkabout what, simon, do you think the role of poetry is in 2019, contemporary society? it is more valuable and more relevant than it is more valuable and more relevant than it has ever been in this world that we live in, which is a very confused and confusing place — over—information, over—communication — that poetry is time out from that. did it cross your mind even for a moment when you were offered the post to say, actually, i don't think this is one at this stage, for a white male. maybe somebody from a different point of view or background would be
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better for this role at this moment? i come from a sort of an outside position. i've got no formal education in english literature at all. i understand, to a lesser extent, what it means to come from outside the establishment, even if i have arrived at a certain established position. a confused customer in nottinghamshire opened a loaf of bread only to find the bag was full of crusts. timea ganji was hoping to make sandwiches for her children's lunch when she made the discovery. a spokeswoman for kingsmill said they are investigating "how this particular collection of crusts found its way into mrs ganji's shopping". there you go. a loaf full of cross. not good if you hate cross like i
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do. —— if you hate a christ like i do. —— if you hate a christ like i do. but a dream for me —— hate a crust like i do. labour has announced plans to abolish the ‘youth rate' minimum wage and pay the real living wage of ten pounds an hour to under 18—year—olds. they say it will leave the average young worker more than £2,000 a year better off, but the federation of small businesses has accused politicians of competing tit—for—tat over wage increases. joining us is shadow chief secretary to treasury, peter dowd. the principle is simply this. if you are 16 and 18 you should be paid the same as someone who is in their 20s if you do the same job. it is a question of equality and equity, quite simple. can you go through for people unaware about what the change would mean? for an adult who is paid around eight pounds 21 and our currently and someone under 18 gets
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paid £4 35. we believe that that is not fair paid £4 35. we believe that that is notfairand paid £4 35. we believe that that is not fair and not reasonable. we say that by 2020 everybody should the on at least £10 an hour including 16—18 —year—olds in employment. at least £10 an hour including 16—18 -year-olds in employment. that is a significant change and clearly if you are the sick recipient that is a welcome change. —— if you are the recipient. real wages for that group of teenagers are at 2006 levels in real terms. in effect that group of young people, that cohort have not had an increase for a long time. in relation to the people who are paying the wage, what labour is saying we will do is that those small businesses we would support those young people through, in effect, the tax system. for example
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we already have £30 billion a year spent supporting and subsidising people in work stop it would be an extension of that. so break down for ina way extension of that. so break down for in a way we can understand if i am an employer and i have a young person working for me on the £4 35 rate, labour government comes in and i then have to pay them £10 an hour. how much of that. i'm trying to do my mass, that is £6 65, how much of that will i have to pay extra and how much is the labour government going to make up the difference was to mark the difference is that by 2020 labour will talk with small business and the small business federation as to how we can close that gap. the other thing. stop there for a second. what is the a nswer to there for a second. what is the answer to the question? you say you will talk about it. as ever the way
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with these things you are damned if you do and damned if you do not. if you do and damned if you do not. if you say we're going to put this increase for people in wages and thatis increase for people in wages and that is the end of the matter, we wa nt to that is the end of the matter, we want to discuss how the mechanisms work. a proportion of that would be made up a proportion of that would be made up by a proportion of that would be made up by the then government? yes, in the same way to some extent it already is with the tax credit system and remember many of the people employed are not necessarily small businesses there are big companies as well so it is not simplya companies as well so it is not simply a question of putting this all on small businesses. that is where we have the mechanism to top people's wages up and that is what we are prepared to discuss but we have to send the message that you
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cannot be treated as a second—class employee. bring us up-to-date to brexit tox. can you give us any insides as to where we sit? regrettably i cannot because of those discussions go on and of the problem we have had is we have had some leaks and we want to maintain the confidentiality of those talks. the shadow chief secretary to the treasury. time to get some weather. good morning to you. it has been a week of april showers for may. downpours and temperatures below par but we are seeing those showers easing away and we have had some good rain. beautiful start to the day in north yorkshire. having had
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so much moisture, we have been plagued by mist and fog first thing and this is what we're seeing on the scottish border. puzzle northern ireland, and the south—east is where we saw quite a bit of mist and fog it will clear quickly. fewer showers but that said, having looked at some weather watchers, some showers around here. we will see those showers around and about four eastern and central england and for the northern isles as well but for many others, where we have had real illusion, it is our drier picture. —— deluge. today will feel quite pleasa nt —— deluge. today will feel quite pleasant with fewer showers and more sunshine. not particularly warm because of the northerly breeze. northern ireland, much drier, wales and the south—west, if you showers
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on the border. the odd rumble of thunder but the intense showers will not be as widespread and will ease away quite quickly as the high—pressure starts to take hold of our weather, driving the dry weather and it will turn chilly tonight. fairly widespread frost across the countryside of scotland. gardens anywhere for those delicate plants. but the high—pressure will cut the northerly wind. tomorrow although we start on a chilly note with mist and fog, it will become warmer. we have the strong may sunshine and 16—17 quite widely across england and wales. next week, we start to lose the northerly pickup. coming up the
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bayer —— bay. it looks warmer as we head into sunday and next week as the high—pressure allows temperatures to claim high up by day so they do drop as far by night. temperatures will reach into the mid—to high teens by this stage and getting warmer as the week goes on. so it is getting drier but if you're heading to any of your outside activities, still the risk of showers particularly across central and eastern areas. looking good. in just 12 days time voters will be asked to elect 73 representatives into the european parliament. the delay in a brexit deal being decided means the uk is obliged to take part in the european elections on the 23rd may. tim muffet has been to grimsby, which overwhelmingly voted to leave the eu, to see what businesses and residents think
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about next week's vote. gutted. that's howjohn feels about the uk's participation in the european elections. i think it's absolutely disgraceful and i think we should have been out now. will you take part in the elections? no. what is the point of voting when that is not what we want to do? this is the alfred and enderby smokehouse in grimsby. the way we traditionally smoke haddock and salmon is unchanged for centuries. the tannins and the flavours within the fabric of the building are part of that taste. when it comes to the european elections, for some employees there is also a whiff of anger. i don't think we should be in europe in the first place. it is a waste of time and a waste of money. in the 2016 referendum, grimsby was one of the most pro brexit parts of the uk. 70% of those who voted,
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did so to leave the eu. for this company, eu rules and regulations play an important role. we have a protected geographic indication and that is something that is given not easily by europe. things like parma ham and champagne. in lincolnshire there is only one protected name and that is grimsby traditional smoked fish and it took several years to get that. how do you feel that we will take part in the european elections? we do need to be engaged. if we stay in, and there is every chance we may, we want someone in there who will represent our interests. the fishing industry in grimsby dates back over 1000 years. the legend has it that the town's name came from a danish fisherman named grimm who settled here. today it lies within a european constituency of yorkshire and the humber. they have not delivered on brexit. it isjust a big circle
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whether common man is not being listened to. those who voted to remain will be more serious this time. do you think there has been a change since the last european election because of the referendum? yes. i don't really know about europe, ijust know about brexit and what we were supposed to get and what we did not get. this constituency elects six meps. last time it picked two from labour, three from ukip and one conservative. this time they will be up against english democrats, liberal democrats, change uk, the green party, the yorkshire party and the brexit party. confused. you don't know what direction to look in. it is probably not in everybody's face as it should be. i don't care. i'm not interested. probably be fixed and all that, anyway. if brexit has made some more
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engaged with politics, it is had the opposite effect with others. political changes across the north sea leave many here cold. you can find out more about who is running in the european elections on the bbc news website. it's been a great season for english teams in europe with liverpool and tottenham reaching the champions league final in madrid and arsenal and chelsea progressing to the europa league final, which will take place in baku, the capital of azerbaijan. for fans though, success is proving expensive. flight, ticket and accomodation costs have been rising dramatically since the teams confirmed their places. prices are so high, even the managers are struggling to get things booked. yesterday i was calling some hotel to book some rooms because my family is going to be there, some friends,
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some people from argentina and i wanted to book and it was so difficult and the prices were so crazy. a room for £100 is now £2700 and it is just crazy. what can i say, i sympathise a lot. of course. it is not normal but it is normal that people profit from this opportunity to make benefit and, yes, i opportunity to make benefit and, yes, lam opportunity to make benefit and, yes, i am suffering for both clubs and both fans. for ourfans yes, i am suffering for both clubs and both fans. for our fans and the liverpool fans because it is going to be so, so difficult. so, chelsea and arsenal fans face both an expensive and trickyjourney to get to the europa league final. they will have to travel more than 2,468 miles to baku, the capital of azerbaijan. but there's no direct flights available during the week of the final,
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and a flight that goes via istanbul costs around £800 return, taking ten hours. let's talk more about this with simon calder, travel editor for the independent, and joe blott from liverpool's spirit of shankly supporters group. there i asked, how much are you paying? i shouldn't answer with a family watching. £1500 and that would include the match ticket. for the trip? for the trip, without food, drinkjust the trip? for the trip, without food, drink just purely the trip? for the trip, without food, drinkjust purely the accommodation and flight and match ticket. what did you say? we came away from tuesday night's match, a fantastic game, absolutely overjoyed with what we achieved, beating barcelona but it was tempered by the effort to try to get to madrid and
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we hope that, having travelled to kyiv for the final last year, £900 flight kyiv for the final last year, £900 flight that going to madrid should be quite easy and, of course, it is not. the prices have doubled. hotels have priced hotel rooms out of the market and the reality is, on top of the matches, fans paying £1500 or having to make inordinate journeys to circumvent the normal flight route, which feels wrong. a lot of people feel for you but just the straightforward geography, what about azerbaijan? madrid is one thing... it is stretching the definition of europe. it is the same latitude as madrid but actually further east than baghdad. it is
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roughly a 5000 mile round trip from london. arsenal and chelsea fans will have quite a problem getting that and, as you say, very few flights they where spain you can have 100 different options. it is really serious and on top of that you have to get your visa settled andl you have to get your visa settled and i would advise people to sort that before getting the flightjust in case anything goes wrong and then of course there is accommodation and thatis of course there is accommodation and that is a real challenge. i think the madrid issue, you have seen airlines selling lots £1300 return, ten times the normal rate. you have ryanair, £800. you could flight from london to sydney and back for that price. our fans being exploited. why do those applied go up and people
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charged ten times the normal amount? any airline will charge whatever it can get away with for its flight and they are saying they are allocating scarce resources. school holidays, prices double. and, of course, this is the most extreme version i have ever seen is the most extreme version i have everseen in is the most extreme version i have ever seen in terms of prices going to madrid but it will probably be the biggest movement of sports fans in english football history. you could drive to madrid. i know football supporters are resourceful. if you heard of unusual means of transport, just to be there because it would be an amazing occasion. fans are doing that. a friend is travelling to parma, then to
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majorca, then to madrid and then he has to get back via paris and manchester. if anybody else is planning to have a trip to see a specific concert you would not have to do this. it might be kind of romantic to have these fantastic journeys but we're going to a foot match, —— football. it is a testa m e nt to match, —— football. it is a testament to english football, liverpool and tottenham but everything around it, whether it is price, travel, it just everything around it, whether it is price, travel, itjust gets in the way. you can be inventive, of course stopped in the past few minutes i have been tracking and for a week from bristol and effectively you go for a weeks holiday. people are organising buses into madrid for the match. back to the resort and enjoy
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the holiday. £350 per person. now you said it the companies will bring up you said it the companies will bring up the price. this is why it is so bad, the boeing 737 max aircraft, because it has been grounded following two tragedies, there is simply not the planes around you would expect to have lined up flying fans out. that is why prices are even more extreme than normally. thank you for coming in. enjoy your trip. i think it will be a fantastic time regardless. looking forward to it. we will be back in just a time regardless. looking forward to it. we will be back injust a moment with the headlines.
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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and tina daheley. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. concerns over climate change might restrict the growth of flying in the uk, the government has admitted. a senior civil servant has said ministers may have to review its aviation strategy to curb carbon emissions— including plans to expand heathrow. the department for transport says that heathrow expansion would "provide a massive economic boost" to the uk while still observing "environmental obligations". theresa may is expected to answer questions about her departure when she meets with conservative mps next week. the prime minister has promised to stand aside after the brexit withdrawal agreement passes through parliament, but is facing increasing pressure to go after disappointing local election results.
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the chairman of the 1922 committee of conservative mps, sir graham brady, says he understands her tactics: i don't think it is about an intention of staying indefinitely as prime minister or leader of the conservative party. the reticence is the concern that by promising to go on a certain timetable may make it less likely that she would secure parliamentary approval for the withdrawal agreement rather than more likely. and you can hear more of that interview with graham brady on westminster hour at 10pm tomorrow night on bbc radio 4. —— 11am tomorrow on bbc 4. labour has announced plans to abolish the ‘youth rate‘ minimum wage and extend its real living wage of ten pounds per hour to under 18 year olds. they say it will leave the average young worker more than £2,000 a year better off,
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but the federation of small businesses has accused politicians of competing tit—for—tat over wage increases. the united nations says the houthi rebel group in yemen is planning to withdraw its forces from three key ports over the coming days, in the first major step since a ceasefire was agreed in december. the un general overseeing the deal said the rebels intended to redeploy their forces over four days. the yemeni information minister has dismissed the houthi offer as misleading. president trump says us—china relations remain "very strong" despite washington escalating the trade war between the two countries. the united states has begun the process of extending tariffs to almost all chinese goods after more than doubling them on many other products yesterday. beijing described the negotiations as "honest" and "constructive" and confirmed that further talks would take place. an event aiming to reunite families separated between mexico and the united states has been cancelled after organisers said the american authorities refused to give permission. the gathering, called "hugs not walls", allowed families to meet in an area between frontier crossings
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near the texas city of el paso. the organisers have blamed president trump for the cancellation. a confused customer in nottinghamshire opened a loaf of bread only to find the bag was full of crusts. timea ganji was hoping to make sandwiches for her children‘s lunch when she made the discovery. a spokeswoman for kingsmill said they are investigating "how this particular collection of crusts found its way into mrs ganji‘s shopping". i hate crusts doctor be a nightmare. do you cut them off? i do. there is a solution. do not buy a sliced loaf. if you buy an entire loaf you could not have only crusts. i guess
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thatis could not have only crusts. i guess that is a solution to something that is not that big a problem, really. what do you think of them?|j is not that big a problem, really. what do you think of them? i don't like them when they are sick and dry on the edge. i used to put them in my pocket as a child, i had a big collection at the end of teatime. i used to get told off for that. a huge day in rugby union. even though it is the pinnacle game of domestic rugby, it is more like an international, more like six nations. we have an irish player against others in saracens. so two european giants meet in newcastle later. lei nster are the defending champions and they‘re hoping to lift the trophy for a record fifth time. saracens have won all eight
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of their matches, in this competition coming into the final — and they‘re aiming for their third title in four years. we have a load of respect for leinster and the quality of the player that they have. it is stacked with british lions and international players. it is obvious that the experience that they have and we have some big match experience ourselves and i think that‘s why everyone is so excited. when you go for match ups across the board, both teams are full of internationals and if there is an overseas player he is normally an international as well. i think it is a fantastic testimony to both clubs that we have both reached the final and everyone is looking forward to it. well the second tier competition was decided last night — and an all—french affair was won by clermont auvergne, who comfortably beat la rochelle 36—16, with scotland scrum—half greg laidlaw kicking 18 points, and wesley fofana, scoring the last of their three tries. that‘s a record—equalling, third challenge cup title for clermont. tottenham manager mauricio pochettino says he would be "stupid", to stay at the club
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without a clear plan, for the future. he‘s been in charge for five years now and he says he‘ll be looking for assurances from chairman daniel levy this summer, that spurs are serious about building on their recent success — they‘re into the champions league final, of course. the race for promotion, to the premier league takes centre stage today, with the first legs of the championship play—off semi—finals. aston villa face west brom at lunchtime, while derby take on a leeds side, who for much of the season, looked to be heading for automatic promotion. we focused on ourselves and we mustn't forget the fact that we have been here twice, the fact that they finished points above us in the league. they are a strong team who looked a certainty to be promoted at one point. the competition is great and they dropped out but i still expect a great challenge. we prepare as we would for anyone, we watch them and focus on what we can do. it the scottish premiership has already been decided, but third place is still up for grabs with a europa league place at stake — and aberdeen moved into position, last night after a 2—1 win over hearts.
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greg stewart scored the decisive goal. lewis hamilton will be one of the men to catch, in qualifying this afternoon for the spanish grand prix. his mercedes, looks like the fastest car, at the circuit de catalunya, but it‘s his teammate, and championship leader valtteri bottas, who set the pace in friday practice. mercedes have finished 1—2, in all 4 races, so far this season. it‘s the last 16 in rugby league‘s challenge cup this weekend, with three more matches today — the pick of them looks to be bradford bulls aiming to upset leeds rhinos. already through to the quarter—finals are halifax and wakefield — and hull, who eased past castleford tigers 28—12 in the all—superleague game. matt wallace, has a one shot lead, going into the third round, of the british masters golf. the englishman hasn‘t dropped a single shot in his two rounds in southport, and leads on 12 under par, ahead of compatriot ross fisher — and sweden‘s niklas lemke, who came close to equalling the european record for consecutive birdies but felljust one short, with 8 in a row. there‘ll be no mouthwatering semi—final match—up in madrid,
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between novak djokovic and roger federer because the 20—time grand slam champion, was knocked out by dominic thiem. federer had match points, before losing in three sets. rafa nadal will play stefanos tsitsipas in the other semi—final. and simona halep, remains on course, to reclaim the world number one spot, after beating belinda bencic, to reach the final, where she‘ll play kiki bertens. victory would take her back above naomi 0saka, in the rankings. time now is 739. nearly 900 children, many of whom who were recruited as child soldiers have been released by a vigilante group in nigeria. the civilianjoint task force has been working with the country‘s military to fight the terrorist organisation boko haram. more than 20,000 people have been killed and millions of others have lost their homes during the decade long conflict in the country. around 3,500 children were recruited by vigilante groups between 2013 and 2017.
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in 2017 they signed a commitment with unicef to stop recruiting children in any role. since then, more than 1,700 children have been released. unicef say the 894 children released yesterday — including more than one hundred girls — will now undergo reintegration programmes to help them return to civilian life. hannah started joins us now from all child charity. where do you even begin when it comes to rehabilitating children who have been on the front line of war? the important thing to be aware of is that, really, these children have in through such rental experiences and have been subject to all kinds of violence that they really need a very extensive, as we say, a care
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package to help them reintegrate back into society. it is not merely a matter of putting a gun down and disarming and then just getting back on with their lives. many of them will have experienced intense trauma asa will have experienced intense trauma as a result of what they have been through, it may be that the community they return to stigmatises and marginalises them as a result of the atrocities they may have committed full of at war child we provide a range of services to support them which is so important. firstly we reunite them with their family or if that is not possible, we find other care arrangements and, crucially, making sure they have access to what we call mental health and psychosocial support to deal with the trauma and, depending on how old they are, linking them with education and seeing if there are any livelihood or opportunities
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around full of and very importantly for the integration and rehabilitation to be successful, it is absolutely vital to work with the local community as well who will have their own feelings about re— absorbing children who have been associated with that kind of conflict, to build their capacity. and tragically, over decades, there have been children caught up in war. talk to us about success stories. have we now got people in communities in some of these places who were those children when they we re who were those children when they were young and have enabled to. i don‘t know how you phrase it, to reconstruct the life so that things are set in place for them? those stories do exist? absolutely they do. and war child works with former child shoulders, children associated with armed groups in the central african republic and the dental
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clinic democratic republic of congo. we also have programmes that use sport and football to offer them something different now that they have come out of the association with an armed group. and through the provision of those kinds of services, through providing counselling, psychosocial support, mental health support, we have a number of children including in the central african republic who have been able to get over those experiences and process the trauma and also by working with the communities that they are reabsorbed into they have an opportunity for a better life. the crucial thing is that often rehabilitation is seen as a short—term thing. so six months, done and dusted and you are back in the community. what we‘re saying it war child is that you need tailored
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an individualised support for that child to identify their needs and work with them. that child needs a proper case worker, like a social worker who works with them all the time up to five years, really, to reduce the potential for them returning to the armed group of feeling they don‘t have any opportunities or any possibility of a future. we do have success stories and we work with children in many countries where they are out of the armed group and they feel they do have a future. but the crucial thing is that you need the funding to support the kind of long—term comprehensive care that these children need and to fund social workers who could work with them on a week by week basis to make sure that they can get access to the kind of support they need full thank you very much.
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here‘s helen with a look at this morning‘s weather. thank you very much. good morning to you. mist and fog lingering after the downpours through the central lowlands. a heads up if you‘re heading into the roads in the next couple of hours. more mist and fog in the coming mornings because of the high—pressure settling down but also a few showers across the eastern side yorkshire and across east anglia. for the vast majority a drier picture than in the last few days. a good dose of rain for the gardens but in time for the weekend it looks as if we will see dry weather. not entirely dry. northern ireland and central scotland, far fewer showers with the exception of the northern isles. the weather system has moved out to the north
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sea. not a strong northerly breeze. it tempers the feel of things here. the welsh borders and towards gloucester. not as widespread but the odd downpour possibly. the odd rumble of thunder. 0vernight, the high—pressure moving further east, cutting off the supply of northerly breeze and gets quite chilly under the high—pressure. more widely frosty overnight. quite chilly out there this morning in the north—east. the high—pressure. that northerly breeze and it cuts off the arctic airflow so northerly breeze and it cuts off the arctic air flow so gradually things warm up through the day tomorrow, monday and tuesday. an isolated chance of a shower across the south downs and possibly the pennines but it isa downs and possibly the pennines but it is a plain sailing nice state for most of us and feeling warmer
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because we have lost the northerly breeze. for the start of the new week, temperatures gradually lifting by day and a little frost overnight. as it was by day it was a little bit overnight as well. next week for most should be dry with sunny spells. but there will be some mist and fog first thing in the mornings and fog first thing in the mornings and it does not look as though it lasts throughout next week. peaking in the middle part of the week by the end of the week it looks as if it will then start to turn unsettled again. remember, no matter how chilly it feels, the sun is still pretty strong at this time of year. it is heating up next week again. thankfully. now newswatch with samira ahmed.
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hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. a cause for celebration for the duke and duchess of sussex, but the queue for complaints from some. that bbc coverage of the new baby was excessive and sycophantic. and did bbc news give too much currency to the tweet sent by danny baker which resulted in his being sacked by radio five live? this time there were no cameras waiting for days outside a hospital, as there had been for the birth of the duke and duchess of cambridges‘ three children. by the time the media were reporting that the duchess of sussex had gone into labour early on monday afternoon, her much anticipated child was already a few hours old and it was his father who broke the news live on television. i‘m very excited to announce that meghan and myself had a baby boy early this morning.
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a very healthy boy. mother and baby are doing incredibly well. it‘s been the most amazing experience i could ever have possibly imagined. bbc news caught up quickly, devoting much of its output on monday afternoon to the new arrival. david buckton turned on the news channel at 6:00pm. the lead item, lasting, i think about 35 minutes was a report on the birth of a royal baby. and the next item was also about a report, this time on the urgent need for action on climate change. ijust wonder which the bbc really thinks is the more important? i am sure the young family are delightful and i hope they have a good life, but isn't that really more of a tail end, human interest story than a really vital lead? over the next few days and particularly on wednesday when the first pictures of the baby, now revealed to be named archie,
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was shown, viewers continue to contact us about the tone as well as the extent of the coverage. here is nigel greensit and first, ben adams. the bbc went from reporting the news to its default position of speculation. we still don't know the name, of course. we are waiting. lots of speculation... you are running a news channel. you are not running the tv equivalent of hello or 0k magazines. was it really necessary to go into so much coverage of a child that is, let's face it, seventh in line to the throne and very unlikely to succeed. with me here at windsor is our correspondence... correspondence are stood outside windsor castle over ever, buckingham palace and commenting on nothing happening or speculation. speculation isn't news so why do
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they continue to do it? sojoining me now from our tunbridge wells studio is another viewer who got in touch with us this week, john. and here with me is the executive editor of the bbc news channel, sam taylor. john, you contacted us, saying you‘d watched about four and a half hours worth of the news channel from 2:00pm on monday. what was on? well, i was watching the bbc baby channel, wasn‘t i? the announcements that she‘d gone into labour i think was about 2pm. but we got nothing else. i actually don‘t mind coverage of royal events, but i thought, on what is supposed to be the bbc news channel, they might at least have had reports on the hour of what else was going on in the world. russian air crash, war in israel, trade talks, everything. there weren‘t even any headlines.
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lets take that one first, this specific point, sam. the sheer quantity, why was there no other news for such a long stretch on the news channel? obviously, the bbc news channel's most important role among all the bbc services in the end is to provide live and breaking news cove rage. so we do, it's fair to say, clear the schedule when we get a big breaking story and we will suspend normal programming while we are doing it. this was a bank holiday monday so part of the programme we drop when we got news of the royal baby and meghan going into labour was actually recorded programming, documentaries and things that we'd scheduled, a bit like a weekend because it was a bank holiday. so we removed some of those when we had a breaking story. but that is ourjob when there is a breaking story, to work out how long shall we continue with the coverage of a rolling story. we do it partly because we get people tuning in all the time as the story develops and they first learn to hear of it. 0k. so that, if you like, the context in which we will sometimes clear the schedules. right, there is a second part that
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follows from thatjohn, which is how much new information did you get over the course of those four hours? yes, that was my other main complaint. it became fairly evident fairly soon, they weren‘t actually going to tell as much. mother and baby doing well. a gender or sex of baby, i think we got the weight of the baby. that was about it. let me put this to sam. because one can feel a bit sorry for you in the news team. three pieces of information repeated all afternoon and then what are you filling the rest of that airtime with? there is a little bit more to it than that, we had some interesting conversations with people that responded to the news. the story itself took a while to come through, didn't it? so we had the news first of all of the labour and then we had confirmation of the birth and then we heard from prince harry and that, as a story took up the first hour and a half of the coverage john is talking about. i want to reassure john that we do think quite a lot about this balance
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that we need to strike between our regular viewers who are tuning in and often use the news channel to get a summary of the day's newsstories. and then the quite significantly increased numbers of people from elsewhere who tune in when a big story breaks. but you were not doing the summaries, that‘s a big part of it. why couldn‘t you have had proper summaries of world news instead ofjust rolling with this? i think that's what i am saying. we think quite a lot about how long to roll on a story for and i came in that afternoon to help the team with that issue. we certainly, as we got further along the period of which we were rolling and it did stop in the end. we stopped and went back to our normal programming schedule. we weighed that up quite a lot. we were aware there were some other stories around. the interesting thing for us, just to sort of explain the dilemma in a way, when we got round to 5pm and 6pm our audience went up more and more people tuned in than would normally tune in at those hours. we think because more people had been out and had heard the news on an alert and then came back to watch all the footage. we are balancing two different user groups, if you like. sometimes when we are rolling
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the story we need to compensate by people picking up that news elsewhere. so there was a bbc one bulletin at 6:30pm that had a range of the day's news. our website lead and had a big splash on this story, but then had the other stories underneath. i guess i want to reassure you that i understand what you are saying and the whole judgment call about when have you had enough rolling coverage, versus when have you met the needs of the people who really need to see the rolling coverage, is always going to be a bit of a judgment. 0k, john you know it is a rare good news story. it was for one day, as sam said, it was all over eventually. what would you have done differently, what would you have liked the news channel to run at that period? is itjust interrupting it with more bulletins? interrupting it with bulletins, yes. 0k, they planned a big outside broadcast from windsor so might as well make the most of that. so even most of the coverage from windsor, but not all of it for four and three quarters of an hour. i think that's a really useful feedback.
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i suppose i am trying to say, i understand what you are saying, john, and i am trying to explain, we try to balance two competing demands, often when there is a story like this. you know, the process sometimes of getting back out of your rolling coverage into something more structured can in itself take a bit of time to organise, because everybody is working on that story and they are really going for it and they are rolling with it for a period of time. so i think this is interesting for us to get your feedback about the point at which some people have had enough and how we balance out with people who want more. that‘s a good place to end. john, you have been heard. john and sam taylor, thank you both. three days after the birth of archie harrison mountbatten windsor, the bbc found itself reporting on the behaviour of one of its own radio stars. here is david sillito. as the press arrived at danny baker‘s house this morning, he opened the door to reveal he had just been sacked. the conversation had
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not been cordial. by mutual agreement it was terminated. the reason, this tweet. a couple and between them a chimpanzee in a coat and a bowler hat and a reference to the royal baby. the showing of the tweet even in that truncated form offended some news watch viewers including philip who e—mailed. paul hayden had this to say... we asked bbc news about how they handled this and they told us.
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it has been an exciting week to be a football fan in england. having four english teams in the two european finals and particularly the dramatic comebacks by liverpool and tottenham hotspur were widely reported this week on bbc news. two widely for some like jan who wrote... and finally, bbc news programme sometimes ask viewers to look away now before they report the results of sports matches
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but should those spoiler alerts be extended to other events such as the finale of the hit drama series line of duty? that was shown on bbc one on sunday night. thank you for all your comments this week. please do get in touch with your opinions about what you see on tv news, online or on social media. you may even appear on the programme. you can e—mail us orfind us on twitter. you can call us and you can watch previous interviews on our website. that‘s all from us. we will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again in the next week. goodbye.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and tina daheley. 0ur headlines today: concerns over climate change could restrict air travel in the future, and raises questions around heathrow expansion plans. the prime minister could give a clear timetable for her departure from downing street when she meets conservative mps this week. after a week of drama in the champions league,

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