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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  May 13, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2. prosecutors in sweden are to reopen a rape investigation against the founder of wikileaks, julian assange. the shadow brexit secretary says any agreement with the government to leave the eu, will need a public vote. itv takes ‘thejeremy kyle show‘ off air, following the death of a guest shortly after filming. a witness at the london bridge terror inquests describes how he saw bystanders throwing objects at the three attackers, forcing them to run away. coming up on afternoon live all the sport, hugh ferris. yes, good afternoon. two down and when to go, manchester city's win
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means they claim an unprecedented domestic treble at the fa cup on saturday. more on that later. thanks hugh, and chris fawkes has the weather. it's a lovely and it's going to stay that way. we look at why the changes in our weather, and by the weather has been surprisingly warm in a place you might not expect. see you later. we're going to be talking to one of the women behind killing eve, the hit tv show which swept the board at last night's baftas. hello, this is afternoon live. prosecutors in sweden say they will reopen an investigation into rape allegations against the founder of wikileaks, julian assange. he denies the charges, and has avoided extradition for seven years after seeking refuge
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at the ecuadorean embassy in london. assange, who was jailed last month for breaching bail conditions, also faces extradition to the united states, for his alleged role in unlawfully releasing classified military material. this report is from caroline hawley. it was this dramatic moment that paved the way for today's decision. julian assange evicted by the ecuadorians last month, his political asylum stripped from him. under arrest. translation: as mr assange is currently incarcerated in the united kingdom, the circumstances now allow for an extradition to sweden on the basis of a european arrest warrant. this was not the case prior to april 11th of this year. after reviewing the preliminary investigation in its current state, my assessment is that there is still probable cause to suspect that mr assange committed rape.
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during the seven long years that julian assange was inside the ecuadorian embassy, prosecutors ran out of time to investigate three lesser allegations of sexual assault, but they have until the summer of next year to examine the rape case. prosecutors came to london in 2016, but then dropped the investigation the following year, not because of difficulties with evidence, they say, but because of the circumstances. butjulian assange is no longer beyond the reach of the law. his lawyer has criticised the prosecutor's decision, but says he will co—operate, that he wants to clear his name. i am very surprised that they did this. i think it is wrong to put this burden on him now when he is in prison in the uk, 50 weeks in prison, and he is risking to be extradited to the united states. julian assange is wanted in the us for conspiracy to commit computer intrusion over the mass leak of american state secrets which first made his name. as he sits behind bars at belmarsh prison, it will be
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for the uk government to decide which of the extradition requests takes precedence, that of sweden or the us. caroline hawley, bbc news. two senior members of labour's frontbench say they're likely to demand a fresh public vote, on any cross party deal over brexit. talks between the government and labour aimed at finding a way out of the current deadlock will resume later today. the deputy leader, tom watson, and the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, say any agreement would have to be put to another referendum. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, says this is a ‘crunch week‘ for the talks, but has rejected having another public vote. for more than a month, these two sides have been talking — labour and the government trying to do a deal that finds a way forward for brexit. but should whatever‘s agreed be put to a public vote? one key member of labour's team now says yes, that's the only way. the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, said a significant number of labourmps,
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probably 120, if not 150, would not back a deal if it hasn't got a confirmatory vote. he added, "i've made it clear at this stage, others in labourfeel the same. i've wanted a deal, i reluctantly came to the view that there should be a confirmatory ballot, but only... in all circumstances? no, hold on, let mejust explain, because i thought what was the only way we'd break the impasse. if a deal could be found that inspires enough votes in westminster, then fine. but it seemed to me that that's very, very difficult. so no deal without the promise of another public vote — is that labour's position? well, it's not quite that simple, because others on their negotiating team who've been sitting round the table with ministers up the road there see it differently and don't regard another referendum as essential. add to that the fact that many tory
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and labour mps over the road in parliament there are deeply uneasy about doing any kind of a deal with the other side, and it starts to look very difficult for these talks to reach an agreement. keir starmer says he wants a second referendum, would you ever accept that? ministers have their own reservations. are these talks with labour really going anywhere? international trade secretary liam fox is against a customs union with the eu, which labour wants to see, and on that idea of another public vote, one cabinet minister made his position clear. i think from the conservative point of view, we've always said that we think that would be a betrayal of what people voted for, and we want to implement the first referendum, but let's see where these talks go to. theresa may's critics have been on the march recently, putting her under pressure to set a date for her departure from downing street. arriving back at number ten after a weekend where polls painted a gloomy picture for the tories in forthcoming european elections, the prime minister may see these talks with labour —
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difficult as they are — as her best hope of persuading voters that she can yet deliver brexit. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. we can speak now to our political correspondent chris mason, who joins us from westminster. i hate to quote norman smith but he was saying we've got more chance of winning the eurovision and sorting this out. yes, probably with norman as the lead singer as well. the talks don't seem to be going anywhere. the question now comes back to the question now comes back to the question that's been dominating westminster for ages, what on earth should happen next? this morning we spoke to two labour mps who voted remain but now have different views, one advocating a referendum on the other thing that would be a mistake. let's bring in a conservative mp who was part of the brexiteers. i put the same question to uefa to them, what happens now? we are in a position where the prime
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minister has become so entrenched in her position on this that she is the blockage, i am of the view, and have been for some time now, that she needs to lay out the timetable for herdeparture, needs to lay out the timetable for her departure, where she steps down and that needs to be sooner rather than later so we can find a new leader who brings a fresh approach. if she goes, the numbers are the same over there. numbers might change a bit. most importantly, it would bring a fresh approach, a new leader, a fresh team, elections and the eu, a fresh team negotiating. what's happened is both the eu won the prime minister have become so entrenched in their positions, let's remember that the biggest issue is the backstop, and the eu keep sewing it back and saying that was the prime minister's idea. we need to change that dynamic and a new leader will have the opportunity to do that. at what point would it be legitimate to conclude that the place over your shoulder is in a
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logjam and the only solution is a general election where the parties have to promise what they will do one brexit under any mandate, or a referendum? i'm not sure a general election will change much. if you look at the polls we would be where we are now, a hung parliament with a coalition needed to be cobbled together. it wouldn't bring any more clarity. but let's remember that both main parties are equally divided down the middle, as parliament is. i'm not sure a general election would solve it. we've got a referendum a week on thursday in the eu elections, they will be a very clear message from the british people. and as the polls suggest, if the brexit party do very well, that gives a clear message as to what the british people want. it sounds like you are advocating a vote for your rivals? i always want people to vote conservative but i understand why people feel frustrated, betrayed and angry, whatever word you want to use. they want to send a clear
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message to parliament, notjust in the conservative party, but in general, they want us to get on and deliver brexit. you were enthusiastically campaigning for the conservative cause, it sounds like you may not be? lam be? i am focused on other things at the moment. i campaigned in other places for local elections, we didn't have local elections, i won't be doing too much towards the eu elections, let's put it that way. a real sense, simon, to burnish and garnish norman pez michael univision thought that these talks don't seem to be going anywhere, but there are 650 people in the commons, and 650 different views about how we resolve this. thank you very much. you are watching afternoon live, some breaking news we are hearing that one of the biggest stars of all time, doris day, has died at the age of 97. herfilms made her one of the biggest female stars of all time.
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the singer turned actress enjoyed success in films such as calamity jane, pillow talk and she had a hit song. her screen partnership with rock hudson was one of the biggest box office draws of the 19505 and 19605. a huge hollywood name, who latterly in life has been concerned with animal welfare. living on the west coast of california, 5he with animal welfare. living on the west coast of california, she set with animal welfare. living on the west coast of california, 5he setup a pet friendly hotel and has been working right up until her death, which has just been announced at the age of 97. plenty more on this, the death of dori5 age of 97. plenty more on this, the death of doris day has just been announced in hollywood. thejeremy kyle show has been 5u5pended indefinitely following the death of a guest shortly after filming an episode. itv has begun a review in to the programme and will not broadcast the show which featured the guest. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba has been following why itv has suspended the programme.
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given the seriousness of this event, that was why they decided to suspend filming and broadcasting of the show in order to give them time to conduct a review of this episode in particular. the jeremy conduct a review of this episode in particular. thejeremy kyle show is well known for its confrontational style, with jeremy well known for its confrontational style, withjeremy kyle mediating between gu5t5 who are in conflict over a range of issues, be it addiction, relationships, it's particularly known for dna tests, often in cases of disputed parentage, and lie detector test, which are often used on the show too, as they say, indicate whether they think people participated and have been truthful with friends or family, this is a former that made it itv's family, this is a former that made it itv‘5 mo5t family, this is a former that made it itv‘5 most successful daytime show. it's been nominated and shortlisted the times at the
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national television awards, voted for by the public. jeremy kyle, we have heard nothing from him directly at this time, about the show, and right now we are waiting to see what other details might emerge. the inquest into the london bridge terror attacks two years ago, has been hearing about the death of the youngest of the eight people who died, sara zelenak, who was 21 from australia. a witness who saw what happened 5aid he also saw bystanders throwing objects at the three attackers, forcing them to run away. here's daniel sandford. 0njune on june three, 2017 0njune three, 2017 australian open here sara zelenak went out for a drink with herfriend. she never made it home. becoming one of eight people to be killed in the london bridge attack. her mother and stepfather have come from australia for hearing quest to hear how their daughter's trip ended in tragedy. the attackers had already fatally injured two people in london bridge,
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and crash their van into railings. that is terrorists. filming with his phone eric had quickly realised this was a deliberate attack. today he was a deliberate attack. today he was in court to describe what happened. he said, as soon as the van crashed the driver stepped out. sara's friend gave evidence, explaining how she and sara had reached him stone steps in to borough market. people say run, and we started running. in the chaos of the night it was the last time she saw her friend. she frantically tried to call and message as she sought shelter in a restau ra nt. message as she sought shelter in a restaurant. she discovered later that week that asada had died. eric told the court how come in the panic
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he had seen a young woman fall to the ground, and a man tried to help her out when they were both stabbed. it is thought that woman was sara zelenak, and the young man was james meg mallon, another of those who was killed. eric said he also saw customers at a restaurant fighting back with chairs, glasses, as they try to defend themselves and each other from the murderous try to defend themselves and each otherfrom the murderous knifeman. themselves and each other from the murderous knifeman. people fleeing domestic abuse and violence could be guaranteed somewhere safe to live, by their local authority. the government says new proposals will mean an end the ‘postcode lottery‘ of survivors, getting support. ministers say extra funding will be provided, though the government hasn‘t said, how much. chichi izundu has more. she has dubbed it a postcode lottery, and an apparent crime that has no place in the uk, today theresa may was meeting victims of domestic abuse, to announce plans to
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make it a legal duty for councils in england to provide secure homes for those fleeing violent relationships. having a safe place to go for victims can be life—saving. a former victims can be life—saving. a former victim who now runs a refuge says she‘s been fighting for this for yea rs. for me, and for many other women having a refugee is, literally, life—saving. you know, we always feel absolutely terrible when we have to say to somebody, sorry, we‘ve got no space. this is critical. according to women‘s aid, 60% of referrals to refugees were declined in 2016 to 2017, normally due to lack of space. the charity says it‘s concerned about how much money will be put up to help, because of the cast to local authorities. this needs to be backed up by funding for local councils to deliver on this, to deliver effectively. 0ur estimate is that
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they may be around £90 million for a year, for councils. we want to test that with those involved. ministers have launched a 12 week consultation to not only work out how much money will be needed, but how it should be spent. last november the government awarded £22 million to buy more than 2000 beds for refugees under the safe accommodation, education and employment. we are pressing very, very hard in consultations, we welcome this, but it needs to be fully funded so that those who find themselves in that situation can access support they need. charities say the number of people attempting to access services is increasing year on year. as well, today‘s announcement is, they need the fullest range of support to help those that need it. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. prosecutors in sweden are to reopen a rape investigation against the founder of wikileaks — julian assange. the shadow brexit secretary says any agreement with the government to leave the eu,
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will need a public vote. itv takes ‘thejeremy kyle show‘ off air, following the death doris day has died aged 97. and in the sport manchester city have sore heads today, but tomorrow it‘s back to training after their premier league win. they have the chance to claim an unprecedented domestic treble. the team they beat to win the title have sacked their manager, chris hilton leaves brighton afterfour manager, chris hilton leaves brighton after four and a half years in charge. and a straight sets win over alison risk sense the british number one into the second round of the italian open in rome. i‘ve got more on those stories just after half past. the man in charge of safety at the hillsborough football stadium on the day 96 liverpool fans died almost 30 years ago, has been fined six and a half thousand pounds. graham mackrell was convicted last month, of a health and safety offence. 0ur correspondentjudith moritz
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is at preston crown court. he was the safety officer in 1989, ultimately responsible for making sure fans got inside the stadium without any problems, but he didn‘t assign enough turnstiles, just seven for the number of liverpool fans who had tickets for the lettings lane end of the ground, the turnstiles couldn‘t turn fast enough, he expected them to admit twice as many spectators as a safe number set out in the guidelines. so what happened was the large cloud built up outside the stadium, the police opened an exit gate to relieve the pressure, but fans went inside into an area already full. there was a fatal crash and 96 people died. today‘s sentencing, sir peter 0penshaw said that graham mackrell should have foreseen the risk of that cloud building up outside the ground, with just 17 sails to let fans inside. he
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said that although mr mackrell‘s action set the scene for the disaster which unfolded they hadn‘t directly caused the 96 deaths. peter 0penshaw said that had such an offence being committed recently he could have considered a jail term. as it is, he has fined mackrell six and a half thousand pounds. some of the families of those who died at hillsborough says they are disappointed with the amount. they say it is £67.70 per person who died in the disaster. you may remember at preston crown court last month that julie couldn‘t decide what to do in the case of david duckenfield. the match commander who was charged with gross negligence, lan and manslaughter. they couldn‘t reach a verdict on the court he will meet again next month when the judge decides whether or not a retrial should be held. an iraqi boy who, in 1991, was left seriously injured in a napalm attack by saddam hussein‘s forces, came to personify the suffering
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of the iraqi people at the hands of a dictator. amar karneem‘s story became known around the world and he was adopted by a british politician, making a new life here in the uk. for almost thirty years he believed he was an orphan, until a chance appearance by a woman on iraqi tv last year changed everything. he was the little boy who lost everything in a napalm attack. that day, i physically got scarred, i lost my family. it changed my entire life. for 30 years amar karneem and believed he is an orphan. there is nothing more important than feeling you belong to someone and are feeling you belong to someone and a re loved by feeling you belong to someone and are loved by someone. could everything he knows be about to change? the british politician emma nicholson found amar karneem are emma nicholson found amar karneem a re close emma nicholson found amar karneem are close to death in a refugee camp in1991. he was a complete orphan. he's lost
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everything, life, home, whole family. with brutal suppression saddam ordered his forces to crush the uprising. she was told all his relatives had been killed when the iraqi dictator bombed his own people in basra. doctors advised her to ta ke in basra. doctors advised her to take him to london, where he underwent 27 major operations. let this commission i dropped the genocide convention and save the iraqi people. amar karneem or even appeared at the united nations. after surgery he stayed in the uk, moving to devon with the mp who had rescued him. that‘s where we found him, three decades on. settled, but still haunted by the last of his birth family. you feel completely empty, this word has let you down. you feel com pletely this word has let you down. you feel completely against the world, you can‘t trust anyone. it‘s the most horrible position to be in. without family, you don‘t belong to anyone.
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you don‘t have nothing. family, you don‘t belong to anyone. you don't have nothing. but could it be that in the confusion of war, a terrible mistake was made? a year ago, he received this extraordinary message, a video clip of a woman in iraq interrupting a tv broadcast, appealing for her lost son. someone watching wondered if it could be the same little boy who was taken to the uk all those years ago. so he tracked down amar karneem on social media. i‘d like to think it‘s true. i don‘t wa nt to i‘d like to think it‘s true. i don‘t want to get my hopes up. i don‘t wa nt to want to get my hopes up. i don‘t want to be disappointed, really. after months of research, we tracked down the woman in the video to this house in the city we investigated her story. the woman emerged with what she said was her most treasured possession. but could it be the same
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amar? she told us she‘d searched for her son in the rubble, four days after the napalm attack. she agreed to the request for a dna test. so the results have come. two weeks later... she is my biological mother. i‘m over the moon. really happy about this. you‘ve got a man! i‘m going to celebrate tonight. it's the first time we‘ve seen him smile. so, three decades after he thought he was orphaned, amar is ready to go back and be reunited with his mother. every day i was waking, it was playing on my mind. i couldn‘t
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dress, everyday, just wondering, if i was ever going to find my mother, some relatives. it‘s a relief coming out. i can‘t imagine what she felt. it's out. i can‘t imagine what she felt. it‘s hard to imagine, after 30 yea rs. it‘s hard to imagine, after 30 years. i never thought! it‘s hard to imagine, after 30 years. i never thought i wanted to go back. they was no reason for me to go back, i thought i had nothing left. it‘s been incrediblejourney. and you can see more on amar‘s story on panorama tonight at 8.30 on bbc one, and later, on iplayer. the iconic hollywood actress and singer doris day has died at the age of 97 — according to her foundation. correspondent looks back on her illustrious career. doris day, cracking her as calamity jane. no one symbolise the hollywood of the 19505 and early 605 better. good musical escapism. born in 1922,
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she had one ambition, to be a ballet dancer. but after being injured in a car crash she began singing instead. by car crash she began singing instead. by 16 she was doris day, touring with the band, a chance film addition made her an overnight star. it was the first of a string of musicals, that launched a successful recording career. but the public image, light a darker private life. ended unhappily, they first was a violent and unnervingly close to the on—screen relationship with james cagney. you can‘t tell me what to do! yes i can. do you think you only? that is
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exactly right. she is best remembered for romantic comedies, glamorous, witty and innocent. you ain't the kind of girl who'd break a date. no, not. i'm! ain't the kind of girl who'd break a date. no, not. i'm i into the kind of guy who would ask you to. i know you're not. i'll pick you up at eight. i had a great time, and i think they sensed that fun. i‘d read all the gorgeous clothes, and work with rock hudson, jimmy gardner and clark gable, you know. how bad can it be? for the public doris day was the all singing, all smiling icon of the all singing, all smiling icon of the last hollywood. que sera. que sera. whatever will be, will be. the future is not ours to see. que sera. que sera. what will be, will be.
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remembering doris day who has died at the age of 97. they will be plenty more on doris day throughout the afternoon. for now let‘s take a look at the weather. chris is here. that‘s a strange map. yes, we‘ve been having some warm weather, we saw 32 celsius yesterday. the thing that surprising is exactly where that was recorded. maybe we can zoom out and take a look at where we are. that 32 was just near the arctic circle, would you believe it? it‘s may, near the arctic. looking just at they. it‘s been incredibly warm. it‘s all to do with a jet stream bringing the weather there. it is also responsible for the fine weather here and wet and windy weather across the mediterranean. it could
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cause some problems over the next few days. but our weather is set to be fairat few days. but our weather is set to be fair at the moment. it‘s been so warm that some people have been cooling off in the sea. 0ther warm that some people have been cooling off in the sea. other people that i think that was a dog, chris! 0h, that i think that was a dog, chris! oh, yes! maybe he regrets putting that feast on, it‘s a bit warm. no rain. bit of a stag party going on there, in the forest. these plans are awful. i guess this means we don‘t have much to talk about. it‘s just going to be lovely. marvellous. anyway, you better put some detail on it. it‘s been lovely and sunny today, the big change, of course, is last week we saw the cool and wet weather, but a complete change in fortu nes weather, but a complete change in fortunes with guys like this around the country. this week we could see
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temperatures as high as 2a degrees. so warm and in scotland than anywhere else? yes, this area of high pressure, that is wafting all of the warm weather to the north and west of the uk. that‘s where the highest temperatures are going to be. it won‘t be any complaints, it has to be said, weather—wise. this is the latest satellite picture. not much cloud at all. this cloud in scotla nd much cloud at all. this cloud in scotland is thin stuff so the cloud is coming through as well. temperatures into the high teens, whiteley, starting to feel warm in the sunshine. in the unsure whinge, fresh feel to the weather, pleasant in that strong sunshine. 20 degrees in hollow and 19 in edinburgh. as though where the picture for this evening. the high pressure keeps the cloud away. clear skies, well, relatively cool, temperatures down to around 2 degrees in norwich.
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0nshore winds in scotland make it about 8 degrees in stornoway, not as cold as it has been. the high pressure with a slow tuesday, the breeze picks up a little bit, sue essex, kent as well. a fresh feel to the weather, warm in the sunshine, wherever you are. temperatures continue to climb into the low 205 in scotland, that is likely to be the warm spot on tuesday, into wednesday high pressure still there, if isobars around, so lighter winds nationwide, and lighter winds allow temperatures to rise by another degree or two. plenty of sunshine, in warmer spots across scotland we will probably see the temperatures climbing to 20 or 2a degrees. across the board, pleasant spells of sunshine. it won‘t stay that way, towards the end of the week some further changes in the weather picture, our area of high pressure begins to move northwards losing its influence, getting more traffic coming in from the continent. a bit more cloud across the uk,
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strengthening easterly winds as well. not windy, but that combination of cloud and the easterly breeze knocks the temperature down. some outbreaks of rainfor temperature down. some outbreaks of rain for some of us as we had through friday. most of the week dry, with warm sunshine as well. that‘s your latest. good afternoon.
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our latest headlines: hollywood actress doris day dies at the age of 97. prosecutors in sweden are to reopen a rape investigation against the founder of wikileaks — julian assange. the shadow brexit secretary says any agreement with the government to leave the eu, will need a public vote. itv takes thejeremy kyle show off air following the death of a guest shortly after filming. a witness at the london bridge terror inquests describes how he saw bystanders throwing objects at the three attackers, forcing them to run away. also coming up — killing eve. we‘re going to be talking to one of the women behind killing eve, the hit tv show which swept the board at last night‘s baftas. sport now on afternoon live with hugh ferris. they‘ve onlyjust finished partying up there at manchester city but thoughts now are onto this weekend‘s fa cup final and the chance to make
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history, aren‘t they? good afternoon. there were two trophy left yesterday. in between, a little bit of booze, perhaps. a good job they have got a day off today but tomorrow back in training and preparing for the fa cup final against watford. no english team has ever completed the domestic treble of league, fa cup and league cup. city have to of those three. manchester united did a treble in 1999 but that was with the league cup swapped out for the champions league. a fourth premier league title it was yesterday for manchester city after winning at brighton. they beat liverpool by that symbol point. they have won back—to—back titles for the first time since manchester united did it ten yea rs time since manchester united did it ten years ago. so will pep guardiola make three in a row his next task? i think he will want to invest. they
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have had injuries. left back has been an issue. that is somewhere he would like to strengthen and have that security. but i think manchester city will be looking for that treble. who can stop them? liverpool have got a lot stronger. it is brilliant. this is what we wa nt it is brilliant. this is what we want from the premier league. watford are the team hoping to stop manchester city in the short term. that game on the bbc next saturday. chris hughton looking for a brighter future? yes, and the club hoping the same thing, because following that defeat to manchester city, brighton have sacked chris hughton today. they finished 17th in the premier league, so he has to save them from relegation twice, but they were on precipice of league1 relegation twice, but they were on precipice of league 1 when he took over, four and a half years later he has kept them in the premier league for a couple of years, but they have
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only managed two wins from their last 18 league games. 2019 has been pretty woeful and the chairman said poor form pretty woeful and the chairman said poorform in the pretty woeful and the chairman said poor form in the second half of the season has led to him making what he described as one of his most difficult decisions. britian‘s number one kyle edmund is out of the italian 0pen after losing to spaniard fernando verdasco. edmund took the first set 6—4 and was leading 4—1 in the second, before losing 11 of the next 13 games. verdasco winning in three sets. it‘s a fifth straight defeat for edmund. better news forjohanna konta. the british number one has beaten alison riske for a second week in a row. konta won in straight sets in rome, after victory over the american in the madrid 0pen last week. she‘ll play another american, sloane stephens in round two. finally, athletes are always told
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to dip for the finish line. it‘s your torso that counts. you often see sprinters falling over the line such is the effort they‘re making. but there‘s more than one way to skin this particular cat. infinite tucker. meeting in arkansas in the us. college athlete running 400 metres hurdeles"| he said after that final hurdle, he closed his eyes, he saw his mum at the finish and he jumped to give closed his eyes, he saw his mum at the finish and hejumped to give her a hug, which is the most extraordinary cheesy but rather touching way of winning a race. but he one. he did win. that‘s all that matters. yes, success.
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it was a successful night for the bbc‘s killing eve at the tv baftas. the thriller took three awards, including one for best drama, as the stars of the small screen gathered for the ceremony at the royal festival hall in london. well, sally woodward gentle, executive producer of killing eve, is with me now. how is the head? it's all right. i'm just a bit tired. i don‘t drink so i was safe. the assumption everybody has, before going into killing eve itself, when you came up with this asa itself, when you came up with this as a project, it wasn‘t an easy sell, was it? it wasn't. it was quite easy to set up the development, which we set up in the uk, with the stories and with a freebie, because she was a brilliant new voice at that point. but explain to me, because this is an interesting story too, about her involvement, because you first heard
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of this project through a dinner party, is that right? it was a colleague of ours at work and she had dinner with friends and they said, i have written these, take a look, and she handed them onto s. a tiny little company, eight of us then, we read them and we love them, but we realised there was quite a few shows out there about female assassins, but it felt like a fresh, two women, it felt like a fresh thing to do and to give it to somebody like phoebe. what we did not realise was how extraordinary she would be taking it on because it felt like at the time a low risk thing. and it is lovely to work with new talent. what we didn‘t know then was how hard it would be to set up a show that is funny and violent and moving. difficult in this country because it was bbc america that
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spotted this eventually, when they came over here. yes, we developed it in the uk and it did not take in the way that we wanted it to, it did not get a green light. that means you we re get a green light. that means you were trying to sell it to bbc, itv, sky. were trying to sell it to bbc, itv, sky, whoever, and they said no. they must be kicking themselves today. sky, whoever, and they said no. they must be kicking themselves todaylj think they are incredibly jealous must be kicking themselves todaylj think they are incrediblyjealous —— generous human beings and so i think it is ok. bbc america popped in see us it is ok. bbc america popped in see us because they were in town and this was the one that got away. they read it and they loved it for the same reasons that we did, for the extraordinary tone and the wildness of it, and it wasn‘t difficult. extraordinary tone and the wildness of it, and it wasn't difficult. down to the fact that not just featuring strong women but very much made by strong women but very much made by strong women but very much made by strong women too. i mean, we have got phoebe behind—the—scenes, but
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there are a lot of great men behind there are a lot of great men behind there as well. but it definitely feels like a strong female peace. but we weren‘t setting out to do something political. itjust happened this was the story we wa nted happened this was the story we wanted to tell and the way we wanted to tell it. and how important, the characters, what is it about them? and those that played them? what phoebe did and what we did as we started to make the show was we realised that we need to give those characters are real depth and it is essentially a character piece, not a genre piece. it is about these extraordinary women. and being mostly women behind the show, i think it showed that women are complicated, complex, contrary, ironic, funny, glorious, sexy, and we gave all of those characters that many colours and then you exploit —— employee extraordinary actors. you
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said, we like to kill people that shouldn‘t be killed, we like to do things that shouldn‘t be allowed. 15 that the trick? if you stumble upon something that feels like it is familiar, you think, what would really happen if we were in that situation? and then you look for things that you can flip. and the other thing you need to do is recognise when something familiar actually just works and recognise when something familiar actuallyjust works and you go with it. but constantly looking for surprise and not falling into a tv genre tropes. it is a difficult thing to follow and yet you are. there is another one. how is that going? it is going great. it is going? it is going great. it is going out in the states at the moment.
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and jodie comer‘s performance just gets stronger. they just and jodie comer‘s performance just gets stronger. theyjust love it. the best of luck with that. and what an amazing night for you. thank you very much. new research suggests a generation of young people who entered the workplace a decade ago have been left financially scarred by the impact of the economic crisis. those leaving education to get a job between 2008 and 2011 have endured 10 years of reduced earning power, with many graduates having to accept lower paid jobs, affecting future earnings and pensions. here‘s our business correspondent, katy austin. i was mainly applying for retail, hospitality roles. in one interview, i was interviewed against people who at the time had a business degree. looking for her first at the time had a business degree. looking for herfirstjob at the time had a business degree. looking for her firstjob in 2008 during the recession, carol found herself up against stiff competition for fewer herself up against stiff competition forfewerjobs. since then
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herself up against stiff competition for fewerjobs. since then she has ina for fewerjobs. since then she has in a string of different roles, not earning as much as she had hoped. in a string of different roles, not earning as much as she had hopedlj did earning as much as she had hoped.” did not expected to as tough. but on a positive note, i think the whole experience has taught me a lot about just persevering. we already knew that people starting out in their careers in the aftermath of the financial crash were at a disadvantage but new research highlights that because of this particularly difficult find well—paid work, there has been a long lasting impact. today‘s report says a so—called crisis cohort who graduated during the downturn took a 6% pay hit. it says university leavers with 30% more likely to get a lower paid job and a young person qualified to gcse level was 30% less likely to find a job at all. researchers say earning less then has seen this group and less since compared to people who left educationjust a few
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compared to people who left education just a few years earlier or later. in the early 1980s and early 19905, we saw a much larger rise in youth unemployment. 0n the other hand, in the recession, we saw a less marked rise in any ploy meant but we saw inflation rise a lot higher, real hate —— we'll pay be hit a lot harder and it hasn't re cove red hit a lot harder and it hasn't re cove re d a hit a lot harder and it hasn't recovered a decade later. this recruitment agency says the freeze on hiring that happened a decade ago has eased but it is still harder to get that firstjob. has eased but it is still harder to get that first job. before the recession, it was more going in, doing exactly what you wanted to and now it is about that compromise and saying, may be i can't do my dream job right away, maybe i need to go and do something else first and sidestep within that company. the authors of today‘s report have called for politicians to do more to support those whose working lives with god when the economy was at its wea kest. with god when the economy was at its weakest. the government told us youth unemployment was half since
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2010 and it is introducing new programmes to support career and pay progression. the british heart foundation has warned that deaths from heart and artery diseases among most of the population are rising for the first time in five decades. the charity says the historic pace of progress in reducing death rates "has slowed to a near standstill". more than 42,000 people under 75 died from these diseases in the uk in 2017 — 3% more than in 2014. let‘s speak to simon gillespie, the chief executive at the british heart foundation. how worried should we be?” how worried should we be? i think we should be very concerned about this. after decades of excellent progress in reducing deaths from heart diseases, those rates have now stalled and there is some really strong indications it is going to get a lot worse in the future. why? all sorts of things. we have seen an increase in the number of people with diabetes, which almost doubles your risk of heart attack or stroke.
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high blood pressure, if not treated, can increase your risk of a heart attack or stroke as well. so how many people have undiagnosed high blood pressure? about 4 million people with undiagnosed high blood pressure in the uk. it is really concerning. we have got to this position, which is not bad at the moment, because a lot of research and people contributing to that research. we need to really make some step changes over the next ten yea rs some step changes over the next ten years to some step changes over the next ten yea rs to reverse some step changes over the next ten years to reverse where we are at the moment, which is a little bit of an uptick. we need to make sure it does not become an upward trend and continue to drive death rates down. it is still one of the biggest killers in the uk and the biggest globally. have we got a bit complacent about our hearts? well, eve ryo ne complacent about our hearts? well, everyone has got one, and if it keeps on going, you don‘t notice it is there. you only don‘t notice it is there. you only don‘t notice it is if your heart is not working
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properly. that can really lead to significant problems. it can kill you but it can lead to serious disability and disease as well. our gps on top of this or are they too many slipping through the net? we know that gps and primary care are under pressure so we all have the opportunity now to go and buy a relatively cheap blood pressure monitor you can have at home and reasonably regularly check your blood pressure or make sure it is 0k. blood pressure or make sure it is ok. if it's blood pressure or make sure it is ok. if it‘s not, go and speak to a health care... what is not? what are those two figures? a blood pressure reading will give you two figures and the established norm for the uk is 140, 90. if the higherfigure is above 140, you should go and see a gp, and if the lowerfigure is above 90. if there are issues there are things you can‘t do it yourself, but you needn‘t necessarily think this isa you needn‘t necessarily think this is a change of life moment. quite
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often you will get advice on the little things that will make a difference in your lifestyle. but sometimes those things don‘t work and you will need medication. what is the advice to anybody watching now? don't get worried about it. just check. if your numbers are high, go and see your gp and talk about it. the weird thing is, we can and should as a country, given the huge burden both in personal and family terms, but also to the nhs and the rest of the economy, we should be setting much more ambitious targets. thank you. now imagine sailing on a ship where you don‘t need to carry a passport, entry cards or even a ticket. well, if you‘re on board the celebrity edge, that‘s exactly what will happen. she‘s a new cruise ship making her debut in southampton and it‘s the first ship with a facial recognition pass system. our business presenter, susannah streeter is in southampton.
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it could not be a more perfect day for reporting on the cruise industry. the weather really is glorious. there are plenty of high—tech features on this ship. the cruise industry really is booming because last year in the uk and ireland, we had more than 2 million passengers on cruise ships and by 2023, that number is forecast to grow at 22%. much greater than the travel industry as a whole. and i‘m currently in the retreat, this is just for sweet passengers, so it is very exclusive, and they have brought in a few top designers to cure brought in a few top designers to cu re rate brought in a few top designers to cure rate and create these rooms, cabins, restaurants, and places like the retreat on this ship. and i am pleased to say that the designer kelly halpern is with me to talk about this. you are more used to designing hotels, aren‘t you? have you employed really all the techniques that you use in the hotel
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industry to work on this ship?” have been designing for 41 years, mainly private homes and now hotels, and when they came to me and asked ifi and when they came to me and asked if i would be interested in designing a huge part of their ship they were building in france, i said i will only do it if it is to the standard i am used to designing and it was an extraordinary challenge and they have been an incredible company to work for. it is extraordinary. everyone comes on and goes into the cabins, the iconic suites, they can't believe they are ona suites, they can't believe they are on a cruise ship. i can't because i would never have gone on a cruise ship. this particular ship has changed the entire face of the cruise industry. and you are also designing other ships.” cruise industry. and you are also designing other ships. i have been working with them now for quite a few years so we have gone into some of the older fleets and now we are designing two, three, four, five, and it will keep getting more incredible, but the industry does
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not seem to be hit by the recession. people are addicted to it. but what this ship has done, which i think is extraordinary, it has opened up its doors to a whole another arena of people that would never have come on a cruise ship. my brief to myself was, design something spectacular of the highest luxury that you can literally travel the world in one place and go to restaurants, you can go place and go to restaurants, you can go shopping, you can have your hair done, there is a barber, botox, everything that you want is here. and you don't have to go on land and drive somewhere. many thanks. i want to very quickly introduce one more guest. pippa jackson is from the travel industry. tell me very quickly, people are worried about the environmental footprint of ships. 0ur consumers worried about that when they book? it is something consumers are that when they book? it is something consumers are becoming increasingly aware of but what the industry is
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doing is focusing on fuel efficiency and recycling to make sure that the impact is minimised if you do go on a cruise holiday. many thanks. i know pepper and kelly are setting sail with lots of the other passengers this afternoon around five o‘clock. it certainly seems as if it cruise industry is going from success to if it cruise industry is going from su ccess to su ccess if it cruise industry is going from success to success and those numbers are projected to rise up to 2023 and beyond. and the weather helps. more now on the death of the actress and singer, doris day. the 97—year—old, who is best remembered for starring roles in calamityjane and pillow talk was one of the biggest stars during the golden age of hollywood. with me is our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba. i have read descriptions of her as the biggest star hollywood ever had. that is always arguable but what is absolutely true is that she was one of the biggest stars in the world
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throughout the 19505 and early 19605 and she was one of the last remaining people from what we nostalgically and accurately called the golden age of hollywood. gentler age. yes, with the likes of kirk douglas, who is still with us from that time. she portrayed this wonderful girl next door type. that endeared her to millions of fans across the world. even though, for the time, those films were quite sexy and daring. even then, she was seen as a really strong female character, the like that hadn‘t really been seen in hollywood before. unfortunately, these wonderful warm projection that we saw of her on—screen wasn‘t reflected in her private life, which was tumultuous to say the least. a string of marriages that didn‘t work out for various reasons and in her
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latter yea rs out for various reasons and in her latter years she really devoted herself to one course that she really cared about and that was her animalfoundation really cared about and that was her animal foundation and caring for animals. 0ne animal foundation and caring for animals. one of those hollywood stars that really decided to use theirfame to stars that really decided to use their fame to make things better for others. as well as hollywood, she had her own tv show and we all know the song, k serra. she had so many strings to that bow. she wasn't a huge fan of that song. but it is one of the songs that absolutely defines her. a wonderful recording artist. she was really seen as somebody who was one of those genuine multitalented cinema figures who could do almost anything she turned her hand to. that is why she will be remembered with such fondness. 0ne of the last people of that age of hollywood way they did absolutely everything. they sang, they danced,
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they acted beautifully, they made audiences holler and weep and cheer with everything they did. and of course that girl next door figure that she liked to portray, in the 19605, the sexual revolution really took off, she found herself slightly out of step with that. it did not sit with the kind of films she wa nted sit with the kind of films she wanted to make. she turned down the role of mrs robinson in the graduate. she moved into other things. she had a marvellously successful tv show and in the latter yea rs of successful tv show and in the latter years of her life, we are talking half a century, she was devoted to her animal causes. it is her animal foundation that announced the news of her death a few hours ago and that was the thing she really cared about. after many offers, she accepted the presidential medal of freedom from the american president at the time and it was because it was not just for
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at the time and it was because it was notjust for entertainment, at the time and it was because it was not just for entertainment, it was not just for entertainment, it was for animal welfare as well. those are the two things that defined her career. thank you very much. time for a look at the weather. here‘s chris fawkes. still some glorious scenes across the country with sunshine. we have got more of that sunshine to come so get used to skies like these over the next few days. it is also going to get quite a bit warmer. temperatures peaking on wednesday. around 24 celsius in parts of scotland. highs typically running into the high teens or low 205. that change is all down to this area of high pressure that is going nowhere fast, keeping these atlantic weather systems out to our west. you can see clear skies for most parts of the country at the moment. any cloud is thin and allowing the sunshine to
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come streaming through so no one is really missing out on this fine weather. temperatures are doing pretty well as well. widely climbing into the high teens. 19 degrees in edinburgh and newcastle. similar temperatures in cardiff. just a little bit fresher around our coasts. 0vernight tonight, we will keep those clear skies in place with the wind on shore across parts of north and west scotland. temperatures falling no lower than 8 degrees. further south, with the clear skies and lighter winds, temperatures could get down to 2 degrees in norwich. they will be more of that sunshine with temperatures again rising very quickly. the breeze a little bit stronger around the coastline. but still warm in the sunshine. the highest temperatures will be across the north and west of the uk. 21 celsius in edinburgh and 20 in the north. subtle changes as we head
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through the middle part of the week. the isobars get more spread out so the winds will be lighter on wednesday and it is those winds that allow those temperatures to rise another degree or two. wednesday is likely to be the warmest day of this week with temperatures around 23, 20 four celsius in scotland. but fairly widely high teens or low 205. from there, though whether to start a change as we head into thursday and friday. we get more of an easterly breeze blowing and that will dragging more cloud and with those stronger winds that temperatures will be going down as well. a little bit of rain for some of us by friday but most of the week dry with more of that warm sunshine.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. today at 3. hollywood actress doris day, best known for such films as calamity jane and pillow talk has died at the age of 97. prosecutors in sweden are to reopen a rape investigation against the founder of wikileaks julian assange. the shadow brexit secretary says any agreement with the government to leave the eu, will need a public vote. itv takes ‘thejeremy kyle show‘ off air, following the death of a guest shortly after filming. coming up on afternoon live all the sport, hugh ferris. two trophies, two parties already. manchester city have won myjob to do, if they beat watford on
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saturday, the premier league champions will claim an unprecedented domestic treble. more on that later. thanks, hugh, and chris fawkes has the weather. it's it‘s lovely out there. yes, more of this to come for the rest of this week. looking at the weather further afield, where it has been unusually ha rd afield, where it has been unusually hard in places you wouldn‘t expect it to be. we will look at why. thanks chris. also coming up. four new species, plastic bag and a sweet wrapper. all discovered at the bottom of the deepest sea change, we‘ll speak to the diver, who is the third in history to dive to the bottom of the mariana trench. hello, this is afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy.
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doris day, one of the biggest hollywood stars of the 505 and 605 has died at the age of 97. the news has been released by her foundation in the past hour. they say she recently contracted pneumonia. we‘ve been looking back at her illustrious career. doris day, cracking her whip as calamity jane. no one symbolise the hollywood of the 19505 and early 605 better. good musical escapism. born doris kappelhoff in 1922, she had one ambition, to be a ballet dancer. but after being injured in a car crash she began singing instead. by 16 she was doris day, touring with the band. a chance film addition made her an overnight star. it was the first of a string of musicals, that launched
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a successful recording career. but the public image, belied a darker private life. four marriages ended unhappily, the first was a violent and unnervingly close to the on—screen relationship with james cagney. you can‘t tell me what to do! yes, ican. do you think own me? that is exactly right. she is best remembered for romantic comedies, glamorous, witty and innocent. you ain't the kind of girl who'd break a date. no, not. i ain't the kind of guy who would ask you to. i know you‘re not. i'll pick you up at eight. i had a great time, and i think they sensed that fun. i‘d read all the gorgeous clothes, and work with rock hudson,
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jimmy garner and clark gable, you know. how bad can it be? for the public doris day was the all singing, all smiling icon of the lost hollywood. # que sera, sera. # whatever will be, will be. # the future‘s not ours to see. # que sera, que sera, what will be, will be. remembering doris day who has died at the age of 97. 0ne one of the last hollywood greats. prosecutors in sweden say they will reopen an investigation into rape allegations against the founder of wikileaks — julian assange. he denies the charges, and has avoided extradition for seven years after seeking refuge at the ecuadorean embassy in london. assange, who was jailed last month for breaching bail conditions, also faces extradition to the united states, for his alleged role in unlawfully releasing classified military material. this report is from caroline hawley.
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it was this dramatic moment that paved the way for today present a good decision. julian assange were evicted by the ecuadorians last month. political asylum stripped from him. under arrest. as julian assange is currently incarcerated in the united kingdom the circumstances now allow for an extradition siege on the basis of this. that wasn‘t the case prior to this year. after reviewing the investigation in its current state my assessment is that there is still a probable cause to suspect that julian assange committed a sexual crime. during the seven long yea rs committed a sexual crime. during the seven long years prosecutors ran out of time to investigate less allegations of sexual assault. they have until the summer of next year
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to examine the other case. prosecutors came to london in 2016, but dropped the investigation following the air. not because of difficulties with evidence, but because of the circumstances. julian assange is no longer beyond the reach of the law. his lawyer has criticised the prosecution ‘s decision but says he will cooperate. he wants to clear his name. i'm very surprised that they did this. i think it's wrong to put this burden on him now. when he is in prison in the uk. 50 weeks in prison. he is risking extradition to the united states. julian assange was wanted in the us for conspiracy to commit computer intrusion over a mass leak of state secrets which made his name. as he sits behind bars at belmarsh jail it will be for the uk government to decide which of the uk government to decide which of the competing extradition requests ta ke the competing extradition requests take precedence. sweden, orthe the competing extradition requests take precedence. sweden, or the us? two senior members of labour‘s frontbench say they‘re likely to demand a fresh public vote,
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on any cross party deal over brexit. talks between the government and labour aimed at finding a way out of the current deadlock will resume later today. the deputy leader, tom watson, and the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, say any agreement would have to be put to another referendum. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, says this is a ‘crunch week‘ for the talks, but has rejected having another public vote. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake reports. for more than a month, these two sides have been talking — labour and the government trying to do a deal that finds a way forward for brexit. but should whatever‘s agreed be put to a public vote? one key member of labour‘s team now says yes, that‘s the only way. the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, said a significant number of labourmps, probably 120, if not 150, would not back a deal if it hasn‘t got a confirmatory vote. he added, "i‘ve made it clear at this stage, at this 11th hour, any deal that comes through from this government
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ought to be subject to the lock of a confirmatory vote." others in labourfeel the same. i‘ve wanted a deal, i reluctantly came to the view that there should be a confirmatory ballot, but only... in all circumstances? no, hold on, let mejust explain, because i thought what was the only way we‘d break the impasse. if a deal could be found that inspires enough votes in westminster, then fine. but it seemed to me that that‘s very, very difficult. so no deal without the promise of another public vote — is that labour‘s position? well, it‘s not quite that simple, because others on their negotiating team who‘ve been sitting round the table with ministers up the road there see it differently and don‘t regard another referendum as essential. add to that the fact that many tory and labour mps over the road in parliament there are deeply uneasy about doing any kind of a deal with the other side, and it starts to look very difficult for these talks to reach an agreement. keir starmer says he wants a second referendum, would you ever accept that? ministers have their own reservations. are these talks with labour really going anywhere?
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international trade secretary liam fox is against a customs union with the eu, which labour wants to see, and on that idea of another public vote, one cabinet minister made his position clear. i think from the conservative point of view, we've always said that we think that would be a betrayal of what people voted for, and we want to implement the first referendum, but let's see where these talks go to. theresa may‘s critics have been on the march recently, putting her under pressure to set a date for her departure from downing street. arriving back at number ten after a weekend where polls painted a gloomy picture for the tories in forthcoming european elections, the prime minister may see these talks with labour — difficult as they are — as her best hope of persuading voters that she can yet deliver brexit. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. thejeremy kyle show has been suspended indefinitely following the death of a guest shortly after filming an episode. itv has begun a review
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in to the programme and will not broadcast the show which featured the guest. with me is our correspondent charlotte gallagher. so, what are we being told by a tv so far? they say the guest died a week after their episode was recorded, they‘ve not said it was a minority woman, or what the episode was about. if people had watched the programme it‘s confrontational, dna tests, lie detectors, being reunited. it has been very controversial and a lot of people criticise it for that style. we don‘t know how the person died, but the fact it has been pulled off the schedule, and they aren‘t going to broadcast any more episodes, they aren‘t going to record any more. it would suggest this isn‘t natural causes. that they are going to review the duty of care surrounding this programme. they have
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counsellors, psychotherapists, working alongside producers. there are some questions for itv. it is at the core of daytime output there‘s been a question about other programmes such as love island, where the duty of care of broadcasters has come into question. they are both hugely popular with viewers. love island, two co ntesta nts viewers. love island, two contestants have died since taking pa rt contestants have died since taking part in that programme. 0ne took her own life last year, and another was found dead earlier this year. an inquest will be held into one of those deaths later this year. an itv boss said after these deaths that they would look at their after—care standards, and perhaps change them. so contestants who are particularly vulnerable would be in touch with psychotherapists and counsellors for longer than previously. thank you very much. the inquest into the london bridge terror attacks two years ago, has been hearing about the death of the youngest of the eight people who died, sara zelenak, who was 21 from australia.
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a witness who saw what happened said he also saw bystanders throwing objects at the three attackers, forcing them to run away. 0njune 3rd, 2017 australian open here sara zelenak went out for a drink with herfriend, priscilla gonzales. she never made it home, becoming one of eight people to be killed in the london bridge attack. her mother and stepfather have come from australia for her inquest to hear how their daughter‘s trip ended in tragedy. the attackers had already fatally injured two people in london bridge, and crashed their van into railings. that is terrorists. filming with his phone eric had quickly realised this was a deliberate attack. today he was in court to describe what happened. he said...
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sara‘s friend, priscilla, gave evidence, explaining how she and sara had reached the stone steps in to borough market... in the chaos of the night it was the last time she saw herfriend. she frantically tried to call and message as she sought shelter in a restaurant. she discovered later that week that sara had died. eric told the court how come in the panic he had seen a young woman fall to the ground, and a man tried to help her out when they were both stabbed. it is thought that woman was sara zelenak, and the young man was james magellan, another of those who was killed. eric said he also saw customers at a restaurant fighting back with chairs, glasses, as they try to defend themselves and each other from the murderous knifemen. our correspondent richard lister
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is at the inquest for us. harrowing evidence about what happened. yes, we are at the stage where the inquest is hearing each day, about the circumstances of the deaths of one of the victims. so this is the third victim, sara zelenak was the third victim, sara zelenak was the third person to be killed. so today has been about how she came today. as you heard there it was quite clear that as soon as the van crashed into this, the three men ran from it, and they came across sara zelenak and stabbed her to death. we‘ve been hearing from some of the first police officers on the scene, and they‘ve been talking about how they desperately tried to get paramedics onto the scene, how they we re paramedics onto the scene, how they were doing cpr on sara zelenak and other injured people in the area. they were frantically asking members
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of the public to see if they could flag down ambulances. they were calling on radios for help, and they simply couldn‘t hear any response from the emergency services. although they didn‘t say a day was an element of frustration about that. that was picked up by gareth patterson, the council for six of the bereaved families. we‘vejust heard in the last few minutes from gary edwards, a tactical response paramedic, trained to deal with this kind of scenario, and he says he was with two colleagues fairly soon after the first attacks, about, less than ten minutes after the first reports of van being driven at pedestrians on london bridge, he was on the scene. he was giving us the information about how they decide when paramedics are allowed into an area like that, where they could be people still armed and situation is still dangerous. he said no paramedics are permitted into a hot zone, where there are terrorists thought to be at large. they can
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only go into a warm zone nearby with armed police. he too expressed frustration that he wasn‘t able to do more, he was trying to move people to safety. thank you very much. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. hollywood actress doris day — best known for such films as calamityjane and pillow talk — has died at the age of 97. prosecutors in sweden are to reopen a rape investigation against the founder of wikileaks — julian assange. the shadow brexit secretary says any agreement with the government to leave the eu, will need a public vote. coming up — we‘ll be speaking to the man who dived nearly 11,000 metres to the bottom of the world‘s deepest sea trench — the mariana trench. and in sport manchester city are
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looking for an unprecedented domestic treble. the team they beat to win the title have sacked their manager. he leaves brighton after 4.5 years in charge. and a straight set win sends the british number one into the second round of the italian open. more on those stories after half past. people fleeing domestic abuse and violence could be guaranteed somewhere safe to live, by their local authority. the government says new proposals will mean an end the ‘postcode lottery‘ of survivors, getting support. ministers say extra funding will be provided, though the government hasn‘t said, how much.chi chi izundu has more. she has dubbed it a postcode lottery, and an apparent crime that has no place in the uk, today theresa may was meeting victims of domestic abuse, to announce plans to make it a legal duty for councils
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england to provide secure homes for those fleeing he violent relationships. a former victim who now runs a refuge says she‘s been fighting for this for years. for me, and for many other women having a refugee is, literally, life—saving. you know, we always feel absolutely terrible when we have to say to somebody, sorry, we‘ve got no space. this is critical. according to women‘s aid, 60% of referrals to refuges were declined in 2016 to 2017, normally due to lack of space. to help, because of the cost to local authorities. this needs to be backed up by funding for local councils to deliver on this, to deliver effectively. 0ur estimate is that they may be around £90 million for a year, for councils. we want to test that
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with those involved. ministers have launched a 12 week consultation to not only work out how much money will be needed, but how it should be spent. last november the government awarded £22 million to buy more than 2000 beds for refugees under the safe accommodation, education and employment. we are pressing very, very hard in consultations, we welcome this, but it needs to be fully funded so that those who find themselves in that situation can access support they need. charities say the number of people attempting to access services is increasing year on year. as well, today‘s announcement is, they need the fullest range of support to help those that need it. the man in charge of safety at the hillsborough football stadium on the day 96 liverpool fans died almost 30 years ago, has been fined six and a half thousand pounds. graham mackrell was convicted last month, of a health and safety offence. 0ur correspondentjudith moritz has been at preston crown court.
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graham mackrell was the safety officer at hillsborough in 1989, ultimately responsible for making sure fans got inside the stadium without any problems. but he didn‘t assign enough turnstiles, just seven for the number of liverpool fans who had tickets for this end of the ground. the turnstiles couldn‘t turn fast enough. he expected them to admit twice the number of spectators as the safe numbers set out in guidelines. what happened was a large cloud built up outside the stadium, the police opened an exit gate to relieve the pressure, and fa ns we nt gate to relieve the pressure, and fans went inside to an area already full. there was a fatal crash and 96 people died. today‘s sentencing sir peter 0penshaw said that graham mackrell should have foreseen a risk of that cloud building up outside the ground, with just 17 styles to let fans inside. he said that
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although graham mackrell ‘s collection set the scene for the disaster, they hadn‘t directly caused the 96 deaths, and he said that had such an offence being committed recently he could have considered a jail term. as it is, he has fined graham mackrell £6,500, some of the families of the people who died at hillsborough have said they are disappointed, they say that is just they are disappointed, they say that isjust a £67.70 per person they are disappointed, they say that is just a £67.70 per person who died in the disaster. you may remember at preston crown court last month that thejudy preston crown court last month that the judy couldn‘t decide preston crown court last month that thejudy couldn‘t decide what to do in the case of david duckenfield, the match commander who is charged with gross negligence, manslaughter. they didn‘t reach a verdict and the court will meet again next month when thejudge will court will meet again next month when the judge will decide whether or not a retrial should be held. new research suggests a generation of young people who entered the workplace a decade ago, have been left financially ‘scarred‘ by the impact
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of the economic crisis. those leaving education to get a job between 2008 and 2011, have endured 10 years of reduced earning power, with many graduates having to accept lower paid jobs, affecting future earnings and pensions. here‘s our business correspondent, katy austin. i was applying for retail or hospitality roles. in one interview i was hospitality roles. in one interview iwas up hospitality roles. in one interview i was up against people who had a business degree, i was, like a while. looking for her firstjob business degree, i was, like a while. looking for herfirstjob in 2008, during the recession carroll found herself up against stiff competition for fewer jobs. since then she‘s done a string of different drills, not earning as much as she helped. ididn‘t much as she helped. i didn‘t expected to be tough, really. 0n i didn‘t expected to be tough, really. on a positive note, i think the whole experience has taught me a lot about perseverance. we already
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knew that people starting out their careers in the aftermath of the financial crisis were disadvantage. but new research highlights that because it is difficult to find well—paid work there has been a long lasting impact. today‘s ‘5 report says a crisis cohort who graduated during the downturn took a 6% pay kate did mega hit. university leavers with 30% more likely to get a low—paid job, and a young person are qualified to gcse level was less likely to find a job at all. earning less tha n likely to find a job at all. earning less than has seen this group in lessons compared to people who left education a few years earlier or later. in the 19805 and 19905 we saw much larger rises in youth unemployment, but the initial session, we sought less marked rise in unemployment, but inflation rising higher. real pay was hit a lot harder and people because my coupe hasn‘t recovered.
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this recruitment agency says the freeze that happened a decade ago has eased, but it‘s harder to get that firstjob. before the recession it was going and doing exactly what you want to. now it's about compromise, saying, maybe i can't do my dream job. maybe i need to go and do something else first, sidestep within that company. the authors of the report called for politicians to do more to support those whose working lives are scarred when the economy was at its wea kest. scarred when the economy was at its weakest. the government told us youth unemployment has halved since 2010, and it is introducing new programmes to support career and pay progression. deaths from heart and artery disease are rising among people under the age of 75 for the first time in 50 years, according to the british heart foundation. until recently, deaths had fallen by 75% since 1971, but they went up by 3% between 2013 and 2017. the charity believes diabetes,
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high blood pressure and obesity are all contributing to the trend and is calling for increased investment in research. lewis hamilton has sent a formula 0ne car and trophy, to the home of a boy, whom he says inspired his win in yesterday‘s spanish grand prix. harry shaw who‘s 5, has a rare form of cancer, and, sent hamilton a video last week wishing him luck in the latest race in barcelona. the driver replied with his own video, calling harry ‘his spirit angel‘, before he and his racing team mercedes, arranged for the car and trophy to be dropped off at his home. you can let us know what you think about any stories we‘ve covered. use
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the hashtag afternoon alive. there are ways to contact us are on screen right now. now, waiting patiently, chris has the weather for us. no now, waiting patiently, chris has the weatherfor us. no i don‘t know where that is. i can‘t pronounce it. i could guess. yes. i suppose so. 32 celsius yesterday. the thing is, this is the north—west of russia, we are talking about an area just close to the arctic circle which shouldn‘t be that warm at all. so this is really unusual? yes, thejet be that warm at all. so this is really unusual? yes, the jet stream has taken this undulating pattern which is making the low pressure, strong winds and heavy rain across the mediterranean, whereas we get more warm sunshine. a sunshine so warm you might want to take... they don‘t look very well! they are just
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enjoying things, they haven‘t fallen over. they aren‘t on the way out. they certainly aren‘t cold, they aren‘t friesian! did you just say that out loud? i‘m here all week, sadly. it‘s a bit warm for a fleece. good, next. after last week‘s cold weather we‘ve retrieved some spring sunshine. next. and if you think this fine weather isn‘t going to last you a very gullible! yeah sex gram you know, someone has sent me a tweet. they say now is the time for bbc weather to put atmospheric c02 on your weather graphics, is that something you are thinking about? no. it‘s only because we are looking at the arctic. atmospheric c02, since you
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brought it up increases by about one or two ppm each year. the difference in how much it increases by is down to el nino, and in el nino years, because the climate gets warmer all the plants get more stressed. so they don‘t suck as much carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. because we are pumping carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, you actually get a little bit more going into the atmosphere in el nino yea rs. into the atmosphere in el nino years. that‘s because plants don‘t ta ke years. that‘s because plants don‘t take up as much carbon dioxide. that‘s fascinating. it took us half an hourto get that‘s fascinating. it took us half an hour to get there, but you‘ve just been interesting. so, this one. . . just been interesting. so, this one... are they friesian? what about that! can you remember this one? retrieving? please, let‘s have the weather forecast, let‘s just get on with it. where is the bridge? so,
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lots of sunshine, as you have gathered from those pictures it‘s going to get even warmer. after 24 celsius. now, the reason for the changing weather is down to this area of high pressure, it‘s keeping atla ntic area of high pressure, it‘s keeping atlantic weather fronts at bay and with s for the next few days, keeping things dry and sunny. it is looking glorious outside at the moment. a bit of patchy cloud in scotland. their son is drizzly able to get through, we keep those guys and the rest of the afternoon. —— mike keep those skies. 0vernight tonight, we keep that clear weather, daytime temperatures are higher than they have been, night time won‘t fall quite as far. still chilly and a few spots where winds are light. parts of east anglia and some yellows on the
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charts for northern ireland and scotland. the onshore winds keep the temperature is a little bit. for tuesday, little overall change, perhaps more of a breeze for coastal areas of east anglia. it notjust cold, but this sort of fresh feel to the weather. warm in the sunshine, higher temperatures further north and west. into wednesday‘s forecast, the high pressure is still there, fewer ice baths and lighter winds, temperatures rise even further. a chilly start, plenty of sunshine. and in the sunshine those temperatures climb up to about 24 degrees across parts of scotland. pretty warm for northern ireland, north—western parts of england and wales. however, some changes in the where the picture as we head towards the end of the week. all down to the jet stream and we start to see some traffic moving in, encouraging more
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in the way of cloud. slightly stronger winds and patchy outbreaks of rain. before we get there, for most of us, dry with more pleasant sunshine. that‘s your weather. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: hollywood actress doris day, best known for such films as calamityjane and pillow talk,
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has died at the age of 97. prosecutors in sweden are to reopen a rape investigation against the founder of wikileaks — julian assange. the shadow brexit secretary says any agreement with the government to leave the eu, will need a public vote. itv takes thejeremy kyle show off air, following the death of a guest shortly after filming. and coming up, we‘ll be taking a look at the cruise ship industry as celebrity edge makes her debut in southampton today. sport now on afternoon live. let‘s talk about manchester city while you get your breath back. amazing so far but it could get even better at the weekend.
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good job they‘ve got a day off today. two trophy lifts yesterday. a little bit of booze in between. tomorrow it‘s back to training and preparing for the fa cup final against watford. no english team has ever completed the domestic treble of league, fa cup and league cup. manchester united did a treble but it was different. that was with the league cup swapped out for the champions league. for city, a fourth premier league. they beat liverpool by a point. they have won back to back titles for the first time since manchester united managed it 10 years ago. united were also the last team to win three in a row. so will pep guardiola make that his next target? i think he will want to invest. they have had the injuries, as we know.
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left back has been an issue so that might be somewhere he would like to strengthen to have that security. but i think manchester city will be looking for that travel. who can stop them? liverpool have got a lot stronger. this is what we want from the premier league. michael brown talking there after the pictures you saw of celebrities having fun. let‘s talk about another manager whose future he is pondering, and thatis whose future he is pondering, and that is bright in‘s former manager. losing to city was chris hughton‘s last in charg. he took over when the club was flirting with relegation to league one but got them promoted. he kept them in the premier league. they finished 17th. 0ne place and three points above the relegation zone. they‘ve only managed two wins from 18 league games in 2019. chairman tony bloom says that poor
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form led to him making what he‘s described as one of his most difficult decisions. tyson fury says he loves boxing "more than ever" and lives his life "like a training camp" as he prepares for his first fight in las vegas. the former world heavyweight champion takes on german tom schwarz on 15june having returned from a 32 month absence to draw with wbc champion deontay wilder in december last year. lam very i am very contented. i am happy in my life and a i am very contented. i am happy in py i am very contented. i am happy in my life and a happy fighter is a dangerous fighter. i always remember a coach telling me, a happy fighter isa a coach telling me, a happy fighter is a dangerous fighter and my objective is to make my fight is happy. objective is to make my fight is happy, and then makes me happy. we have got a great relationship. sol am dangerous when i am happy so watch out. britian‘s number one
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kyle edmund is out of the italian 0pen after losing to fernando verdasco. edmund took the first set 6—4 and was leading 4—1 in the second, before losing 11 of the next 13 games. verdasco winning in three sets. it‘s a fifth straight defeat for edmund. better news forjohanna konta. the british number one has beaten alison riske for a second week in a row. konta won in straight sets in rome, after victory over the american in the madrid 0pen last week. she‘ll play another american, sloane stephens in round two. finally, we wanted to give you another chance to see an athlete‘s superman dive over the finish line. they‘re told to dip for the finish line. it‘s your torso that counts. but instead of straining so much he falls across the line, infinite tucker lept full stretch. the meeeting was in arkansas in the us. he was a college athlete running 400 metres hurdles.
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he said he saw his mum and jumped to give her a hug. 0ver over the line he goes. there is a superhero in every single one of us andi superhero in every single one of us and i have thought of a better gag relating not to superman but you buzz light year. he is infinite and beyond the line. i don‘t know about that. his eyes we re i don‘t know about that. his eyes were watering from where i was watching that. everyone thought he landed on his chin but i don‘t think so. more now on the death of the actress and singer, doris day. the 97—year—old, who is best remembered for starring roles in calamityjane and pillow talk was one of the biggest stars during the golden age of hollywood.
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stella mccartney has tweeted — the one, the only, the woman who inspired so much of what i do... doris day i love you, my calamity jane. an iconic woman who i was hugely honoured to meet and share precious moments with. let‘s speak to neil sean, media correspondent and filmmaker, who knew doris day well through his friendships with hollywood stars mickey rooney and tony curtis. i managed to speak to her. i never met her in person because she only took phone calls. she could not understand that people still remembered her simply because she had retired from that world. she totally changed her life, so she thought, but what she really gave eve ryo ne thought, but what she really gave everyone was a nice cosy world with wonderful songs and this was a person truly that could do it all. she could sing, dance, act, but she
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didn‘t totally believe in herself. i remember her saying to me that she really admired people likejudy garland and frank sinatra. she didn‘t put herself in that league. but for me she surpassed, or was certainly equal to those in every single way. but she was the epitome ofa single way. but she was the epitome of a much gentler time. there was an innocence about the film is that she appeared in. you say that, but what she told me, when they first made the rock hudson comedies, she said some of the shots had to be reshot because she appeared in a negligee and this apparently was very racy in 1959. we know now she would have been incredibly safe with rock hudson, but at that time they were billed as of this wonderful golden couple. what people liked about it was the fact that she was very glamorous, she was the every woman, the all—american woman, but people related to her because she was
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nonthreatening, and i think that was pa rt nonthreatening, and i think that was part of her success, along with that golden voice and those wonderful songs she gave us. but also i travelled private life, four marriages and the death of her seven. “— marriages and the death of her seven. —— troubled private life. marriages and the death of her seven. -- troubled private life. she managed to pick the wrong men every single time but the reason why she came into television in the 705 was when her last husband died, he gambled all of her fortune away and she had to go back to tv, she had to go back to work simply to get so many for herself to continue to live. but she didn‘t hold grudges. she spoke about all people with a grace and kindness. i think the biggest thing for her was the fact that people of my generation, and younger, she has lots of fans today, she was amazed that people still remembered her with great affection. your generation and indeed mine. of
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course, in latter years, she had another obsession and that was the welfare of animals. that was her true passion. if she could have done another career, it would have been involved with animals. it was interesting, because when she starred in a movie called move over darling, that was a remake of the ill—fated last marilyn monroe movie somethings gotta give. but part of the attraction of that movie was the fa ct the attraction of that movie was the fact it featured a dog and that is the reason she signed on. if you are a hollywood producer, 101 dalmatians, she would have snapped that roll for sure. thank you. and tonight on bbc4 at 8pm, the documentary ‘doris day: virgin territory, covering her early years as a band singer and her troubled private life. for the third time in history, a diver has gone down to the bottom
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of the world‘s deepest sea trench. the mariana trench is located in the western pacific ocean approximately 120 miles east of the mariana islands. victor vescovo‘s solo dive is the deepest ever at nearly 11,000 meters. he discovered four new species and observed at the deepest point a plastic bag and sweet wrapper. let‘s now speak to the diver himself, victor vescovo. the first thing is, why? this is a terribly risky thing to do. what possessed you? a big reason for the entire mission was to develop a new set of capabilities. we have spent four years designing and building this submersible and testing it all over the world so we could provide a doorway for science and exploration, because before this is has all been experimental craft and one—off visitation, but we delve five times in ten days. i made two dives
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myself. it was an extraordinary technical achievement which we hope will benefit scientists going forward. what is it like if you are down there on your own? it actually is quite peaceful. 0nce down there on your own? it actually is quite peaceful. once you break the surface and go down, it is very dark until you turn the light on, but it is a very peaceful feeling to descend. and the last 20 or 25 metres before you get to the bottom, you start to see it come into view and it is very exciting. to be at the bottom of the ocean with £16,000 per square inch outside the submersible but feeling completely safe, it is a wonderful experience. until you see a wretched plastic bag. we are not quite sure what it was. it was definitely man—made and eyewear scientists have taught their pilots that nature doesn‘t work in straight lines. so we saw some things, unfortunately, that were man—made. we are still analysing data. but in any ocean we have gone
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diving, and we have been to the bottom of four of the world‘s oceans, we have found the sign of man‘s imprint on the ecology of the world. but on the bright side, they we re world. but on the bright side, they were a number of new species that you saw. how did you register that you saw. how did you register that you have found something that no one has seen before? it is quite simple. i wear scientific team looks at what we have discovered and they compare it to everything that we have seen before. they are experts and they say, that doesn‘t look like anything we have seen before. eventually, with time, they can break down the dna of the organisms and see if it is too similar or very different from something we have discovered before, but with every dive we are doing, we are typically going somewhere where no human being has been before. we went to the deepest point ever reach so it was not com pletely point ever reach so it was not completely surprising that we found things that had not been seen. do
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you get a sense of colour down there? what can you see? it is a little bit of a reduced palette. you see the deep blue of the ocean. the ocean floor is a bit beige in colour, like the sound of a beach, but we go to other areas that have quite large rock fields and we are very happy that we went to a place close to the challenger deep, and we we re close to the challenger deep, and we were able to see bacterial mats of red and orange and yellow, where we have bacterial organisms that are feeding off of non—photosynthesis type activity. they are getting energy from chemical reactions at the bottom of the ocean and that is extraordinary because it is chemistry you don‘t see on land. we are learning so much from these dives. thank you so much forjoining us. now imagine sailing on a ship where you don‘t need to carry a passport, entry cards or even a ticket. well if you‘re on board the celebrity edge that‘s exactly what will happen.
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she‘s a new cruise ship making her debut in southampton and it‘s the first ship with a facial recognition pass system. our business presenter, susannah streeter is in southampton. yes, this is quite an impressive high—tech ship. it is absolutely enormous. it is its european premiere and there are lots of different high—tech devices on board. also lots of facilities for the gusts. it is very different to the gusts. it is very different to the cross—channel ferries i‘m used to. there are 29 restaurants, a rooftop garden, there are pools, a huge spa, and there‘s even a running track. this stretches all the way around the ship for around a mile. it gives you some idea of the scale of this ship. the cruise industry really is booming at the moment. last year more than 2 million passengers from the uk and ireland took a cruise and it is expected to
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grow year on year until at least 2023. let's grow year on year until at least 2023. let‘s have a chat to someone from the cruise line international association. why do you think cruising is booming?” association. why do you think cruising is booming? i think more people are trying cruising for the first time and our research shows that nine out of ten people who take their first cruise will do so again their first cruise will do so again the following year. and then it is down to impressive new ships like this one. lots of innovation on—board, great food, great entertainment, and a cruise for everyone. whether you want smaller ships or the bigger ships with lots of facilities, you can find you want. this is like a floating town. with the carbon emissions to match, many would say. there is concern about the environmental footprint of these huge floating towns. the captain earlier told me what this ship is doing to try and you reduce that footprint. all cruise lines has
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a sustainability at the heart of everything they do so they have x —— invested over $1 billion in new technology that allows us to be more sustainable year on year, and that's notjust because our customers are asking for it be because it is the right thing to do. we go to some incredible places so we are investing in new technology. new fuel tanks, which will reduce those emissions, and different paint on the hole that allows us to go through the water using less fuel, air conditioning we can turn down because of tinted windows. there is a lot of work being done in this area and it really does set the standard for the rest of the maritime sector. we are focusing on mental health in the workplace on the bbc. there are 1300 staff that work on this cruise ship, many of them in confined spaces for quite a long period of time. what is done for these employees in terms of their mental health. to many of our gusts, the crew really do epitomise their holiday. they are very
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friendly, helpful and they work very hard. there is a lot then by the cruise industry. whether it is the structure on board with the offices ensuring their well— being, the structure on board with the offices ensuring their well—being, the state of the technology, the medical rooms, the rained professionals we have on the ships but also in head as well. they really are central to everything we do. we have got to cut it short because we have got to get off this ship in five or ten minutes, otherwise we could end up going to rome as well, which would not be bad, but i don‘t think our editors would want us to. just took me through what is on each deck. that fell on stony ground. get off, get off. a lorry driver using his mobile phone
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to make a card payment, while behind the wheel. that was just one of thousands of dangerous drivers caught by police in england last year. highways england have been using unmarked hgvs to film drivers breaking the law. 0ur transport correspondent tom burridge has the story. caught on the m40, and notjust typing away on his phone. still texting, and he‘s actually making a payment with his card. card in one hand, phone in the other, shopping online at the wheel. then, on the a38 near derby... he‘s on his phone. he‘s got his hands on his phone. and when changing gear, momentarily neither hand on the wheel. just like this pickup driver on the m60 in greater manchester, whose attention also seems to be on his phone rather than on the road. they were all caught by police officers travelling in unmarked lorry cabs which have been patrolling britain‘s main roads and motorways over the past year. in total, they recorded
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3,500 offences. nearly 1,200 drivers were caught not wearing seat belts. a similar number were using mobile phones while driving. the police made 73 prosecutions for the most serious offences. this footage shows what happened when a lorry driver fell asleep at the wheel on the m6 two years ago, a reminder of why truck drivers have a big responsibility when out on the road. tom burridge, bbc news. the bafta television awards took place in london last night and there was a clear winner. bbc spy thriller killing eve scooped three trophies, including best actress and best drama series. the executive producer of the series sally woodward gentle, told me how killing eve didn‘t originally get off to a good start in the uk. it did not take in the way that we wa nted it did not take in the way that we wanted it to, or at least it did not get a green light. that means you we re get a green light. that means you were trying to sell it to bbc, itv,
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sky. were trying to sell it to bbc, itv, sky, and they said no. eventually they said, we are not quite sure this works for us. they must be kicking themselves.” this works for us. they must be kicking themselves. i am sure they are generous human beings. but bbc america popped into see us because they were in town and this was the one that got away, this is a script you need to read, and they read it and left it for the reasons we did, because of the extraordinary tone and wildness of it. down to the fact that not just featuring and wildness of it. down to the fact that notjust featuring strong women but very much made by strong women. iam quite but very much made by strong women. i am quite strong, and we have got phoebe behind the seen is, and a lot of female staff behind the scenes, a lot of great men as well, but it definitely feels like a strong female piece, but we weren‘t setting out to do something political, it just happened this was the story we wa nted just happened this was the story we wanted to tell and the way we wanted
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to tell it. and how important, the characters, what is it about them? and those that played them? what phoebe did and what we did as we started to make the show was, we realised that you need to give those characters are real depth and it is essentially a character piece, not a genre piece. it is about these extraordinary women. and being mostly women behind the show, that made us realise that women are complicated, complex, contrary, ironic, funny, brilliant, sexy, and we gave all of those characters that many colours and then you employ extraordinary actors like jodie comer and hopefully it flies. and you have said, we like to kill people that shouldn‘t be killed, we like to do things that shouldn‘t be allowed. that is the trick, is it?” don‘t think it is a trick but if you
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stumble upon something that feels like it is a familiar, you think, what would really happen if we were in that situation? and then you look for things that you can flip. and the other thing you need to do is recognise when something familiar actually just works and recognise when something familiar actuallyjust works and you go with it. but constantly looking for surprise and not falling into a tv genre tropes. it is a difficult thing to follow and yet you are. there is another one. how is that going? great. it is going out in the states at the moment. it is gloriously dark and funny and camp and brilliant. and jody‘s performance just get stronger. sandra‘s. they just love it. performance just get stronger. sandra‘s. theyjust love it. i think you can feel that. that was a little earlier. lots of reaction coming into the
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death of doris day. time for a look at the weather. compared with the cool and at times wet weather we had last week, this week is looking much drier and also it is going to be a good deal warmer as well. earlier today, a glorious start on the norfolk broads with some early morning sunshine. as of the week goes by, we are looking at lots of sunshine and temperatures could reach 24 celsius across
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northern scotland, and the changing weather fortunes is all down to this area of high pressure that is going to be with us for the next few days, keeping these atlantic weather systems at bay. at the moment we have not got a great deal of cloud showing up on the satellite picture. this cloud in scotland, that is quite thin, so we are seeing some sunny spells breaking through that as well. it‘s a pleasant afternoon at ban down the country with temperatures in most places climbing up temperatures in most places climbing up to the high teens. a little bit fresher around the coastline of east anglia and kent and essex. 0vernight, with that high pressure, the sky is a state clear. but because it has been a little bit warmer by day, generally temperatures not falling quite as far as they have over recent nights so temperatures down to around four celsius. turning a little bit colder in our more rural locations and perhaps a little bit of frost but for most it is not going to be too bad. and another cracking day on
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tuesday. lots of sunshine on offer. debris is a little bit strongerfor the coastline of east anglia, kent and essex. temperatures pegged back and essex. temperatures pegged back a little bit but still feeling warm in the sunshine. temperatures rising elsewhere. 20 in cardiff. for the middle of the week, our area of high pressure starts to drift a little bit further northwards into scandinavia. you will notice not many isobars on the charts and that means the wind will fall light across means the wind will fall light a cross m ost means the wind will fall light across most of the uk and it looks like wednesday is likely to be the warmest day of the week with temperatures potentially reaching 24 celsius. with the wind circulating ina celsius. with the wind circulating in a clockwise sense, the highest temperatures will always be across the north and west of the country but i don‘t think they will be many complaints anyway. there will be changes towards the end of the week. the high pressure eases away, the weather turns a little bit cooler, perhaps with some reinforcing by friday.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. today at 4. hollywood actress doris day, best known for such films as calamityjane and pillow talk, has died at the age of 97. prosecutors in sweden are to reopen a rape investigation against the founder of wikileaks, julian assange. the shadow brexit secretary says any agreement with the government to leave the eu, will need a public vote. itv takes ‘thejeremy kyle show‘ off air, following the death of a guest shortly after filming. four new species, a plastic bag and a sweet wrapper all discovered 11,000 metres under the sea in the the mariana trench. coming up on afternoon live all the sport, hugh ferris. yes, two down and one to go.
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manchester city‘s win means they claim an unprecedented domestic treble if they take the fa cup on saturday. thanks hugh, and we‘ll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. chris fawkes has all the weather. sunny and warm over the next few days, how warm? i‘ll tell you later on. thanks chris.also coming up. a man has attempted a world speed record at an airfield in yorkshire today, in a tuktuk! more on that in news nationwide after 4:30. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. hollywood legend doris day, whose films made her one of the biggest female stars of all time, has died aged 97. the singer turned actress starred in films such as calamityjane and pillow talk and had a hit
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in 1956 with que sera, sera. herfoundation said she had been in good health until recently when she contracted pneumonia. our correspondent david silitto has been looking back at her illustrious career. doris day, cracking her whip as calamity jane. no one symbolised the hollywood of the 19505 and early 605 better. good musical escapism. born doris kappelhoff in 1922, she had one ambition, to be a ballet dancer. but after being injured in a car crash she began singing instead. by 16 she was doris day, touring with the band. a chance film addition made her an overnight star. it was the first of a string of musicals, that launched a successful recording career.
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but the public image, belied a darker private life. four marriages ended unhappily, the first was a violent and unnervingly close to the on—screen relationship with james cagney. you can‘t tell me what to do! yes, ican. do you think own me? that is exactly right. she is best remembered for romantic comedies, glamorous, witty and innocent. you ain't the kind of girl who'd break a date. no, i‘m not. i ain't the kind of guy who would ask you to. i know you‘re not. i'll pick you up at eight. i had a great time, and i think they sensed that fun. i‘d worn all those gorgeous clothes, and worked with rock hudson, jimmy garner and clark gable, you know.
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how bad can it be? for the public doris day was the all singing, all smiling icon of the lost hollywood. # que sera, sera. # whatever will be, will be. # the future‘s not ours to see. # que sera, que sera, what will be, will be. remembering doris day who has died at the age of 97. and tonight there‘s a special documentary ‘doris day: virgin territory‘, which looks at her early years as a band singer and her troubled private life. that‘s on bbc four at 8pm. prosecutors in sweden say they will reopen an investigation into rape allegations against the founder of wikileaks, julian assange. he denies the charges, and has avoided extradition for seven years after seeking refuge at the ecuadorean embassy in london.
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assange, who was jailed last month for breaching bail conditions, also faces extradition to the united states, for his alleged role in unlawfully releasing classified military material. this report is from caroline hawley. it was this dramatic moment that paved the way for today‘s decision. julian assange evicted by the ecuadorians last month, his political asylum stripped from him. under arrest. translation: as mr assange is currently incarcerated in the united kingdom, the circumstances now allow for an extradition to sweden on the basis of a european arrest warrant. this was not the case prior to april 11th of this year. after reviewing the preliminary investigation in its current state, my assessment is that there is still probable cause to suspect that mr assange committed rape. during the seven long years that julian assange was inside the ecuadorian embassy, prosecutors ran out of time to investigate three
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lesser allegations of sexual assault, but they have until the summer of next year to examine the rape case. prosecutors came to london in 2016, but then dropped the investigation the following year, not because of difficulties with evidence, they say, but because of the circumstances. butjulian assange is no longer beyond the reach of the law. his lawyer has criticised the prosecutor‘s decision, but says he will co—operate, that he wants to clear his name. i am very surprised that they did this. i think it is wrong to put this burden on him now when he is in prison in the uk, 50 weeks in prison, and he is risking to be extradited to the united states. julian assange is wanted in the us for conspiracy to commit computer intrusion over the mass leak of american state secrets which first made his name. as he sits behind bars at belmarsh prison, it will be for the uk government to decide which of the extradition requests takes precedence, that of sweden or the us. caroline hawley, bbc news.
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two senior members of labour‘s frontbench say they‘re likely to demand a fresh public vote, on any cross party deal over brexit. talks between the government and labour aimed at finding a way out of the current deadlock will resume later today. the deputy leader, tom watson, and the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, say any agreement would have to be put to another referendum. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, says this is a ‘crunch week‘ for the talks, but has rejected having another public vote. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake reports. for more than a month, these two sides have been talking — labour and the government trying to do a deal that finds a way forward for brexit. but should whatever‘s agreed be put to a public vote? one key member of labour‘s team now says yes, that‘s the only way. the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, said a significant number of labourmps, probably 120, if not 150, would not back a deal if it hasn‘t got a confirmatory vote.
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he added, "i‘ve made it clear at this stage, at this 11th hour, any deal that comes through from this government ought to be subject to the lock of a confirmatory vote." others in labourfeel the same. i‘ve wanted a deal, i reluctantly came to the view that there should be a confirmatory ballot, but only... in all circumstances? no, hold on, let mejust explain, because i thought what was the only way we‘d break the impasse. if a deal could be found that inspires enough votes in westminster, then fine. but it seemed to me that that‘s very, very difficult. so no deal without the promise of another public vote — is that labour‘s position? well, it‘s not quite that simple, because others on their negotiating team who‘ve been sitting round the table with ministers up the road there see it differently and don‘t regard another referendum as essential. add to that the fact that many tory and labour mps over the road in parliament there are deeply uneasy about doing any kind of a deal with the other side, and it starts to look very difficult for these talks to reach an agreement.
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keir starmer says he wants a second referendum, would you ever accept that? ministers have their own reservations. are these talks with labour really going anywhere? international trade secretary liam fox is against a customs union with the eu, which labour wants to see, and on that idea of another public vote, one cabinet minister made his position clear. i think from the conservative point of view, we've always said that we think that would be a betrayal of what people voted for, and we want to implement the first referendum, but let's see where these talks go to. theresa may‘s critics have been on the march recently, putting her under pressure to set a date for her departure from downing street. arriving back at number ten after a weekend where polls painted a gloomy picture for the tories in forthcoming european elections, the prime minister may see these talks with labour — difficult as they are — as her best hope of persuading voters that she can yet deliver brexit. jonathan blake, bbc
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news, westminster. we can speak now to our political correspondent chris mason, who joins us from westminster. are you getting excited? we seem to hit these crunch weeks every week, with a possible break they want nothing happens. exactly. i think these talks are a microcosm of the whole process, ever since the referendum, they inspire chatter but don‘t add up to a great deal. when you ask around in westminster, about these talks, you look beyond those who are around the table and there isn‘t a bubbling cauldron of enthusiasm about them. even when you speak around the table they acknowledge that getting a deal over the line would be very difficult, and may well not happen. little wonder, when you step beyond them and speak to others with a range of views about brexit that plenty of them say they are a waste of time, we are going to get nowhere, and they were come to
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nothing. that is absolutely westminster‘s expectation even though talks are continuing with the next round getting under way in the next round getting under way in the next hour. in the papers this morning, they was the suggestion that philip mabel persuaded his wife to see that the game is up. there is talk about the game being up, when it might be up for the prime minister. there has been talk about that line, not long after she got thejob, certainly about that line, not long after she got the job, certainly after the general election where she seemed to go backwards, what has turbo—charged it for many is election results, ten or so days ago. the coming crunch that plenty of conservative expect in the european parliamentary elections a week on thursday. i was chatting to a conservative mp on afternoon live a couple of hours ago who came close to endorsing the brexit party, a rival to his own party. he did say in the end that he
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would vote for the conservatives, his party, but would find better things to do than knock on doors and persuade people to vote tory in the european parliamentary elections. plenty within the conservative party are looking at dates and expecting to getan are looking at dates and expecting to get an absolute kicking. they are beginning to think that after that, the case to be made to downing street and the prime minister is, basically, get out of there quickly. it's basically, get out of there quickly. it‘s going to ask late but we‘ve been here before as well. we‘ve had tory mps saying that and not come anything. i don‘t mean to be nasty, but we‘ve spent four minutes, and i‘m none the wiser. it's wiser. it‘s a fair critique. if it‘s any comfort, neither am i. thank you very much to chris mason with the latest from westminster. you are watching afternoon live. thejeremy kyle show has been suspended indefinitely following the death of a guest shortly after filming an episode. itv has begun a review
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in to the programme and will not broadcast the show which featured the guest. 0ur news correspondent charlotte gallagher told me earlier that other than itv confirming that the guest had died a week afterfilming, the broadcaster had not given many details about the incident. they‘ve not said if it was a minority woman, or watch the episode was about. if people have watched it it isa was about. if people have watched it it is a confrontational programme, dna tests, lie detectors and families reunited. it‘s been very controversial with lots of people criticising its confrontational style. we don‘t know how the person died, but the fact that it has been pulled, and they aren‘t going to broadcast any more episodes, they aren‘t even going to record any more episodes, it suggests that this isn‘t natural causes, this death, and they are going to review the duty of care surrounding this programme. they have counsellors, psychotherapists, but it‘s obviously some questions to be raised for itv.
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it's some questions to be raised for itv. it‘s the core of their daytime output, one thinks of love island, where the duty of care of broadcasters has come into question. both are hugely popular programmes with viewers. to love island co ntesta nts with viewers. to love island contestants have died since taking pa rt contestants have died since taking part in that programme. sophie gradin took her own life last year, and then another contestant was found dead earlier this year. one of the itv bosses after these deaths said that itv would be looking at their after—care standards, said that itv would be looking at their after—ca re standards, and perhaps changing them. so some co ntesta nts perhaps changing them. so some contestants who are vulnerable would be in touch with psychotherapists for longer than previously. our headlines this afternoon... hollywood actress doris day, best known for such films as calamityjane and pillow talk, has died at the age of 97. prosecutors in sweden are to reopen a rape investigation against the founder of wikileaks, julian assange. the shadow brexit secretary says any agreement with the government
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to leave the eu, will need a public vote. coming up — a man has attempted a world speed record at an airfield in yorkshire today, ina tuktuk! more on that in news nationwide after four thirty. and in sport manchester city may have sore heads today, but tomorrow they have to get back to work after their premier league win. they have their premier league win. they have the chance to claim an unprecedented domestic treble. the team they beat to win the title have sacked their manager, he leaves brighton after 4.5 years in charge. and straight sets sends the british number one into the second round of the italian openin into the second round of the italian open in rome. more on those stories just after 4:30pm. people fleeing domestic abuse and violence could be guaranteed somewhere safe to live, by their local authority. the government says new proposals will mean an end the ‘postcode lottery‘ of survivors, getting support. ministers say extra funding will be provided, though
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the government hasn‘t said, how much. chi chi izundu has more. she has dubbed it a postcode lottery, and an abhorent crime that has no place in the uk. today theresa may was meeting victims of domestic abuse, to announce plans to make it a legal duty for councils in england to provide secure homes for those fleeing violent relationships. having a safe place to go for victims can be life—saving. a former victim who now runs a refuge says she‘s been fighting for this for years. for me, and for many other women having a refuge is, literally, life—saving. you know, we always feel absolutely terrible when we have to say to somebody, sorry, we‘ve got no space. this is critical. according to women‘s aid, 60% of referrals to refuges were declined in 2016 to 2017, normally due to lack of space. the charity says it‘s concerned about how much money
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will be put up to help, because of the cuts to local authorities. this needs to be backed up by funding for local councils to deliver on this, to deliver effectively. 0ur estimate is that they may be around £90 million for a year, for councils. we want to test that with those involved. ministers have launched a 12 week consultation to not only work out how much money will be needed, but how it should be spent. last november the government awarded £22 million to buy more than 2000 beds for refuges under the safe accommodation, education and employment. we are pressing very, very hard in consultations, we welcome this, but it needs to be fully funded so that those who find themselves in that situation can access support they need. charities say the number of people attempting to access services is increasing year on year. as welcome as today‘s announcement
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is, they need the fullest range of support to help those that need it. we can now speak to rachel williams, a domestic abuse survivor, author and ambassador for welsh women‘s aid. shejoins me via webcam. i‘vejust read a few highlights of your story, and it‘s rather typical, but it‘s better if you explain. it really does highlight how big a problem the stairs. this is an academic. i was with my abuserfor 18 years, this is an academic. i was with my abuser for 18 years, and this is an academic. i was with my abuserfor 18 years, and i plucked up abuserfor 18 years, and i plucked up the courage to leave after the there of staying with him became greater than the there of leaving. it resulted in him coming to my place of work and shooting me with a sawn off shotgun. he went off and hang himself and then my 16—year—old son committed suicide.” hang himself and then my 16—year—old son committed suicide. i use that word, hindsight, it is a wonderful
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thing, but what could have stop that happening? him being locked up for a start, and not being released on bail. waiting his court appearance. i mean, not being released on bail. waiting his courtappearance. i mean, i had 36 police officers dealing with my case within six weeks, i work with gwent police now, my localforce, and they are fabulous and really listening to the victims and survivors. they are making the changes that are needed. what do you say to people who say, well, if you stay with someone for that length of time, there is, not that length of time, there is, not that you are condoning what is happening, but you are prepared to put up with it. nobody is prepared to put up with it, let‘s not put the onus on the victim and start putting the onus on the perpetrator. at the end of the day it is the perpetrator that is raining the abuse on the victims. let‘s not ask why doesn‘t she leave,
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let‘s ask why is he abusing. so why are we talking about the need for refuge is if we need to tackle this at the heart, the perpetrators. it is great that theresa may is doing this, obviously there are more disclosures coming forward which means we need more refuge space, but you‘ve got to give victims the option to stay in their own home. if that‘s the case, we look after the victim in their own home and put safety measures in place that might bea safety measures in place that might be a choice. for some, they are so high—risk, they‘ve got to move. if they move from england to wales, this isn‘t implemented in wales. the welsh government need to look at this to make it work. last year alone 431 survivors were turned away from a refuge space in wales, so for this to work we‘ve got to make sure it‘s put into place in wales and scotla nd it‘s put into place in wales and scotland too. you described it as an epidemic, what is at the heart of this? i really don‘t know. for this
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generation, i think we‘ve got to manage and monitor the perpetrators. we‘ve got to teach about healthy relationships. it‘s got to start in school. what we are dealing with now, we‘ve got to say this is unacceptable and we won‘t stand for it. everybody has to stand united and say it‘s not ok to abuse somebody, and start of —— stop asking the victim why doesn‘t she leave, and ask the victim why is he abusing. if you are going to talk about what makes a healthy relationship you‘re also going to say, what are the signs to look for, what are the giveaway is about saying, hang on, they could be an alarm bell there, because that‘s presumably something you wish you had heard? it is down to education. education is power. having that knowledge. when i look back at my relationship, i had nothing to compare it to. they
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we re i had nothing to compare it to. they were early warning signs, red flags, from the beginning but i didn‘t know any different. there was nothing i could compare it to. we‘ve got to teach the next generation about what a healthy relationship looks like. it's a healthy relationship looks like. it‘s very brave of someone in your position to talk about this, what do you hope to achieve? iam doing you hope to achieve? i am doing a lot in this arena. i‘ve got four campaigns running at the moment with changes that need implementing. i‘ve got over half a million signatures on petitions. we have family courts, restraining orders and everybody needs to be specially trained, nojudges, anyone that deals with domestic abuse victims, needs to be specifically trained in that arena. someone watching you now, going through an abusive relationship, should do what? make the call, there are plenty of services out there to get support from. if you are going to leave,
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realise that is when you become high—risk. make sure you do it with the help of the police as well. it's the help of the police as well. it‘s good to talk to you, thank you. the inquest into the london bridge terror attacks two years ago, has been hearing about the death of the youngest of the eight people who died, sara zelenak, who was 21 from australia. a witness who saw what happened said he also saw bystanders throwing objects at the three attackers, forcing them to run away. here‘s daniel sandford. 0njune 3rd, 2017 australian au pair sara zelenak went out for a drink with herfriend, priscilla gonzales. she never made it home, becoming one of eight people to be killed in the london bridge attack. her mother and stepfather have come from australia for her inquest to hear how their daughter‘s trip ended in tragedy. the attackers had already fatally injured two people in london bridge, and crashed their van into railings. that is terrorists. filming with his phone eric had quickly realised this
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was a deliberate attack. today he was in court to describe what happened. he said... sara‘s friend, priscilla, gave evidence, explaining how she and sara had reached the stone steps in to borough market... in the chaos of the night it was the last time she saw herfriend. she frantically tried to call and message as she sought shelter in a restaurant. she discovered later that week that sara had died. eric told the court how come in the panic he had seen a young woman fall to the ground, and a man tried to help her out when they were both stabbed. it is thought that woman
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was sara zelenak, and the young man was james mcmullan, another of those who was killed. eric said he also saw customers at a restaurant fighting back with chairs, glasses, as they try to defend themselves and each other from the murderous knifemen. our correspondent richard lister has been at the inquest and described the evidence given by the police officers on the scene. we are at the stage where the inquest is hearing, each day, about the circumstances of the death of one of the victims. so this is the third victim, sara was the third person to be killed. all the evidence has been about how she came today. as daniel was saying, it was clear that as soon as that van crashed, to this one witness, the three men armed with knives ran from
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it, and they came across sara and stabbed her to death. we‘ve been hearing from the first police officers on the scene, and they‘ve been talking about how they desperately tried to get paramedics onto the scene, how they were doing cpr on sara, and other injured people in the area. they were asking members of the public to see if they could flag down ambulances, calling for help, saying they didn‘t hear any kind of response from the emergency services. although they didn‘t say that there was an element of frustration. that was picked up by gareth patterson, the council for six of the bereaved families, we‘ve been hearing over the last few minutes from gary edwards, a tactical response paramedic, trained to deal with this kind of scenario. he says he was there with two colleagues, fairly soon after the first attacks, about less than ten minutes after the first reports of a
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van being driven at pedestrians on london bridge, he was on the scene. he was giving us information about how they decide when paramedics are allowed into an area. they could be people still armed and the situation is still dangerous, no paramedic is permitted into a hot zone where there are terrorist thought to be at large. they can only go into a warmed zone, he expressed frustration that he couldn‘t do more. he said he was trying to move people to safety. the stadium safety officer in charge at the time of the hillsborough disaster has been fined £6,500. former secretary of sheffield wednesday football club, graham mackrell, is the first person to be convicted of an offence relating to the tragedy.mackrell failed to ensure there were enough turnstiles to prevent large crowds building up. deaths from heart and artery disease are rising among people under the age of 75 for the first time in 50 years, according to the british heart foundation. until recently, deaths had fallen by 75% since 1971, but they went up by 3% between 2013 and 2017.
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the charity believes diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity are all contributing to the trend and is calling for increased investment in research. lewis hamilton has sent a formula 0ne car and trophy, to the home of a boy, whom he says inspired his win in yesterday‘s spanish grand prix. harry shaw who‘s 5, has a rare form of cancer, and, sent hamilton a video last week wishing him luck in the latest race in barcelona. the driver replied with his own video, calling harry ‘his spirit angel‘, before he and his racing team mercedes, arranged for the car and trophy to be dropped off at his home. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello. pretty cool weather at times last week, this week is looking much warmer. more sunshine as well. can midweek temperatures could reach about 24 celsius across parts of
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scotland. the change is down to high pressure, that‘s bringing the sunny skies today. clear conditions overnight as well. more another breeze around southern anne western coastal areas. some high temperatures, stornoway is around 8 degrees. not as not as cold as recent nights for most of us. temperatures edging up a couple of degrees or so. more breeze around the coastline of east anglia into parts of kent and essex. still feeling pleasantly warm in the sunshine. lots of sunshine right the way through the united kingdom. if anything it will be even warmer, low 205 with the warmest aid across northern anne western parts. that your weather.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines... # que sera, sera # que sera, sera # whatever will be, will be. hollywood actress doris day, best known for such films as calamityjane and pillow talk,
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has died at the age of 97. prosecutors in sweden are to reopen a rape investigation against the founder of wikileaks, julian assange. the shadow brexit secretary says any agreement with the government to leave the eu will need a public vote. itv takes thejeremy kyle show off air following the death of a guest shortly after filming. and coming up, four new species, a plastic bag and a sweet wrapper have all been discovered 11,000 metres under the sea in the the mariana trench. we‘ll be hearing from the man who found them. sport now on afternoon live with hugh ferris. we have news about manchester city celebrating yesterday but they need to gird their loins. they do indeed, many sore heads and smiled in manchester. if you saw any because of their trip back up, you will notice they feature the inescapable presence of beer bottles so no doubt relieved to have the day off today
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to recuperate. but for the place tomorrow it is back to training and preparing for that fa cup final against watford and their attempt to do something that no english team has done before, the completion of a domestic treble, the league, the fa cup and league cup. manchester united, city‘s rivals did a treble but a different one, instead of the league cup it was the champions league cup it was the champions league so for city, after their fourth premier league title after beating liverpool byjust a point, they have won back—to—back titles for the first time since manchester united managed it ten years ago but united managed it ten years ago but united were also the last team to win three in wrote soap would guardiola make that next target? he will want to invest, they have had injuries, at left back has been an issue and he might need to strengthen better have that security. but do not think? i think
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manchester city will be looking for that treble and who can stop them? liverpool have got a lot stronger and it‘s brilliant, it‘s what we wa nt and it‘s brilliant, it‘s what we want from the premier league and we are so lucky to have it. if that is to be achieved, you can watch it on the bbc on saturday. the end of the season and time for all managers to relax and look forward u nless managers to relax and look forward unless you have just been sacked! plan for the future, unless you don‘t have a job. losing to city was chris hughton‘s last game in charge. he took over when the club was flirting with relegation to league one but got them promoted, kept them in the premier league, finished 17th, a place and two points above relegation zone. they‘ve only managed two wins from 18 league games in 2019. chairman tony bloom says that poor form led to him making what he‘s described as one
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of his most difficult decisions. relegated championship club bolton have officially entered administration. they‘ve appointed administrators this afternoon after announcing their intention to do so last week. that followed the adjournment of a winding—up order. the club have faced a string of financial problems and a recent failed takeover attempt. there‘ll now be a period for interested parties to step forward. british number one johanna konta is through to the second round of the italian 0pen after her second win over american alison riske in straight sets. konta did the same in madrid last week and in the second round on rome she‘ll play another american, sloane stephens. kyle edmund though is out, beaten by spaniard fernando verdasco in three sets. it‘s a fifth straight defeat for edmund. dan evans has also just lost in three sets to caspar ruud. tyson fury says he loves boxing "more than ever" and lives his life "like a training camp" as he prepares for his first
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fight in las vegas. the former world heavyweight champion takes on german tom schwarz on 15th june having returned from a 32 month absence to draw with wbc champion deontay wilder in december last year. i‘m very contented, unhappy in my life and a happy fight is a dangerous fighter for them i always remember emanuel steward, god rest his soul, saying to me, a happy fight is a dangerous fighter and my objective is to make my fighters happy. and bender makes me happy, we get on and have a great relationship so i‘m dangerous when i‘m happy. so watch out! now if you thought the premier league title race was tight, imagine an outcome that‘s decided in literally the last second. kawhi leonard landed a jump shot at the death to send his nba team, the toronto raptors, into basketball‘s eastern conference finals. the ball bounced off the ring four times before it settled in the net to send the raptors into raptures as the raptors beat the philadelphia 76ers 92—90 in the most
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incredible of finishes. leonard had 15 of his 41 points in the final quarter as the raptors make it to the eastern conference finals for just the second time in their history, where they‘ll play the milwaukee bucks in a best of seven series starting in milwaukee on wednesday. all four times and it went through. that‘s all the sport for now. now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to janine machin in cambridge to tell us about some students with cerebal palsy, and how they are overcoming these obstacles to complete their gcses. we will be with you in just a moment. and luxmy gopal is in leeds to tell us about a man who has attempted a world speed record at an airfield
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in yorkshire today, in a tuk—tuk. we will be with you in a moment. first a all, gcses starting today and this particular group of people are facing real obstacles so how have they dealt with this? willian is one of them. he can barely speak or control his body but he is about to ta ke or control his body but he is about to take his biology gcse —— he can only really communicate properly using eye movement and will take him seven times longer to complete the paper and he needs advanced technology to help him. he uses a special software system, and this is really intense. he basically has a virtual keyboard to look at, he had to stare at the u once too tight for several seconds before the system acknowledges it is a deliberate act —— at the letter he wants to type. it is really hard work so this exam is done over three days. mum says
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that in one way she is completely amazed he is doing it but another she‘s not surprised at all because she‘s not surprised at all because she says he has always been so determined to do everything himself and he really wants to go on to couege and he really wants to go on to college and eventually have a career in business. that is utterly inspirational and amazing to see both are many people doing exams this way? not exactly like will because people need slightly different help so it could be someone to turn pages for them or technology to dictate questions. we don‘t have an overall figure but for example, will goes to lonsdale school which it set up for people with physical and neurological conditions. they have about 20 stu d e nts conditions. they have about 20 students doing aided gcses but the head teacher told us that everyone of them really to do them. let's be honest about it, you are a young man or woman your peers are taking exams, you have more than enough nous to give it a go so jolly well do. it is a challenge to win with the exam boards because something,
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it requires a lot of adaptation and a lot of thinking to enable the students to access the papers but living heck, excuse me, but they jolly well should! of course, what we do know is that not everyone can benefit from these facilities has access to them. lonsdale is not a private school, parents do not have the pay, but it is only for young people with health care plans from their local councils and of course some parents say they struggle to get those plans, critically ones they built to suit their child‘s kneels because the help they need is complex and expensive. this school is not the only in the uk working like this but there are 104 pupils there at the moment and there is a waiting list for places notjust for this year but already people waiting for a place in september 2020. clearly, many more people hoping they can have the same chance as will in the years to come. will you let us know how he gets on? absolutely. it‘s a great story, thank you. let‘s go to luxmy. a world record in a tuk—tuk, what on
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earth was he thinking? this was doing that mega beginning of a man called matt everard from essex. in his own words, this was the result ofa his own words, this was the result of a boozy night on ebay and a midlife crisis! the vehicle started life as a bangkok taxi. you will be familiar with these three wheeled tuk—tuks familiar with these three wheeled tuk—tu ks that you familiar with these three wheeled tuk—tuks that you might have seen on holiday. he bought this online from an owner in bolton. why you would need one in bolton, i have no idea! but five months and £20,000 later, with many parts imported from thailand, he had a rebuilt tuk—tuk ready to race for the world speed record in elvington airfield near york which is where the challenge was taking place today. it is a venue that has seen other interesting world land speed record is being made including for a shed and a toilet possum and today it was and a toilet possum and today it was a nice day for it. so did he do it? to build up a bit of suspense, firstly, the record to beat with 68
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mph. there are strict rules from the guinness world records so it had to be him and a passenger and he picked his cousin. he had replaced his tuk—tuk 350 engine with one four times as powerful from a van. the frame is not designed to be fuelled by that kind of power and those kinds of speeds so it made it potentially unstable. but, he did it! the reached a speed of 74.036 mph. these were the last few moments of the record. it's great, did not feel that fast, really stable and quite surprising fault of the runway is lovely and flat, a lovely day for it. i wish i could do it all again. i could spend the day doing that! he is barking mad! some would say mad, 1—person‘s is another personpioneer! very diplomatic! welcome to
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nationwide, luxmy. nice to see you. more on look north tonight. if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them on the bbc iplayer and a reminder that we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm here on the show. new research suggests a generation of young people who entered the workplace a decade ago, have been left financially "scarred" by the impact of the economic crisis. those leaving education to get a job between 2008 and 2011 have endured ten years of reduced earning power, with many graduates having to accept lower paid jobs, affecting future earnings and pensions. here‘s our business correspondent, katy austin. i was mainly applying
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for retail, hospitality roles. in one interview, i was interviewed against people who, at the time, had a business degree and i was, like, wow. looking for her firstjob in 2008 during the recession, carol found herself up against stiff competition for fewer jobs. since then, she has in a string of different roles, not earning as much as she had hoped. i did not expect it to as tough, really. but, on a positive note, i think the whole experience has taught me a lot about just persevering. we already knew that people starting out in their careers in the aftermath of the financial crash were at a disadvantage, but new research highlights that because it was particularly difficult find well—paid work, there has been a long lasting impact.
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today‘s report says a so—called crisis cohort who graduated during the downturn took a 6% pay hit. it says university leavers were 30% more likely to get a lower paid job and a young person qualified to gcse level was 30% less likely to find a job at all. researchers say earning less then has seen this group earn less since compared to people who left education just a few years earlier or later. in the early 19805 and early 19905, we saw a much larger rise in youth unemployment. 0n the other hand, in this recession, what happened was we saw a less marked rise in unemployment but, on the other hand, we saw inflation rise a lot higher, real pay be hit a lot harder and therefore people's pay still hasn't recovered a decade later. this recruitment agency says the freeze in hiring that happened a decade ago has eased but it is still harder to get that first job. before the recession, it was more going in, doing exactly what you wanted to, and now it is about that compromise and saying, maybe i can't do my dream job right away, maybe i need to go and do something else first and sidestep within that company.
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the authors of today‘s report have called for politicians to do more to support those whose working lives were scarred when the economy was at its weakest. the government told us youth unemployment was halved since 2010 and it is introducing new programmes to support career and pay progression. katie austin, bbc news. in a moment, we‘ll cross to susannah in southampton for the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. hollywood actress doris day — best known for such films as calamityjane and pillow talk — has died at the age of 97. prosecutors in sweden are to reopen a rape investigation against the founder of wikileaks, julian assange. the shadow brexit secretary says any agreement with the government to leave the eu will need a public vote.
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now, imagine sailing on a ship where you don‘t need to carry a passport, entry cards or even a ticket. well, if you‘re on board the ‘celebrity edge‘ that‘s exactly what will happen. she‘s a new cruise ship making her debut in southampton and it‘s the first ship with a facial recognition pass system. our business presenter, susannah streeter is in southampton. she has just missed she hasjust missed it she has just missed it because she hasjust missed it because it she has just missed it because it is about to go behind you! it is about to go. back on dry land now, i have had a tour all the way round this very high—tech ship and it is like a luxury floating mini town. it has 29 restau ra nts, luxury floating mini town. it has 29 restaurants, enough cabins for 3500 passengers, numerous pools, a spa, retreats, you name it, it‘s got it. it is enormous and there is even a running track. there have been real concerns about the environmental footprint of cruise ships around the world. that in fact they emit far
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too many emissions. 0ne cruise ship, some estimate, for example, emit as many carbon emissions as around a million cars. that was from a german study. i can bring in kendra from clea n study. i can bring in kendra from clean earth who is a chipping campaign. does it concern you there has been a huge increase in cruise line passengers, for example in the uk and ireland last year there were more than 2 million? yes, first and foremost, thank you for having me on the show. ijust want to say that the show. ijust want to say that the name of our organisation is standearth. we the name of our organisation is stand. earth. we have the name of our organisation is standearth. we have been campaigning on cruise ships because these ships go to some of the most vulnerable places on the planet and they burn one of the dirtiest fossil fuels on earth. it is the dirtiest fossil fuel available for marine transportation. as demand increases
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for cruisers, it only increases the urgency for these corporate actors to step up to clean up their ships. you mentioned that the ships are like floating cities and that is exactly what they are like. they are like a floating city that is going toa like a floating city that is going to a very vulnerable ecosystem. they have a lot of various waste strains that have enormous environmental impact and as we are seeing in the us, where the largest global cruise ship operator, one of the brands that will be familiar to you which isa that will be familiar to you which is a piano cruisers, because they are based in the —— p&0 cruisers. they went under investigation and to to multiple felony environ mental issues and conspiracy to cover up pollution. we cannot talk about p&0 currently because i do not have write a reply for them at the moment but what i can say, having spoken to celebrity cruises, i spoke to the captain of
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the ship and also to the international association and they say that there are big advances being made, for example this ship behind me is 20% more efficient than others in the fleet. would you say there has been some progress? yes, i would say that we would certainly support increased efficiency of ships, as long as that increased efficiency is a part of an overarching programme and commitment to absolute reductions. this is very important nuance. a lot of times you go important nuance. a lot of times you go on these cruise industry websites, you take a look at what they say their carbon emissions are and it appears to be going down. that is because they are calculating their based upon available lower berth, that is how many people they can reasonably fit onto the ship. what that means is that, at the ships get bigger, even if the amount per person that they have the capacity for, not the actual amount
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on board, but the amount per person they have capacity for, even though thatis they have capacity for, even though that is going down, the actual absolute emissions are going up. we are ata absolute emissions are going up. we are at a moment where the ip pc —— ipcc, the international punnet on climate change, have said we have 11 years to address the impacts of climate change —— international panel. we cannot afford increasing emissions, whether or not on paper that they are decreasing per passenger capacity, we need absolute reductions. 0k, many thanks for talking to us, kendra. celebrity cruises say they are trying to ensure that they keep their commitments to reducing carbon emissions and impact the industry as a whole said they had a target to reduce it by 60%. but there is certainly an awful lot of interest in these cruise ships at the moment, numbers are going up year on year. this ship is about to set sail any
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minute, there is a huge crowd forming around me watching it go because there is still so much interest, and interest in the business it brings to southampton. fairto business it brings to southampton. fair to say your guest probably won‘t be on it! fair to say your guest probably won't be on it! i don't think so! thank you very much. you are watching afternoon life. for the third time in history, a diver has gone done to the bottom of the world‘s deepest sea trench. the mariana trench is located in the western pacific ocean approximately 120 miles east of the mariana islands. victor vescovo‘s solo dive is the deepest ever at nearly 11,000 meters. he discovered four new species and observed, at the deepest point, a plastic bag and sweet wrapper. ealier, i spoke to victor vescovo about the goals of the mission. well, a big reason for the entire mission was to develop a new set of capabilities so, we have spent four years designing
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and building the submersible and testing it all over the world so we could provide a doorway for science and exploration. because before this, it has all been experimental craft and kind of one—off visitations, but we dove the mariana trench five times in ten days. i made two dives myself and it was just an extraordinary technical achievement that hopefully will benefit a lot of scientists going forward. just tell me, what is it like, if you are down there on your own? what does it feel like? it actually is quite peaceful. once you break the surface and go down, it is very dark, until you turn the lights on of course. but it is a very peaceful feeling to descend. the last 20 or 25 metres before you get to the bottom, you slowly start to see it come into view, and it is peaceful but also incredibly exciting. to be at the bottom of the ocean with, you know, 16,000 lbs per square inch pounding the outside of the submersible but feeling completely safe, it was just a wonderful experience. until you see a wretched plastic bag! well, we are not quite sure what it was.
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it was definitely man made and our scientists have taught us sub pilots that nature does not work in straight lines. so, we saw some things, unfortunately, that were man—made. we are still trying to figure out what they were, we are trying to analyse the data. but in any ocean that we have gone diving, and we have been to the bottom of four of the world‘s oceans, we have unfortunately found evidence of one kind or another of man‘s imprint on the ecology of the world. let‘s look on the bright side because there are a number of new species that you saw. how do you tell what it is that you‘re looking at how do you register that you found something that nobody has seen before? well, it‘s actually quite simple. 0ur scientific team just explains to us that they are looking at what we have discovered and compared it to everything they have seen before both and these are experts in deep ocean marine ecology. they will say, that doesn‘t look like anything we have seen before and they will start to break it down. but eventually, with time, they can actually break down the dna of the organisms and see if it is too similar or very different from something
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we have discovered before. but with every dive that we are doing in these deep trenches, we‘re typically going some place where no human being has ever been before and we went to the deepest point ever reached. and so it‘s not completely surprising that we would find things that have not been seen. victor, do you get a sense of colour down there? what can you actually see? the colours, it‘s a bit of a reduced palette so you see the deep blue of the ocean. the ocean floor itself is typically a bit beige in colour, just like the sand of a beach. but what is fascinating is that we did go to some other areas that have quite a large rock fields, and we were very happy that we went to a place close to the challenger deep in the mariana trench called the serena deep, and we were able to see bacterial mats, as they are called, of red and orange and yellow where we have bacterial organisms that are feeding off of non—photosynthesis type activity. they‘re actually getting energy from chemical reactions at the bottom of the ocean and that is extraordinary because it is chemistry that you don‘t see on land, and we are learning so much from these dives and hope to continue to do so.
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that‘s it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at five with huw edwards. now lets have a look at the weather with chris. compared with the cool and at times wet weather of last week, this week is looking much drier and it will be a good deal warmer. earlier today, a glorious start on the norfolk broads with some early morning sunshine and as the week goes on we are looking at lots of sunshine with things warming up. mid week temperatures could reach 24 degrees across parts of northern scotland and the change in weather is down to this area of high pressure that will be with us for the next few days, keeping the atla ntic for the next few days, keeping the atlantic systems at bay. at the moment we don‘t have a great deal of cloud on the satellite picture, most of us have a lot of sunshine and this cloud in scotland is quite thin so we are seeing sunny spells breaking through that as well. a pleasa nt breaking through that as well. a pleasant afternoon up and down the country, tempered as in most places
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climbing into the high teens. a bit fresher around the coast in east anglia and kent and essex where we have onshore winds. 0vernight, with that high pressure, the skies stay clear but because it has been warmer by day, generally temperatures not falling quite as far as they have donein falling quite as far as they have done in recent nights. temperatures down to 4—6d, chillier in some more rural locations but for most it will not be too bad by the time you‘re up. and another cracking day tomorrow, a lot of sunshine on offer. the breeze a bit stronger on the east anglia coast, kent and essex, temperatures pegged back a little bit but still feeling warm in the sunshine and those temperatures are rising elsewhere, 20 in cardiff and in the low 205 in scotland. in the middle of the week pressure sta rts the middle of the week pressure starts to drift a bit further northward into scandinavia. you will notice that not many ice about on the charts and that means the winds
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will fall light across most of the uk and it looks like wednesday will be the warmest day of the week with temperatures potentially reaching 23 or 24 celsius put up with the winds circulating around the high pressure ina circulating around the high pressure in a clockwise sense, high and put it will be in the north and west but i don‘t think there will be many complaints anywhere with that dry and sunny weather. changes at the end of the week, the high pressure eases off and the weather turns a bit cooler and cloudier, perhaps with some rain for some by friday.
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today at five, prosecutors in sweden will reopen a rape investigation, against the founder of wikileaks, julian assange. he denies the charges, having avoided extradition for seven years, by taking refuge in the ecuadorean embassy in london, but swedish prosecutors say they‘re still on the case. my my assessment is that there is probable cause. we‘ll have the latest, and we‘ll be talking to the editor in chief of wikileaks. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. # que sera sera # whatever will be will be... tributes to one of the biggest names in hollywood history, doris day,

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